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Emphasis on 'culture' in psychology fuels stereotypes, scholar says In the current issue of the influential journal Human Development, a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, challenges his colleagues to reconsider popular ideas about the role of culture in human development. Contemporary scholarship is rife with broad, distorted generalizations about "culture" that play into stereotypes and threaten to obscure the powerful influences that individuality, resistance, and power play in development, said psychology professor Per Gjerde, who contributed the invited lead article to the journal's issue focused on "The Study of Diversity: Human Development in Culture." "Psychologists often speak about the power of culture as an independent variable, but they fail to pay attention to the power structures that frame culture," said Gjerde. "Class differences are typically neglected and the perspective of subordinate groups is therefore overlooked." Much of the trouble stems from the use of nations as proxies for cultural units, said Gjerde. Notions of culture are linked to national boundaries and geographical areas, like "East" and "West," fueling generalizations about "American individualism" and "Asian collectivism," said Gjerde. Despite the permeability of borders and the pace of globalization, many scholars in psychology assign groups different styles of cognition and even personality traits, and references to "Easterners" and "Westerners" are common in scholarly and popular literature, observed Gjerde. Although nations function as "powerful identity symbols," Gjerde calls for the study of human diversity and complexity in a manner that values individuality and the ability to transcend one's culture. "The emphasis on diversity is welcome, but people are not exchangeable carbon copies," he said. "It is counterproductive to generalize about human development across nations and continents. If you don't take the individual into account, you run the risk--paradoxically--of creating a new set of stereotypes." Confusing culture and nationality also obscures important racial and ethnic differences. "To equate the Chinese with the Han people marginalizes approximately 100 million people, and to speak about 'Japanese culture' obscures the fact that Japan is a multiethnic society," said Gjerde. "It fails to give voice to ethnic and other oppressed groups within Japan." Born in Norway and married to a Japanese woman, Gjerde has studied human development in Japan, Thailand, and the United States. Much of contemporary scholarship about culture in psychology is ahistorical and insufficiently interdisciplinary to advance understanding of the human experience, he said. "I have been bothered by these broad generalizations for some time, but they are catching on," he said. "I am afraid this approach is promoting a disregard for heterogeneity and is minimizing the role of the individual." Gjerde is critical of the fieldwork that forms the basis for most notions of culture, saying it has been conducted in "limited and bounded social contexts" and that the fixation on groups has obscured the exploration of variation and complexity within and between human beings. But the dualistic, or "us-them," view of the world has received powerful endorsements, sometimes in the form of research funds from influential organizations. "People want to generalize because it makes it easier to understand the world, so they come up with cultural labels like collectivist and individualist, which give us an illusion that the world is easily understandable," said Gjerde. "But these ideas have amazing staying power." Writing that "different social regularities indubitably exist," Gjerde emphasizes the difficulty of interpreting the meaning of such differences. Describing street scenes in Bangkok and Tokyo, he says people in Bangkok look and smile at others much more often than in Tokyo, where eye contact is generally avoided among strangers. Concluding, however, that Japanese are shyer than Thai would be "inane." Gjerde recommends shifting the focus from groups to individuals and mapping the areas where human experience overlaps, and where it does not. Through observation, in-depth interviews, and the study of variability within groups, Gjerde believes researchers could learn about things like degrees of interdependence, which would be more credible and of greater value than sweeping statements about group differences. Gjerde's model would take a more interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture, incorporating the writings of anthropology and other fields, and it would consider the influence of power, coercion, and class differences on individual psychological development. He also questions the premise that culture is passed on in a straightforward and passive manner from adults to children. "The assumption is that children acquire skills, values, and behaviors by participating in the adult world, but children today are not passive receptors," he said. "Their resistance to dominant adult cultural practices is a crucial--but often overlooked--component of their experience. It is noteworthy that most cultural psychologists shy away from studying conflict, resistance, and disharmony." "Culture as ideology is relevant in the study of human development, but the question is how strong and how uniform that influence is, especially in this era of globalization when we're subject to a multitude of influences," said Gjerde. "Culture has a place, but it also has to be put in its place." _____________ Editor's Note: Per Gjerde may be reached at (831) 459-3148 or via e-mail at gjerde@ucsc.edu.
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From AAUP National The mission of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. AAUP Chapter Report Indiana State University Relations between ISU faculty and administration are strained. The recent forced resignation of the Dean of our College of Business, the attempt to force a merger between the College of Nursing and the College of Health and Human Performance, and a proposed radical restructuring of the College of Arts and Sciences are actions that have exacerbated already existing tensions. Also contributing to tension is the failure of the administration to provide pay increases adequate to match inflation over the past three years, although the President received a 12 percent increase. The majority of faculty and staff are working now for about 9 percent less pay in real terms, compared to 2003-2004. The chapter has pursued the following activities: We organized of a fall forum to investigate the potentials and pitfalls of pursuing collective bargaining by the ISU faculty and support staff. On 18 October we hosted two speakers, Pat Shaw from the national AAUP and K. Vinodgopal from the Indiana AAUP conference, who addressed a small audience of interested faculty. Energetic presentations by the speakers and active audience participation made the forum a success. We had a jump in membership soon after the forum. In response to an initiative to radically restructure the College of Arts and Sciences, the local chapter wrote an open letter to Interim Dean Thomas Sauer and Provost Jack Maynard asking for clarification on the motivations and requesting that traditional shared governance procedures be followed in place of the ad hoc approach designed by the Dean. We held a brief press conference to announce the letter to the public. Media coverage included the ISU student paper, the local Terre Haute paper, and a short story on local television news. The Executive Committee of the local chapter will be engaged in strategy planning for further activities in support of faculty and public interest in Indiana State University. Here are issues that will receive out attention: Increasing membership in AAUP Formulating additional steps to take in opposition to the proposed restructuring Developing a task force to evaluate the ISU budget and devise critiques of misguided spending Establishing a newsletter to inform faculty of issues that affect the working lives of faculty and staff at ISU and related AAUP activities Developing relations with the print and broadcast media Developing relations with elected officials and others in state government
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#if UNITY_EDITOR using System; using UnityEngine; namespace RuntimeUnitTestToolkit.Editor { // functional declarative construction like flutter. internal interface IBuilder { GameObject GameObject { get; } T GetComponent<T>(); } internal class Builder<T> : IBuilder where T : Component { public T Component1 { get; private set; } public GameObject GameObject { get; private set; } public Transform Transform { get { return GameObject.transform; } } public RectTransform RectTransform { get { return GameObject.GetComponent<RectTransform>(); } } public Action<GameObject> SetTarget { set { value(this.GameObject); } } public IBuilder Child { set { value.GameObject.transform.SetParent(GameObject.transform); } } public IBuilder[] Children { set { foreach (var item in value) { item.GameObject.transform.SetParent(GameObject.transform); } } } public Builder(string name) { this.GameObject = new GameObject(name); this.Component1 = GameObject.AddComponent<T>(); } public Builder(string name, out T referenceSelf) // out primary reference. { this.GameObject = new GameObject(name); this.Component1 = GameObject.AddComponent<T>(); referenceSelf = this.Component1; } public TComponent GetComponent<TComponent>() { return this.GameObject.GetComponent<TComponent>(); } } internal class Builder<T1, T2> : Builder<T1> where T1 : Component where T2 : Component { public T2 Component2 { get; private set; } public Builder(string name) : base(name) { this.Component2 = GameObject.AddComponent<T2>(); } public Builder(string name, out T1 referenceSelf) : base(name, out referenceSelf) { this.Component2 = GameObject.AddComponent<T2>(); } } internal class Builder<T1, T2, T3> : Builder<T1, T2> where T1 : Component where T2 : Component where T3 : Component { public T3 Component3 { get; private set; } public Builder(string name) : base(name) { this.Component3 = GameObject.AddComponent<T3>(); } public Builder(string name, out T1 referenceSelf) : base(name, out referenceSelf) { this.Component3 = GameObject.AddComponent<T3>(); } } internal class Builder<T1, T2, T3, T4> : Builder<T1, T2, T3> where T1 : Component where T2 : Component where T3 : Component where T4 : Component { public T4 Component4 { get; private set; } public Builder(string name) : base(name) { this.Component4 = GameObject.AddComponent<T4>(); } public Builder(string name, out T1 referenceSelf) : base(name, out referenceSelf) { this.Component4 = GameObject.AddComponent<T4>(); } } } #endif
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1982 World Weightlifting Championships The 1982 Men's World Weightlifting Championships were held in Hala Tivoli, Ljubljana, SR Slovenia, SFR Yugoslavia from September 18 to September 26, 1982. There were 205 men in action from 38 nations. These world championships were combined with European championships. Medal summary Medal table Ranking by Big (Total result) medals Ranking by all medals: Big (Total result) and Small (Snatch and Clean & Jerk) Team ranking References Results (Sport 123) Weightlifting World Championships Seniors Statistics External links International Weightlifting Federation World Weightlifting Championships World Weightlifting Championships Category:International sports competitions hosted by Yugoslavia Category:World Weightlifting Championships Category:Weightlifting in Slovenia
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Q: Please can we have runnable Python snippets using Skulpt? Skulpt is an entirely in-browser implementation of Python. No preprocessing, plugins, or server-side support required, just write Python and reload. Python is an extremely popular language, especially for beginners, who also happen to be the people who have the hardest time understanding how to post a MCVE as well as a traceback or output. Being able to comment asking posters to include a runnable snippet would improve a great many questions. Skulpt overcomes the implementation difficulties of snippets in Python since the code does not have to run on a server. It should simply be a matter of loading one or two javascript libraries when needed. A: You can already do this with normal Snippets. (Please add your code twice if you do this, it's too cluttered to find it in the HTML.) I'm still not convinced this is a fantastic idea, however. One press of the "tidy" button and it might mess up all your precious spaces. <html> <head> <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.0/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="http://www.skulpt.org/static/skulpt.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="http://www.skulpt.org/static/skulpt-stdlib.js" type="text/javascript"></script> </head> <body> <script type="text/javascript"> // output functions are configurable. This one just appends some text // to a pre element. function outf(text) { var mypre = document.getElementById("output"); mypre.innerHTML = mypre.innerHTML + text; } function builtinRead(x) { if (Sk.builtinFiles === undefined || Sk.builtinFiles["files"][x] === undefined) throw "File not found: '" + x + "'"; return Sk.builtinFiles["files"][x]; } // Here's everything you need to run a python program in skulpt // grab the code from your textarea // get a reference to your pre element for output // configure the output function // call Sk.importMainWithBody() function runit() { var prog = document.getElementById("yourcode").value; var mypre = document.getElementById("output"); mypre.innerHTML = ''; Sk.pre = "output"; Sk.configure({output:outf, read:builtinRead}); (Sk.TurtleGraphics || (Sk.TurtleGraphics = {})).target = 'mycanvas'; var myPromise = Sk.misceval.asyncToPromise(function() { return Sk.importMainWithBody("<stdin>", false, prog, true); }); myPromise.then(function(mod) { console.log('success'); }, function(err) { console.log(err.toString()); }); } </script> <form> <textarea id="yourcode" cols="40" rows="10">import turtle t = turtle.Turtle() t.forward(100) print "Hello World" </textarea><br /> <button type="button" onclick="runit()">Run</button> </form> <pre id="output" ></pre> <!-- If you want turtle graphics include a canvas --> <div id="mycanvas"></div> </body> </html>
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Introduction ============ Tokenization, or word segmentation, is an indispensable first step in natural language processing (NLP). Unlike languages such as English, in which sentences are already segmented into words by spaces, tokenization is not a trivial process in Japanese, where usually no word delimiters are provided. Systems called morphological analyzers, which tokenize sentences and assign parts of speech to the tokens, are used for this purpose, and most current morphological analyzers require dictionaries. In this process, biomedical text requires special dictionaries, because technical terms often cause problems as out-of-vocabulary terms. In BLAH5 (Biomedical Linked Annotation Hackathon 5), the current status of Japanese medical vocabularies, especially the Japanese version of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is reviewed, and the creation of an open-source alternative is attempted. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) =============================== MeSH \[[@b1-gi-2019-17-2-e16]\] is a medical thesaurus developed and maintained by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) for indexing and cataloging biomedical research articles. MeSH consists of descriptors, qualifiers, and supplementary concept records (SCRs). As of 2018, MeSH contained 28,939 descriptors, 79 qualifiers, and 244,778 SCRs, with each mapped to a unique ID (MeSH ID). Descriptors are hierarchically organized sets of medical concepts, and a descriptor record has a heading (a term in a controlled vocabulary for describing the subjects of articles), entry terms (synonyms to the heading), tree numbers (positions in the hierarchy), scope note (the definition of the subject, in natural language text), and other information. A descriptor may have more than one tree numbers (thus, the MeSH hierarchy is not a tree but a lattice). Qualifiers are terms that are used with a descriptor to define the domain of the study for which the descriptor is applied. SCRs consist mostly of names of substances, having headings and synonyms, but not tree numbers. Instead, SCRs are mapped to the headings in descriptor records. Due to synonyms, the number of terms that can be mapped to records far exceeds the number of records. For example, there are 234,842 unique terms (headings and synonyms) in MeSH descriptors, and 609,418 unique terms in supplementary concepts. As the synonyms are mapped to headings, via MeSH IDs, and are hierarchically organized, via tree numbers, MeSH represents synonym- and hypernym-hyponym relationships between biomedical terms, and is thus a useful resource for text mining. MeSH is openly available (downloadable) from the NLM site, and is also included as a part of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), which also includes translation of MeSH into other languages, including Japanese. The Japanese translation of MeSH, included in the UMLS, was created by NPO Japan Medical Abstracts Society (JAMAS, *Igaku-Chuo-Zasshi*). The current version, as of February 2019, was released in 2015, and is based on MeSH 2014. Although the original English MeSH is openly available, other MeSH translations in the UMLS (Czech, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latvian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese \[Brazilian\], Russian, Croatian, Spanish, and Swedish) carry the Category 3 License Restriction (<https://uts.nlm.nih.gov/license.html>); that is, they can only be used at the licencee\'s site, and cannot be incorporated into publicly accessible computer-based information systems, thus prohibiting creation of open-source, derivative works. These restrictions significantly complicate adapting MeSH for dictionaries used for various NLP tasks. Japanese Language Resources with Mappings to MeSH ================================================= There are several online resources in Japan which have MeSH information. Unfortunately, none are fully open for NLP. For example, the *Igaku-Chuo-Zasshi* Thesaurus (<https://www.jamas.or.jp/database/thesaurus.html>), created by JAMAS, organizes Japanese medical terms, based on MeSH tree structures. The latest version (version 9), released in 2019, is freely available for searching and browsing, without registration, but is not downloadable. This thesaurus is based on MeSH 2018, but is not its direct translation. It has 28,247 of 28,939 MeSH 2018 descriptors, and 3,513 terms outside the original MeSH, such as names of drugs sold in Japan and names of Japanese locations and institutions. The terms excluded from MeSH 2018 mainly consist of the names of foreign locations and institutions. The previous version (version 8), released in 2015, was based on MeSH 2014, and claimed to be the Japanese MeSH included in the UMLS. However, while the data download is not free, and the price is not made public. The Japanese Association of Medical Sciences (JAMS, *Nihon Igakkai*) provides an English-Japanese/Japanese-English medical dictionary online (<http://jams.med.or.jp/dic/mdic.html>), to registered users, for searching. Download of data, however, is not available. The latest version of the online dictionary (November 2016) has 71,067 Japanese terms and 70,103 English terms, corresponding to 50,088 concepts. The terms in MeSH (and their translation to Japanese) are marked as such, and the top of the MeSH tree numbers (e.g., C14 for *abdominal aortic aneurysm*, whose tree numbers are C14.907.055.239.075 and C14.907.109.139.075) are provided. This MeSH coding is based on MeSH 2014. The Life Science Dictionary (<https://lsd-project.jp/cgi-bin/lsdproj/ejlookup04.pl>) \[[@b2-gi-2019-17-2-e16]\] is developed and regularly updated at Kyoto University. The dictionary actually consists of three mutually linked components: the English-Japanese/Japanese-English dictionary, the thesaurus, and the corpus. The English-Japanese/Japanese-English dictionary has 117,857 English terms and 132,100 Japanese terms. The entries have been assigned ICD-10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases, version 10) codes, and a link to the thesaurus, where applicable. The thesaurus is a subset of English terms in the dictionary which have corresponding entries in MeSH (the current thesaurus is based on MeSH 2018), organized in the MeSH hierarchy, with synonyms both in English and Japanese, and related terms, based on co-ocurrences in PubMed abstracts. The corpus is a KWIC (keyword in context) of English terms in PubMed articles, generated on-demand. The dictionary, the thesaurus, and the corpus can all be searched freely, without registration, but downloading them requires an extra license agreement. In addition, the Life Science Dictionary converted to a Resource Description Framework (RDF) format is maintained by the Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS, <http://lsd.dbcls.jp/portal/>), available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported license (<https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/>). The Interlinking Ontology for Biological Concepts (IOBC) \[[@b3-gi-2019-17-2-e16]\] is a derivative of the JST-thesaurus (i.e., the thesaurus for indexing general science and technology publications used by the Japan Science and Technology Agency \[JST\]). This derivative was developed by the National Bioscience Database Center of JST, and is available from the NCBO BioPortal (<https://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/IOBC>) under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International license (<https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/>). This IOBC has 153,160 concepts, from the life sciences and related categories (such as chemistry), from the JST thesaurus 2015 version, written in both English and Japanese. Among them, 12,780 concepts also have corresponding MeSH UIDs. However, the MeSH information in the IOBC has not been updated from the one in the JST thesaurus 2015 version. The JST thesaurus itself is updated, and can be freely searched via web interface, although data download is not allowed. The JST also has the RDF version of the thesaurus, and its SPARQL endpoint was available to registered users of the service "J-Global Knowledge," which unfortunately, has been discontinued. Of these dictionaries, the JAMAS Thesaurus, JAMS Dictionary, and Life Science Dictionary are targeted to readers to seek information on already known terms, but cannot be searched by applications (such as morphological analysis), where the systems must find unspecified terms, over a broader context. Since creating derivatives of these dictionaries is not allowed for free, adapting them for NLP processes (such as morphological analysis), and especially making the results open, is very difficult. The IOBC does allow creation of derivatives, but only for non-commercial purposes, and its MeSH information is not updated, at least in the current version. Toward an Open Alternative of Japanese MeSH =========================================== In BLAH5, a small experiment was conducted as an attempt to map Japanese medical terms to MeSH, using open English-Japanese vocabularies, by first mapping Japanese terms to English terms, and the resulting English terms mapped to concepts in MeSH, which have the term as either its heading or one of its entry terms. In our endeavor, we first used the English Wikipedia. From this, we retrieved Wikipedia entries (via DBpedia), with MeSH UIDs in the infobox, and Japanese language links were retrieved. The number of English Wikipedia entries with the MeSH UIDs was 2,719, of which 1,136 had links to Japanese Wikipedia entries. The number of distinct MeSH UIDs was 1,102, of which 1,075 were assigned to one Wikipedia entry. The remaining 27 UIDs were mapped to more than one term, but the relationships of the terms assigned the same UID were not always synonymous. Those other undesirable relationships included hypernym-hyponym (e.g., D003117 for *Dichromacy* and *Color blindness*; dichromacy is a type of color blindness) and cause-results (e.g., D006471), for *Gastrointestinal bleeding* and *Hematochezia*; hematochezia is a result of gastrointestinal bleeding). Further investigation is left for future work. Second, use of open English-Japanese glossaries, for Japanese-English mapping and matching of English terms to the MeSH UID, was attempted. For this preliminary experiment, the MeSpEN English-Japanese glossary, a part of the multilingual medical glossary \[[@b4-gi-2019-17-2-e16]\], developed by the Spanish National Cancer Research Center and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (the version in this experiment was downloaded from <http://temu.bsc.es/mespen/downloads/glossaries.tar.gz>), was used. The English-Japanese glossary had 27,668 entries, although 18,325 unique English-Japanese ones were duplicate entries. Simple (lower-cased) matching against MH (heading) and MN (entry terms) of the MeSH 2018 descriptors, assigned the MeSH UIDs to 5,866 English-Japanese pairs. From this process, the number of unique MeSH UIDs assigned to these pairs was 2,955, and matched the remaining pairs to MeSH 2018 supplementary concepts (having assigned UIDs), leaving a remaining 1,725 pairs (1,173 unique UIDs). Conclusion ========== In this study, dictionaries for assigning MeSH information to Japanese medical terms was investigated. Although there are limited numbers of Japanese-English dictionaries that assign MeSH IDs (i.e., tree numbers) to Japanese terms, using them for NLP applications is not simple, due to license restrictions. An alternative approach, using open-source resources, was attempted, and yielded a partial success. Using other open resources, and qualitative evaluation of our results, will be the subject of future work. **Conflicts of Interest** No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. I am grateful to Dina Demner-Fushman, Nigel Collier, Martin Krallinger, Mizuki Morita, and Yasunori Yamamoto for their suggestions.
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Q: segmantation fault malloc pointers functions hello guys this is my code : #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int power(int a, int b) { int exponent = b, result = 1; while (exponent != 0) { result = result * a; exponent--; } //printf("%d",result); return result; } int fill_it(char ** p, int N, int fliptimes, int column2) { if (N < 0) return 0; int counter = 0, l; char a = 'H'; for (l = 0; l < power(2, fliptimes); l++) { p[l][column2] = a; counter++; if (counter == (power(2, N) / 2)) { counter = 0; if (a == 'H') a = 'T'; if (a == 'T') a = 'H'; } } fill_it(p, N--, fliptimes, column2++); } int main() { int i, fores, j, l, m; char ** p; printf("how many times did you toss the coin?:"); scanf("%d", & fores); p = (char ** ) malloc((power(2, fores)) * sizeof(char * )); for (i = 0; i < fores; i++) p[i] = (char * ) malloc(fores * sizeof(char)); fill_it(p, fores, fores, 0); for (l = 0; l < power(2, fores); l++) { for (m = 0; m < fores; m++) { printf("%c", p[l][m]); } } printf(","); } it does compile.But when i run the program it returns a "segmantation fault (core dumped)" error i know it means that i tried to access memory,i dont have acces to but i dont understand which part of the program is defective A: The problem is, you're not allocating enough memory. This line is fine p = (char ** ) malloc((power(2, fores)) * sizeof(char * )); but this loop is only allocating memory for part of the 2-dimensional array. for (i = 0; i < fores; i++) p[i] = (char * ) malloc(fores * sizeof(char)); The memory allocation should look more like this... foresSquared = power(2, fores); p = malloc(foresSquared*sizeof(char *)); for (i = 0; i < foresSquared; i++) p[i] = malloc(fores); Since the result of power is going to be consistent, it makes sense to store the value in a variable and use that rather than recalculating it. It'll make the code clearer too. You also don't need to cast the return value of malloc as C handles that for you. And sizeof(char) isn't needed as it's guaranteed to always be 1.
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UVA1 radiation inhibits calcineurin through oxidative damage mediated by photosensitization. The protein phosphatase calcineurin has been gradually revealing itself as the central controller of our immune response, although it is involved in a wide array of signaling pathways related to cellular development and cell cycle progression. As such, calcineurin is an attractive, yet delicate, therapeutic target for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of several inflammatory skin conditions. However, calcineurin activity is not only sensitive to immunosuppressants such as cyclosporin A and tacrolimus, but also subject to modulation by reactive oxygen species. We have recently shown, both in vivo and in vitro, that UVA1 radiation suppresses calcineurin activity. In this paper, we present evidence that this activity loss is due to singlet oxygen and superoxide generated by photosensitization and show that a closely related phosphatase, PP2A, is not affected. Furthermore, a survey of this damage reveals oxidation of several Met and Cys residues as well as an overall conformational change. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the hypothesis that UVA1 and calcineurin inhibitors both affect the same signal transduction pathway in skin.
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Jerry Stackhouse Jerry Darnell Stackhouse (born November 5, 1974) is an American basketball coach and retired professional basketball player. He is currently the head coach of the Vanderbilt Commodores, and he played 18 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He formerly was the head coach of Raptors 905 and an assistant coach for the Toronto Raptors and Memphis Grizzlies. Additionally, he has worked as an NBA TV analyst. Stackhouse played college basketball at North Carolina. Early career Stackhouse was a premier player from the time he was a sophomore in high school. He was the state player of the year for North Carolina in 1991–92, leading Kinston (N.C) High School to the state finals. His senior year, he played for Oak Hill Academy with future college teammate Jeff McInnis, leading them to an undefeated season. He was a two-time first team Parade All-America selection, and was the MVP of the McDonald's All-American Game. At the 1992 Nike Camp, he and Rasheed Wallace were considered to be the top players at the camp. There were some who considered Stackhouse the top prep player to come out of North Carolina since Michael Jordan. Stackhouse attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was a teammate of future NBA players Wallace, McInnis and Shammond Williams. In his sophomore season at UNC, Stackhouse led the team in scoring with 19.2 points per game and averaged 8.2 rebounds per contest. He led UNC to a Final Four appearance and was named as the National Player of the Year by Sports Illustrated and earned first-team All-America and All-ACC honors. While playing for Tar Heels, he was coached by Dean Smith. Following the season, Stackhouse declared his eligibility for the 1995 NBA draft. Even though he left UNC after two years, he continued working on his degree and received his bachelor's degree in African American Studies in 1999. NBA career NBA draft Stackhouse was selected in the first round of the 1995 NBA draft with the third pick by the Philadelphia 76ers. At one time he was hyped as the "Next Jordan" since both players played at North Carolina, went #3 in the draft, were listed at 6'6", looked similar physically, and had similarly acrobatic games. Coincidentally, both had a taller power forward from UNC drafted immediately after them in the #4 spot, Sam Perkins in 1984, and Rasheed Wallace in 1995. Philadelphia 76ers (1995–1998) In his first season with the 76ers, Stackhouse led his team with a 19.2 points per game (PPG) average, and was named to the NBA's All-Rookie team. In the 1996–97 season, the 76ers also drafted Allen Iverson. Combined, the two posted 44.2 points per game for the Sixers. Detroit Pistons (1998–2002) Midway through the 1997–98 season, Stackhouse was dealt to the Detroit Pistons with Eric Montross for Theo Ratliff, Aaron McKie and future considerations. By the 1999–2000 season, his second full season with the Pistons, Stackhouse was averaging 23.6 points per game. A year later, he had a career-high average of 29.8 points per game. In a late season victory over the Chicago Bulls, he set the Pistons' franchise record and the league's season high for points in a game with 57. Stackhouse saw his final action as a Piston with Detroit's elimination in the second round of the 2001–02 NBA playoffs to the Boston Celtics. Washington Wizards (2002–2004) During the 2002 offseason, Stackhouse was traded to the Washington Wizards in a six-player deal, also involving Richard Hamilton. In his first season with Washington (2002–03), Stackhouse led the Wizards in points and assists per game with 21.5 and 4.5 respectively. Stackhouse became the only teammate to average more points per game than Michael Jordan for an entire season (Jordan averaged 20.0 points per game in 2002-03 which was his last season in the NBA). Stackhouse missed most of the 2003–04 season while recovering from arthroscopic surgery on his right knee, playing in only 26 games. Dallas Mavericks (2004–2009) In the 2004 offseason, Stackhouse—along with Christian Laettner and the Wizards' first-round draft pick (Devin Harris)—was traded to the Dallas Mavericks in exchange for former Tar Heel and NBA All-Star Antawn Jamison. He did not play for 41 games during his first two seasons with Dallas due to groin and continued knee problems, and played mostly the role of sixth man. During the 2004–05 playoffs, Stackhouse began wearing pressure stockings during games to keep his legs warm, to aid his groin injury, and hold his thigh sleeves in place; the stockings also allowed for better blood flow to the legs. The practice quickly became a trend among NBA players, with Kobe Bryant, Tracy McGrady, Vince Carter, Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and others adopting pressure stockings the following season. Stackhouse was still coming off the bench as the 6th man for the Dallas Mavericks during the 2005–06 NBA season, however he was a significant factor in the NBA Finals series with the Dallas Mavericks against the Miami Heat. The Mavericks suffered, however, when Stackhouse was suspended for Game 5 for a flagrant foul on Shaquille O'Neal, and the Heat eventually won the series 4–2. Stackhouse was the third player from the Mavericks suspended during the 2006 playoffs. Milwaukee Bucks (2010) Stackhouse was traded to the Memphis Grizzlies on July 8, 2009, in a four-way trade. On the day after the trade, Stackhouse was waived by the Grizzlies. On January 17, 2010, the Milwaukee Bucks signed Stackhouse for the remainder of the 2009–10 season. Miami Heat (2010) On October 23, 2010, Stackhouse and the Miami Heat agreed to a contract. On November 23, 2010, the Heat waived Stackhouse to make room for Erick Dampier who was signed to replace injured forward Udonis Haslem. Atlanta Hawks (2011–2012) On December 9, 2011, Stackhouse joined the Atlanta Hawks. Stackhouse was chosen to replace injured teammate Joe Johnson as Atlanta's representative in the Haier Shooting Stars Competition during NBA All-Star weekend. Brooklyn Nets (2012–2013) On July 11, 2012, Stackhouse made a verbal agreement to sign a one-year, $1.3 million deal with the Nets. Stackhouse has worn the number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson, his favorite athlete, and became the first professional athlete to wear the number 42 in Brooklyn since Robinson. On November 26, 2012, the Nets played the New York Knicks for the first time since the Nets had moved to Brooklyn. Stackhouse played 22 minutes and scored 14 points, including a tiebreaking 3-pointer in overtime, and the Nets went on to win. On March 18, 2013, he scored 10 points against the Detroit Pistons, one of his former teams. After the Nets first round playoff loss to the Chicago Bulls, Stackhouse announced his retirement. Broadcasting career On November 15, 2013, it was announced that Stackhouse had joined Fox Sports Detroit as a Pistons analyst. He primarily provided studio analysis but also was the road color commentator for Fox Sports Detroit on select road trips. Stackhouse was also a college basketball analyst for the ACC Network and Fox Sports Detroit. By Joining Fox Sports Detroit, Stackhouse reunited with his former Pistons teammate Mateen Cleaves in the studio. Coaching career Toronto Raptors On June 29, 2015, he was hired to serve as an assistant coach by the Toronto Raptors. During his first season with the Raptors, he helped the team finish second in the Eastern Conference along with reaching the Eastern Conference Finals. Raptors 905 On September 9, 2016, the Raptors named him head coach for Raptors 905, the franchise's NBA Development League team. Stackhouse has aspirations of being an NBA head coach and told The Ringer that he hopes the D-League position will propel him to a head coaching job. Stackhouse led the 905 to a successful year during the 2016–17 season as the team was crowned champion of the NBA D-League. Stackhouse was named NBA D-league Coach of the Year in 2017. Memphis Grizzlies Stackhouse served as an assistant coach for the Memphis Grizzlies for the 2018–19 NBA season. Vanderbilt On April 5, 2019, Stackhouse was named the head coach of the Vanderbilt Commodores, signing a six year contract. Personal life Stackhouse is the younger brother of former CBA player and one-time Sacramento Kings and Boston Celtics forward Tony Dawson, and he is the uncle of former Wake Forest University guard Craig Dawson. Stackhouse has performed the National Anthem before Mavericks home games and during the Bucks' 2010 and the Nets' 2013 playoff appearances. Although formerly a Pescatarian, Stackhouse is now back to eating meat. In 2017, Stackhouse completed the Harvard Business School executive education program on the Business of Entertainment, Media, and Sports. Achievements Sports Illustrated Player of the Year (1995) Had the highest point total, 2,380, for the 2000–01 NBA season, but was second in scoring average, 29.8. Became the 106th NBA player to score 15,000 career points, only one game after teammate Dirk Nowitzki surpassed 15,000 points. 2017 NBA D-League Coach of the Year NBA career statistics Regular season |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Philadelphia | 72 || 71 || 37.5 || .414 || .318 || .747 || 3.7 || 3.9 || 1.1 || 1.1 || 19.2 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Philadelphia | 81 || 81 || 39.1 || .407 || .298 || .766 || 4.2 || 3.1 || 1.1 || .8 || 20.7 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Philadelphia | 22 || 22 || 34.0 || .452 || .348 || .802 || 3.5 || 3.0 || 1.4 || 1.0 || 16.0 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 57 || 15 || 31.5 || .428 || .208 || .782 || 3.3 || 3.1 || 1.0 || .7 || 15.7 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 42 || 9 || 28.3 || .371 || .278 || .850 || 2.5 || 2.8 || .8 || .5 || 14.5 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 82 || 82 || 38.4 || .428 || .288 || .815 || 3.8 || 4.5 || 1.3 || .4 || 23.6 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 80 || 80 || 40.2 || .402 || .351 || .822 || 3.9 || 5.1 || 1.2 || .7 || 29.8 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 76 || 76 || 35.3 || .397 || .287 || .858 || 4.1 || 5.3 || 1.0 || .5 || 21.4 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Washington | 70 || 70 || 39.2 || .409 || .290 || .878 || 3.7 || 4.5 || .9 || .4 || 21.5 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Washington | 26 || 17 || 29.8 || .399 || .354 || .806 || 3.6 || 4.0 || .9 || .1 || 13.9 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 56 || 7 || 28.9 || .414 || .267 || .849 || 3.3 || 2.3 || .9 || .2 || 14.9 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 55 || 11 || 27.7 || .401 || .277 || .882 || 2.8 || 2.9 || .7 || .2 || 13.0 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 67 || 8 || 24.1 || .428 || .383 || .847 || 2.2 || 2.8 || .8 || .1 || 12.0 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 58 || 13 || 24.3 || .405 || .326 || .892 || 2.3 || 2.5 || .5 || .2 || 10.7 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 10 || 1 || 16.2 || .267 || .158 || 1.000 || 1.7 || 1.2 || .4 || .1 || 4.2 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Milwaukee | 42 || 0 || 20.4 || .408 || .346 || .797 || 2.4 || 1.7 || .5 || .2 || 8.5 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Miami | 7 || 1 || 7.1 || .250 || .250 || .714 || 1.0 || .4 || .0 || .3 || 1.7 |- | style="text-align:left;"| | style="text-align:left;"| Atlanta | 30 || 0 || 9.1 || .370 || .342 || .913 || .8 || .5 || .3 || .1 || 3.6 |- | align="left" | | align="left" | Brooklyn | 37 || 0 || 14.7 || .384 || .337 || .870 || .9 || .9 || .2 || .1 || 4.9 |- class="sortbottom" | style="text-align:center;" colspan="2"| Career | 970 || 564 || 31.2 || .409 || .309 || .822 || 3.2 || 3.3 || .9 || .5 || 16.9 |- class="sortbottom" | style="text-align:center;" colspan="2"| All-Star | 2 || 0 || 14.5 || .467 || 1.000 || .000 || 1.5 || 2.0 || .0 || .0 || 7.5 Playoffs |- | style="text-align:left;"| 1999 | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 5 || 0 || 24.8 || .391 || .250 || .857 || 1.6 || 1.2 || .4 || .2 || 10.0 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2000 | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 3 || 3 || 40.0 || .407 || .429 || .742 || 4.0 || 3.3 || .7 || .0 || 24.7 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2002 | style="text-align:left;"| Detroit | 10 || 10 || 36.1 || .321 || .340 || .825 || 4.3 || 4.3 || .6 || .6 || 17.6 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2005 | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 13 || 0 || 31.0 || .386 || .400 || .864 || 4.1 || 2.3 || .6 || .2 || 16.1 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2006 | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 22 || 1 || 32.3 || .402 || .338 || .784 || 2.8 || 2.5 || .5 || .3 || 13.7 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2007 | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 6 || 0 || 28.2 || .348 || .355 || .879 || 3.7 || 2.5 || .7 || .2 || 14.3 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2008 | style="text-align:left;"| Dallas | 5 || 2 || 20.4 || .316 || .167 || 1.000 || 3.2 || 1.2 || .2 || .0 || 6.2 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2010 | style="text-align:left;"| Milwaukee | 7 || 0 || 20.6 || .326 || .333 || .900 || 1.7 || 1.1 || .7 || .1 || 7.3 |- | style="text-align:left;"| 2013 | style="text-align:left;"| Brooklyn | 4 || 0 || 7.0 || .100 || .000 || .750 || 1.0 || .0 || .0 || .0 || 1.3 |- class="sortbottom" | style="text-align:center;" colspan="2"| Career | 75 || 16 || 28.8 || .369 || .332 || .829 || 3.1 || 2.3 || .5 || .2 || 13.1 Head coaching record College See also List of National Basketball Association career turnovers leaders List of National Basketball Association career free throw scoring leaders References External links Official website Category:1974 births Category:Living people Category:African-American basketball players Category:All-American college men's basketball players Category:American expatriate basketball people in Canada Category:American men's basketball coaches Category:American men's basketball players Category:Atlanta Hawks players Category:Basketball coaches from North Carolina Category:Basketball players at the 1995 NCAA Men's Division I Final Four Category:Basketball players from North Carolina Category:Brooklyn Nets players Category:College men's basketball head coaches in the United States Category:Dallas Mavericks players Category:Detroit Pistons players Category:McDonald's High School All-Americans Category:Memphis Grizzlies assistant coaches Category:Miami Heat players Category:Milwaukee Bucks players Category:National Basketball Association All-Stars Category:North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball players Category:Parade High School All-Americans (boys' basketball) Category:People from Kinston, North Carolina Category:Philadelphia 76ers draft picks Category:Philadelphia 76ers players Category:Raptors 905 coaches Category:Shooting guards Category:Small forwards Category:Toronto Raptors assistant coaches Category:Vanderbilt Commodores men's basketball coaches Category:Washington Wizards players
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August Cole reports on the Pentagon. The nominee for the Defense Department’s No. 2 job got a pass on President Barack Obama‘s tough new ethics rules. After a long stint as a senior Washington operations executive at Raytheon Co., William J. Lynn is poised to head back to the Pentagon to become the deputy secretary of defense. He was a registered lobbyist for the giant defense contractor from 2003 through June 2008. Peter Orszag, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, said in a statement that “it is in the public interest to grant the waiver given Mr. Lynn’s qualifications for his position and the current national security situation.” Specifically, the waiver covers a “revolving door ban” designed to address appointees’ conflicts of interest with former employers or clients during and after their government service. Sen. Carl Levin, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said he was satisfied with the waiver and expected Lynn will follow the relevant ethics rules. Sen. John McCain, who lost to Obama in the November election, was less than happy with the waiver. “I am disappointed in President Obama’s decision to waive the ‘revolving door’ provisions of the executive order for Mr. Bill Lynn,” McCain said in a statement. “While I applaud the president’s action to implement new, more stringent ethical rules, I had hoped he would not find it necessary to waive them so soon.” Still, McCain didn’t say he would vote for or against the 55-year-old Raytheon official, adding, “I intend to ask him to clarify for the record what matters and decisions will require his recusal.”
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Suspect arrested after Mandrax found concealed in cereal box Mandrax and dagga in bags found by police during a search at a roadblock along the N14 near Upington. Pictures: SAPS The drugs were found after police stopped a Quantum minibus taxi at a roadblock. Police have recovered hundreds of Mandrax tablets which were concealed in a box of cereal during a routine roadblock along the N14 between Upington and Olifantshoek. On Wednesday, police stopped a Quantum minibus taxi at a roadblock and searched all the passengers who were travelling from Olifantshoek to Upington. Police spokesperson Colonel Mashay Gamieldien said: “While searching the passengers, members found 25 bags of dagga in a bag with an estimated street value of R25,000 and 300 Mandrax tablets concealed in a Kellogg’s box with an estimated street value of R30,000. “A 46-year-old male passenger was arrested and the Upington police are investigating a case of dealing in drugs. The suspect will soon be appearing in the Upington Magistrate’s court.” – African News Agency (ANA) For more news your way, download The Citizen’s app for iOS and Android.
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Arc System Works is well known for their fighting game series – in particular, the Guilty Gear series and the BlazBlue series. Now, they're releasing a new adventure game that is linked to the BlazBlue games. Advertisement XBlaze: Code Embryo is a visual novel set to come out in Japan this upcoming July. As stated above, the game is "linked" to the BlazBlue game series world, though does not necessarily take place in the same world. So while people well versed with the fighting game series may encounter key words, events, or even characters they find familiar, XBlaze is meant as a stand-alone game/story – which means there's no need for fighting game novices to trudge through the other games beforehand. The story centers around the fantastical adventures of an ordinary high school student who, through a series of events, encounters a mysterious girl in a quarantine zone. The game features a colorful cast of characters, most of whom look like they belong in a fighting game of their own. Unlike most visual novels, XBlaze will apparently not have the standard choice selection system. Instead, there will be an in-game information-gathering system and how this system and the information gathered is utilized will determine the player's fate. XBlaze: Code Embryo is scheduled for release on July 25th in Japan. No word on an international release, but the visual novel aspect of the game makes that possibility somewhat slim. The game will be for the PlayStation 3 and the PS Vita. Advertisement Interestingly, the game will not be released on the PSP – an indicator that at least in Japan, some publishers are gaining enough confidence in the Vita that they are beginning to let go of its predecessor. Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.
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118 Ariz. 136 (1977) 575 P.2d 335 The STATE of Arizona, Appellee, v. Frank James VALENCIA, Appellant. No. 2 CA-CR 1111. Court of Appeals of Arizona, Division 2. November 17, 1977. Rehearing Denied December 28, 1977. Review Denied January 24, 1978. *137 Bruce E. Babbitt, Atty. Gen. by Philip G. Urry, Asst. Atty. Gen., Tucson, for appellee. Donald S. Klein, Tucson, for appellant. OPINION HOWARD, Chief Judge. Appellant was convicted by a jury of four crimes: Count One, kidnapping with intent to commit rape or robbery; Count Two, rape while armed with a gun; Count Three, robbery while armed with a gun; and Count Four, theft of a motor vehicle. He was sentenced on Count Two to the Arizona State Prison for a term of not less than forty nor more than sixty years to run concurrently with a twenty to thirty-year sentence on Count One. He was sentenced to a ten to fifteen-year term on Count Three to run consecutively to the sentences on Counts One and Two. On Count Four, appellant was sentenced to time served in the Pima County Jail. The record shows that at 8:45 p.m. on September 24, 1975, the victim arrived at her place of employment, a bar and eating establishment. She parked her vehicle in the parking lot and as she started to exit from the automobile was confronted by a person pointing a handgun at her. Her assailant got in the backseat of the car and directed her to drive west of the downtown area. En route, he crawled from the backseat to the front passenger seat. They traveled on a dirt road until it ended. Appellant had the victim stop the car, tied her hands behind her back and took her out of the car to an area where there were three mattresses on the ground. He then tore off her clothes and raped her at gunpoint. After raping her, appellant tore her clothes up, used them to gag and tie her and threw her into a clump of bushes which he ignited and then extinguished. Appellant departed in the victim's car, leaving her tied up in the bushes. She succeeded in untying herself and tore two pieces of cloth off a mattress to cover her upper and lower body. She then walked until she came to a trailer occupied by the Lahun family who took her into the trailer and called the sheriff. A sheriff's deputy arrived shortly thereafter. The victim was shown various photographs of suspects but did not identify any of them as her assailant until March 19, 1976 when she saw a picture in a Tucson newspaper of the appellant, who had been arrested for the murder of one Karen Tweedy. Her immediate reaction was that appellant was her attacker. She called the sheriff's office and four weeks later made a photo identification of appellant at the sheriff's office. At trial, appellant never contested the fact that the rape occurred, but based his defense on alibi. He has raised six questions for review. INSTRUCTION ON EYEWITNESS IDENTIFICATION The trial court refused to give appellant's lengthy instruction on eyewitness identification. This instruction was taken verbatim from the model instruction on identification contained in the appendix of the case of United States v. Telfaire, 152 U.S.App.D.C. 146, 469 F.2d 552 (1972). We are unable to agree that the court erred in its refusal. The trial court instructed the jury on the factors it should take into consideration in passing upon the credibility of the witnesses, and also gave an instruction on the defense of alibi. Thus, the failure to *138 give the requested instruction was not error. State v. Taylor, 109 Ariz. 267, 508 P.2d 731 (1973). Furthermore, great care should be exercised before giving an instruction approved by a federal court. A federal judge may comment on the evidence. 2 Federal Practice and Procedure § 488 (Wright, 1969). In Arizona state courts, however, such comment is constitutionally prohibited. Ariz.Const. art. 6, § 27; State v. Barnett, 111 Ariz. 391, 531 P.2d 148 (1975); State v. Godsoe, 107 Ariz. 367, 489 P.2d 4 (1971). Our examination of the instruction discloses that part of it constituted a comment on the evidence and part was inapplicable to the facts of this case. The instruction also ran afoul of the rule that when a requested instruction is good in part and bad in part, the trial court is not required to separate the good from the bad, and may reject the whole instruction. State v. Boozer, 80 Ariz. 8, 291 P.2d 786 (1955). EXPERT OPINION EVIDENCE ON THE RELIABILITY OF EYEWITNESS IDENTIFICATION Appellant contends the trial court erred in refusing to allow him to present the testimony of Dr. Kevin Gilmartin. His testimony would have dealt with the psychological problems which reduce the reliability of eyewitness identification. We do not agree that this was error. Whether a witness is competent to testify as an expert is within the trial court's discretion and this rule applies also to a determination of the areas in which expert testimony is appropriate. State v. Knapp, 114 Ariz. 531, 562 P.2d 704 (App. 1977). It is not error to disallow expert testimony on the limitations and weakness of eyewitness identification. United States v. Brown, 540 F.2d 1048 (10th Cir.1976). ADMISSION OF HEARSAY TESTIMONY The trial court allowed Brady Lahun and his wife to tell the jury what the victim told them concerning the rape. Appellant claims this was error. We do not agree. She arrived at their trailer clothed only in scraps of mattress cover. She was nervous, crying and shaking. Her statements to the Lahuns were admissible as spontaneous utterances. State v. Perry, 116 Ariz. 40, 567 P.2d 786 (App. 1977). Appellant also contends it was error to allow the deputy sheriff who went to the Lahun residence to testify as to what the victim told him about the rape. Since no objection was made to this testimony at trial, any right to raise the issue on appeal was waived. State v. Perry, supra. PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT Appellant contends there were four instances of prosecutorial misconduct during the trial. During the direct examination of Gloria Lahun the prosecuting attorney asked her why she had aided the victim. The witness replied: "Because we have a daughter and I wouldn't want — " The answer was cut off by a sustained objection. The second instance occurred when the prosecuting attorney was making her final argument. She said: "If this were you or your daughter, or your wife or your sister — " At that point, the trial judge sua sponte interrupted, reprimanded her and instructed the jury to disregard the remark. In neither instance did appellant make a motion for a mistrial. No predicate for appellate review exists when there has been a failure to move for a mistrial. State v. Ballesteros, 100 Ariz. 262, 413 P.2d 739 (1966). Appellant next complains that the prosecuting attorney was guilty of misconduct in her cross-examination of appellant's uncle. Appellant, however, did not object and therefore has waived any error. State v. Perry, supra. Lastly, it is appellant's contention that the trial court erred in permitting the prosecuting attorney to elicit from appellant during cross-examination the fact that he spoke to a police officer on March 2, 1976. He claims this suggested to the jury that appellant was implicated in some criminal *139 conduct other than the present case and the Karen Tweedy murder. We do not agree. The mere fact that a person has spoken to a police officer does not necessarily suggest criminal involvement. Here, the jury could well have believed the incident referred to the Tweedy murder case. The jury already knew that appellant was involved in that murder because his attorney brought this out in his voir dire of the jury and in his opening statement.[1] RESTRICTION OF JURY VOIR DIRE Appellant claims the trial court erred in failing to fully investigate whether the prospective jurors were prejudiced against appellant because of his race. In addition, he claims the court failed to fully investigate whether the pretrial publicity surrounding the Tweedy murder case would affect the jurors' ability to fairly review the evidence in the instant case. We do not agree. The trial judge questioned the veniremen in groups of four about whether their impartiality would be affected by appellant's involvement in the Tweedy case. He specifically asked them whether they had heard about the Tweedy case from news accounts or other sources, and whether they had reached any conclusions as to appellant's guilt or innocence. The trial judge also informed the veniremen that appellant's mother was half Papago and half Mexican and that appellant was part Negro. He then asked them whether they felt that the matter of appellant's racial background would cause them to be influenced or prejudiced. IMPEACHMENT ON A COLLATERAL ISSUE Appellant's mother testified that he was watching television at her home on the evening of September 24, 1975. She also admitted on cross-examination that she had stated at an earlier hearing that appellant had also been home watching television during the late evening and early morning of March 1st and March 2nd, 1976. Without objection on the part of appellant, the prosecuting attorney asked him if his mother was correct in her testimony as to his whereabouts on March 1st and 2nd, 1976. He said that she was not correct. Appellant now claims it was error to allow the prosecuting attorney to question him as to the truth of his mother's testimony since it constituted impeachment on a collateral matter. See, State v. Johnson, 27 Ariz. App. 96, 551 P.2d 86 (1976). Assuming arguendo he is correct, appellant is precluded from complaining on appeal since he failed to object. State v. Perry, supra. Affirmed. HATHAWAY and RICHMOND, JJ., concur. NOTES [1] Appellant's counsel felt it was necessary to bring up the Tweedy murder case in order to attack the victim's method of identification of appellant. In other words, that the identification was the product of suggestion as a result of the newspaper article.
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High resolution x-ray imaging systems, also known as X-ray imaging microscopes (“XRM”), provide high-resolution/high magnification, non-destructive imaging of internal structures in samples for a variety of industrial and research applications, such as materials science, clinical research, and failure analysis to list a few examples. XRMs provide the ability to visualize features in samples without the need to cut and slice the samples. XRMs are part of the field of x-ray microscopy. XRMs are often used to perform computed tomography (“CT”) scans of samples. CT scanning is the process of generating three dimensional tomographic volumes of the samples from a series of projections at different angles. XRMs often present these tomographic volumes in two-dimensional, cross-sectional images or “slices” of the three dimensional tomographic volume data set. The tomographic volumes are generated from the projection data using software reconstruction algorithms based on back-projection and other image processing techniques to reveal and analyze features within the samples. Operators select scanning parameters, such as x-ray energy value, exposure time, and filter settings, and direct the XRM to perform a CT scanning “run.” For each run, the operator or an automatic loader installs the sample between an x-ray source and an x-ray detector system, and exposes the sample to a beam of x-rays. The XRM rotates the sample in the x-ray beam, and its detector system detects the x-rays that are transmitted through and modulated by the sample at each rotation angle. During a run, the sample absorbs or scatters some of the x-rays before passing through to the x-ray detector system. The x-ray detector system receives the attenuated photon flux of x-rays that pass through and are spatially modulated by the sample. The detector system creates an image representation, in pixels, of the x-ray photons that react with the detector system. X-ray absorption increases with sample density and thickness, and is also generally higher for elements within the sample that have a higher atomic number (“Z”) in the periodic table. Operators use standard operating procedures and best known methods (“BKM”) for the selection of the optimum “run” conditions. BKMs are written instructions for workflows that are written instructions for workflows that help the operator determine the optimum x-ray source voltage settings, beam pre-filter and detector settings associated with a particular sample. The resulting three-dimensional image representation of the sample after processing is also known as a reconstructed tomographic volume data set. Operators typically operate an XRM using software control. For each scanning run, also known as a single energy scan, operators set the scanning parameters. Scanning parameters include variables such as the x-ray source voltage setting, exposure time, and source filter settings. A related technology of XRM is x-ray fluorescence (“XRF”) microscopy. XRF microscopy utilizes x-rays differently than does XRM. Operators use the secondary x-ray energy emission associated with XRF, or fluorescence, to uniquely identify individual atomic elements (“Z”) within the sample. In XRM, the contrast mechanism for attenuation in the sample has two principal components in the x-ray energy range of interest called the photoelectric absorption component and the Compton scattering component. In the photoelectric absorption process, an x-ray is absorbed completely by a bound electron of an atom and ejects this electron from the atom. In the Compton scattering process, the incident x-ray loses part of its energy and gets redirected by scattering off an electron. The effects of both components contribute to the image in an XRM arising from attenuation of the illuminating x-ray beam. The relative strength of the photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering processes is a strong function of incident x-ray energy and the atomic number Z of the atom that interacts with the x-ray. The absorption due to the photoelectric effect generally dominates at lower energies and decays in strength inversely with the fourth power of the x-ray energy. The absorption due to the Compton scattering effect becomes dominant at higher energies and has a much slower decay with x-ray energy (inversely with first power of energy). The transition point between photoelectric and Compton scattering absorption is referred to as the “knee,” where the absorption changes from decaying inversely with the fourth power of the energy to the first power. This knee is a characteristic of the atomic number Z of the atom and increases with increasing Z.
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Case Study: Museum Square - 5757 Wilshire Blvd. An impressive Los Angeles landmark since its construction as a shopping center in 1940, this 10-story structure was later converted to offices and is the new home of the national Screen Actors’ Guild. Ellis manages all asbestos removal projects and indoor air quality challenges as they arise. We have also assisted the owner in responding to a unique challenge: the building’s proximity to the La Brea Tar Pits means that occasionally, small amounts of crude oil must be removed from elevator pits! Most popular related searches Related articles In late 2011, Global was contracted by the Genesee County Land Bank and City of Flint to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) in accordance with guidelines set for by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 24 CFR Part 58 for the Smith Village Project. Global utilized the HUD recommended format during the preparation of the EA including completion of the Statutory Checklist and Environmental Assessment Checklist. As part of the EA process, Global completed several Phase I ESA, Phase II ESA,... Global has been contracted by the Genesee County Land Bank Authority (GCLBA) to complete pre-demolition hazardous material and asbestos inspections on blighted structures located in the City of Flint beginning in 2002 and continuing through the present. In March and November 2013, Global was awarded multiple contracts from GCLBA, which utilize MBEG and HHF funding sources to eliminate blight and stabilize communities. GCLBA was awarded $3,713,240.00 from the State of Michigan to demolishblighted structures within... Project Highlights We have recently completed the clearances at the Former Wills Tobacco Factory in Bristol. This work involved a large number of site visits and a total of 5 clearances on sprayed asbestos coating (each area requiring approximately 20 pumps). Project Description The work commenced on 18thOctober and was completed on 4thDecember.We have recently completed the clearances at the Former Wills Tobacco Factory in Bristol. This work involved a large number of site visits and a total of 5 clearances... Project Highlights Envirochem managed and offered the complete package at the best price to fit the clients time restraints and allowing continued unaffected work within the factory. Envirochem utilised asbestos licensed scaffolders, electricians, ceiling fixers, and asbestos removers. Keeping the continuation of the project and overflow of the trades was a logistical difficulty that we completed smoothly. Project Description To remove asbestos over-spray and encapsulate asbestos over-spray to beams. To...
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Gabriel Resources, compania din spatele proiectului Roșia Montană, a reluat tema daunelor de miliarde pe care vrea sa le solicite statului român dacă autoritățile nu dau undă verde exploatării aurului. Acționarul principal al proiectului aurifer, grupul BSG Resources, a demarat anul trecut o acțiune similară împotriva Republicii Guineea, țară din Africa de Vest unde i-au fost anulate două concesiuni miniere pe fondul unor grave acuzații de corupție. Lupta pentru resursele din Guineea a scos la suprafață tranzacțiile oculte la care au recurs reprezentanții grupului BSG pentru a influența demnitarii din țara africană. Actorii principali din cazul Guineea au legături directe cu România. RISE Project a găsit aceste conexiuni după ce a analizat documentele unei anchete FBI, dar și pe cele rezultate dintr-un proces civil în care se luptă doi coloși ai mineritului mondial, grupul australiano – britanic Rio Tinto și corporația braziliană Vale. Structura acționarilor din afacere. Firma lui Steinmetz deține acțiuni în proiectul Roșia prin intermediul companiei Gabriel Resources, listată la bursa din Toronto. Disputa multinaționalelor Conflictul dintre cele două corporații a izbucnit în 2009, dar a devenit public abia anul trecut. Rio Tinto a deschis în aprilie 2014 un proces la New York, acuzând corporația Vale că a conspirat cu un grup rival ca să îi fure drepturile de exploatare asupra minereului de fier din zona Simandou, în Guineea. Grupul rival era BSG Resources, patronat de miliardarul israelian Benjamin “Beny” Steinmetz, jucător important pe piața globală a diamantelor. Citești această investigație fiindcă îți pasă. Dacă vrei să afli și mai multe despre corupția din instituțiile statului, crima organizată și cum te afectează toate astea, poți dona aici! Pe scurt, Rio Tinto spune că a vrut să vândă brazilienilor de la Vale afacerea din Africa de Vest, dar că aceștia, după ce au avut acces la documentația confidențială aferentă zăcămintelor de la Simandou, au conspirat cu BSG să scoată Rio Tinto de pe piață, prin cointeresarea politicienilor locali. Printr-o divizie a grupului BSG, Steinmetz a fost implicat în ultimii cinci ani și în proiectul aurifer de la Roșia Montană, iar prin companii offshore și prin interpuși a derulat afaceri imobiliare la București și în alte orașe din țară. Intrarea lui Steinmetz în proiectul Roșia Montană, în noiembrie 2009, a revitalizat afacerea: proiectul a fost inclus rapid în programul de guvernare. Compania BSG Capital Market, parte a grupului controlat de Steinmetz, a achiziționat în 2009 aproape nouă la sută din Gabriel Resources, plătind peste 67 milioane de dolari, iar ulterior prin mai multe plasamente și-a extins influența în compania care deține proiectul aurifer din Munții Apuseni. Raportările oficiale plasează compania lui Steinmetz pe primul loc între acționarii Gabriel Resources, cu 16 la sută, alături de Electronum Group, un fond de investiții american. Grupul lui Steinmetz , singurul cu investiții masive la București, a devansat în ultimii ani gigantul minier Newmont Mining Corporation, unul dintre cei mai mari producători de aur din lume, care mai deține doar 13 la sută din Gabriel Resources. De partea cealaltă, multinaționala Rio Tinto a prospectat de asemenea piața românească în 1999 când a intenționat să concesioneze perimetre în Munții Apuseni. Agenția Națională a Resurselor Minerale (ANRM) i-a acordat atunci mai multe concesiuni în Munții Apuseni, printre care și perimetrul de la Rovina, de lângă orașul Brad, unul dintre cele mai importante zăcăminte de aur și cupru din România. Mihail Ianăș, președintele ANRM de la acel moment, ne-a spus că grupul Rio Tinto avea ca țintă finală zăcământul mixt de cupru și aur de la Roșia Poieni, localitate situată aproape de Roșia Montană. Afacerea nu s-a finalizat, iar gigantul minier s-a retras din România. Intermediarul BSG, după gratii Anterior procesului dintre Rio Tinto și Vale, un alt caz aflat pe rolul justiției americane, direct legat de evenimentele din Guineea, ne-a dezvăluit modul în care intermediarii BSG s-au implicat în coruperea oficialilor din țara vest africană. Procesul s-a soldat cu condamnarea la pușcărie a unui intermediar al companiei lui Steinmetz. Acesta este francezul Frederic Cilins, 52 de ani, fost angajat al filialei BSG Resources din Guineea. Cilins era un obișnuit al capitalei Conakry dar mergea des și în Florida, SUA, unde avea afaceri și proprietăți imobiliare. În aprilie 2013, Cilins a fost arestat de FBI pe aeroportul din Jacksonville, Florida, după ce tocmai se întâlnise cu Mamadie Toure, văduva fostului președinte al Republicii Guineea, Lansana Conte – decedat în decembrie 2008 și în mandatul căruia s-a realizat preluarea zăcămintelor de către grupul lui Steinmetz. Toure era și ea rezidentă în Florida, unde avea mai multe proprietăți, confiscate de autoritățile americane în urmă cu trei luni. DOCUMENTELE ANCHETEI FBI Cilins îi promisese văduvei 1 milion de dolari în schimbul distrugerii unor documente compromițătoare privind operațiunea din Guineea. Toure colabora deja ca martor cu FBI în cadrul investigației și le-a spus anchetatorilor că francezul nu a acționat singur, ci l-a avut ca șef pe Michael Noy – un francez în vârstă de 64 de ani și partener de afaceri cu Cilins. UN FILM REALIZAT DE ORGANIZAȚIA GLOBAL WITNESS ÎI PREZINTĂ PE PRINCIPALII ACTORI AI AFACERII GUINEEA FBI a interceptat mai multe discuții purtate de Toure cu Cilins și cu Noy, descriindu-i pe cei doi intermediari ca fiind la fel de nerăbdători ca probele să dispară. RISE Project a descoperit că francezii au mai fost implicați de-a lungul anilor în mai multe afaceri, inclusiv în România. În 1999, Michael Noy a înființat la București firma Danver Europe SRL ca să facă comerț cu alimente, băuturi și tutun, dar și să deruleze operațiuni de import – export. Afacerea nu i-a mers prea bine, așa că israelianul a închis-o definitiv în 2006, înainte să se implice personal în schema din Guineea. Concomitent, Noy și Cilins conduceau împreună o altă companie Danver International SA în Luxemburg – țară în care mai administrau și alte afaceri. Alți parteneri de-ai lor au mai fost implicați la București, în firme de consultanță, oferind clienților inclusiv servicii de tip offhsore. O astfel de schemă offshore era investigată și de FBI la momentul arestării lui Cilins, iar mai apoi a intrat și în vizorul autorităților elvețiene. Purtătorul de cuvânt al procuraturii din Manhattan a precizat pentru RISE Project că Frederic Cilins a fost singurul condamnat la doi ani de închisoare, în iulie 2014, pentru obstrucționarea anchetei federale și că nu poate comenta dacă în acest caz mai sunt investigați Michael Noy sau magnatul Benjamin Steinmetz. Pe de altă parte, investigația din Elveția îi conectează pe alți directori din imperiul lui Steinmetz la afacerile lui din Guineea și România. Percheziții în Geneva Poliția elvețiană a descins în august 2013 la birourile firmei de consultanță Onyx Financial Advisors, parte din grupul lui Steinmetz – el însuși rezident în țara cantoanelor și ținta finală a perchezițiilor. Cel care a dat detalii atunci despre acțiunea polițiștilor a fost Dag Cramer, reprezentantul lui Steinmetz în conducerea companiei canadiene care deține proiectul Roșia Montană. Cramer mai era și șeful filialei din Guineea al grupului lui Steinmetz, adică exact firma care încheiase parteneriatul strategic cu grupul Vale pentru perimetrele Simandou. Cramer nu conducea la nivel local birourile Onyx din cantonul Geneva, ci era directorul executiv al companiei mamă din Londra. Ca administrator al firmei elvețiene figura Sandra Merloni Horemans, o belgiancă de 45 ani, angajată de peste două decenii în grupul lui Steinmetz. Horemans a fost prezentă în nouă companii din România, reprezentându-i la București interesele imobiliare ale lui Beny Steinmetz. În timp ce administra afacerile din România, ea figura și ca director ne-executiv la filiala BSG din Guineea. În SRL-uril românești, Horemans l-a avut de-a lungul anilor ca partener și pe Remus Truică, fostul șef de cabinet al premierului Adrian Năstase. În alt SRL, ea i-a cedat locul de administrator lui Alfred Gusenbauer, fost cancelar al Austriei și un alt reprezenant al lui Steinmetz în conducerea companiei canadiene care deține proiectul Roșia Montană. Firmele reprezentate de Horemans au fost doar o mică parte din afacerile pe care magnatul israelian le-a derulat în România, în proiecte energetice și imobiliare. Multe dintre afacerile sale au fost închise în ultimii ani, lăsând în urmă datorii de zeci de milioane de dolari la băncile locale. Horemans, Cramer și Steinmetz au cerut anul trecut unei instanțe din Londra să le admită un proces împotriva organizației Global Witness, acuzând că relatările ONG-ului despre cazul de corupție din Guineea le-a afectat intimitatea. Cererea celor trei a fost respinsă luna trecută. Rețeaua offshore Polițiștii elvețieni au confiscat documentele din birourile administrate de Horemans, suspectând că firma Onyx a fost implicată în suveica offshore prin intermediul căreia Cilins, Noy și Toure au primit acțiuni în afacerea cu zăcăminte din Guineea. Schema offshore avea ca punct nodal Insulele Virgine Britanice. Aceeași filieră a fost investigată și de FBI, care a susținut că unul din documentele pe care Cilins vroia să-l ardă era un acord de angajament prin care văduva președintelui african primea o felie din afacerea cu minereu de fier. Angajamentul a fost semnat în februarie 2006, între Mamadie Toure și un partener al celor doi francezi din firma offshore Pentler Holdings Ltd., înregistrată în același an în Insulele Virgine. Offshore-ul urma să preia 17,65 din subsidiara BSGR Guinea Ltd tot din Insulele Virgine, iar Mamadie Toure devenea acționar cu 33,3% din Pentler Holdings. La final, Toure obținea indirect o cotă de aproape 5 la sută din drepturile asupra minereului de fier, dar și mai multe milioane de dolari în conturi. Grupul lui Steinmetz a recunoscut oficial parteneriatul cu firma Pentler Holdings Ltd, în mai 2013, dar a negat orice acuzație privind implicarea filialelor sale în fapte de corupție. BSG Resources a mai susținut că firma Pentler Holdings a fost înființată de Cilins și partenerii săi și că a apelat la ei pentru că aveau operațiuni extinse în Guinea. Mai mult, grupul lui Steinmetz a declarat că a încheiat colaborarea oficială cu Cilins și partenerii săi încă din 2008. Interceptările FBI arătau însă că Frederic Cilins susținea în convorbirile cu Toure că acționează în continuare la ordinele lui Steinmetz. Organizația Global Witness a arătat că firma elvețiană Onyx Financial Advisors, condusă de Horemans, a înființat, de fapt, offshore-ul Pentler Holdings Ltd, folosit apoi de Cilins și partenerii săi în aranjamentele cu soția președintelui african. Autoritățile din Guineea au anulat în aprilie 2014 drepturile filialei lui Steinmetz asupra perimetrelor din Simandou. În replică, magnatul israelian a anunțat că a demarat procedurile pentru un proces la Curtea Internațională de Arbitraj din Washington împotriva statului african ca să-și recapete drepturile. (Detalii, AICI). În aceeași perioadă, reprezentanții Gabriel Resources – compania canadiană care dezvoltă proiectul de la Roșia Montană și în care grupul lui Steinmetz deține 16 la sută – a anunțat că pregătește un caz similar la o curte internațională de arbitraj și va solicita despăgubiri de miliarde de dolari pentru că autoritățile române nu i-au aprobat proiectul nici după cincispreze ani de la primirea licenței. Conducerea companiei Gabriel Resources nu a răspuns întrebărilor transmise săptămâna trecută de RISE Project privind pașii care s-au făcut în acest sens, însă experții susțin că o astfel de acțiune poate fi începută doar după o procedură prealabilă de conciliere cu autoritățile române. Marți, 20 ianuarie 2014, Gabriel Resources a anunțat, printr-un comunicat oficial, că a invitat autoritățile române la consultări pentru deblocarea proiectului, iar dacă soluția nu va fi satisfăcătoare va urma pașii necesari pentru deschiderea unei acțiuni de arbitraj. Orice litigiu dintre statul român și compania care deține proiectul aurifer de la Roșia Montană poate fi soluționat la Curtea Internațională de Arbitraj de Viena, potrivit licenței de exploatare a zăcământului. (Detalii, AICI). PRINCIPALELE ACUZAȚII ALE RIO TINTO: – Frederic Cilins a ajuns în anturajul familiei președintelui Lansana Conte, în 2006, după ce l-a angajat pe cumnatul său la filiala BSG Resources din Guinea. – Grupul international Vale a negociat în noiembrie 2008 cu Rio Tinto pentru preluarea perimetrelor africane, dar în realitate a folosit informațiile confidențiale ca să scoată corporația din afacere și să se alieze cu grupul lui Steinmetz. – Pe 9 decembrie 2008, Guvernul de la Conakry a anulat contractul pe care îl avea cu Rio Tinto pentru două perimetre, oferind două zile mai târziu drepturile respective direct grupului lui Steinmetz. – După ce președintele Lansana Conte a murit pe 22 decembrie 2008, oamenii lui Steinmetz s-au orientat către noul ministru al minelor, Mahmoud Thiam – care a semnat și licențele pentru grupul Steinmetz în februarie 2009. – Asocierea Vale – BSG s-a oficializat în aprilie 2010, când brazilienii au plătit o primă tranșă în valoare de 500 de milioane de dolari lui Steinmetz. Pentru jumătate din drepturile de exploatare, Vale s-a angajat să plătească în total 2,5 miliarde de dolari. – Mamadie Toure, cea de-a patra soție a președintelui Lansana Conte, a primit bani și acțiuni în exploatarea din Guineea, de la Cilins și partenerii săi. În instanță, avocații Vale au susținut că grupul pe care-l reprezintă “a ajuns la cuțite” cu BSG Resources și că le-a deschis o acțiune de arbitraj la Londra în care le solicită daune de 1,2 miliarde dolari. De partea cealaltă, grupul BSGR a catalogat acuzațiile Rio Tinto ca fiind asburde și că ele fac parte din “cruciada ilegală” lansată împotriva sa de noul președinte al Republicii Guinea ca să satisfacă interesele celor care l-au ajutat să câștige alegerile. (Detalii, AICI) Paul Radu, Daniel Bojin, Matt Sarnecki CITITI ȘI CULISELE TRANZACȚIEI PENALE ÎN CAZUL ROȘIA MONTANĂ
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<resources> <style name="AppTheme" parent="BaseTheme"/> <style name="BaseTheme" parent="android:Theme.Material.Light"> <item name="android:colorPrimary">@color/primary</item>
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Q: Angular: Why can't I inject $provide directly into $get? I assume there's a straightforward (maybe trivial) answer for this that I just haven't wrapped my head around. Why does this do what I want -- that is, inject a reference to $provide into my service: angular.module('error_reporting', []) .provider('RaygunLogger', function() { var provide = undefined; this.setProvide = function(p){ provide = p; } this.$get = function() { // use $provide in p }; }) .config(function(RaygunLoggerProvider, $provide) { RaygunLoggerProvider.setProvide($provide); }); while this produces an error of the form Unknown provider: $provideProvider <- $provide <- RaygunLogger <- RaygunLogger? angular.module('error_reporting', []) .provider('RaygunLogger', function() { this.$get = function($provide) { // use $provide }; }); Is RaygunLogger.$get() running before the injector is set up? I presume this is an order-of-operations issue, where I need to wait until the module config phase before I can inject $provide, but I don't know where to verify that in the doc. A: $provide is only available during the config phase. Provider's $get function is run after the config phase to create the thing the provider provides. At this point, you cannot do what you are trying to do.
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TV Program Search The Roast The Roast - Series 2, Episode 17 Series Synopsis A weekday ten-minute comedy news show that destroys every bastion of journalism known to man produced by a young, talented group of comedians who don't know how to make television. CAST: Tom Glasson, Nich Richardson Previous Episode Synopsis Episode 15Tonight, we look at a punch up on Mt. Everest, the parking ban on congested roads, and cleaning up space - because earth is spotless and it's time to focus on the important issues.
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To date, several chemotherapeutic regimens have been developed for treating HIV infected patients. Certain of these regimens have been approved for clinical use, and others are the subject of on-going clinical trials. It can be assumed that the number of approved chemotherapeutic regimens will increase steadily in the near future. Increasingly, combination therapy or multiple drug treatment regimens are being used because of the development of drug-resistant HIV variants during therapy. Although these chemotherapeutic regimens have been shown to exert an effect on virological (viral load), immunological and clinical parameters of HIV disease, practical experience teaches that these effects are transient. In particular, one finds that the HIV strains infecting an individual patient after a while start to display reduced sensitivity to the drug or drug combination with which said patient is being treated. The loss of efficacy of the chemotherapy can vary from patient to patient, from drug to drug, or from drug combination to drug combination. It is well established that the loss of efficacy to a particular type of chemotherapy can be associated with a genotypic pattern of amino acid changes in the genome of the HIV strains infecting the patient. This probably renders these HIV strains less susceptible to the chemotherapy. As an HIV infected patient is exposed to several chemotherapeutic regimens over extended periods of time, more complex patterns of amino acid changes in the genome of infecting HIV strains occur which for the present defeat a rational approach to the further treatment of the infected patient. As implied in the previous explanation, one can routinely determine the genotypic changes occurring in HIV strains exposed to different chemotherapeutic regimens involving single or multiple anti-HIV drugs, but thus far it has proven very difficult to derive from these data information enabling a physician in charge of prescribing the chemotherapy whether or not it is sensible to initiate or continue a particular chemotherapeutic regimen. In other words, the genotypic information which is available on a limited scale, cannot routinely be translated into phenotypic information enabling the responsible physician to make the crucial decision as to which chemotherapy a patient should preferably follow. The problem also exists for drug-naive patients who become infected by drug-resistant HIV strains. Viral load monitoring is becoming a routine aspect of HIV care. However, viral load number alone cannot be used as a basis for deciding which drugs to use alone or in combination. Combination therapy is becoming increasingly the chemotherapeutic regimen of choice. When a person using a combination of drugs begins to experience drug failure, it is impossible to know with certainty which of the drugs in the combination is no longer active. One cannot simply replace all of the drugs, because of the limited number of drugs currently available. Furthermore, if one replaces an entire chemotherapeutic regimen, one may discard one or more drugs which are active for that particular patient. Furthermore, it is possible for viruses which display resistance to a particular inhibitor to also display varying degrees of cross-resistance to other inhibitors. Ideally, therefore, every time a person has a viral load test and a viral load increase is detected, a drug sensitivity/resistance test should also be carried out. Until effective curative therapy is developed, management of HIV disease will require such testing. Currently there does exist a phenotyping method which is based on virus isolation from plasma in the presence of donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and subsequent phenotyping in said cells (Japour, A. J., et al. (1993) Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy; Vol. 37, No. 5, p1095-1101). This co-cultivation method, which is advocated by the AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG)--particularly for phenotyping AZT (synonymous herein with zidovudine/Retrovir (Retrovir is a Trade Mark)) resistance, is time-consuming, costly and too complex to be used on a routine basis. A phenotypic recombinant virus assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of HIV Type 1 isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors has been developed by Kellam, P. and Larder, B. A. (Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (1994) Vol. 38, No. 1, p23-30). This procedure allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV.DELTA.RTBstEII. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. However, the procedure involves isolation of the patient virus by co-cultivation of patient plasma or patient PBMCs with donor PBMCs. Such prior cultivation of virus may distort the original virus composition. Furthermore, this method, although allowing one to determine the sensitivity of the isolates to various inhibitors, does not provide the physician with information as to whether to continue with the existing chemotherapeutic regimen or to alter the therapy. Also when one enzyme only of the pol gene is being studied, the method does not readily lend itself to routine phenotypic assessment of combination therapy which conventionally involves the use of one protease and 2 RT inhibitors. The nested PCR (polymerase chain reaction) procedure used in the recombinant virus assay can lead to a situation where the recombinant virus does not truly reflect the situation with the HIV strains infecting the patient under investigation. This problem resides in DNA sequence homology and the minimum amount of homology required for homologous recombination in mammalian cells (C. Rubnitz, J. and Subramini, S. (1984) Molecular and Cellular Biology Vol. 4, No. 11, p2253-2258). Accordingly, any phenotypic assay based on the recombinant virus approach should endeavour to ensure that as much as possible of the patient material is amplified and that there is maximum recombination. Thus, the RNA extraction and nested PCR procedures employed should ensure that the viral genetic material is amplified such that the amplified material maximally reflects the viral genetic diversity in the patient being investigated. In current clinical practice there is therefore a hard-felt need (a) to determine rapidly and on a routine basis the phenotypic drug sensitivity of HIV strains infecting a particular patient, (b) to process the thus obtained data into easily understood information, and (c) to initiate, continue or adjust on the basis of said information the chemotherapy prescribed for said particular patients.
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Reno Bound "Reno Bound" is a song written by John McFee and Andre Pessis, and recorded by American country music group Southern Pacific. It was released in April 1986 as the third single from the album Southern Pacific. The song reached number 9 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart. Personnel Keith Knudsen – drums, percussion, background vocals John McFee – lead guitar, harmonica, background vocals Tim Goodman – lead vocals, rhythm guitar, synthesizer Glen D. Hardin – piano, synthesizer, background vocals Jerry Scheff – bass guitar, background vocals Chart performance References Category:1986 singles Category:Southern Pacific (band) songs Category:Song recordings produced by Jim Ed Norman Category:Songs written by John McFee Category:Warner Records singles Category:1986 songs Category:Songs written by Andre Pessis
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Q: Select the specific column of ListView and print it in a new messagebox in C#.net I've just started to use ListView in C#.net. I got to know how to add items and subitems. Going through the listview I wanted to fetch all the data from a whole column with multiple rows. I want to know how to do this. I found this code to list a specific selected data from a row: ListView.SelectedIndexCollection sel = listView1.SelectedIndices; if (sel.Count == 1) { ListViewItem selItem = listView1.Items[sel[0]]; MessageBox.Show(selItem.SubItems[2].Text); } That was helpful but i want to list all the items in a row, may be i want to add all the column items in array? A: private string[] GetListViewItemColumns(ListViewItem item) { var columns = new string[item.SubItems.Count]; for (int column = 0; column < columns.Length; column++) { columns[column] = item.SubItems[column].Text; } return columns; } I would recommend some caution against doing this. A ListView is really meant to display information, it is not a great collection class. Getting the data out of it is slow and crummy, it can only store strings. Keep the data in your program in its original form, maybe a List<Foo>. Now it is simple and fast.
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Project Intern Founded in 2010, Eskolta School Research and Design, Inc., is a non-profit organization that helps urban public schools improve results for their most vulnerable youth. We consult with teachers, school principals, and school district staff to interpret existing data and research, use this to launch and share practices in their schools, test those practices in order to improve and adapt them to their student needs, and help them to disseminate learning so that more educators can learn from their experience. We complement this site-based work with coaching to school district staff and research on school-based work to better understand how change occurs in public schools. The research-based practices we study and support schools to put in place draw upon four core principles: strength-based culture to engage students and adults; transparent and frequent feedback loops to help students and adults know how they can improve; clear pathways to success to help students flexibly progress to their futures; and data-guided leadership for adults to collaborate towards success. Working with Eskolta is a unique opportunity to join an organization that is at the forefront of the effort to turn around the dropout problem through innovative education reform. We are dedicated to supporting a healthy work/life balance for everyone we work with by supporting a talented team while building a flexible workplace. To learn more, visit http://www.eskolta.org. Project Overview Eskolta is seeking a project intern to support its program team. Job responsibilities may include, but will not be limited to: visiting and documenting meetings at schools with school design partners, compiling existing research and other resources for use in schools, supporting professional development events, compiling and cleaning quantitative data on student outcomes and conducting simple statistical analysis of that data, and writing and drafting portions of reports and other products, all with the direction and input of our school design partners. Qualifications The ideal candidate will be a highly organized, clear thinker and self-starter who has excellent skills in quantitative and qualitative research and the ability to write clearly and cohesively. Familiarity with Google apps and MS Office suite are critical. Also: A self-starter with the ability to move a project forward in a small, entrepreneurial environment A good listener, eager to grow and take feedback to learn A commitment to helping to improve urban public education. Compensation & Time Commitment This is a full-year internship beginning as soon as possible and ending in May, though candidates interested in a one-term internship may apply. Pay is hourly at a rate of $13.50/hr for graduate students and $11.00/hr for undergraduate students. Hours are flexible and there will be variability across the year, but candidates must be able to commit an average of at least 10 hours per week to the internship. How to Apply Submit via email to jobs@eskolta.org: resume and a cover letter. In your cover letter, please answer two of the following three questions: What is one example of a paper you have written that required original research? How do you approach supporting adults in schools to effect change for students? What do you think is an important issue that needs to be addressed in public schools in the United States? Applications will be considered as they are received.
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The true story of Pollyanna, the reindeer submariner of HMS Trident in 1941 will feature on a festive edition of BBC’s The One Show, this Thursday 11th December from 7pm. Presenter Gyles Brandreth visited Gosport’s Royal Navy Submarine Museum earlier this year and met with National Museum of the Royal Navy archivist George Malcolmson to discover more about the intriguing story. Pollyanna was a gift from the Russians at Polyarnoe in Northern Russia to the captain, Commander Geoffrey Sladen D.S.O, D.S.C and crew of HMS Trident during World War 2. The reindeer was loaded through the torpedo loading hatch with a barrel of moss and Petty Officer James Riddoch was detailed to look after her. He was always thereafter known as the “zoo attendant” by his crew mates. George Malcolmson, archivist at the National Museum of the Royal Navy said, “Pollyanna spent six weeks with HMS Trident on patrol off Norway after rumours that elements of the German fleet were on the move.” “Accounts show that Pollyanna became quite settled with life on the submarine and moved about easily. She had taken up residence in the captain’s cabin next to his bunk and got used to the noises of the submarine. She would be the first to trot into the control room to be ready for the main hatch to open and the fresh air to pour in. On diving she would go back to her resting area.” “After the barrel of moss ran out, she would help herself from the buckets of leftovers from the officer’s mess and got a taste for condensed milk. She even ate some of the navigation charts” When HMS Trident finished her patrol and arrived at Blyth Northumberland, Pollyanna had to be hoisted out of the main hatch as she had put on weight. Eventually Pollyanna was presented to Regents Park Zoo London where she became a firm favourite. George Malcolmson said, “Trident survived the war, but by a sad irony both perished within a week of each other five years later, Pollyanna in Regents Park Zoo and Trident in the breakers yard. It was rumoured that she never forgot her submarine career for whenever she heard bells or a sound like a submarine tannoy she would lower her head as though preparing for diving stations.”
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Q: Allegro 5 problems The code below won't work; it produces a blank screen. But if I change the filled rectangle line toward the bottom line to: al_draw_filled_rectangle(100, 100, 100+15, 100+15, al_map_rgb(155, 255, 155)); It produces a square at the correct coordinates. What's up? #define ALLEGRO_STATICLINK #include <allegro5/allegro.h> #include <allegro5/allegro_primitives.h> int main(int argc, char **argv) { ALLEGRO_DISPLAY *display; if(!al_init()) { return -1; } display = al_create_display(640, 480); if(!display) { return -1; } if(!al_init_primitives_addon()) { return -1; } al_draw_filled_rectangle(73, 493, 73+15, 493+15, al_map_rgb(155, 255, 155)); al_flip_display(); al_rest(10); return 0; } A: You are trying to draw at a Y coordinate greater than the screen height... al_draw_filled_rectangle(73, 493, 73+15, 493+15, al_map_rgb(155, 255, 155)); Draws at 493 to 493+15 493 > 480 and 493+15 > 480 display = al_create_display(640, 480); This set 480 as your screen height so drawing above that number will result in nothing being shown. When you use al_draw_filled_rectangle(100, 100, 100+15, 100+15, al_map_rgb(155, 255, 155)); You are now actually on the screen so it works.
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California's Broken Jaywalking Law - cozzyd https://systemicfailure.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/californias-broken-jaywalking-law/ ====== menssen Anecdotally (I'm posting this to see if I'm the only one who's noticed), there's something culturally (or legally) unique about jaywalking in California. The ambiguity of countdown timers should have been a problem in every city/state that put them in. But I can't imagine reading this article about anywhere else because everywhere else, everybody jaywalks all the time and the laws are rarely enforced. But relatively nobody jaywalks in CA. A few years ago I was in downtown LA very early in the morning, standing on a street corner with five or so other people who were all patiently waiting for a green light to cross a completely empty street. No cars in sight. For someone from east of the Rockies, it's actually kind of surreal. Why is jaywalking such a big deal in CA? ~~~ jballanc I definitely don't think it's just you. Once, when I lived in the valley, I was at a restaurant on one side of the street and wanted to go to a shop across the street, but it was the middle of the block and I didn't feel like walking to the cross-walk. The road was 3 lanes in either direction, but there was a wide grassy median, so I did what I've always done growing up in NYC: I crossed the near 3 lanes and waited on the median for the traffic in the other direction to clear. Well, apparently the sight of a pedestrian in the median was unexpected enough that every driver in the far 3 lanes slammed on their brakes immediately, stopping traffic right in the middle of the block. It was as if they expected that I was just aimlessly wandering across the road and would step out into oncoming traffic if they didn't stop. Of course, I think at least part of the problem is that pedestrians, _in general_ , are so rare in CA. I used to live ~1 mile from work and would walk in regularly, whereas co-workers who lived half that distance would always drive (and don't get me started about the difficulty walking after 9 pm when every lawn sprinkler in the valley would unleash a deluge across the sidewalks). ~~~ iopq Even worse, you get to street that has no sidewalk at all, you cross and the other side has no sidewalk either. Literally no sidewalk on either side of the street! ~~~ lsaferite Welcome to 90%+ of the US. I live in a fairly rural city and drive a stretch of road every morning with no sidewalk and lots of walkers in the grass. And the speed limit is 65. I'm constantly worried some idiot will wander onto the road. ------ dmitrygr Refuse to talk to cops (always, not just about jaywalking). Do not provide ID ever (unless driving, since it also happens to be your DL) and do not answer questions as to whether you have ID. The amount of paperwork they'll need to fill out in order to arrest you (and thus allow them to search you [the claim will be that the search is for weapons for their safety, but anything they find is free for them to use/look at, incl your ID, if you even have it]) makes it not worth it for them. They'll just find a stupider victim. Disclaimer: IANAL, but i do often end up in court with cops over a lot of things, this included, and have not yet paid any fines ~~~ killerdhmo This isn't really an endorsement though is it. IANAL and I'm not often in court with cops and I say cooperate they're people too. _shrugs_ ~~~ MBlume They're...people who want to point guns at you and steal your money? Why would anyone want to cooperate with people like that? ------ escherize This is a bit like keeping speed limits down at 65 mph (a standard set when car technology was 50 years less mature). It's another way that the state can selectively punish most any citizen at will, within the bounds of law. ~~~ deadfall Yes, I agree. The flow of traffic for most commuters, like myself, seem to around 75 mph. "The speed limit is commonly set at or below the 85th percentile operating speed (being the speed which no more than 15% of traffic is exceeding)[41][42][43] and in the US is typically set 8 to 12 mph (13 to 19 km/h) below that speed." [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limit](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limit) ~~~ JoshTriplett On the other hand, if the speed limit was set at 75mph, would that remain the common speed of traffic, or would the common speed increase with the limit? ~~~ cozzyd On the Autobahn people drive at infinity km/h ~~~ raldi Could you convert that to mph please? ~~~ darkmighty The maximum speed there is 1, in natural units. ------ mullingitover The funny part is that it's also illegal for a car to make a turn through the crosswalk while pedestrians are anywhere in the crosswalk. This is far more dangerous than jaywalking and happens routinely. The law covering this is rarely/never enforced. ------ vacri _Otherwise, what’s the point of having a countdown signal?_ It tells people currently on the crossing how long they have. If they're infirm, they may be better off waiting at a traffic island than trying to rush across. The red hand is pretty clear - it means "don't start crossing", not "start crossing if you're confident you can make it in time" (though that is the way the countdown is used). $200 is a ridiculous fine, though - that's over 20 hours work at the minimum wage. ~~~ JoshTriplett Agreed; this isn't at all ambiguous. If you were allowed to cross, it would be a walk signal with countdown. ~~~ Cymen That is a joke -- people walk at different speeds. Walking in carland is enough punishment. The worst are burbias where the walk signal never comes on if you don't press a button. ~~~ vacri _Walking in carland is enough punishment_ LA was the only place I've ever been crossing the road with the valid pedestrian signal and had to stop walking or I'd literally walk into the car turning across my path (to the right, with the same green light I'm crossing with). It happened a couple of times, and I was only there for one week. ~~~ seanmcdirmid You have never been to china before. Here crossing the street is a game of frogger. ------ flurp Maybe the problem is the length of countdown timers? I don't know how they are determined and set but anecdotally I often see 10 seconds or sometimes others in excess of 15s or even 20s on a road that takes ~5s to cross. It seems to me like this is a reasonable law IF the timers were set to only give the pedestrians minimal amount of time to cross the street. Given it takes 5s to cross, timer starts with 5 remaining. Pedestrians in the road see it and rush to either side. Pedestrians about to enter the road will have an easier decision to make: I can't make it in 5s so I wait. Obviously some will think they can, then fine them; I think that's reasonable. But holding up pedestrians with 20s remaining seems unreasonable to me. The main problem I see is for slower pedestrians; seniors, handicapped etc. They might need more time and could be caught of guard in the middle of the street with no time remaining... An immediate thought would be a white flashing hand as a warning that time is running low (no counter!)... Probably requires lots of reprogramming though. ~~~ hijiri It might just be that the car traffic signals are patterned to last that long, so the pedestrian crossing signals are the same length to match. But that would depend on the crosswalk. ------ hayd $190-250, sheesh - that fine amount is far to high. The maximum parking fine in LA, for parking on a red curb, only costs you $93. ~~~ thatswrong0 I recently got a $197 ticket for crossing a marked crosswalk in an uncontrolled intersection on foot.. In front of a cop car. There was no danger, but he accelerated at me in the intersection causing a "hazard". Nailed me for CVc 21950(b). It's a racket - they're scumbags. If I didn't work in tech, that could be a very difficult amount to deal with. ~~~ knorby Wish you fought that, since the cop broke CVc 21950(c). ------ tommoor Obviously this thread needs a link to this article for anyone that missed it a few months back :) [https://www.vox.com/2015/1/15/7551873/jaywalking- history](https://www.vox.com/2015/1/15/7551873/jaywalking-history) ------ meddlepal As a Bostonian I find the idea of jaywalking fines quaint. ~~~ tommoor As an Englishman I find the idea of jaywalking quaint ~~~ meddlepal As a Bostonian I find the idea of heriditary rule quaint. ~~~ ZeroGravitas Technically they don't rule, they're just a prominent part of a network of very rich and well-connected families that move in the same social circles, go to the same schools, give each other jobs and sometimes intermarry. Luckily Boston has nothing like that. ------ bentrevor I was in San Fransisco this past January, and I was actually stopped by an officer for crossing when the hand was blinking, even though I made it to the other side in time. I think it was a matter of the officer not having anything better to do, since it was 8 in the morning. I didn't get a ticket because I answered his questions politely, but I'm sure if I was still in high school, I would have been a smart-ass about it. ------ nahname Got a ticket for $205 while working in LA. Definitely felt like a cash grab. ------ sukilot What's interesting is that cities have found that countdown timers cause _drivers_ far up the block to race to beat the green light before to turns yellow/red, which then causes collisions with bikers and pedestrians. ~~~ 5555624 I haven't seen this behavior with cars; but, as a cyclist, I use them to figure out if I can make it through an upcoming intersection or not. What's annoying is the lack of a standard action when the countdown timer reaches zero. At some intersections, the timers are set so that the yellow light is the last second or two and zero is when the traffic light changes to red. Other hit zero and then the traffic light changes to yellow. Some hit zero and a number of seconds pass before the traffic light changes to yellow. ------ chrisbennet It makes as much sense to ticket pedestrians crossing during the countdown, as it would to ticket drivers for entering the intersection during a yellow light. ------ iwwr The fact that there is such a thing as 'jaywalking' is a broken aspect of modern society. ------ upofadown I'm actually OK with the enforcement. The politicians should do their damn jobs and update the laws. The police shouldn't have to maintain a list of exceptions in their heads. ... and yes, this is a car culture thing. Most of the broken laws relate to bikes and pedestrians in the places where I have bothered to look.
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At first glance, readers might disagree with the decision to publish a paper that reports not one, but two negative results. However, it is absolutely vital for scientific progress that such findings are shared with the research and the clinical community, because publication bias skews the quality of the evidence.[@CR1] As this paper reports two carefully designed and executed randomised controlled trials, its lessons are particularly important. In both trials, all participants greatly increased their medication adherence, despite being in a high risk group, older, and of lower socioeconomic status.[@CR2] All they did was take part in a trial where they received an electronic pill bottle. Additional social feedback, as provided in the intervention arms of the trials, was not needed. While the authors list a number of possible reasons for this finding, it would have been much better to explore it through a programme of qualitative interviews and focus groups. The data from such qualitative work are key for translating findings from randomised controlled trials into practice.[@CR3] In this study, the Hawthorne effect---that observation changes behaviour, a phenomenon well-documented in clinical trials[@CR4]---may have been augmented by the fact that all study arms received a special device, the electronic pill bottle. Providing such bottles in itself constitutes an intervention that improves medication adherence.[@CR5] A well-designed qualitative interview study with a small proportion of the participants in each arm could have helped clarify to what extent those effects might have been present. It would also have provided valuable data on the participants' motivation for taking part in the study, and highlighted the extent to which the study itself might have been a valuable social force. Conflict of Interest {#FPar1} ==================== The author has no conflict with any of the material in this manuscript.
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Genomic imprinting and human chromosome 15. Genomic imprinting is a reversible phenomenon that affects the expression of genes depending on their parental origin. The best characterized human disorders resulting from an alteration of the imprinting process are Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. They are due to the lack of active maternal or paternal genes, respectively, from chromosome region 15q11q13. Most cases arise via interstitial deletions. We review evidence that other common cytogenetic alterations of this region, interstitial and supernumerary duplications, could be the reciprocal products of the deletions and are also affected by the imprinting phenomenon, given the predominance of maternally-derived duplications in patients ascertained due to developmental delays or autistic features.
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1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a developing device for storing therein a developer material composed of toner particles and carrier granules. The device supplies the developer material onto a surface of a photoreceptor in order to visualize an electrostatic latent image formed on the surface of the photoreceptor provided in an electrophotographic printing machine such as a copying machine. 2. Description of the Prior Art Developer devices for visualizing ( developing ) an electrostatic latent image formed on the surface of a photoreceptor using a developer material composed of carrier granules and toner particles are used, for example, in many dry-type copying machines. In such developing devices, the quantity of the toner particles is reduced while being used in the developing process; whereas, the quantity of carrier granules in the developer material remains the same. Therefore, the quality of the carrier granules being stirred with toner particles in the developer vessel deteriorates because a resin coating layer on the surface thereof is peeled, or toner particles adhere onto the surface thereof. As a result, the charging ability of the developer material gradually deteriorates, thereby presenting the problem that the copied image quality deteriorates. A device designed for the trickle system which prevents the deterioration of the charging ability by supplying additional carrier granules separately from the refill for the used toner particles is disclosed (see, for example, Japanese Laid-Open Patent Application No. 21591/1990 (Tokukouhei 2-21591)). In such a device, when adding additional carrier granules, excessive developer material in the developer vessel overflows and is discharged through a discharge opening formed on the side face of the developer vessel to be collected in a collecting case. By repeating the above refill and discharge of the developer material, the developer material in the developer vessel whose charging ability has deteriorated can gradually replace. Thus, the required charging ability of the developer material can be maintained, and the copied image quality is prevented from being lowered. However, in the above developing device, the developer material in the developer vessel overflows and is discharged through the discharge opening provided on the side face of the developer vessel. Thus, depending on the tilt of the developing device, a quantity of the developer material to be discharged through the discharge opening changes. For example, when moving the copying machine, as being tilted, a large quantity of the developer material may be discharged through the discharge opening at one time, or an appropriate quantity of the developer material in the developer vessel may not be discharged. If this occurs, there arises a great difference from appropriate quantity of the developer material in the developer vessel, thereby presenting the problem that the copied image quality is lowered. More specifically, when moving the copying machine, if the copying machine is tilted in the direction where the discharge opening is placed at lower position than the reference position, a large quantity of the developer material is discharged through the discharge opening, and the quantity of the developer material in the developer vessel becomes much less than the appropriate quantity. The above situation may occur even after the copying machine is moved if the developing device is being used in the above tilted position. If the above situation occurs, the charging ability of the developer material deteriorates, thereby presenting the problem that the copied image quality is lowered. Moreover, in the case of controlling the ratio of the toner particles to the carrier granules by the output from a permeability sensor, the ratio of the toner particles cannot be detected accurately due to a reduced quantity of carrier granules in contact with the permeability sensor, thereby presenting the problems that the ratio of the toner particle drops and the image density is reduced. Furthermore, if the quantity of the developer material in the developer vessel is greatly reduced, a magnetic brush may not be formed, and therefore the developing process may not be carried out desirably. Moreover, the image may be blurred, or the image may not be developed. Furthermore, even after the tilt of the developing device is set back to the horizontal position, an appropriate quantity of the developer material cannot be achieved immediately, and thus a desirable quality of the copied image cannot be ensured for a while. On the other hand, if the developing device is being used in the tilted position in the direction where the discharge opening is placed at upper position than the reference position after the copying machine is moved, the developer material is not discharged through the discharge opening, and thus an excessive quantity of the developer material exists in the developer vessel. If this occurs, the drive torque for driving a developer material supply section provided in the developer vessel increases, and the developing device may not be activated properly, thereby presenting the problem that the developer material may not be supplied onto the photoreceptor surface appropriately. Furthermore, in the case of controlling the ratio of the toner particles to the carrier granules by the output from the permeability sensor, the quantity of the developer material becomes excessive with respect to the appropriate quantity, thereby presenting the problem that the copied image quality is lowered. Namely, in the arrangement where the developer material overflows and is discharged through the discharge opening, if the developing device is tilted, an appropriate discharge of the developer material through the discharge opening may not be ensured, and thus the developer material may not be supplied onto the photoreceptor surface appropriately, thereby presenting the problem that the copied image quality deteriorates.
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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov made a joke about FBI Director James Comey's sudden firing as he once again sparred on camera with NBC's longtime correspondent Andrea Mitchell. Lavrov made the unexpected comment during a visit to the State Department, just hours after President Trump's firing of the FBI boss once again brought swirling investigations of alleged Russian election interference to the forefront. Lavrov appeared with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson for a brief photo-op that included a prolonged handshake between the two men. 'Does the Comey firing cast a shadow over your talks, gentlemen?' Mitchell shouted out. Lavrov responded: 'Was he fired? You are kidding! You are kidding!' Scroll down for video Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (R) watches as Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov reacts to a reporter's question by joking about FBI Director James Comey's firing With that, Lavrov shrugged his shoulders, turned away from gathered reporters, and walked out the door of the ornate Treaty Room where the event was held as reporters continued to yell questions about the Russia investigation. Lavrov didn't offer any other words. Tillerson's own remarks were brief, and overlapped with the long handshake with the skilled and longtime emissary for Russian President Vladimir Putin. 'I want to welcome foreign minister Lavrov to the State Department,' Tillerson said, 'and express my appreciation for him making the trip to Washington so that we could continue our dialogue and our exchange of views that began in Moscow with the dialogue he hosted on a very broad range of topics. Thank you.' Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (L) and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson exchanged a hearty handshake before Tillerson made brief remarks After reporters including NBC's Andrea Mitchell shouted questions, Lavrov stopped to engage, joking about FBI Director James Comey: 'Was he fired?' Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov (L) speaks while posing for photos with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in the Treaty Room of the State Department The two diplomats then walked out of the room while reporters continued to shout questions It wasn't Lavrov's first exchange with Mitchell, 70. Lavrov scolded her for her 'manners' after she shouted a question during his meeting with Tillerson in Moscow in April. Video of the incident begins by showing Tillerson, Lavrov and other officials sitting down at a table at the start of the press conference. Before anyone could be seated at the table, Mitchell started shouting: 'Mr. Secretary, the Russians don't believe the intelligence. How confident are you, Mr. Secretary—?' But before the 70-year-old journalist could finish her sentence, Lavrov quickly interjected: 'Who was bringing you up?' 'Who was giving you your manners, you know?' he asked Mitchell while grinning. Mithcell got scolded by Lavrov in Moscow in April. That wasn't her first incident with Tillerson (above left on Wednesday next to Lavrov), as a little over a month ago the veteran journalist was kicked out of a State Department press conference for repeatedly shouting questions at Tillerson Mitchell however claims that she was not the one being targeted, stating: 'My colleague Carol Morello was the brave journalist who started asking questions. 'Lavrov was looking right at her. I was on the opposite side of the room, behind him, out of sight. Perhaps I was a convenient foil, but I'm pretty sure I wasn't his target.' The exchange came as tensions between Russia and the U.S. were high following the missile strike President Trump ordered on Syria. President Trump was set to meet with Lavrov in the Oval Office Wednesday morning. The U.S. and Russia have a series of friction points, including Moscow's support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, and what the U.S. intelligence community says was interference in the U.S. presidential election.
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Despite large numbers of US troops and assets in Japan, there have been no reports of serious injury or death to US military personnel in the aftermath of a 8.9-magnitude earthquake there Friday morning, nor has there yet been any “significant damage” to ships or facilities, according to Pentagon officials. Japan has long been one of the US military’s key base regions. There are some 38,000 US troops stationed in Japan, along with 43,000 US family members and roughly 3,000 Department of Defense civilians. While the US Navy continues to assess the state of its fleet, it is also getting ships underway and clear of the rough coast in Hawaii and Seal Beach, San Diego to protect them from turbulent seas and possible tsunami in the wake of the earthquake that has devastated Japan, defense officials said Friday. “We’re moving things out from affected areas and getting them inland,” says Col. Dave Lapan, Pentagon spokesman. This is expected to include submarines as well, which the Pentagon is often loath to discuss because they are equipped with strategic weapons and intelligence capabilities. In Guam, the mooring lines of two US navy submarines broke from the pier after the earthquake and had to be tugged back to port. At the same time, ships from the US Navy’s 7th Fleet are mobilizing to provide humanitarian aid and medical relief that has been requested by Japan’s new foreign minister. These vessels are being “positioned and prepared to provide any assistance necessary,” Lapan told reporters Friday. “We are in the process of determining what the requirements are, and how we might fill them.” The USS Blue Ridge, the 7th Fleet’s command ship, is currently on-loading humanitarian supplies in Singapore, while others, including the USS Essex in Malaysia, are ready to depart to provide aid in the hardest-hit earthquake regions, Lapan says. The US military often takes part in exercises designed to practice providing humanitarian aid, including one in which US, Japanese, and Malaysian forces took part earlier this week. “This is when this comes in very handy,” Lapan added, referring to the humanitarian relief drills. This US military assistance can take many forms, from making floating medical centers on US Navy ships available to provide emergency care, to US troops who may simply be “filling sandbags,” Lapan says. The ships are also equipped with food, blankets, and airlift capacity to help move people and supplies. “If they need food, we can bring food,” he adds. “If they need shelter, we can bring that.”
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CHAIRMAN PARTNERS TRUSTEE PARTNER Adopt a Chamber and Community Ways to Help our Adopted Chamber/Community – Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce and Community The Frisco Chamber of Commerce will be adopting the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce and community as part of the TCCE/TAB Disaster Recovery Initiative. The goal of the “Adopt a Chamber/Community” program is to come alongside affected chambers and assist them during the long-term recovery period, as well as engage community partners and local businesses to assist in meeting the needs of the impacted community. Other Texas chambers of commerce and several out of state chambers have adopted Texas chambers/communities along the coastline. In fact, several of the hardest hit areas have been adopted by more than one chamber because the needs are immense. The goal of TCCE/TAB is to engage additional Texas and out of state chambers as part of the “Adopt A Chamber/Community” program. After assessing the needs of northwest Harris County and learning of the efforts of the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce, the Frisco Chamber is proud to adopt the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce and community. Individuals and Employees: Donate to the Hurricane Harvey Business Relief Grant Fund for Northwest Harris County The Grant Fund is intended to provide small grants to help with immediate business expenses related to business recovery for those businesses in northwest Harris County that experienced flooding damage as a result of Hurricane Harvey. Sadly, the SBA reports that after disasters, 40% of the businesses never reopen. Our goal, along with the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce, is to reduce that percentage measurably. Find additional information HE RE. When you make a donation, please use #FriscoFriends in the comment section. Businesses: Support the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce The Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce immediately became a resource for the flooded business community. Their website and social media accounts were up and running with resources, including an Emergency Resources Page with details on business requirements, flood recovery tips, and ways to get involved in donating and volunteering. In addition, the Houston Northwest Chamber revised its monthly Lunch N Learn to bring in a speaker from the SBA to provide disaster recovery resources. Registration fees were waived for damaged businesses. The Frisco Chamber of Commerce asks you to support the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce so that they can continue to be a valuable resource for their business community. As businesses incur the cost of the hurricane, such as physical damage and lost revenue, the membership revenue of the Houston Northwest Chamber will naturally decline. We ask our thriving Frisco business community to help by paying for a half ($250), one year ($500), or multiple annual memberships for a Harris County business. You can sponsor a Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce membership Recovery and beyond! Support a Similar Business As this program progresses, another goal is to match similar Frisco businesses with like northwest Harris County businesses. Imagine a flooded Houston church being taken under wing by a Frisco church, a tradesman helping a Houston tradesman, or a Frisco public or private school helping a flooded school. The needs are great! Stay tuned! Follow the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce on Twitter and Facebook for the latest info. #FriscoFriends #SupportNWHarris Texans always unite at times like this. TAB (Texas Association of Business) has established a hotline for businesses to connect to the resources they need as the rebuilding begins. The hotline can be reached at (512) 637-7714 and is available to all businesses and not just limited to TAB members. More information can be found HERE. More Resources: If your business has a branch or location affected by the hurricane or if you know other business owners and leaders in affected communities, please share this information. American Red Cross: The Red Cross has launched a massive response to this devastating storm and needs financial donations to be able to provide immediate disaster relief. Help people affected by Hurricane Harvey by donating online HERE, calling 1- 800-RED CROSS or texting the word HARVEY to 90999 to make a $10 donation. The Salvation Army: The Salvation Army disaster teams from across the country are mobilizing, ready to provide physical, emotional and spiritual care to survivors and relief workers. They will remain in communities impacted, supporting long-term disaster recovery efforts and providing ongoing assistance to those in need. Donate online HERE. US Chamber of Commerce Corporate Aid Tracker: In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey making landfall, the business community is mobilizing their expertise, capabilities, and community resources to assist with the relief and recovery efforts. Use this form to submit how your company is aiding in the Hurricane Harvey relief and recovery efforts. View the list of corporate aid HERE.
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Story highlights Stephen M. Howells II and Nicole Vaisey receive 25-year sentences on state kidnapping charges The girls were abducted in August near their family's farm in upstate New York The Amish sisters were abandoned on a road a number of miles away (CNN) An upstate New York couple who abducted and sexually abused two Amish girls were sentenced to a maximum of 25 years in prison on state kidnapping charges. The sentences imposed by St. Lawrence County Judge Jerome Richards will run concurrently with federal prison terms of 580 years for Stephen M. Howells II and 300 years for Nicole Vaisey. They were sentenced in federal court last month. Howells and Vaisey, who were sentenced separately in state court on Tuesday, did not address the court before receiving 25-year terms each for the August 2014 kidnappings. The couple "targeted the most vulnerable members of our community," District Attorney Mary Rain told the court. Howells' attorney, Amy Dona, told the court that her "client is not looking for sympathy," CNN affiliate WWNY reported . She described Howells' childhood as "pretty disturbing." Read More
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Q: GDB: Can I add a "watch" for a variable in another scope? Seems that watch only works when I run into a function and watch the value of a function-local variable. My question is, can I watch and see if a function's input parameter is larger than a number? E.g. I've this code: $cat testWatch.cpp #include<stdio.h> void f(int i){ ++i; printf("%d\n",i); } int main(){ int i=1; f(2); f(3); ++i; f(4); ++i; return 0; } I wish to (1) When program is in "main" function, I wish to set a "watch" inside f(). Is it possible? (2)I want set a "watch" point at the beginning of f() function, when the input "int i" is larger than 2, I want gdb to stop. Is it possible? A: 1) do you really need a 'watch'? It's trivial to set a conditional breakpoint inside f() by specifying the line number. (or in less trivial programs, fileName:lineNum ) 2) the behavior you describe is a conditional breakpoint. (gdb) break 2 if (i > 2) Breakpoint 5 at 0x400531: file test.c, line 2. (gdb) run Starting program: /tmp/test 3 Breakpoint 5, f (i=3) at test.c:3
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Itaru Hashimoto is a Japanese professional baseball outfielder for the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles in Japan's Nippon Professional Baseball. External links Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference Category:1990 births Category:Living people Category:Baseball people from Sendai Category:Japanese baseball players Category:Nippon Professional Baseball outfielders Category:Yomiuri Giants players Category:Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles players
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Religion United State Price and Kimberlyn Headley are, in 27-year-old Kimberlyn's words, "good kids." They are committed to each other and to their four-year marriage. They work hard and rely on themselves, saving and investing conscientiously. They are caring and honest and have sought, said 29-year-old Price Headley, "to live up to a higher standard" than what they see around them. "We do all the right things," said Kimberlyn Headley. "It ain't 'Leave it to Beaver,' but it works for us." Price and Kimberlyn Headley are, in 27-year-old Kimberlyn's words, "good kids." They are committed to each other and to their four-year marriage. They work hard and rely on themselves, saving and investing conscientiously. They are caring and honest and have sought, said 29-year-old Price Headley, "to live up to a higher standard" than what they see around them. "We do all the right things," said Kimberlyn Headley. "It ain't 'Leave it to Beaver,' but it works for us."
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WHEN I WAS A KID... I THOUGHT all superheroes were Jewish because my principal was named silverman 146 shares
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Stadtoldendorf Stadtoldendorf is a town in the center of the Holzminden district, Lower Saxony, Germany. Stadtoldendorf is the seat of the Samtgemeinde ("collective municipality") Eschershausen-Stadtoldendorf. Allocation of seats in the local council electoral period 2006-2011: CDU: 10 SPD: 5 Grünen: 1 FDP: 1 Culture Museums Stadtmuseum im Charlotte-Leitzen-Haus Freilichtmuseum Mühlenanger Buildings Försterbergturm, from the 13th century Hagentorturm Kellbergturm Homburg castle, above old village Altes Rathaus (from 1875) Ratskeller (from 1621) Charlotte-Leitzen-Haus References Category:Towns in Lower Saxony Category:Holzminden (district) Category:Duchy of Brunswick
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Using zebrafish models of leukemia to streamline drug screening and discovery. Current treatment strategies for acute leukemias largely rely on nonspecific cytotoxic drugs that result in high therapy-related morbidity and mortality. Cost-effective, pertinent animal models are needed to link in vitro studies with the development of new therapeutic agents in clinical trials on a high-throughput scale. However, targeted therapies have had limited success moving from bench to clinic, often due to unexpected off-target effects. The zebrafish has emerged as a reliable in vivo tool for modeling human leukemia. Zebrafish genetic and xenograft models of acute leukemia provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct rapid, phenotype-based screens. This allows for the identification of relevant therapies while simultaneously evaluating drug toxicity, thus circumventing the limitations of target-centric approaches.
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Wall Street and financial interests spend huge sums of money trying to get their way in Washington. During the current election cycle, they have already poured more than $800 million into campaign contributions and federal lobbying. That works out to about $1.5 million a day. On the campaign spending side of the ledger, finance is the runaway leader, with $245 million in donations reported through June 2014. In fact, no other economic sector even comes close. (The also-rans include health, at $86 million, and communications/electronics, at $63 million.) When it comes to lobbying, financial interests had expended, through March, nearly $560 million – a total surpassed only by the $612 million spending of the health industry and the $613 million associated with a category of “miscellaneous business” companies and associations, which includes groups, such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, that also lobby on financial issues. (These and many other figures can be found in “Wall Street Money in Washington,” a new Americans for Financial Reform report that draws on data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics.) In both categories, the industry is on track to equal or exceed its expenditures in the 2010 election cycle, when the Dodd-Frank financial reform law was making its way through Congress. That’s because financial reform remains a battle zone; more than four years after the passage of Dodd-Frank, many rules have yet to be written, and the industry is still pressing hard to repeal, water down or delay provisions of the law and to forestall further proposals for change. Where does the money go? Much of it winds up in the campaign warchests of candidates for national office, with 62 percent going to Republicans and 38 percent to Democrats. The biggest recipients are incumbent members of Congress, especially those with leadership positions or seats on the two main financial oversight committees. In the House of Representatives, the top 20 beneficiaries of financial-industry largesse include Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and 10 of his committee colleagues: Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. Tom Cotton, R-Ark. Jim Himes, D-Conn. Scott Garrett, R-N.J. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va. Ed Royce, R-Calif. Gary Peters, D-Mich. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio Randy Neugebauer, R-Texas Patrick McHenry, R-N.C. Three – Cotton, Capito and Peters – are candidates for the Senate this year. [ READ: Congress Is Enabling Bad Corporate Citizens] All told, members of the Financial Services Committee have collected an average of $408,671 from the financial industry in the current election cycle, compared to a $186,242 average for the House as a whole – a wide gap, which possibly helps account for the steady stream of Wall Street-friendly bills that have come out of the committee lately. In the Senate, the discrepancy between Banking Committee members (average take $448,667) and the chamber as a whole (average take $423,413) is much smaller; and it’s worth noting that the committee has not taken up any of the deregulatory bills pushed in the House. Just the same, five members of the Banking Committee have made the financial industry’s top 15 senators list: Mark Warner, D-Va., Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Pat Toomey, R-Pa., Kay Hagan, D-N.C., and Mike Crapo, R-Idaho. (Warner and Hagan are running for re-election this year.) Another big chunk of Wall Street change pays for the salaries and day-to-day activities of the more than 2,000 registered lobbyists working on behalf of the nation’s banks, investment advisers, financial companies and related trade associations. Many are former regulators, lawmakers, or congressional staffers, who can expect to be well-compensated for the expertise and relationships they bring to the task. And the official expenditures don’t tell the whole story. To begin with, they exclude a great deal of money spent on activities (including research, communications, office administration and legal work) intended either to influence political outcomes directly or to get positions based on narrow industry self-interest treated as serious policy arguments. Nor do they cover the seven-figure paychecks of people like Scott O’Malia, the newly named CEO of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association. O’Malia, a former aide to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., was until a few weeks ago a Commissioner of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the agency chiefly responsible for regulating the industry he now represents. At the CFTC, O’Malia gained a reputation as an aggressive champion of the swaps dealers’ relentless efforts to keep much of their opaque business from being moved onto regulated and transparent exchanges. That record no doubt helped make him an attractive candidate to lead what the headlines reporting his appointment routinely described as a “lobbying” group. Nevertheless, O’Malia will probably not have to register as a lobbyist. (By law, he is barred from having any direct dealings with the CFTC for the next two years.) The International Swaps and Derivatives Association has not said how much money O’Malia will make, but his predecessor’s salary, according to Bloomberg, was $1.8 million a year. With all this financial-sector money flooding in, it’s no wonder that financial reform remains a contentious topic in Washington. There would be much less opposition, though, if some of our elected officials did a better job of listening to their constituents, since the voters are remarkably united on these issues. Across lines of geography, party, age and race, Americans overwhelmingly support stronger oversight of Wall Street and the financial industry. Nearly four out of five voters (78 percent), according to recent polling conducted by Lake Research on behalf of AFR and the Center for Responsible Lending, agree that financial rules and enforcement should be strengthened, and that Wall Street’s bad practices have not changed enough. Americans are troubled not only by the financial sector’s business practices, but by its political power. Four-fifths of the voters surveyed in the poll voiced concern about the influence of Wall Street financial companies on elected officials. (84 percent of Democrats, 82 percent of independents, and 74 percent of Republicans identified with that sentiment.) More than half (55 percent) said they would be less likely to vote for a congressional candidate known to have received large donations from big banks and financial companies, as opposed to just 13 percent who said they would be more likely to vote for such a candidate. (Another 31 percent said neither.) Money needs to have less influence in Washington. This is a larger cause that, like financial reform, would go better with more disclosure (and public awareness) of the many specific ways in which money is used to benefit Wall Street at the expense of regular people and businesses.
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Through-silicon vias (TSVs) are formed in a semiconductor wafer by initially forming an opening at least partially in the semiconductor wafer (e.g., Si substrate), and forming a conductive material in the opening. The TSV electrically connects electronic devices (e.g., transistors) formed on the front surface of the substrate and a terminal formed at the rear (back) surface of the substrate.
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This Little Piggy… Weird stuff happens. That’s just life, I guess. Writing this blog, by this point I’ve just come to accept the day to day weirdness and not really question it that much. It’s not so much that weird stuff in general happens, but rather that there’s an unbelievable amount of weird stuff that often happens in the zany world of tattoo. Prove it, you say? Okay, then. How about this: 36-year-old tattooist David Howard King of Panacea, Florida was arrested this week after he shot, killed and ate his neighbour’s 12-year old potbellied pig, who was lovingly named Spam. The pig’s remains were found in the freezer at King’s Apocalyptic Tattoo Studio this Monday after police arrived with a warrant to search the premises as part of a prescription drug investivation. When questioned about the pig parts, King admitted to killing the animal when it wandered on to his property. ‘King, 36, said the 12-year-old pot-bellied pig named Spam had wandered into his property last week. Deputies said they recovered six plastic bags of pork parts from a freezer at the tattoo studio. They say they also found the gun used to shoot Spam. The pig was valued at $350. King is charged with grand theft of livestock and cruelty to animals. He also faces charges of possession of prescription pills with intent to sell, distribution of Schedule III prescription pills and trafficking in more than four grams.’ Very odd. I don’t know, is this normal in Florida? Do people regularly keep pot-bellied pigs as pets and open fire on animals that wander into their yards? Or hey, maybe King is just a poor tattooist trying to make ends meet and dude wasn’t really tattooing enough to put food on his table. Or, maybe King just plain likes him some BBQ’d hog. Whatever the reasoning for this, it’s weird.
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Life is but a dream, Drifting on a stream, a stream, Consciously it seems, All of what remains, Ego brain, Man made shame,shame. Love after it rains, You see my pain is real, Watch my world dissolve, And pretend that none of us see the Fall, As I turn to sand, You took me by the hand, And declared, that love prevails over all. I am just a man, Fighting other men, For land, for land, While I turn to sand, In spite of the pain, Ego brain, Man made shame,shame. Love after it rains, You see my pain is real, Watch my world dissolve, And pretend that none of us see the Fall As I turn to sand, You took me by the hand, And declared that love prevails over all. All of what remains, Ego brain, Man made shame,shame. Love after it rains, You see my pain is real, Watch my world dissolve, And pretend that none of us see the Fall, As I turn to sand, You took me by the hand, And declared that love prevails over all. (Love after it rains)
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Haiti Hotel Promotes “Urban Mural” Culture PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – A historic Caribbean hotel is beautifying the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince with a stunning mural of Haitian art. The mural, commissioned last summer by the hotel’s management team and created by renowned Haitian graffiti artist Jerry Rosembert Moise, wraps around the popular Le Plaza hotel to feature the globally-famed creativity of Haitian artisans. Rosembert Moise, assisted by Nadia Todres, an American photographer resident in the country since 2010, is known for highlighting the vibrancy of Haiti’s art and culture. After the devastating earthquake in 2010, Rosembert Moise took his painting tools to the streets of Port-au-Prince with a strong political message, but today he uplifts his compatriots with lively artistic renderings of Haitian life. Rosembert Moise in front of his mural His work, redolent with the humor and color of Haitian life, also graces the walls of a new shopping and restaurant compound in Pétion-ville, enlivening an otherwise undistinguished corner of town. He is nearing completion of his latest creation, which features lush jungle scenes, on the walls of Le Plaza, which is located in a dense urban setting. “As one of the few hotels that has stayed open in downtown Port-au-Prince during these challenging years, there is no way that we could miss this opportunity to celebrate Haitian culture and beautify this historic downtown area for the benefit of citizens and visitors alike,” said Marc Pierre-Louis, General Manager of Le Plaza. “We hope more visitors will come and see the creativity of our people, and the vibrant history and culture of this, the second-oldest independent state in the hemisphere.” About Le Plaza Hotel A tranquil sanctuary in the heart of Port-au-Prince, Le Plaza Hotel is tucked discreetly behind courtyard walls that conceal a lush oasis of historic trees and fragrant tropical flowers. Established 60 years ago, this 95-room hotel is soulful and stunning, an exuberant testament to the island’s history and heritage. Beloved by long-time guests who delight in the hotel’s exceptional cuisine, local artwork and unbeatable central location, it’s a favored choice for visitors seeking “the real Haiti” from a home base that’s both stylish and secure. For more information visit www.plazahaiti.com.
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Wireless communication systems may support discontinuous transmission in which the various parties to a communication link use resources only as needed. Limiting the allocation and consumption of resources to those devices actively engaged in communications increases the capacity of a wireless communication system. However, each device may need to request an allocation of resources before it is granted the opportunity to communicate. The request and grant of communication resources can itself consume a large amount of resources that otherwise could be used to support additional users or provide increased bandwidth to active users. It is desirable to minimize the amount of resources consumed in requesting and allocating resources for discontinuous communications. However, there remains the need to maximize the flexibility in generating access requests and allocating the resources associated with the access requests.
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Liver X receptor agonist inhibits proliferation of ovarian carcinoma cells stimulated by oxidized low density lipoprotein. We previously observed an association between ovarian cancer outcome and statin use and hypothesized lipoproteins have direct effects on ovarian cancer proliferation. Here we investigate the direct effects of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) on proliferation and the inhibitory effects of fluvastatin and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. The effects of LDL, oxLDL, the LXR agonist TO901317, fluvastatin and cisplatin on cellular proliferation were determined using MTT assays. LXR pathway proteins were assayed by immunoblotting. Cytokine expression was determined by antibody array. Concentrations of oxLDL as small as 0.1 microg/ml stimulated CAOV3 and SKOV3 proliferation, while LDL had no effect. TO901317 inhibited the proliferation of CAOV3, OVCAR3 and SKOV3 cells stimulated by oxLDL. Fluvastatin inhibited oxLDL mediated proliferation of CAOV3 and SKOV3. Cardiotrophin 1 (CT-1) was mitogenic to CAOV3 and SKOV3, was induced by oxLDL, and was reversed by TO901317. OxLDL increased cisplatin IC50s by 3.8 microM and > 60 microM for CAOV3 and SKOV3 cells, respectively. The LXR pathway proteins CD36, LXR, and ABCA1 were expressed in eight ovarian carcinoma cell lines (A2780, CAOV3, CP70, CSOC882, ES2, OVCAR3, SKOV3). OxLDL reduced ovarian carcinoma cell chemosensitivity and stimulated proliferation. These effects were reversed by LXR agonist or fluvastatin. The LXR agonist also inhibited expression of the ovarian cancer mitogen CT-1. These observations suggest a biologic mechanism for our clinical finding that ovarian cancer survival is associated with statin use. Targeting LXR and statin use may have a therapeutic role in ovarian cancer.
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Q: dpkg: error processing package oracle-java8-installer (--configure): I am trying to install sbt on Ubuntu 16.04. I have mistakenly stopped the process when running the following command, sudo apt-get install sbt Now when I try to install again, I am getting the below error, Downloading Oracle Java 8... --2017-04-24 17:34:33-- http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u131-b11/d54c1d3a095b4ff2b6607d096fa80163/jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz Resolving download.oracle.com (download.oracle.com)... 104.80.89.58, 104.80.89.16 Connecting to download.oracle.com (download.oracle.com)|104.80.89.58|:80... connected. HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 302 Moved Temporarily Location: https://edelivery.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u131-b11/d54c1d3a095b4ff2b6607d096fa80163/jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz [following] --2017-04-24 17:34:35-- https://edelivery.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u131-b11/d54c1d3a095b4ff2b6607d096fa80163/jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz Resolving edelivery.oracle.com (edelivery.oracle.com)... 23.200.209.153, 2600:1409:a:183::2d3e, 2600:1409:a:193::2d3e Connecting to edelivery.oracle.com (edelivery.oracle.com)|23.200.209.153|:443... connected. HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 302 Moved Temporarily Location: http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u131-b11/d54c1d3a095b4ff2b6607d096fa80163/jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz?AuthParam=1493035597_d0396e6a99df9ccfeb3f6d895673df09 [following] --2017-04-24 17:34:37-- http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u131-b11/d54c1d3a095b4ff2b6607d096fa80163/jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz?AuthParam=1493035597_d0396e6a99df9ccfeb3f6d895673df09 Connecting to download.oracle.com (download.oracle.com)|104.80.89.58|:80... connected. HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable The file is already fully retrieved; nothing to do. Download done. Removing outdated cached downloads... sha256sum mismatch jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz Oracle JDK 8 is NOT installed. dpkg: error processing package oracle-java8-installer (--configure): subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 1 dpkg: dependency problems prevent configuration of sbt: sbt depends on openjdk-8-jdk; however: Package openjdk-8-jdk is not installed. Package oracle-java8-installer which provides openjdk-8-jdk is not configured yet. dpkg: error processing package sbt (--configure): dependency problems - leaving unconfigured No apport report written because the error message indicates its a followup error from a previous failure. Errors were encountered while processing: oracle-java8-installer sbt E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) How do I solve this? Update 1: I have tried this solution. But still it didn't help me to solve this issue and getting the same error below? After this operation, 0 B of additional disk space will be used. Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y Setting up oracle-java8-installer (8u131-1~webupd8~2) ... Installing from local file /var/cache/oracle-jdk8-installer/jdk-8u131-linux-x64.tar.gz Removing outdated cached downloads... install: cannot stat 'javaws-wrapper.sh': No such file or directory dpkg: error processing package oracle-java8-installer (--configure): subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 1 dpkg: dependency problems prevent configuration of sbt: sbt depends on openjdk-8-jdk; however: Package openjdk-8-jdk is not installed. Package oracle-java8-installer which provides openjdk-8-jdk is not configured yet. dpkg: error processing package sbt (--configure): dependency problems - leaving unconfigured No apport report written because the error message indicates its a followup error from a previous failure. Errors were encountered while processing: oracle-java8-installer sbt E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) A: it's so long time since you asked. Because of no answer here, I show you my solution that works well for me. The root cause of your problem may be from previous java install (it's not from any repositories, but from manually download package). Thus, you must manually remove post-install scripts, use below commands: sudo rm /var/lib/dpkg/info/oracle-java8-installer.postinst -f sudo dpkg --configure oracle-java8-installer Hope them help you. A: For Ubuntu 19.04 and Oracle JDK 11: sudo rm /var/lib/dpkg/info/oracle-java11-installer-local.postinst -f sudo dpkg --configure oracle-java11-installer-local A: !! NOTE !! This solution may not work if Oracle stops serving files from their FTP service. They do that for older Java releases. When using ppa:webupd8team/java there can be deprecated/archived Oracle links hardcoded in PPA. Oracle is moving their older versions to archive and PPA has internal links to "active" (at the time of PPA creation) Oracle download versions. The maintainer of ppa:webupd8team/java is only one man - Andrew (see here) Problem download failed Oracle JDK 8 is NOT installed. dpkg: error processing package oracle-java8-installer (--configure): subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 1 Errors were encountered while processing: oracle-java8-installer E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) Solution cd /var/lib/dpkg/info sudo sed -i 's|JAVA_VERSION=8u151|JAVA_VERSION=8u162|' oracle-java8-installer.* sudo sed -i 's|PARTNER_URL=http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u151-b12/e758a0de34e24606bca991d704f6dcbf/|PARTNER_URL=http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u162-b12/0da788060d494f5095bf8624735fa2f1/|' oracle-java8-installer.* sudo sed -i 's|SHA256SUM_TGZ="c78200ce409367b296ec39be4427f020e2c585470c4eed01021feada576f027f"|SHA256SUM_TGZ="68ec82d47fd9c2b8eb84225b6db398a72008285fafc98631b1ff8d2229680257"|' oracle-java8-installer.* sudo sed -i 's|J_DIR=jdk1.8.0_151|J_DIR=jdk1.8.0_162|' oracle-java8-installer.* Java versions change "often" so update 8u151 and 8u162 to reflect your environment. (this versions worked on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS - 2018-01-18) Try again apt install oracle-java8-installer apt install oracle-java8-set-default Read more about the problem https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2374686&p=13699352#post13699352 https://disqus.com/home/discussion/webupd8/install_oracle_java_8_in_ubuntu_via_ppa_jdk8_web_upd8_ubuntu_linux_blog/newest/ http://www.webupd8.org/2012/09/install-oracle-java-8-in-ubuntu-via-ppa.html
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Historical data suggest that while market timing is not a futile endeavor, it is certainly difficult. Investors that insist on such a course of action can gain some much needed assistance from the Hull Tactical US ETF (NYSE: HTUS). The Hull Tactical US ETF, which debuted last year, tries to generate long-term capital appreciation through long and short positions in S&P 500 index-related ETFs. The fund was designed by investment veteran Blair Hull, who lost to Barack Obama in the Democratic Primary for the U.S. State Senate in 2004 and founder of the Hull Trading Company, which was acquired by Goldman Sachs. The current market environment is conducive to an ETF such as HTUS, which is actively managed, as highlighted by the ETF’s S&P 500-beating returns since inception. However, there are some complexities associated with HTUS. “Hull says the aim is to beat the market but also enhance risk-adjusted returns. Simulations in his academic paper show annualized returns double that of the market, and a Sharpe Ratio four times as large, indicating one-quarter of the risk. This year’s trading shows how that can work. The ETF’s median daily price move this year is just 0.03%. It plods along when signals are mixed, but should bound higher when the coast is clear,” reports Chris Dieterich for Barron’s. [related_stories] HTUS takes long and short positions in ETFs, leveraged ETFs and or other securities that follow the S&P 500. According to the prospectus, the fund may maintain long exposure of up to 200% of net assets, hold exposure to short positions limited to no more than 100% of net assets and adjust long and short positions when necessary to account for changing market conditions.
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Q: Reading assembly, jump and compare statements I'm studying for a retake and I'm having problems reading assembly. Question: Starting with C code of the form 1 int test(int x, int y) { 2 int val = ; 3 if ( ) { 4 if ( ) 5 val = ; 6 else 7 val = ; 8 } else if ( ) 9 val = ; 10 return val; 11} gcc generates the following assembly code: x at %ebp+8, y at %ebp+12 1 movl 8(%ebp), %eax 2 movl 12(%ebp), %edx 3 cmpl $-3, %eax 4 jge .L2 5 cmpl %edx, %eax 6 jle .L3 7 imull %edx, %eax 8 jmp .L4 9 .L3: 10 leal (%edx,%eax), %eax 11 jmp .L4 12 .L2: Section 3.6 Control 197 13 cmpl $2, %eax 14 jg .L5 15 xorl %edx, %eax 16 jmp .L4 17 .L5: 18 subl %edx, %eax 19 .L4: Fill in the missing expressions in the C code. To make the code fit into the C code template, you will need to undo some of the reordering of computations done by gcc. So I tried this, and I though it would be: int val = x+y if -3>x if 2>x val = x^y else val = x*y else if y<x val = x-y It compares -3 > x and then it jumps to L2, so I thought that's where we continue (and everytime it jumps, that's where I continued reading). However, it just continues reading it from top to bottom (why?). Next, when -3 > x, I assumed 2 > x, but now they're turning it around in x>2. Yet, it still is y < x and not x < y. So I basically don't get why my entire order of reading the code is wrong, and why they sometimes compare the second argument with the first, and sometimes the other way around. The correct answer is: int val = x^y if x<-3 if y<x val = x*y else val = x+y else if x>2 val = x-y A: Most C implementations push arguments on the stack last first, and x86 stacks grow downward. From this: 1 movl 8(%ebp), %eax 2 movl 12(%ebp), %edx we can verfiy edx holds the word pushed first because it has the higher address. So it's y. And eax is x. This comparison is x ? -3. Note the reversal of arguments due to AT&T assembly conventions. 3 cmpl $-3, %eax So here we jump to L2 if x >= -3. 4 jge .L2 Similarly, here we jump if x <= y 5 cmpl %edx, %eax 6 jle .L3 Here we compute a returnValue = x * y and jump to the end. Note the compiler has determined that x is no longer needed, so it can use the eax register for the return value starting here. 7 imull %edx, %eax 8 jmp .L4 Here we are computing returnValue = x + y. 9 .L3: 10 leal (%edx,%eax), %eax 11 jmp .L4 Here we are jumping if x > 2. 12 .L2: 13 cmpl $2, %eax 14 jg .L5 Here we compute returnValue = x ^ y. 15 xorl %edx, %eax 16 jmp .L4 Here we have returnValue = x - y. 17 .L5: 18 subl %edx, %eax 19 .L4: Translate this into C that uses gotos as an intermediate step: if (x >= -3) goto L2; if (x <= y) goto L3; val = x * y; goto L4 L3: val = x + y; goto L4 L2: if (x > 2) goto L5; val = x ^ y; goto L4 L5: val = x - y; L4: return val; Note that most compilers seeing if (x > y) x *= 3; else y -= 4; will reverse the sense of the comparison and produce the assembly-level logic if (x <= y) goto L1; x *= 3; goto L2; L1: y -= 4; L2: Using this convention to re-arrange the above, we'd get: int test(int x, int y) { int val = x; // Compiler uses eax for both x and return if (x < -3) { if (x > y) val = x * y; else val = x + y; } else { if (x <= 2) val = x ^ y; else val = x - y; } return val; } The last else clause is missing from the provided original C. Our only choice is to infer that the original code put x-y in val initially, and the compiler did an optimization so the value isn't computed unless its actually returned: int test(int x, int y) { int val = x - y; // Compiler doesn't compute x-y unless it's returned! if (x < -3) { if (x > y) val = x * y; else val = x + y; } else if (x <= 2) val = x ^ y; return val; }
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Robert Lee Morris Robert Lee Morris is a jewelry designer and sculptor who attributes much of his inspiration to forms he admires in nature. His designs have been made in gold, silver and bronze and he is known for his 24 carat matte gold plating and rich deep red copper and green patina. He has collaborated or designed collections for fashion designers Geoffrey Beene, Kansai Yamamoto, Calvin Klein, Anne Klein, Karl Lagerfeld, Michael Kors and Donna Karan. He was born in Nuremberg, Germany, where his parents were stationed after the end of World War II. His father was in the US Air Force. They were also stationed in Japan when he was nine for four years and later in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He graduated from Beloit College with honors in 1969.By the time Morris turned 18 years old, his family had moved 23 times around the world. Morris was discovered in 1971 by New York gallery owner Joan Sonnabend and first exhibited at her art jewelry outpost in the Plaza Hotel called Sculpture to Wear. Shortly after the closing of Sculpture to Wear in 1977, he opened the first edition of Artwear Gallery at 28 East 74th Street on the Upper East Side, near the couture district on Madison Avenue. Artwear relocated to SoHo in August 1978 where it would be surrounded by contemporary art galleries. A few years later a second, larger location opened nearby, followed by another on Madison Avenue in what is now the Sony building. A location on Königsallee in Düsseldorf, Germany was short-lived. Morris closed Artwear in 1995 and the RLM Robert Lee Morris Gallery opened in September 1995 at 400 West Broadway, focusing exclusively on Morris's own work. His career took off after he appeared on the cover of Vogue in 1976. Vogue featured his work over a period of seven years in 49 consecutive issues. Known primarily for his collaborations with leading fashion designers, especially Geoffrey Beene, Karl Lagerfeld, Kansai Yamamoto, Calvin Klein, Anne Klein, Michael Kors, and Donna Karan, Morris has designed Karan's new perfume bottle "Gold" for Estée Lauder. He also designed a special edition lipstick and compact for Elisabeth Arden in 1990. In 2007, Robert Lee Morris was the first jewelry designer to ever be awarded the Geoffrey Beene Lifetime Achievement Award from the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). He won the Coty Award in 1981 for his collection for Calvin Klein. He has received two other CFDA awards for accessory design, in 1985 and 1994. Robert Lee Morris developed a jewelry collection for Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen’s clothing line, Elizabeth & James. He has a presence on QVC television, selling RLM Studio, designed exclusively for QVC. In 2011, Manhattan-based, Haskell Jewels, LLC announced its acquisition of Robert Lee Morris. Robert Lee Morris launched his Soho line at national department stores in September 2012. His higher end Collection line was launched in September 2012 at fine retailers nationwide. The Collection launched with Morris's first national ad campaign in American fashion magazines, including Vogue, W Magazine and Elle. In 2017, MAC Cosmetics collaborated with Robert Lee Morris on a limited collection of products, lipstick, powder, blush, and brushes, all in signature sculptural forms. Acquired in November 2017 by Global Brands Group, the Robert Lee Morris brand is poised to expand into many new categories, home, leathergoods, watches, and other accessory areas. References External links Category:Beloit College alumni Category:American jewelry designers Category:Year of birth missing (living people) Category:Living people Category:People from Nuremberg
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Want to make a film? Cut an album? Organise an event? Give to charity? Whatever it is that your heart desires, here’s the latest on how to raise money — crowdfunding. Sudhish Kamath has the details Want to make your film, stage your own production, record your album or organise an event to raise funds but never had the money to make your dream come true? Ask the crowd, it has all the answers. The crowdfunding model is picking up steam in a big way, that it might just redefine the way creative and social projects are funded, thanks to the early players. All you need is to sign up with an online portal, create your project, spell out the rewards you will be offering to contributors willing to shell out money towards your dream, set a deadline to raise the total amount needed and gain publicity for your campaign through your Twitter and Facebook updates. One of the earliest players, filmmaker Onir, raised Rs. 1 crore by asking people through social networks to make his National award-winning film I Am. Many filmmakers and musicians have followed the crowdfunding model ever since. Wishberry, one of India’s first crowdfunding portals has raised over Rs. 2.5 crore through 6,500 people over 18 months. “We ran about 550 campaigns in all. Initially, we were in the social fundraising space for events with causes attached to them. So about 400 were all social fundraising and 150 were films, short films, documentaries, theatre productions, music albums and concerts,” says Priyanka Agarwal, founder and CEO of Wishberry (http://wishberry.in). Filmmaker Srinivas Sunderrajan raised Rs. 5,26,000 from 79 supporters for the post-production of his film Greater Elephant. Student filmmakers Aniket Dasgupta and Swathy Sethumadhavan raised Rs. 1,01,000 from 49 supporters for the pre-production of their documentary The Other Way on the indie film movement in India while 21-year-old Vanshaj Kapur raised Rs. 1,15,000 from 32 contributors for completing his film through Wishberry. “My favourite campaign is Vasudha Sharma’s raising Rs. 5,65,000 from 119 supporters for her music album,” adds Priyanka. The success stories are many. Aazin Printer raised over Rs. 3 lakh for his music album, theatre group Limbo raised Rs. 1 lakh for rehearsal space, a not-for-profit People’s Power Collective in Uttarakhand raised Rs. 8 lakh to start a rural community radio station and Project Khel raised over Rs. 2,75,000 for its life skills programme for underprivileged kids. Even recently, The Goa Project, after not finding adequate support from the corporate sector for its social experiment, turned to people and raised Rs. 1,89,000 for the unconference in less than two weeks! “A couple of students BITS-Pilani were looking to start a portal called brainbought.com/ to teach the crowd on how to trade in the stock market, and investors started calling saying they wanted to put down big amounts for a stake in the venture. So, it is interesting how crowdfunding works,” adds Priyanka. Creating awareness Back in Chennai, the Nalanda Way uses its crowdfunding portal Orange Street (http://orangestreet.in) to raise funds specifically for projects involved with social change. “Over the last year, we have raised over Rs.62 lakh through 35 campaigns and 1,005 donors,” says Hema Priyadarshini, product manager of the Nalanda Way Foundation. Theatre groups, musicians and social workers from all around the country have been using the portal for their fundraisers and to create awareness about various causes. “About 10 per cent of the funds raised through Orange Street are used for Nalanda Way’s core activities,” she adds. There are three kinds of campaigns you could create through Orange Street. “One, if there’s a central campaigner and a cause with a deadline. T.M. Krishna recently raised about Rs. 5 lakh for 20 special children by sending three emails to his fans. The second kind of campaign allows individuals to pick beneficiaries. You can choose how many ever children and fund their needs based on occasions — such as your birthday or the day you got your first salary, an anniversary or any special day in a year. The third kind of campaign is by organisations to raise funds for specific projects. Kamal Haasan’s fans who have formed the PTP Trust hosted their fundraising campaign through OrangeStreet,” explains Hema. The latest entrant into the market is Catapooolt (spelt with three Os in http://www.catapooolt.com because ‘two’s company and three’s crowd’ as the founders put it!) that is launching projects this week. For entertainment Catapooolt will specialise in the entertainment sector — music, movies and performing arts. Started by Satish Kataria, managing director and Yogesh Karikurve, associate director, Catapooolt boasts of experts from the private funding sector. “Satish was vice-president with Religare Venture Capital fund and I have been with Reliance’s international distribution,” says Yogesh. “We are looking at taking it beyond just crowdfunding by also helping our projects find private funding. That’s our biggest differentiating factor.” Catapooolt will also offer a three-tier reward system for contributors on its portal. “The project owners will be rewarding their supporters. Additionally, we will be giving them rewards and at the third level, we will be giving all contributors loyalty points that they can redeem for rewards with our brand partners.” Catapooolt will soon start crowdfunding campaigns for filmmaker Sarthak Dasgupta’s film Cut Throat, the Jar Pictures’ production Khushlata, a documentary on the Indian Sporting Struggle and Ek Nayi Umeed, an album by Shankar Mahadevan along with seven children from different NGOs.
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New Zealand cricket team in Australia in 1967–68 The New Zealand cricket team toured Australia in the 1967-68 season. They played four first-class matches and three other matches between 17 November and 12 December 1967. It was New Zealand's first dedicated tour to Australia since 1925-26. However, no Test matches were played. The team Barry Sinclair (captain) Vic Pollard (vice-captain) Jack Alabaster Mark Burgess Richard Collinge Bevan Congdon Roy Harford Terry Jarvis Dick Motz Bruce Murray Bruce Taylor Keith Thomson Bryan Yuile The manager was Joe Ongley. Bob Cunis had to withdraw from the selected team before the tour owing to a knee injury and was replaced by Collinge. Graham Dowling was unavailable. Burgess, Harford, Murray and Thomson were the only players who had not played Test cricket. All four made their Test debuts in the series against India in New Zealand a few weeks later. The tour As three of the team – Murray, Pollard and Yuile – were opposed to Sunday play, the tour schedule was rearranged slightly to avoid Sundays; the Queensland match was reduced from four days to three. The first match was against South Australia. At the end of the third day, the New Zealanders, needing 188 to win, were 67 for 6, with Dick Motz 12 not out. On the last day Motz hit his way to 94, with 10 fours and six sixes, but the New Zealanders still fell for 163, 25 runs short, Eric Freeman taking 8 for 47. The second match, against Victoria, was drawn, Mark Burgess scoring 98 not out in the first innings, and Paul Sheahan making 161 for Victoria. In the easy victory over a Victorian Country side that followed, Motz hit 76 in 46 minutes, taking four sixes and three fours from one over. The next match, against Queensland, was drawn. The New Zealanders were in a strong position when rain washed out play on the last day: after declaring and setting Queensland 353 to win, they had taken two wickets for 44. In the first innings Pollard scored the New Zealanders' only century of the tour, 125 in four hours; Murray made 98. New South Wales won the last match by 131 runs, led by the speed and swing of David Renneberg and Grahame Corling, who each took eight wickets in the match. Murray, the opening batsman, made 45 and 60. Murray was the leading run-scorer, with 351 runs at an average of 43.87. Taylor took the most wickets, 13 at 25.00. References External links New Zealand in Australia, 1967-68 at Cricinfo New Zealand in Australia 1967-68 at CricketArchive Category:1967 in New Zealand cricket Category:1967 in Australian cricket 1967-68 Category:Australian cricket seasons from 1945–46 to 1969–70
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Q: MySQL insert is writing a different value than the one I am entering I just setup a LAMP server in an Amazon Linux instance. Everything is working fine and all my connections with my database are working great. But I'm having a problem that I just can't figure out. I am working on an exam system and I want to give a random id to each student that is going to take it. I don't need any info about the students so I don't have any relevant fields that I could use as unique identifiers. $id_escuela=2; $id_grupo=$_POST['grado']; $id_eval=rand(1,9999999999); $sql = "INSERT INTO pinion_evalua (id_eval,id_escuela,anio) VALUES (".$id_eval.",".$id_escuela.",".$id_grupo.")"; On my local server everything works great and I get random numbers every time, but when I upload my files to the Amazon Server, I'm stuck with a specific number (2147483647), even if the result of the rand is different. For instance, I get: Error: INSERT INTO pinion_evalua(id_eval,id_escuela,anio) VALUES (4612160288,1,2) Duplicate entry '2147483647' for key 'id_eval' How can this even be possible? I tried removing the random part and use an autoincrement but I still receive the same number. I even tried reducing the size of the int but I still get number, even if it goes against the rules of the field. It's driving me mad. Do any of you can give me a hint about what can be wrong? Regards. A: You have many problems in those few lines of code: You are obviously running PHP on a 32 bit system and try to get a random value bigger than that. Since you don't care about the id assigned, why not use an auto-incremented number in MySQL? Your code is susceptible to SQL injection which can be easily demonstrated by inputting 3); delete pinion_evalua where (1 = 1. The proper solution would be to use prepared statements as documented in the PHP manual. A: The maximum value for an INT column in MySQL is exactly 2147483647. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/integer-types.html Any time you use a larger value, it's getting truncated down to its maximum. The behavior you are observing is correct, and expected. You will have the same problem with an AUTO_INCREMENT when the largest value in the column is also the maximum value for that column. The server will try to increment by 1, the value will be truncated to the maximum possible value, and the insert will fail.
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Q: currency default style on osclass Hi guys i have a problem with the currency field! When you are using one currency only you receive the default style! See image! When you are using two or more currency's you receive a drop down box! What i want to have is a box with the currency inside but a read only function! This is on the item-post.php on osclass and this is the code! how do i need to change this? <?php ItemForm::currency_select(); ?> A: if you have only one currency and this currency is the default one. try this <input name="currency" type="text" disabled="disabled" value="<?php echo osc_currency()?>"> And in your css try this input[type="text"]:disabled { background: #dddddd; } See the helpers of osclass which are here : https://doc.osclass.org/Helpers Try it and tell me.
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Johan Santana allowed one run and five hits in eight innings in a win against the Padres yesterday. “I knew coming into this game that it was a very important one because of losing three games in a row,” Santana told reporters following the game. “We knew that somehow we had to stop that.” According to Elias Sports Bureau, courtesy of ESPN.com, yesterday, Santana became the first pitcher in any major league game this season to get two hits and a walk, while scoring one run and driving in another. “I was just lucky, I guess, at the plate,” Santana said. “Any time you have a chance to do something like that, it’s very special.” …it’s pretty clear, despite all of the discussion about offense and power, the Mets top off-season priority needs to be trading for another elite starting pitcher… the team can piece together the offense, but santana is too good to waste… adding one more top arm will mean the team never hits a big-time losing streak… the two aces will create a floor, so to speak, that the team can build up from… i don’t know who that pitcher is, but he’s not on the roster right now… Santana is tied with Cardinals RHP Adam Wainwright for the most wins in the National League (13); he’s 11th in ERA (3.00); and seventh in strikeouts with 138 in 153 innings pitched. …i wonder if the Mets will start to rest him, maybe pitching him every six days or even skipping a start… i mean, what’s the point in having johan throw 220 innings this season, when he can get rest that might save him down the road, next season and beyond…
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Spurs midfielder avoids a £10m price tag to tempt investors away from team-mate Dele Alli's valuation of £9.5m for the 2017/18 Fantasy Premier League is an enticing prospect for managers. With 18 goals and 11 assists last season, Alli being handed a price of £10m+ was a possibility. Instead, the Tottenham Hotspur midfielder's price has been hiked by just £1.0m from 2016/17 and could tempt investors away from team-mate Harry Kane. The Spurs striker is expected to be revealed as the most expensive player when FPL launches this coming week. Pogba price drop Sunday's five price reveals include three other midfielders. The valuations of Manchester United's Paul Pogba and Leroy Sane, of Manchester City, have gone in opposite directions. A drop of £0.5m to £8.0m will put FPL managers on alert to Pogba's potential. The Frenchman converted just 5.4% of his 92 shots into goals in his debut season. But that should improve with Jose Mourinho's side expected to step up their title challenge. A drop of £0.5m to £8.0m will put FPL managers on alert to Paul Pogba's potential Sane on the up Equally, FPL managers will anticipate big things from Sane. The winger started 16 of the final 17 fixtures, supplying four goals and six assists in that spell. He has risen to £8.5m from £7.5m in 2016/17. But that is unlikely to slow investment, with Sane another expected to improve on last season's returns. Redmond rise Nathan Redmond also is subject to a price rise. The Southampton winger is available for £6.5m, climbing from £6.0m in 2016/17. Redmond was often a frustrating player for owners last season, but ended it with a credible seven goals. He could exploit Southampton's favourable opening fixtures; they play just one of last season's top six in the opening 11 Gameweeks. Gayle the third man? Dwight Gayle is the only forward among Sunday's five new player prices and will carry a £6.5m tag on his return to FPL. With 23 goals from 26 starts in Newcastle United's promotion season, Gayle is a strong contender for the third forward slot in our squads. Further FPL player prices will be revealed on Monday. See: Salah commands big fee in Fantasy
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1. Field of Invention Various embodiments of the present disclosure generally relate to an electronic device, and more particularly, to a semiconductor device and a method of manufacturing the same. 2. Description of Related Art Non-volatile memory devices retain stored data regardless of power on/off conditions. Recently, as a two-dimensional non-volatile memory device including memory cells formed on a substrate: in a single layer has reached a limit in enhancing its degree of integration, a three-dimensional (3D) non-volatile memory device including memory cells stacked in a vertical direction on a substrate has been proposed. A three-dimensional non-volatile memory device may include interlayer insulating layers and gate electrodes that are stacked alternately with each other, and channel layers passing therethrough, with memory cells stacked along the channel layers. To improve the operational reliability of such a non-volatile memory device having a three-dimensional structure, various structures and manufacturing methods have been developed.
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BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Vanguardistas LLC//NONSGML Metro Publisher//EN BEGIN:VEVENT SUMMARY:The Incredible 6000 Foot Ladder to Heaven DTSTART:20190215T020000Z DTEND:20190215T020000Z UID:e9fb3d26-1fd4-11e9-b94c-120e7ad5cf50_20190214T200000 DESCRIPTION:A musical fairytale that is an adventure through the credible and the incredible in which you don’t realize what you’ve left behind until you can see it clearly from six thousand feet in the sky. LOCATION:The Edge-Off Broadway URL:https://www.chicagoparent.com/events/the-incredible-6000-foot-ladder-t o-heaven/ END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR
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Grey Moogle: "Snake we're not tools of Square Enix or anyone else. Gaming was the only thing - the only thing I was good at, but a least I always played what I liked."
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By Michael Patrick Dear Michael, Happy Pride Month! It's been a decade, but SPOILER: you're aging great! Michael Patrick grew up in Marbury, AL, and is currently working as a teacher in New York, NY. This year you will frost your tips. Don't. This year you will call a guy a f----t. He is being a huge jerk, but call him something else. Because one day someone will call you this and there will be venom in their eyes, and you will truly understand the hatred that can come packed conveniently into six letter words. This year your father will look you in the eyes and tell you he won't love you if you are gay. I have no advice here. It will hurt. You are going to spend a lot of your time in your late teens and early 20s, after you come out, trying to convince people that you're not like other gay men. You're not campy-- you're different. This is a waste of time. More importantly it's a waste of resources. You will more than likely never again encounter a concentrated group of gay men who are passionate, idealistic, and want to be friends. During the aforementioned time in your life you will write an article in the University of Alabama newspaper (against all odds you go to college!) about how older generations of LGBT people are to blame for the suicides of young gay people. Someone will tell you you're wrong and that your opinion doesn't matter because you are fat and ugly-- do not listen to them. More people will tell you're wrong because you hate yourself and don't understand LGBT history-- listen to them. One day you will regret publishing this article. Speaking of fat and ugly-- you are currently taking a cocktail of weight loss drugs. You're losing a tremendous amount of weight and you will look great for yearbook pictures next year. You will regain every pound. Let it happen. It will teach you the value of hard work. The first people you meet in college will ask you 100 times if you're gay. It's okay that you do not tell them. The first time you tell anyone you're gay will be in a dimly lit dorm room with three people who will never ask you. They will hug you and reassure you that it is not only okay, it is great. One day at 22 you will stand on the fire escape of the 10th floor of an office building in downtown Chicago. You will think long and hard about jumping. You won't, but you will feel powerful just having the ability to choose. You are depressed. You will feel bad that you can't figure out how to get better. Ask for help. You will not feel bad about your symptoms a few years later. You will feel bad you didn't ask for help sooner. Sometimes the only way people will know you need something is if you ask. Asking for help is not weak. It is powerful. You will be in Illinois when same sex marriage is legalized there, and despite coming to recognize that marriage is not the ultimate fight for LGBT rights--and even believe it's somewhat of a distraction--you will cry. You by no means have it figured out at 25. A Lyft driver will ask about women in your neighborhood. You'll wonder if you should tell him you're gay, and you won't. You will still wonder if you should have. You'll wonder why you didn't. You will spend a lot of time and energy over the next decade trying to love yourself in spite of your queerness. Spend more time and energy in loving yourself because of it. Pay attention over the next decade because LGBT people from the state of Alabama are going to be changing the world as we know it. Patricia Todd will be elected to the Alabama House of Representatives making her the first openly gay person to hold public office in Alabama. Tim Cook will be appointed as CEO of Apple, Inc. and come out while in the position to become the first openly gay CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Laverne Cox will become the first trans person to be nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award in acting, and she will be the first openly trans person to be featured on the cover of Time magazine. These amazing LGBT people will be doing amazing things right in front of your eyes, and they all started from the same place you did--Alabama. But they are all standing on the shoulders of giants. So embrace these strides, but also spend more time learning about LGBT history. It is not, as you suspect, a history of victims. It's a history rich with fighters, advocates, artists, and intellectuals. It's as much your history as stories about George Washington, the Civil War, or the Louisiana Purchase. Knowing it will make you stronger. Yours TRULY (lol), MP Michael Patrick grew up in Marbury, AL, and is currently working as a teacher in New York, NY
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Michael Stanhope (Royalist) Michael Stanhope (died 1648) was born at Shelford Manor, the son of Philip Stanhope, 1st Earl of Chesterfield and his wife Catherine, daughter of Lord Hastings. Colonel Stanhope was in charge of the Royalist forces at the 1648 battle at Willoughby Field, Nottinghamshire, where he was killed. After the battle he was buried among his men in Willoughby church. A monument was erected to him and his men. References Category:1648 deaths Category:Cavaliers Category:People from Rushcliffe (district) Category:English military personnel killed in action Category:Younger sons of earls Michael Category:Year of birth unknown
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This proposal ultimately seeks to develop the foundation for a virtual and wet lab high throughput screening system for drugs delivered to the central nervous system (CNS), including those useful for CNS tumors, CNS HIV infection and neuropsychiatric disorders. The goal is to identify highly specific substrates for two olfactory- expressed organic anion transporters (Oats) discovered by us, Oat6 and Oat1, thereby allowing for intranasal delivery of drugs to the CNS. Oats are considered to be the rate-limiting steps in the movement across key epithelial tissue-environment interfaces (eg. kidney, liver) of many common drugs (eg. antibiotics, antivirals, chemotherapeutics, NSAIDs, antihypertensives, diuretics). We were the first to identify the prototype, Oat1, as well as related transporters, and have recently published the Oat1 and Oat3 knockouts, which have defective organic anion transport in kidney and choroid plexus. Because of the expression of Oat6 and Oat1 at the so- called nose-brain barrier and specific substrate preferences, the pathway is attractive for a side-by-side in silico and wet lab strategy (and in vivo validation) for identification of CNS-active drugs and probes. It is hypothesized that the Oat6 and Oat1 transporters provide a unique transport mechanism for the nasal administration of drugs to the CNS, and that a side-by- side in silico (SA1) and wet lab (SA2) approach will prove synergistic and lead more rapidly to high throughput virtual and wet lab screening of a huge number of compounds to identify Oat-specific sets. These compounds may then either function as potential leads to consider for CNS-acting drugs that can be delivered nasally or, perhaps more likely, serve as a range of consensus structures for Oat6 and Oat1-mediated transport that can be considered for the design of new drugs or the derivativization of existing drugs with ineffective CNS delivery. The goal of SA1 (40-45% effort) is in silico modeling of the interaction of Oat6/Oat1 and its substrates using steered molecular dynamics in order to begin to build the basis for virtual screening. SA2 (40- 45% effort) will initially continue wet lab low-medium throughput (Xenopus oocyte transport) screening for potential Oat6 and Oat1-specific substrates and develop a high throughput assay employing stably transfected Oat1 and Oat6-expressing cell lines, which could then be used to screen chemical libraries. SA3 (10-20% effort) involves initial ex vivo and in vivo "proof of concept" experiments. The proposed work will provide a paradigm for this type of screening of drugs and compounds that are transported not only across the olfactory epithelium but also the choroid plexus and brain capillary endothelium (including compounds that can be tagged for imaging of tumors and brain metabolism). We have begun preliminary experiments with NIH Roadmap funded facilities (Scripps) with the long-term goal of developing a synergistic high throughput virtual and wet lab screening strategy. All the expertise for completion of the aims exists within the PI's group. While the emphasis is on screening for CNS active drugs, it is to be emphasized that the proposal is also highly relevant to drug design for elimination via the kidney and liver. This proposal seeks to develop the basis for a virtual and wet lab high throughput screening system for drugs delivered to the central nervous system, including those useful for CNS tumors, CNS HIV infection and neuropsychiatric disorders. The goal is to identify highly specific substrates for the nasally expressed organic anion transporters, Oat1 and Oat6, thereby allowing for efficient intranasal delivery and transport of drugs to the CNS.
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defmodule Accent.Operation do use Accent.Schema @duplicated_fields [ :action, :key, :text, :conflicted, :value_type, :plural, :locked, :file_index, :file_comment, :removed, :revision_id, :translation_id, :user_id, :batch_operation_id, :document_id, :version_id, :project_id, :stats, :previous_translation ] schema "operations" do field(:action, :string) field(:key, :string) field(:text, :string) field(:batch, :boolean, default: false) field(:file_comment, :string) field(:file_index, :integer) field(:value_type, :string) field(:plural, :boolean, default: false) field(:locked, :boolean, default: false) field(:placeholders, {:array, :string}, default: []) field(:rollbacked, :boolean, default: false) field(:stats, {:array, :map}, default: []) embeds_one(:previous_translation, Accent.PreviousTranslation) belongs_to(:document, Accent.Document) belongs_to(:revision, Accent.Revision) belongs_to(:version, Accent.Version) belongs_to(:translation, Accent.Translation) belongs_to(:project, Accent.Project) belongs_to(:comment, Accent.Comment) belongs_to(:user, Accent.User) belongs_to(:batch_operation, Accent.Operation) belongs_to(:rollbacked_operation, Accent.Operation) has_one(:rollback_operation, Accent.Operation, foreign_key: :rollbacked_operation_id) has_many(:operations, Accent.Operation, foreign_key: :batch_operation_id) timestamps() end @optional_fields ~w( rollbacked translation_id comment_id )a def changeset(model, params) do model |> cast(params, [] ++ @optional_fields) end def stats_changeset(model, params) do model |> cast(params, [:stats]) end def copy(operation, new_fields) do duplicated_operation = Map.take(operation, @duplicated_fields) %__MODULE__{} |> Map.merge(duplicated_operation) |> Map.merge(new_fields) end end
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I contratti a termine sono raddoppiati, i giovani inattivi cresciuti di dieci punti percentuali. C’è di buono, almeno, che il tasso di occupazione femminile è salito di 5 punti. Lo scorso 31 ottobre Istat ha pubblicato l’aggiornamento dei dati mensili sull’andamento del mercato del lavoro. E no, i dati citati non fanno riferimento all’andamento tendenziale. Non sono, cioè, colpa o merito del governo Conte. Infodata ha infatti deciso di ricostruire la serie storica a partire dal 2004, così da scattare una fotografia più ampia di come sia cambiato il mercato del lavoro italiano nell’ultimo quindicennio. Il primo dato riguarda il tasso di occupazione, ovvero la percentuale di persone tra i 15 ed i 64 anni che ha un lavoro. Non importa, in questo momento, se dipendente o meno, se a tempo indeterminato o meno. I dati resi disponibili da Istat dicono questo: Nel grafico si può osservare la crescita interrotta nel 2008 dallo scoppio della crisi, con un primo salto verso il basso, seguito da un secondo tra il 2012 ed il 2013. Dall’anno successivo è iniziato un percorso di risalita, che ha sostanzialmente riportato il tasso di occupazione ai livelli pre crisi, quando poco meno del 59% degli italiani tra i 15 ed i 64 anni aveva un lavoro. Interessante, in questo contesto, osservare le dinamiche di genere. Prima della crisi, infatti, il tasso di occupazione maschile superava il 70%. Nel punto più basso, tra la primavera del 2013 e l’inizio del 2015, è sceso intorno al 65%. E la risalita degli ultimi anni lo ha portato poco sotto il 68%, ancora due punti in meno rispetto ai livelli pre crisi. L’occupazione femminile, invece, sta vivendo un significativo incremento. Intanto, ha subito meno la crisi: negli anni in cui gli uomini perdevano 5 punti percentuali, il tasso di occupazione delle donne oscillava tra il 46 ed il 47%. Non solo: dalla fine del 2014 ha iniziato a crescere, arrivando a sfiorare il 50%. Beninteso, siamo ancora 15 punti sotto all’occupazione maschile, ma l’incremento è certamente significativo. Meno positiva, invece, la situazione per quanto riguarda i giovani tra i 15 ed i 24 anni. Questo è quello che dicono i numeri di Istat: Prima dei numeri, una precisazione. Le diverse percentuali di occupati, disoccupati e inattivi sono qui calcolate sulla base della popolazione totale tra i 15 ed i 24 anni, poco meno di 6 milioni di persone. Tra gli inattivi, detto altrimenti, rientra anche chi è tale per il semplice fatto che non ha alcun interesse ad entrare nel mercato del lavoro. Ad esempio perché è impegnato a conseguire un diploma o una laurea. Detto questo, salta all’occhio che sia questa la fetta ad aver conosciuto l’incremento maggiore negli ultimi quindici anni. Gli inattivi erano il 63,57% dei giovani tra i 15 ed i 24 anni nel mese di gennaio del 2004, sono saliti al 74,65% nel settembre del 2018. Sostanzialmente costanti i disoccupati, passati dall’8,41 all’8% (anche qui: il raffronto è sul totale della popolazione. Normalmente Istat diffonde questo dato rapportandolo alla sola quota degli attivi, ovvero di occupati e disoccupati. Per questo le percentuali che normalmente finiscono nei titoli dei giornali sono più alte), mentre sono calati gli occupati, scesi dal 28,2 al 17,35%. La crisi ha insomma spostato un giovane su dieci dal mercato del lavoro all’inattività. Si tratta di ragazzi e ragazze che scelgono di proseguire gli studi o che invece rinunciano a cercare un lavoro e diventano Neet, ovvero persone che non studiano, non lavorano, non si formano. Un fenomeno che negli ultimi anni ha conosciuto una forte crescita in Italia Eurostat nel 2017 erano il 29,5% dei giovani tra i 20 e i 34 anni). Proseguendo nell’analisi, Istat permette di capire come siano cambiate le tipologie di contratti che regolano la presenza degli italiani sul posto di lavoro: Da segnalare, innanzitutto, un leggero incremento dei lavoratori con contratti permanenti. Si tratta di dipendenti sul cui contratto non è indicata una data di scadenza. Nel gennaio del 2004 erano 14,2 milioni, a fine settembre erano 14,8. Non manca molto, dunque, per superare quota 15 milioni, il picco toccato nella primavera del 2008 prima dello scoppio della crisi. C’è, al contrario, una contrazione dei lavoratori indipendenti, passati da 6,2 a 5,3 milioni. Il dato che però più salta all’occhio fa riferimento ai lavoratori con un contratto a termine. I precari, per dirla altrimenti. Nel 2004 erano 1,8 milioni, l’ultima rilevazione ne ha contati 3,2. Sono insomma quasi raddoppiati. Se quindi è vero che rispetto al gennaio del 2014 ci sono 1 milione di occupati in più, è altrettanto vero che si tratta di persone assunte con un contratto precario. Che questo sia un bene o un male, i numeri di Istat non lo dicono. E anche Infodata preferisce lasciare il giudizio ai lettori.
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Q: Image Matching on iOS Was recommended to migrate this question from SO. I am building an iOS app that, as a key feature, incorporates image matching. The problem is the images I need to recognize are small orienteering 10x10 plaques with simple large text on them. They can be quite reflective and will be outside(so the light conditions will be variable). Sample image http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y425/Chris_Mitchelmore/2_zpsce84d4f3.png There will be up to 15 of these types of image in the pool and really all I need to detect is the text, in order to log where the user has been. The problem I am facing is that with the image matching software I have tried, aurasma and slightly more successfully arlabs, they can't distinguish between them as they are primarily built to work with detailed images. I need to accurately detect which plaque is being scanned and have considered using gps to refine the selection but the only reliable way I have found is to get the user to manually enter the text. One of the key attractions we have based the product around is being able to detect these images that are already in place and not have to set up any additional material. Can anyone suggest a piece of software that would work(as is iOS friendly) or a method of detection that would be effective and interactive/pleasing for the user. Sample environment: http://www.orienteeringcoach.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/startfinishscp.jpeg The environment can change substantially, basically anywhere a plaque could be positioned they are; fences, walls, and posts in either wooded or open areas, but overwhelmingly outdoors. A: I managed to find a solution that is working quite well. Im not fully optimized yet but I think its just tweaking filters, as ill explain later on. Initially I tried to set up opencv but it was very time consuming and a steep learning curve but it did give me an idea. The key to my problem is really detecting the characters within the image and ignoring the background, which was basically just noise. OCR was designed exactly for this purpose. I found the free library tesseract (https://github.com/ldiqual/tesseract-ios-lib) easy to use and with plenty of customizability. At first the results were very random but applying sharpening and monochromatic filter and a color invert worked well to clean up the text. Next a marked out a target area on the ui and used that to cut out the rectangle of image to process. The speed of processing is slow on large images and this cut it dramatically. The OCR filter allowed me to restrict allowable characters and as the plaques follow a standard configuration this narrowed down the accuracy. So far its been successful with the grey background plaques but I havent found the correct filter for the red and white editions. My goal will be to add color detection and remove the need to feed in the data type.
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Physiological and anatomical properties of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of an anophthalmic mouse. Congenitally anophthalmic mice (ZRDCT-AN) have circadian rhythms which 'free-run' and are not light modulated. Their rhythms differ from those of controls in: duration of circadian period, length of active phase, and pattern/intensity of activity. Three different populations have been described based upon wheel-running: rhythmic with stable period, rhythmic with unstable period and arrhythmic. Circadian rhythms are generated by neurons in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. To better understand whether intrinsic properties of SCN neurons differ in anophthalmic and sighted mice, we examined the electrical activity of these neurons in slices, using single unit recordings, ionophoresis and bath perfusion of agonists and antagonists of known SCN neurotransmitters. Lucifer yellow was injected to characterize morphology. In controls, in daytime, units fired at a higher rate (44% at >/=5 Hz) than at night (21% at >/=5 Hz) and with regular interspike intervals versus irregular intervals nocturnally. In anophthalmics four firing patterns were observed as follows: (1) irregular at <5 spikes/s (70% of the total); (2) regular at >/=5 spikes/s; (<10%); (3) irregular bursts (20%); (4) regular bursts (<1%). Most neurons were inhibited by GABA, but a few were excited in controls. Blocking synaptic transmission with low Ca(2+)/high Mg(2+) increased the frequency and regularized the pattern of previously irregular discharges both in anophthalmics and controls. Bicuculline (10(-5) M), a GABA(A) antagonist, had a similar effect. These data suggest that the characteristic irregular firing pattern of anophthalmics, and of controls at night, results from extrinsic, at least in part, GABAergic input.
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Comparative integromics on Eph family. EPHA1, EPHA2, EPHA3, EPHA4, EPHA5, EPHA6, EPHA7, EPHA8, EPHA10, EPHB1, EPHB2, EPHB3, EPHB4 and EPHB6 are EPH family receptors for Ephrin family ligands. Ephrin/EPH signaling pathway networks with the WNT signaling pathway during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. TCF/LEF-binding sites within the promoter region of human EPH family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence. Because five TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of the EPHA7 gene, comparative genomics analyses on EPHA7 orthologs were further performed. EPHA7-MANEA-FHL5 locus at human chromosome 6q16.1 and EPHA10-MANEAL-FHL3 locus at human chromosome 1p34.3 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Human EPHA7 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, neural tissues, duodenal cancer and parathyroid tumors, while mouse Epha7 mRNA was expressed in fertilized egg, Rathke's pouche, visual cortex, pituitary gland, other neural tissues, pancreas, lung tumors and mammary tumors. The chimpanzee EPHA7 gene and cow Epha7 gene were identified within NW_107969.1 and AC155055.2 genome sequences, respectively. Five TCF/LEF-binding sites within human EPHA7 promoter were conserved in the chimpanzee EPHA7 promoter, and three TCF/LEF-binding sites in the cow Epha7 promoter, but none in the mouse Epha7 promoter. Primates and cow EPHA7 orthologs were identified as evolutionarily conserved targets of the WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway. D6S1056 microsatellite marker within EPHA7 gene is deleted in prostate cancer. Deletion and/or promoter CpG hypermethylation could explain the EPHA7 down-regulation in human tumors. EPHA7 is a target of systems medicine, especially in the fields of regenerative medicine and oncology.
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In Episode 8 of The Rights Track, Todd talks to Professor Rhoda Howard-Hassmann, International Chair of Human Rights at Wilfred Laurier University in Canada about state food crime, what it is, where it’s happening, why she believes it should be considered an international human rights crime and the challenges... In 1961, President John F. Kennedy established The Presidential Commission on the Status of Women, a formal body that collected evidence and made recommendations on many of the challenges facing women in the modern American economy, polity, and society. No such body has ever been established for the status of African... About the Podcast The Rights Track podcast gets the hard facts about the human rights challenges facing the world today and aims to get our thinking about human rights on the right track. The podcast is hosted by Professor Todd Landman, a human rights scholar and champion for the advancement of human rights understanding. In Series 1, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, Todd interviews leading analysts at the forefront of the latest critical thinking on human rights. Each episode is an insightful, compelling and rigorous interview with academics engaged in systematic human rights research. In Series 2, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, The Rights Track turns its attention to human rights advocates and practitioners involved in the struggle for human rights to learn more about their work and the ways in which academic research is helping them. Series 3 sees our podcast joining the fight to end modern day slavery by 2030. In partnership with the University of Nottingham's Right's Lab research project, we talk with researchers who are providing hard evidence about the scale of the problem and by recommending strategies that can help consign slavery to the history books. Although our interviews focus on often complex research, they have been developed with a much wider audience in mind and we want them to be accessible to anyone with an interest in human rights.
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Before you complete your family medicine residency or even finish medical school, there are ways that you can begin to nurture your interest in global health and prepare for service you may want to provide in the future. Here's how to get started. For Medical Students Integrating Global Health into Your Medical Education Seeking out as many global health-related opportunities as possible during your time in medical school can help you clarify your vision for working and serving globally, and cultivate relationships through which you may contribute and be mentored. Participate in your medical school’s global health track (if available). Getting involved in a global health track during medical school is strongly recommended. A well-designed global health track provides necessary background information and skills. It can also facilitate networking, which is key to short-term international rotations, and help you find individual mentors who can help guide your decisions. Volunteer for a not-for-credit experience serving an underserved population during your M1-M2 summer, or during a fall, spring, or holiday break Do a research project or a scholarly/capstone project focused on a population outside of the United States or an underserved population in the United States Advocate for the value and relevance of global health curriculum and experiences to your medical school. For example, you could provide the dean and the family medicine chair with information about the value of global health experiences and curriculum for your development as a physician and the school’s achievement of its mission. Build a foundation for long-term collaboration by developing relationships with people and organizations involved in global health; tap into your medical school’s existing partnerships and relationships, if available. Cultivate relationships with mentors who can guide your development of abilities and attributes you will need to pursue your interest in global health Finding a Family Medicine Mentor in Global Health Finding a mentor can be a huge help in navigating the many questions you'll have as you become more aware of global health needs and opportunities. Here are some suggestions on finding a mentor for yourself. Attend the American Academy of Family Physicians’ (AAFP’s) annual Family Medicine Global Health Workshop (information available at www.aafp.org/events/global-health.html). This conference is specifically designed to facilitate networking and is attended by experienced global health workers who have long-term involvement in specific cultures and countries. Try personal networking. Ask colleagues, friends, and family members whether they know anyone who works in global health, and contact potential leads with emails and phone calls. The more connections you make, the greater your chances of identifying one or more physicians who would be an appropriate mentor. Look for someone who is doing the type of global health work you would like to do or working in a region that interests you. Contact that person to share your background and aspirations. Reach out to presenters at meetings or to authors of articles/books of interest. Ask for advice or offer to help someone with a project. People working in global health often find it rewarding to advise and work with those who are exploring an interest in global health. For Residents Preparing for Global Health During Family Medicine Residency An accredited family medicine residency program provides ideal preparation for short- and long-term global health work. Family physicians are specifically trained to provide the care that is most needed in the developing world—care for patients of all ages that is comprehensive, continuous, integrated, community oriented, and team based. If you are seriously considering global health work, you should select a residency program that offers: Support and guidance for interest in global health A patient population that includes a variety of ethnicities, cultures, and languages so that you can become proficient in the use of translators and cultural interpreters A robust global health track that provides additional training in tropical and poverty-related diseases, advanced procedural skills, and cultural competence; the opportunity to participate in global rotations; and a network of international contacts. Getting involved in a global health track during residency is strongly recommended. Once you have started your family medicine residency, the following steps can help you prepare for global health work: Develop competence in a team-based approach to medical care; attention to the whole family; preventive and community-oriented care; and provision of continuous care to a defined population Develop specific interventional skills (e.g., procedures that are commonly performed at the primary care level in developing countries, such as repair of complex lacerations and interpretation of diagnostic ultrasound examination) Find a faculty mentor or advisor who is involved in global health work and can help you prepare yourself and your family. A faculty mentor might also be able to help you use your global health experience to develop a scholarly presentation or paper. Complete additional (e.g., fellowship-based) training in advanced obstetrics and gynecology (including c-section) or disaster relief. Although a fellowship is not essential for an effective contribution to global health, it can be helpful. Family Medicine Residency Programs with International Rotations The AAFP Center for Global Health Initiatives has compiled a director of family medicine residency programs that include international rotations. Search our free database to explore these programs. Ways to Integrate Global Health into Your Residency Experience Find your passion within global health. If you want to make a lasting impact in a global health setting, it is important to find your niche within the vast array of family medicine global health opportunities. It may take time and several different experiences to discover and develop your passion. You may find that you are drawn to a certain country, culture, language area, or area of need (e.g., maternal and child health, social determinants of health, disaster relief, policy, noncommunicable diseases). Be open to the many types of experiences that are available. If possible, explore them before you are committed to long-term employment. There may be faculty mentors in your residency program who have experience in certain areas of global health. The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) offers a directory of global health opportunities. Form partnerships. Once you find your passion, partnering with individuals and organizations that share your enthusiasm will further your interest and help you have a lasting, sustainable impact. Cultivate relationships by staying connected with particular organizations or international communities. If you travel, try to return to the same area so you can deepen your commitment to that population. Partnerships and connections will help you integrate global health fully into your career, and expand your capabilities in sustainable global health efforts. Connect with others. There is significant interest in global health among family medicine residents in the United States and abroad. The World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) Young Doctors’ Movements (YDMs) around the world connect passionate residents and young physicians in conversations about family medicine in global health. The Polaris Movement for New and Future Family Physicians in North America is a YDM launced in 2014 that provides an international platform for medical students, residents, and new family physicians. Connect on their Facebook page(www.facebook.com). Another initiative of the Wonca YDMs is Family Medicine 360°(www.vdgm.woncaeurope.org), an exchange program for family medicine residents during their elective months. These four-week exchanges allow participants to travel to a country of interest and experience primary health care delivery in that setting. Consider completing a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree. Proficiency in public health is becoming increasingly important in the global health arena, especially if you want to make lasting impact on prevention and social determinants of health. Some residency programs and fellowship programs pay for pursuit of an MPH while in training. Find out if your residency program is among them. Explore fellowships in global health. It is becoming easier to find residency programs that offer a family medicine global health fellowship; however, there are currently more global health fellowships in emergency medicine (EM) and internal medicine (IM) than in family medicine. If this is the case at your residency program, talk with the fellowship program to find out whether these fellowships can be adapted to family medicine. Explore electives in global health. Many residencies already have global health electives or tracks in place. If your residency does not offer these, consider creating your own global health elective in your area of interest. Most residency programs will accept your ideas for an elective, especially if you already have a relationship with the organization with which you will be working. If you are unable to travel due to time or financial constraints, pursue or create electives locally that encompass global health ideals. Working with underserved or marginalized populations in your own community can create lasting positive changes. Remember, global health is not just international health; it includes efforts in your own backyard as well! Learn more about Domestic Opportunities in Global Health »
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40? 20 Let i(j) = -j**2 - 10*j + 16. Let t be i(-11). Suppose -5*y - 3*l + l + 140 = 0, 0 = -t*y - 4*l + 150. Calculate the highest common factor of y and 39. 13 Suppose 1514 = 24*s + 362. What is the greatest common divisor of 120 and s? 24 Let q = 179 + 265. What is the greatest common divisor of q and 12? 12 Let b = 47 + -47. Suppose 0 = -4*d - 0 + 8. Suppose -d*a + 0*a - 50 = -5*r, 3*a + 15 = b. What is the greatest common divisor of r and 8? 8 Let f = -66 - -72. Suppose -b = -f*b - 5*n + 175, 0 = 4*b - 5*n - 158. What is the greatest common divisor of 407 and b? 37 Let x(w) = -12*w + 2. Let n(b) = -b**3 - 12*b**2 - 1. Let g be n(-12). Let s be x(g). What is the greatest common divisor of 70 and s? 14 Let j be 48*((-35)/15 + 3). Suppose -4*g = -2*p - 6*g + j, g = -4*p + 58. Calculate the highest common factor of p and 98. 14 Let s = -3 + -30. Let t = 41 + s. Let n be ((-42)/9)/(2/(-24)). Calculate the highest common divisor of t and n. 8 Suppose 11 + 149 = 8*t. Suppose 2*i + 8 = w - 10, w - i - t = 0. What is the greatest common factor of w and 77? 11 Let m be (-125)/(-35) + 20/(-35). Suppose -h - 44 = -t + m*h, 4*t = 4*h + 152. Calculate the highest common factor of 396 and t. 36 Let u = -222 + 285. What is the highest common factor of 18 and u? 9 Let v(s) = -2*s + 4*s - 2*s**3 + s**3 + 10*s**2 - 4*s. Let m be v(4). Calculate the greatest common factor of m and 22. 22 Suppose -8*t + 386 = 5*r - 7*t, -3*t = -2*r + 151. Let w = -20 + 31. What is the highest common divisor of w and r? 11 Suppose z + z - 34 = 0. Suppose z*i - 180 = 12*i. What is the greatest common factor of 144 and i? 36 Let f = 169 - 88. Let i(y) = y - 1. Let u(j) = 6*j - 1. Let d(k) = -5*i(k) + u(k). Let l be d(5). What is the highest common factor of l and f? 9 Suppose -3*i - 15 = -3*d, d + 5*i - 14 = 15. Suppose 4*z = 2*q + 320, 5*z + 4*q - 170 = 3*z. Calculate the greatest common factor of d and z. 9 Let o be (-4)/2 - (-2 + -2). Let z = 8 - o. Suppose -5*j + l = -74, -2*j + l = -4*j + 31. Calculate the greatest common divisor of j and z. 3 Let n = 8 - -4. Let y be 3/9 + 107/3. Calculate the greatest common divisor of n and y. 12 Let u be (-1 - -199)/(-17 + 2325/135). What is the highest common factor of u and 11? 11 Let u(q) = q**3 - 6*q**2 + 5*q + 5. Let z be u(5). Let m = -393 + 394. What is the highest common divisor of m and z? 1 Let h(n) = 8*n - 21. Let v be h(3). Suppose c - v*z = -6*z + 6, -2*z = 3*c - 32. What is the highest common factor of 6 and c? 6 Let b(l) = l**3 - 4*l**2 + 54*l - 386. Let i be b(6). Suppose -4*z + 47 = -33. Calculate the greatest common factor of z and i. 10 Let k = 1 + -8. Let w be (k + 2)*(-4)/5. Suppose 3*h = -t - 2*h + 25, -w*t + h + 184 = 0. Calculate the highest common factor of 9 and t. 9 Suppose -p + 0*p = 0. Suppose 2*b = 4*b - 314. Suppose -4*s + 5*y + b = p, 5*s - 4*y + y - 180 = 0. Calculate the greatest common factor of s and 3. 3 Let d = 1241 + -1124. What is the highest common divisor of d and 1131? 39 Let y = -1081 + 1403. What is the greatest common factor of 23 and y? 23 Let l = -80 + 136. Let i = l + -29. What is the greatest common factor of i and 81? 27 Suppose 28517 = 58*i + 1373. Calculate the highest common factor of i and 18. 18 Suppose -555 = -5*x + 30. Suppose i + 5*t = 138 - 139, 5*i + 4*t - 37 = 0. What is the highest common divisor of i and x? 9 Suppose -2*g - 5*w = 23, -g + 0*w = -3*w - 5. Let m = 1 - g. Suppose -m*h = -486 - 449. Calculate the highest common factor of h and 17. 17 Suppose -3*k + 4 = 2*o, -5*o - 9 = -3*k + 2. Let f(l) = 5*l**3 - 8*l + 4. Let n be f(k). What is the greatest common factor of n and 21? 7 Let v be 27/(-54) + (-7)/(-2). Let p(f) = f + 9. Let x be p(0). What is the greatest common factor of v and x? 3 Suppose 0*h + 10 = 2*h. Let n be (-227)/(-4) + 5/20. Suppose -z = -j - 2*z + n, -5*j - z = -277. Calculate the highest common factor of h and j. 5 Let t(k) = -4*k + 127. Let p be t(10). Calculate the greatest common divisor of 261 and p. 87 Let b be 32 + 1 - (3 - 0). Let d(f) = -f - 1. Suppose -4*l - 2*j + 6*j - 44 = 0, j = 4. Let g be d(l). Calculate the highest common divisor of g and b. 6 Let f(l) = -l**3 - 2*l**2 + 2*l + 15. Let v be f(0). Suppose v - 249 = -9*n. Calculate the greatest common factor of n and 2. 2 Suppose 2*a - 41*i + 40*i = 132, -2*a - 3*i = -116. What is the highest common divisor of a and 44? 4 Let z = 40 - 38. Let a be ((-6 - -9) + z)*4/1. Calculate the highest common factor of a and 60. 20 Let t(c) = -c**3 - 4*c**2 - 7*c - 4. Let m be t(-4). Let s = -191 - -351. Let g be ((-18)/8)/((-6)/s). Calculate the highest common factor of m and g. 12 Suppose 0 = -0*m + 3*m + n - 65, -3*m = 4*n - 62. Calculate the greatest common divisor of 638 and m. 22 Let n = 242 + -178. Calculate the greatest common divisor of n and 80. 16 Let r be 3*((-455)/(-14) + 2/4). Let g(o) = -1 + 6*o**2 - 3*o**2 - o + 8*o**2. Let d be g(-1). What is the highest common factor of r and d? 11 Let j be (2/(-4))/((-9)/(-18)). Let q be ((-6)/5)/(j/((-50)/(-4))). Let w = 424 + -289. What is the highest common factor of w and q? 15 Let h(w) = -w**3 + 13*w**2 + 13*w + 2. Let r = -22 - -32. Let y be h(r). Suppose -57 + y = 5*g. What is the highest common factor of 30 and g? 15 Let n(i) = -2*i**3 - 7*i**2 - 9*i. Let h be n(-4). What is the greatest common factor of 39 and h? 13 Suppose h - 4*h + 168 = 0. Suppose -4 = -2*i, -5 - 75 = -4*u + 2*i. Suppose 3*q = -4*b + 23, 2*q - 3*q + u = 3*b. What is the greatest common factor of h and b? 8 Suppose -3*p = -2*j + 42, 2*p - p + 2 = 0. What is the highest common divisor of 27 and j? 9 Suppose -4*y - 6 + 26 = 0. Suppose -t + y + 5 = 0. Calculate the greatest common factor of 20 and t. 10 Let l be (3 - 4)*(265 + 0). Let k be 4*l/(-20) - -1. What is the greatest common divisor of k and 12? 6 Let o be -27 + 4 + 6 + -3. Let j = o + 23. Calculate the highest common factor of 3 and j. 3 Suppose -2 - 8 = -2*s. Let m be ((-3)/2)/(6/(-20)). Suppose -s*p + 80 = m*z - z, -79 = -5*z - p. Calculate the greatest common factor of z and 75. 15 Let l be 3 + ((-3)/3 - -2)/1. Suppose 3*w = h - 33, 3*w = 3*h + l*w - 149. Calculate the highest common divisor of 72 and h. 24 Let a be (-1)/(2/(5 - 11)). Suppose 0 = 2*k - a*k - r + 63, 2*r = -k + 60. What is the greatest common factor of k and 6? 6 Suppose 0 = 2*u - y - 223, -7*u + 5*y = 3*y - 782. Suppose -2*b + 36 = -20. What is the highest common factor of u and b? 28 Let p be (76/(-10))/(5/(250/(-1))). What is the greatest common divisor of p and 20? 20 Let d be 1*29*((-12)/3 - -3). Let j = 19 - d. Calculate the greatest common factor of j and 528. 48 Let k be -6 + (5 - -8) + 2 + 0. What is the highest common divisor of 1 and k? 1 Suppose -5*h + 0*n - 4*n + 320 = 0, 3*h - n = 192. Suppose 4*a - h = 24. Let v = 39 - -16. What is the highest common factor of a and v? 11 Let w be ((-354)/(-9))/((-2)/3). Let j = 72 + w. Suppose 2*f = -2*f + 468. Calculate the greatest common divisor of j and f. 13 Suppose 0 = -41*a + 601 + 1613. Calculate the highest common divisor of 30 and a. 6 Let h = -23 + 25. Suppose -5*r + h*a - 6*a + 36 = 0, -2*r - a + 15 = 0. Calculate the highest common factor of 8 and r. 8 Suppose 7*r + 4*v - 68 = 2*r, 26 = 2*r + 2*v. What is the highest common divisor of 48 and r? 16 Let s be 60/9 + (-2)/3. Suppose 2*q - 4*o = q + s, 5*o = 0. Calculate the greatest common divisor of q and 12. 6 Let f(x) = x**3 + 2*x**2 - 2*x - 3. Let k be f(-3). Let b = -9 - k. Let h = b + 20. What is the greatest common factor of 119 and h? 17 Suppose 92 = -6*z - 364. Let a be z/(-5) - 9/45. Calculate the highest common divisor of 120 and a. 15 Let v = 86 - 16. Suppose 4 = 2*a + 4*p, -3*a - 5*p = -2*a + 10. What is the highest common divisor of v and a? 10 Let c(y) = -y**2 + 32*y - 188. Let r be c(24). Calculate the highest common factor of 42 and r. 2 Suppose 0 = -3*o - 5*k + 57, 6*o - k + 31 = 8*o. Calculate the greatest common factor of o and 238. 14 Let t be -8 - -3 - (-106 - -11). What is the greatest common divisor of 30 and t? 30 Let l = 2 + 1. Suppose -87 = -5*r - 2*s, -2*r - l*r - 5*s = -75. Let k = -221 + 392. Calculate the highest common factor of r and k. 19 Let f(h) be the first derivative of -h**4/4 - 8*h**3/3 - 3*h**2
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Q: Ember Data RESTAdapter: are matrix parameters possible? From my Ember application I have to call some REST API which supports only matrix parameters in URL (separated by ';') and does not support more classic query parameters (separated by '?' and '&'). I use Ember Data 1.0.0-beta.15. By default, when I call store.find(), a request URL is built using query parameters. Is there any configuration ways to instruct RESTAdapter (I believe this is the component to configure in my case) to apply matrix parameters? Thank you! Andre A: Finally my decision was to override the findQuery() method as following: export default DS.RESTAdapter.extend({ findQuery: function(store, type, query) { if (query.matrix) { var url = this.buildURL(type.typeKey); Object.keys(query).forEach(function(queryParamName) { if (queryParamName.toString() !== 'matrix') { url += ';' + queryParamName + '=' + query[queryParamName]; } }); return this.ajax(url, 'GET', { data: {} }); //originally was '{ data: query }' } else { return this._super(store, type, query); } } } I introduced a dedicated 'matrix' query parameter which is optional, can be set by a route and which indicates that a URL with matrix params is required. As you see above the 'matrix' query parameter is intercepted by the findQuery() method and does not go to a server.
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An afternoon concert by the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles was abruptly canceled Saturday and hundreds of people were forced to evacuate after a bomb threat at the historic Alex Theatre in Glendale, officials said. The 2 p.m. event had just gotten underway with a special guest appearance by actor Leslie Jordan, of the popular TV show “Will & Grace,” when an announcement was made about the threat, said Jonathan Weedman, executive director of the Gay Men’s Chorus. Glendale police then evacuated the theater, packed with about 600 people, he said. Brand Boulevard, between Wilson and California avenues, was shut down out of caution. “The good news is that everybody is safe,” Weedman said. “And the Glendale Police Department is sweeping the theater.” Weedman said this is the first time in the history of the Gay Men’s Chorus that a concert had to be halted because of a bomb threat. He said the same was true for the Alex Theatre, a noted Art Deco building that opened in 1925 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. He referenced the politically charged atmosphere sweeping across the country. “This is a difficult time for the LGBTQ community, and we will not be deterred,” he said. “The show must go on, and our message [of inclusiveness] will continue.” The theatre was cleared by police at 4:30 p.m. and the Gay Men’s Chorus was planning to go forward with an 8 p.m. concert. A 2 p.m. concert is also scheduled for Sunday. carlos.lozano@latimes.com UPDATES: 5:00 p.m.: This article was updated with new information regarding the reopening of the theatre. This article was originally posted at 4:10 p.m.
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Primavera Sound 2016 took place over the past few days at the Parc del Fòrum in Barcelona and half of the Methods Unsound team went along to report on it and generally get up to no good. There are some things you should first know about this half of the Methods Unsound team though: 1) we’ve never been to Primavera Sound before, 2) we’ve never been to a European festival before, 3) one of us is a fairly grouchy 35 year-old prone to emotional outbursts after the merest hint of alcohol, 4) the other one of us is pregnant. As you can imagine, it was quite the weekend. But before we get into reviewing the bands, here are a few impressions of Primavera for those who have never been before… – Unlike UK festivals, it’s entirely made of concrete. There is very little greenery… but it’s very beautiful in its own unique way. What #primaverasound lacks in green spaces it makes up for in architectural menace. pic.twitter.com/tqmqu7T3VS — Methods Unsound (@MethodsUnsound) June 3, 2016 – And it is next to the beach, so you’re never far from gorgeous sea, sand and a cooling breeze. – The weather’s lovely. It never got above 23 degrees, and you wouldn’t necessarily want it to as there’s very little shade in the section containing the two main stages. – Because the Spanish are sensible and would never go out in the midday sun anyway, the festival doesn’t really kick off till past 4pm. Hooray! – This does also mean you may be here till 4am every night because most of the best bands are on after the headliners – Battles, Animal Collective, Holly Herndon for instance. Hooray? – You have to really like Heineken. Getting through more than three pints of the stuff becomes a war of attrition. There is however a very reasonably priced selection of gluten-free beers and non-alcoholic beers. And shit-tonnes of second hand smoke. You have to really like second hand smoke. And concrete. – It’s all music. There’s no comedy, theatre, dance, film or any of the other stuff that we pretend to think is added value at UK festivals but never go to see anyway. It’s all music. And concrete. – There are loads of posters, records and CDs on sale too, which is great and makes a change from the usual mixture of shit novelty hats and inflatables, but it does mean you will spunk all of the money you saved on cheap beer on a psychedelic poster of Witchthroat Serpent. – There’s no camping, so you have to find your own accommodation. I know for most people this is half the fun of festivals, but imagine the joy of being able to go back every night to a hotel room or AirBnB and have a shower and sleep in an actual bed and not have to eat beans from a tin. This also means the festival itself feels fresh every day, nobody’s acting like a stinking strung-out asshat, the toilets stay clean, the littering is negligible and you don’t get baked alive in a tarpaulin oven every morning. – Accomodation tip: we highly recommend staying in Badalona instead of central Barcelona. It’s a 20 minute train/tram/cheap taxi ride away from Primavera, it’s quiet, there’s a beautiful beach here, and this Airbnb is genuinely badass. It has the kindest and coolest host, an incredible terrace and contains some terrific books. – Oh God I love it here, I don’t ever want to go to a UK festival ever again. Now all that’s out of the way, let’s talk about the music… Thursday 2nd JUNE THE JAMES HUNTER SIX [18:55 – 19:50] H&M Imagine that your dad is terrific guitarist, singer and performer. Like Charles Bradley good. Then imagine that he still insists on making the same terrible jokes he makes at the dinner table. That’s what makes Colchester born James Hunter so easy to love. Their cover of The “5” Royales’ ‘Baby Don’t Do It‘ was incredible on every level and by any rights you won’t be able to attend any festival from now on without seeing them on the bill. BEAK> [19:30 – 20:20] PRIMAVERA Geoff Barrow from Portishead’s other marginally more terrifying band tore up the Primavera stage like a bunch of fucking heroes, helped by Barrow’s brilliant mixture of warmth and animosity towards the crowd. At one moment he decided not to play one of their more accessible, closest-to-actually-charting hits and instead played a much obscurer abrasive one, proclaiming, “you’re here to be exposed to new music!” I now love them a lot harder than ever before. VINCE STAPLES [22:10 – 23:10] PITCHFORK Despite this being one of my most eagerly anticipated sets of the weekend, the former Odd Future collaborator and creator of one the best rap albums of the last couple of years felt oddly off-form. He was all crazed bouts of aberrant energy but little focus. Much of the moody atmospherics of Summertime ’06’s best tracks were lost, and Staples himself sounded off-key and hilariously incoherent at times. JOHN CARPENTER [23:50 – 00:50] PRIMAVERA It was a privilege to witness first-hand one of horror director John Carpenter‘s first EVER live shows and this was easily the highlight of the first day. Carpenter mostly played his classic themes, beginning with a double-hit of Escape From New York and Assault on Precinct 13, but surprisingly only peppered a handful of Lost Themes tracks throughout the set. Each one sounded chilling and terrific though, especially stood outside with a large captivated crowd long past midnight. Yes I came all this way to a beach in Barcelona to listen to the Halloween soundtrack. I DON’T CARE IF THAT MAKES ME A LUNATIC. LCD SOUNDSYSTEM [01:10 – 02:45] HEINEKEN It may seem trite to say it (and there probably wasn’t really any doubt they’d return) but it is genuinely lovely to have LCD Soundsystem back. Tonight’s set was a perfectly judged and delivered run-through of the best of their three albums. There were very few surprises – save for a GIGANTIC FUCKING DISCO BALL that threatened to disrupt Earth’s gravity – but you can understand the trepidation of these fawn-like steps back to life. Some tracks went on a bit too long. In places it could’ve been a little bit tighter. Personally I was mildly disappointed they didn’t include ‘Drunk Girls’ or ‘North American Scum’, but who can really complain when you get to hear ‘All My Friends’ and ‘Someone Great’ performed so exquisitely in all their emotional, uplifting glory. It should also be noted that James Murphy is in fantastic voice. In fact I’ve only just realised what an incredible vocal talent he really is. Please come back soon. Friday 3RD JUNE SAVAGES [20:00 – 20:50] HEINEKEN On the main stage, lead vocalist Jehnny Beth spent most of her time straddling the crowd and she was clearly having a blast. Say what you will about Savages (“a bit boring, derivative and exhaustingly serious”) they fucking ooze cool and seeing them live makes you appreciate how truly talented they all are. Savages manage to balance intensity and fun in a way that few bands can manage. I just wish they were a tiny bit more interesting. Beirut [21:00 – 22:00] H&M Putting Beirut on before Radiohead makes Radiohead seem like fucking Slade. RADIOHEAD [22:15 – 00:15] HEINEKEN The last time I saw Radiohead live was in a big-top in Warrington the night before Kid A came out and it was one of the best gigs I’ve ever been to. Tonight was just as good. You forget how monumentally wonderful they are live. So tight, so slick, so full of surprises – apart from ‘No Surprises’, they always play that one. They have the ability to make a field of 55,000 people go completely silent in reverie for one minute (if you made even so much as a throat-clear during ‘Daydreaming’ you’d get an evil glare from any number of bearded, bespectacled middle-aged men) then turn them into a full-on mosh pit the next. It was an utterly crowd-pleasing two-hour long set. For the first half-hour it leaned heavily on A Moon Shaped Pool material – which I’m still not totally sold on, but it was suitably atmospheric and hypnotic here tonight – before launching into a mixture of older gems. They pretty much played three or four tracks from every album. Stand-outs included ‘2+2=5’, a rare outing for ‘Talk Show Host’ and a trio of Kid A‘s best tracks including ‘Idioteque’. Although I don’t feel like I ever need to hear ‘Karma Police’ and ‘No Surprises’ ever again – particularly as these just induce mass Glastonbury circa ’97 singalongs – ‘Paranoid Android’ was utterly demolishing. Radiohead ended with ‘Creep’ and although I would have preferred anything from The Bends to finish (from which they only played ‘Street Spirit’ *sad-face emoji*) it would be churlish to fault a band with nine albums worth of insanely brilliant material to choose from. Ultimately you just felt thoroughly spoilt by them. HOLLY HERNDON [01:00 – 02:00] PITCHFORK I frigging love Holly Herndon, and although her experimental sliced-up glitchpop is often perhaps more cerebral than outright enjoyable, it soon found its footing and became a gorgeously textured and danceable set. Despite someone who looked like Thor screaming into a microphone and some terribly dated graphics. My wife fucking hated it. I can totally see why. Saturday 4th June BRIAN WILSON PERFORMING PET SOUNDS [20:00 – 21:15] HEINEKEN I can’t lie. I had a meltdown during this. From the moment Brian Wilson and his band launched into ‘Wouldn’t It Be Nice’ all the way through the entirety of Pet Sounds, to an encore consisting of ‘Good Vibrations’, an assortment of other classic Beach Boys tracks and even the frigging ‘Monster Mash’, I was in tears. “Oh my God, this is so beautiful, Pet Sounds is such a glorious work of art and it completely broke Brian Wilson but here he is performing the whole thing right now in 2016 and I feel so lucky to be here listening to it oh my God why won’t the tears stop?” This was was me for the entire 60 minutes. My wife insists it was all the white wine I drank in the press lounge half-an-hour prior, and she might be right. But seeing Brian Wilson along with original founding member Al Jardine on guitar and his son Matt Jardine on falsetto vocals, performing ‘God Only Knows’ was the highlight of the weekend, if not my entire festival-going career. DRIVE LIKE JEHU [21:35 – 22:35] PRIMAVERA The post-hardcore legends who disbanded in 1995, returned to extraordinary life on the Primavera stage with an eviscerating set full of exhilarating spite and menace. Admittedly, I had little prior knowledge of the band prior to the recent ATP debacle, but I’m so glad I’ve been exposed to them now. Every moment on stage felt vital and a welcome release of energy during a weekend perhaps lacking in pure sweaty fury. PJ HARVEY [22:35 – 23:50] HEINEKEN A rare opportunity to see PJ Harvey live is a moment to savour, and perhaps nobody else can make an album truly come alive on stage more than her. Here Harvey was backed by a nine-piece band including long-term collaborator John Parish and she played a largely The Hope Six Demolition Project set, but threw in a couple of seldom heard older tracks (‘When Under Ether’) some old favourites (‘Down By The Water’, ’50ft Queenie’) as well as a few tracks off the unbeatable Let England Shake. PJ Harvey looked as if she was having the time of her life too. VENOM [23:05 – 00:00] Adidas originals The festival’s only (and surprising) concession to true NWOBHM came in the form of Newcastle-born metallers Venom whose golden years were 30 years ago. Here now though, these survivors stood silhouetted by mist and red lasers, and took the form of immoveable action figures from the 80s with only four points of articulation. They were fucking excellent. ACTION BRONSON [23:45 – 00:45] PRIMAVERA The chef turned rapper busted out an hour’s set full of bonhomie and self-effacing humour, and managed to draw a humungous crowd to a relatively small stage. His delivery was as grizzled as ever, and became more gnarled as the night wore on, but Bronson knows how to keep an audience entertained and would often drop some classic 90s samples into the mix – Biz Markie’s ‘Just a Friend’ being a terrific example. And that’s it for Primavera Sound 2016. Would we go back again next year? Fuck yeah! Would we go back again next year having to be forcibly sober due to pregnancy? Hang on, I’ll ask Toni… She says: “No… Hmm, well actually maybe if I had a fold-up chair… No, it’s still no. Please don’t make me.” Main image: Eric Pamies Author: Christopher Ratcliff Date: 2016-06-06 Title: Primavera Sound 2016 Rating: 4
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The Montreal Alouettes announced on Wednesday that the club has made another catch in the free agent market as national defensive end Jamaal Westerman signed a two-year deal with the team. Westerman (6’3”, 249 lbs.) collected seven sacks in 11 games last season before a season-ending upper body injury sidelined him for the rest of the year. The 32-year-old will now get the opportunity to play with his brother Jabar for the first time at the professional level. “We are thrilled to have signed Jamaal and to be able to reunite him with his brother on our defensive line. Jamaal is a disruptive force on the field who leads by example,” said Alouettes General Manager Kavis Reed. “Not only did we get better on defence with this move, but we also changed our ratio.” The Brooklyn, NY native joined the Bombers in 2015 season began after spending five seasons in the NFL. In 47 games in Winnipeg, Westerman has tallied 118 tackles, 32 sacks and four forced fumbles. He was also named a West Division All-Star and was the West Division nominee for Most Outstanding Canadian in 2015. In 58 career games in the NFL with the New York Jets, Indianapolis Colts, Arizona Cardinals, Buffalo Bills and Pittsburgh Steelers, he cumulated 45 tackles and six quarterback sacks, while forcing a fumble and recovering four. The former Rutgers University Scarlet Knight completed his collegiate career with 141 tackles, including 45 for losses. His 26 career sacks ranked him third highest in Rutgers school history.
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A manufacturing company plans to bring 177 new full-time permanent jobs to the county over the next five years, according to David Dear, interim county manager. The company plans to locate at the Foothills Commerce Center in Shelby and will make an official announcement on their plans within the next month, according to officials. The name of the company is currently being withheld pending that announcement, Dear said Thursday. The company is currently being called Project Lakewood. “Project Lakewood is a manufacturing company,” Dear said. “They will be building a 150,000-square-foot building in the Foothills Commerce Center. They’re going to announce 177 new jobs and an investment of about $26 million.” Both the city of Shelby and Cleveland County plan to provide incentives to the company. Cleveland County is planning an incentive package. “In that package will be a grant back to the company of 65 percent of their property taxes for a seven-year period and $50,000 towards the site preparation expenses, which essentially is the grading expenses of the site,” Dear said. The city of Shelby also plans to give the company a one-time grant of $150,000 for site preparation. That funding will come from the city’s general fund reserve. Public hearings for the incentive grants will be Tuesday evening at the county commissioners meeting and Oct. 7 at the regular city council meeting.
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Vivint gets new COO—from outside the industry PROVO, Utah—Vivint has a new COO: former Xerox executive David Bywater. The recent hire marks the third time this year that Vivint has gone outside the industry to add to its executive team. Hiring an industry outsider is not necessarily a goal of Vivint, but it can be beneficial, Alex Dunn, president of the home automation/home security provider, which is based here, told Security Systems News. “We’re just trying to build the best team possible, find the best people possible, and if they come from outside the industry that’s something we’re OK with,” Dunn said. “And a lot of times they bring really good perspectives to the company, so it’s a benefit.” Dunn said that is the case with Bywater, who most recently was an EVP and corporate officer for Xerox and COO of its $1.8 billion state government services division. Bywater formerly worked for Affiliated Computer Services (ACS), which Xerox acquired in 2009. “One of the things we’re trying to do as we fill out the executive team to make sure we have people that the company is going to grow into, and not have people that grow into the company, just because we’re growing so fast,” Dunn said. “We’re very lucky to get [Bywater], and his experience in running very large organizations at Xerox is going to be helpful as we grow the business to help us get to where we want to get to.” “I think Vivint has got great momentum and I’m really impressed with what they’ve done,” Bywater said. He said his “goal is to help accentuate that” and scale the business and make it stronger as it grows. Bywater, who started his job in the middle of July, was the next hire. Bywater said he and Eyring were classmates at Harvard Business School, where they both earned MBA degrees. Bywater said it’s not uncommon for executives in one industry to become executives in another. For example, he noted, Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson formerly was EVP of UnitedHealth Group. And in the decade Bywater spent working for ACS/Xerox, he ran more than 65 different service companies, which he said were extremely diverse and whose revenues ranged from $10 million per year to more than $400 million per year. And he ran many of them at the same time. “I had never run any of those businesses,” Bywater told SSN. “I had never been an HR expert running a large benefits administration business, I had never run a corporate learning company before, I had never run the largest Medicaid business in the country, I had never run the largest child support services business in the country. … And most people would say, ‘How can you do [that] and do it an excellent way if you weren’t raised in that industry?’” He said that answer is that “the core principles to growing and running an incredible company” are the same from business to business. “How do you attract and motivate people, how do you put the right process in place, the correct strategy, and bring your resources to bear to achieve that strategy, how do you do right by your customers, how do you scale and grow, how do you foster a culture of innovation?” All businesses need to answer those questions to be successful, he said. Bywater said that 80 percent of any business involves those common principles and the remainder is “the particulars.” He added, “The beautiful thing about Vivint is that they have so many people that know the particulars of security and home automation, they are the experts there. I believe I bring the expertise on how you grow a company.” Bywater, who also has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Brigham Young University, is in charge of the daily operations of Vivint, “including customer operations, human resources, field service, and supply chain,” the company said in a news release. Vivint doesn’t just hire from outside the industry. Todd Santiago, formerly president of 2GIG Technologies who also has a Harvard MBA, recently joined Vivint as chief sales officer. 2GIG was acquired by Nortek earlier this year. “Our executive team is one of the reasons Vivint is a success,” Pedersen said in a prepared statement. “During the 13 years we’ve been in business, Vivint has become one of the fastest growing companies in our industry. I have high expectations that with the talent and drive we’re bringing to the team, the goals we’ve already achieved are just the beginning.”
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Single spins in silicon carbide absorb and emit single photons based on the state of their spin. Credit: Prof. David Awschalom An international team led by the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering has discovered how to manipulate a weird quantum interface between light and matter in silicon carbide along wavelengths used in telecommunications. The work advances the possibility of applying quantum mechanical principles to existing optical fiber networks for secure communications and geographically distributed quantum computation. Prof. David Awschalom and his 13 co-authors announced their discovery in the June 23 issue of Physical Review X. "Silicon carbide is currently used to build a wide variety of classical electronic devices today," said Awschalom, the Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering at UChicago and a senior scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. "All of the processing protocols are in place to fabricate small quantum devices out of this material. These results offer a pathway for bringing quantum physics into the technological world." The findings are partly based on theoretical models of the materials performed by Awschalom's co-authors at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest. Another research group in Sweden's Linköping University grew much of the silicon carbide material that Awschalom's team tested in experiments at UChicago. And another team at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Japan helped the UChicago researchers make quantum defects in the materials by irradiating them with electron beams. Quantum mechanics govern the behavior of matter at the atomic and subatomic levels in exotic and counterintuitive ways as compared to the everyday world of classical physics. The new discovery hinges on a quantum interface within atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide that generates the fragile property of entanglement, one of the strangest phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics. Entanglement means that two particles can be so inextricably connected that the state of one particle can instantly influence the state of the other, no matter how far apart they are. "This non-intuitive nature of quantum mechanics might be exploited to ensure that communications between two parties are not intercepted or altered," Awschalom said. Exploiting quantum mechanics The findings enhance the once-unexpected opportunity to create and control quantum states in materials that already have technological applications, Awschalom noted. Pursuing the scientific and technological potential of such advances will become the focus of the newly announced Chicago Quantum Exchange, which Awschalom will direct. An especially intriguing aspect of the new paper was that silicon carbide semiconductor defects have a natural affinity for moving information between light and spin (a magnetic property of electrons). "A key unknown has always been whether we could find a way to convert their quantum states to light," said David Christle, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Chicago and lead author of the work. "We knew a light-matter interface should exist, but we might have been unlucky and found it to be intrinsically unsuitable for generating entanglement. We were very fortuitous in that the optical transitions and the process that converts the spin to light is of very high quality." The defect is a missing atom that causes nearby atoms in the material to rearrange their electrons. The missing atom, or the defect itself, creates an electronic state that researchers control with a tunable infrared laser. "What quality basically means is: How many photons can you get before you've destroyed the quantum state of the spin?" said Abram Falk, a researcher at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Resarch Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., who is familiar with the work but not a co-author on the paper. The UChicago researchers found that they could potentially generate up to 10,000 photons, or packets of light, before they destroyed the spin state. "That would be a world record in terms of what you could do with one of these types of defect states," Falk added. Awschalom's team was able to turn the quantum state of information from single electron spins in commercial wafers of silicon carbide into light and read it out with an efficiency of approximately 95 percent. Millisecond coherence The duration of the spin state—called coherence—that Awschalom's team achieved was a millisecond. Not much by clock standards, but quite a lot in the realm of quantum states, in which multiple calculations can be carried out in a nanosecond, or a billionth of a second. The feat opens up new possibilities in silicon carbide because its nanoscale defects are a leading platform for new technologies that seek to use quantum mechanical properties for quantum information processing, sensing magnetic and electric fields and temperature with nanoscale resolution, and secure communications using light. "There's about a billion-dollar industry of power electronics built on silicon carbide," Falk said. "Following this work, there's an opportunity to build a platform for quantum communication that leverages these very advanced classical devices in the semiconductor industry," he said. Most researchers studying defects for quantum applications have focused on an atomic defect in diamond, which has become a popular visible-light testbed for these technologies. "Diamond has been this huge industry of quantum control work," Falk noted. Dozens of research groups across the country have spent more than a decade perfecting the material to achieve standards that Awschalom's group has mastered in silicon carbide after only a few years of investigation. Silicon carbide versatility "There are many different forms of silicon carbide, and some of them are commonly used today in electronics and optoelectronics," Awschalom said. "Quantum states are present in all forms of silicon carbide that we've explored. This bodes well for introducing quantum mechanical effects into both electronic and optical technologies." Researchers now are beginning to wonder if this type of physics also may work in other materials, Falk noted. "Moreover, can we rationally design a defect that has the properties we want, not just stumble into one?" he asked. Defects are the key. "For decades the electronics industry has come up with a myriad of tricks to remove all the defects from their devices because defects often cause problems in conventional electronics," Awschalom explained. "Ironically, we're putting the defects back in for quantum systems." Related Stories Harnessing solid-state quantum bits, or qubits, is a key step toward the mass production of electronic devices based on quantum information science and technology. However, realizing a robust qubit with a long lifetime is ... A discovery by physicists at UC Santa Barbara may earn silicon carbide -- a semiconductor commonly used by the electronics industry -- a role at the center of a new generation of information technologies designed to exploit ... Quantum computers—a possible future technology that would revolutionize computing by harnessing the bizarre properties of quantum bits, or qubits. Qubits are the quantum analogue to the classical computer bits "0" and "1." ... An electronics technology that uses the "spin" - or magnetization - of atomic nuclei to store and process information promises huge gains in performance over today's electron-based devices. But getting there is proving challenging. For 60 years computers have become smaller, faster and cheaper. But engineers are approaching the limits of how small they can make silicon transistors and how quickly they can push electricity through devices to create digital ... Entanglement is one of the strangest phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics, the theory that underlies most of modern physics. It says that two particles can be so inextricably connected that the state of one particle can ... The realization of so-called topological materials—which exhibit exotic, defect-resistant properties and are expected to have applications in electronics, optics, quantum computing, and other fields—has opened up a new ... Light-by-light scattering is a very rare phenomenon in which two photons interact, producing another pair of photons. This process was among the earliest predictions of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the quantum theory of ... Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons). This occurs at extremely high temperatures, but at relatively low energies. An international ... A team of researchers from several institutions in India and Japan has found that it is possible to use a muon detector to measure electric potential in thunderstorms. The paper is published in the journal Physical Review ... Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even ...
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Recently, thinning and miniaturization of a semiconductor device and its package have been increasingly demanded. Therefore, as the semiconductor device and its package, flip chip type semiconductor devices in which a semiconductor element such as a semiconductor chip is mounted (flip chip-connected) on a substrate by means of flip chip bonding have been widely utilized. In such flip chip connection, a semiconductor chip is fixed to a substrate in a form where a circuit face of the semiconductor chip is opposed to an electrode-formed face of the substrate. In such a semiconductor device or the like, there may be a case where the back surface of the semiconductor chip is protected with a protective film to prevent the semiconductor chip from damaging or the like (see, Patent Document 1 to 10). Patent Document 1: JP-A-2008-166451 Patent Document 2: JP-A-2008-006386 Patent Document 3: JP-A-2007-261035 Patent Document 4: JP-A-2007-250970 Patent Document 5: JP-A-2007-158026 Patent Document 6: JP-A-2004-221169 Patent Document 7: JP-A-2004-214288 Patent Document 8: JP-A-2004-142430 Patent Document 9: JP-A-2004-072108 Patent Document 10: JP-A-2004-063551 The present inventors investigated films for protecting the back surface of semiconductor chips. As a result, the inventors have invented a method of attaching a film to the back surface of a semiconductor chip by using a film for semiconductor device production, in which a plurality of adhesive layer-attached dicing tapes each comprises an adhesive layer laminated on a dicing tape are laminated on a separator at a predetermined interval. The adhesive layer-attached dicing tape is precut in accordance with the shape (for example, a circular form) of the semiconductor wafer to which it is stuck. The adhesive layer-attached dicing tape is peeled from the separator when it is stuck to a semiconductor wafer. However, depending on the physical properties of the adhesive layer-attached dicing tape and on the condition of the apparatus, there has occurred an additional problem in that the adhesive layer-attached dicing tape could not be well separated from the separator.
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Q: Plotting multiple functions in one plot - maple Simple question which is bugging me quite a bit. In maple I'm trying to graph 3 normal distributions, each one being a shift of the other. I run the following code in maple and then get the following plot plots[multiple](plot, [exp(-(x-4)^2), x = -5 .. 5], [exp(-(x-12)^2), x = -5 .. 5], [exp(-(x-20)^2), x = -100 .. 100]); Which is an issue. I don't see what I did wrong. Can someone shed light on this? A: I think you should change the intervals: [> with(plots): a := plot(exp(-(x-4)^2), x = -5 .. 15, color = blue): b := plot(exp(-(x-12)^2), x = -5 .. 15, color = red): c := plot(exp(-(x-20)^2), x = -10 .. 30, color = green): display(a, b, c);
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SINGAPORE: A collision between a sports car and a taxi at Yishun Avenue 1 early Sunday (Oct 22) morning, left two men injured. Police said they were alerted to an accident involving a taxi and a car along Yishun Avenue 1 towards Yishun Avenue 8 at 3.59am. A 56-year-old male taxi driver and the 27-year-old driver of the car were conscious when they were taken to Khoo Teck Puat hospital, police said. Photos and videos posted online of the aftermath showed a red McLaren sports car and a blue ComfortDelGro taxi badly damaged and seen on the pavement surrounded by debris. Police investigations are ongoing. Advertisement
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Hollywood Cowboy Hollywood Cowboy is a 1937 American adventure film directed by Ewing Scott and written by Daniel Jarrett and Ewing Scott. The film stars George O'Brien, Cecilia Parker, Maude Eburne, Joe Caits and Frank Milan. The film was released on May 28, 1937, by RKO Pictures. Plot Cast George O'Brien as Jeffery Carson Cecilia Parker as Joyce Butler Maude Eburne as Violet Butler Joe Caits as G. Gatsby (Shakespear) Holmes Frank Milan as Westbrook Courtney Charles Middleton as 'Doc' Kramer Lee Shumway as Benson Walter De Palma as Rolfe Metzger Al Hill as Henchman Camby William Royle as Klinker Al Herman as Henchman Steger Frank Hagney as Gillie Dan Wolheim as Morey Slim Balch as Ranch hand Slim Sid Jordan as Ranch hand Morgan Lester Dorr as Joe Garvey Harold Daniels as Hotel Clerk References External links Category:1937 films Category:American films Category:American black-and-white films Category:English-language films Category:1930s adventure films Category:American adventure films
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Computers trained to spot fake online profiles Published duration 7 June 2017 image copyright Getty Images image caption Fake profiles are common on dating sites, and can be used to defraud Researchers have trained computers to spot social media users who pose as somebody else - a practice known as catfishing. They say their algorithms can identify users who lie about their gender, with more than 90% accuracy. Most dating website users say they have encountered at least one fake profile, according to consumer group Which? And the number of people defrauded by dating scams reached a record high in 2016. Analysing data from 5,000 verified public profiles manually checked by employees on adult content site Pornhub, the algorithms learned how men and women of different ages interacted with others, how they commented on posts and their style of writing. That allowed them to trawl the rest of the website in search of those lying about their gender and their age. Testing ground The study suggested almost 40% of the site's users lied about their age and 25% lied about their gender, with women more likely to deceive than men. Dr Walid Magdy, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Informatics, said: "Adult websites are populated by users who claim to be other than who they are, so these are a perfect testing ground for techniques that identify catfishes." "What was interesting was that it seems that for many the reason for lying was to get more friends and subscribers." Dr Magdy said the algorithms, developed by computer scientists at Edinburgh University, in collaboration with Lancaster University, Queen Mary University, London and King's College, London, could "lead to useful tools to flag dishonest users and keep social networks of all kinds safe". "It has many applications such as people who fake accounts on Twitter for political reasons or for children who fake accounts to access adult websites," he said. The study will be presented at a conference in Australia on the future of social networks.
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package ini // emptyToken is used to satisfy the Token interface var emptyToken = newToken(TokenNone, []rune{}, NoneType)
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TOIKKA BIRD GUIDE ITEM We guarantee the best price on all glass birds. For more information on our price match and guarantee policy click here BRAND: iittala DESIGNER: Oiva Toikka LIMITED EDITION: No SIGNED: O. Toikka Nuutajärvi MEASUREMENTS: 4-3/4" W x 4-1/3" H (12 x 11 cm) MORE: See all product details ITEM OVERVIEW SPECIFICATIONS REVIEWS Q & A More about iittala Toikka Snow GooseThe stark contrast between the black beak and the white body of the Lumihanhi, or Snow Goose, creates a statement-making addition to your glass birds collection. The sleek design and tall neck allows this bird to stand out among others in the collection.
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Golf World Driving Range can be found at Airline Hwy 15535. The following is offered: Sporting Goods. The entry is present with us since Sep 9, 2010 and was last updated on Nov 14, 2013. In Baton Rouge there are 32 other Sporting Goods. An overview can be found here.
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Naked eye and spectrophotometric detection of chromogenic insecticide in aquaculture using amine functionalized gold nanoparticles in the presence of major interferents. Detection of a chromogenic insecticide, malachite green (MG) using 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole capped gold nanoparticles (DAT-AuNPs) by both naked eye and spectrophotometry was described in this paper. The DAT-AuNPs were prepared by wet chemical method and show absorption maximum at 518nm. The zeta potential of DAT-AuNPs was found to be -39.9mV, suggesting that one of the amine groups of DAT adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs and the other amine group stabilizes the AuNPs from aggregation. The wine red color DAT-AuNPs changes to violet while adding 25μM MG whereas the absorption band at 518nm was increased and shifted towards longer wavelength. However, addition of 70μM MG leads to the aggregation of DAT-AuNPs. This is due to strong electrostatic interaction between ammonium ion of MG and the free amine group of DAT. Based on the color change and shift in SPR band, 25 and 5μM MG can be easily detected by naked eye and spectrophotometry. The DAT-AuNPs show high selectivity towards MG even in the presence of 5000-fold higher concentrations of common interferents. The practical application was successfully demonstrated by determining MG in fish farm water.
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south park If I learned anything from Bon Jovi in the '80s it was that an object's slipperiness had a direct correlation with that same object's relative wetness. But more importantly, I learned that we should never say goodbye. However, following through with such a sentiment -- never say goodbye -- is much more difficult than scrawling it across your bulging crotch on an 8-by-10 -inch glossy for a hysterical groupie. The truth is, we have to say goodbye -- especially in television -- no matter how complicated, emotional or difficult that might be. Some say goodbye too soon, some hang on far too long, and some depart at just the right time. It's our job to make peace with those goodbyes. With the recent departure of Michael Scott from 'The Office,' I started to ponder other televisual vacancies and the interesting circumstances surrounding them. So, how about those 'Comedy Awards'? That was some pretty great stuff, huh? I mean, comedians taking the craft of comedy seriously enough to honor the greats in their area of expertise. Who wouldn't love that? This episode actually wasn't as funny as I expected, considering it was about comedy in general. It seemed to stay more on message throughout, which did make for a good presentation of the point the creators were trying to get across. I hope I got it. It's been five long months since the fourteenth season of 'South Park' bid us adieu. But now, the boys are back and just as awful as ever. Cartman was possibly worse than we've ever seen him -- well, that's not even close to true as he didn't kill anyone or force anyone to eat anyone else -- as he whined and cussed his mother out for not getting him an iPad. Trey Parker and Matt Stone did a masterful job of tying all their storylines together by the end of this episode, culminating in possibly the happiest moment in young Eric's life beautifully dashed. Why 15? Because 'South Park's' 15th season is upon us (premieres Wednesday, April 27, 10PM ET on Comedy Central). Besides, if we included every outrageous episode, we'd pretty much have to count down all 209 installments that have aired so far. Much to my father's chagrin, cartoons are an ever emerging and evolving source of entertainment and social commentary for fully developed humans. My dad, like many dads out there, still operates under the assumption that anything animated is for children and to keep cats company when their owners leave. This outlook on animated television was a lot easier to maintain in the pre-'Simpsons' culture that my father grew up in. Easier, but certainly not justified. The implication that cartoons were initially exclusively "for kids" indicates more ignorance than truth about the nature of the medium. Look at almost any old 'Looney Tunes' short -- as a representative example -- layered with cultural references and parodies that only adults have a shot at understanding. But now, with the wealth of grown-up animated series available on TV, it's impossible to brush off animation as anything less than a legitimate form of television series. What follows is a broad discussion about animated television, including a list of some of the toons that illustrate best this change in perception. Nowadays, creating a tie-in smartphone game or app is just about required for every successful entertainment franchise -- TV shows included. As both a television and iPhone superfan, I've come up with a list of the best TV-related apps. Interestingly, most of them are games that can also be played on the iPod or have an equivalent "HD" version in the iTunes App Store that will play on a larger screen. Interested in beefing up your app collection? Check out my favorites after the jump. Our No. 1 choice for the best Christmas episode ever may not be a surprise -- any episode that involves the creation of a new, Christmas spin-off holiday has to rate a top spot! -- but countdown is designed to bring some ho-ho-ho holiday cheer to your celebration this season. So, jump down off the aluminum pole, postpone that Airing of Grievances and recall these classic Christmas TV installments. Tonight's episode brings us to the end of another season of 'South Park' and Trey Parker and Matt Stone have decided to end the season with a lot of sexual double entendres (or at least more sexual double entendres than usual). With this break, perhaps Matt Stone and Trey Parker will use the time to reflect and create. Perhaps they'll even write a Broadway musical. It's funny how 'Crème Fraiche' made both food and exercise dirty at the same time. The Food Network became analogous to porn (and indeed, it is sometimes) and the Shake Weight became analogous to ... well, you know. This episode was more overtly sexual but you have to be overtly sexual when the subject of your satire is the sex life of a marriage. 'South Park''s 2008 viral video spoof, 'Canada on Strike,' paid tribute to many of the Internet's most famous celebrities. But somehow, it took one of them two years to react to the episode. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the makers of the copyrighted viral music video "What What (In the Butt)" are suing the show for infringement after a remake featuring the character Butters appeared in the 'Canada' episode. The resulting parody was "willful, intentional, and purposeful, in disregard of and indifferent to the rights of Brownmark," the lawsuit states. Well, at last it's come down to this ... a final battle between good and evil. As long as you define "good and evil" in 'South Park' terms, that is. On the new episode (Wed., 10PM ET on Comedy Central), we follow the continuing adventures of Eric Cartman as "The Coon." Cartman is a self-styled "Batman-esque" caped crusader, and like the Dark Knight, Eric has very clear-cut ideas about what is right and what is wrong. As Cartman narrates in full-on, hyperbolic Christian Bale-mode, we get the full info about the evil forces that he opposes. "The Coon's" greatest enemies include the following: "hippies," trendy supermarket chain 'Whole Foods' -- and floppy-haired teen sensation Justin Bieber. Now, Cartman must "take out" his greatest enemy. But is he strong enough to stop Mr. Bieber? This was the final episode of the only four-parter in 'South Park' history, including the episode 'The Coon' from last season. My guess is that we'll eventually see a DVD compilation of these episodes. In one sentence, this was a good episode with a weak ending. In previous multi-part episodes, Trey Parker and Matt Stone are usually trying to philosophize or make a point (such as with 'Imaginationland' or 'Cartoon Wars'). This episode had none of that. While that is not necessarily a bad thing, it does give more weight and impact when one is waiting a couple of weeks to see the story play out. Mike Rowe's TV aspirations reach well beyond 'Dirty Jobs' and manly voiceover work. In fact, the Discovery Channel host has been saying recently that he'd love to be on another show. That show is 'South Park.' Really. So I couldn't help but ask: why 'South Park'? Here, Mr. Rowe explains just exactly what he'd like to do on the foul-mouthed, un-PC cartoon, why he can see Cartman falling in love with 'Dirty Jobs' and how man-cow impregnation factors into all of this. Yes, in typical fashion, this does get a little filthy, but that's just the way we like Mike. The title of tonight's episode was presumably influenced by the title of the next 'Batman' movie in the franchise 'The Dark Knight Rises.' After last week, I was still expecting the show to do its usual "reboot" to normalcy despite the open-ended conclusion, but I guess Trey Parker and Matt Stone had more to say about the superhero genre. Either that or too many people were bugging them about the true identity of Mysterion. It's amazing how often this show reinvents itself. Tonight, it even changed (or rather gave an explanation to) a fundamental aspect of the show's early seasons. But I'm getting ahead of myself. You shouldn't watch the news too often -- the news can be depressing. But you really shouldn't watch the news if you live in 'South Park' (Wed., 10PM ET on Comedy Central). The cartoon series takes on real life events, then turns the volume up to "11." Though it's supposedly just a bunch of crude drawings about foul-mouthed little kids, the show actually confronts the hypocrisy that we see around us every day. The new episode tackles the British Petroleum oil spill. (With the acronym "BP" being changed to "DP.") Like the rest of us, the kids must watch the news passively, as disaster unfolds around them. First, "DP" causes a massive drilling accident on the moon. Then, the company unleashes a thousand-foot demon of eternal darkness during another oil spill. (So, it's not that much worse than the horror inflicted on the Gulf Coast in real life ... ahem.) The superhero genre has a great deal of potential satire left to mine, leading Trey Parker and Matt Stone to an episodic sequel of last season's 'The Coon.' This time the Coon (a.k.a. Eric Cartman) has assembled his own superhero team called Coon and Friends (named so only because he rejected the suggested name "Extreme Avenger League"). There were several callbacks to other previous episodes. We saw a glimpse of Willzyx's as well as Tom Cruise's dead body on the moon as well as Cartman's Antonio Banderas blow-up sex doll wearing a Superman costume. The episode was also filled with various superhero references and had the return of Mysterion from the aforementioned Coon episode. His true identity remains unknown (although it's not Stan, Kyle or Butters and obviously not Token).
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The present invention relates to a condenser microphone and more particularly, a condenser microphone provided with an impedance converter circuit of the push-pull type. Various attempts have been tried to reduce the distortion of a condenser microphone and to make large the allowable input thereto. One of them is that an electrostatic transducer which obtains an electrical output signal responsive to an acoustic input signal or an impedance converter circuit for reducing the electric output impedance of this electrostatic transducer using two FETs (field effect transistor) is arranged in push-pull type. The arrangement of the impedance converter circuit as a push-pull type is an effective way to enable a relatively simple circuit arrangement to reduce the harmonic distortion. The push-pull arrangement of impedance converter circuit is described in detail on pages 530-535, Vol. 23, J.A.E.S., for example. The impedance converter circuit described by this material comprises a complementary push-pull source follower consisting of an N-channel FET and a P-channel FET. According to this impedance converter circuit, its output voltage varies from 0 V only to its power supply voltage. When the distortion factor is taken into consideration as a practical problem, it will follow that the allowable input level of this impedance circuit becomes substantially lower than its power supply voltage. According to the present inventor's tests, the allowable input level had a limit, 1 V in peak to peak and -9dB V (0dB V=1 V) in decibel notation, when its power supply voltage was 1.5 V. The allowable acoustic input level of the microphone naturally depends upon this value and often becomes unpractical when the allowable input level of impedance converter circuit takes such value. It is considered at first that the power supply voltage is raised to increase the allowable input level of impedance converter circuit, so that the allowable acoustic input level may be raised. When dry cells are employed as a power supply, the number of cells may be increased or a DC-DC converter may be employed. However, the increase of cell number will cause the microphone to be larged-sized, which is not preferable in the case of portable microphone. If the DC-DC converter is employed, the power dissipation of cells will be remarkably hastened due to the power loss caused by the DC-DC converter. In addition, when an external power supply is employed instead of cells, it makes the handling of microphone troublesome.
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The overall goal of this project is to characterize the immune response to HPV infection of the genital tract and to define the role of immune modulation in the progression to malignancy. Serological assays to detect serum IgG antibodies to HPV types 6, 16 and 18 have been developed and form the basis for a new marker of HPV exposure in epidemiologic studies. The specific aims of this study are: 1) To continue characterizing the humoral immune response in greater depth by examining the contribution of antibodies directed against conformational epitopes using yeast expressed proteins and virions made using recombinant vaccinia virus vectors; and continuing to delineate immunoreactive epitopes; 2) To examine HPV specific IgA antibodies present in serum, saliva, and cervicovaginal secretions; 3) To compare the Western blot assay with ELISAs using yeast expressed proteins, virions, or synthetic peptides for screening methods; 4) Populations will be screened for HPV antibodies to determine a) the prevalence of antibodies in the general population and in cases with anogenital cancer; b) immunological markers associated with malignancy; c) risk factors associated with seropositivity; d) the correlation between HPV antibodies and other measures of infection; and 5) To study the cell mediated immune response to HPV infection in lymphoproliferative assays and by identifying cytotoxic T cells. Information about the immune response to HPV infection is essential in epidemiologic studies, in the clinical management of disease, and in the development of vaccines to prevent infection or tumor development.
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921 F.2d 276 Unpublished DispositionNOTICE: Sixth Circuit Rule 24(c) states that citation of unpublished dispositions is disfavored except for establishing res judicata, estoppel, or the law of the case and requires service of copies of cited unpublished dispositions of the Sixth Circuit.Chelcie MILLS, Petitioner,v.PLASTICS UNIVERSAL CORP., Director, Office of Workers'Compensation Programs, United States Department ofLabor, Respondents. No. 90-3404. United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit. Dec. 27, 1990. Before RYAN and ALAN E. NORRIS, Circuit Judges, and JOINER, Senior District Judge.* PER CURIAM. 1 Petitioner, Chelcie Mills, seeks review of the order of the Benefits Review Board which affirmed the decision and decision and order of the Administrative Law Judge denying her deceased husband's claim under the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act. 2 Having had the benefit or oral argument, and having carefully considered the record on appeal and the briefs of the parties, we are unable to say that the order is not supported by substantial evidence or is contrary to law. 3 As the reasons why the claim should be denied have been articulated by the Administrative Law Judge and the Benefits Review Board, the issuance of a written opinion by this court would be duplicative and serve no useful purpose. Accordingly, we affirm the Board's Decision and Order of March 27, 1990, upon the reasoning set forth in that Order, and in the June 8, 1988 Order of the Administrative Law Judge as corrected and reissued on June 24, 1988. * The Honorable Charles W. Joiner, Senior United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Michigan, sitting by designation
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Heart No. 24 will be unveiled tonight during Night on the Town Engaging Loveland announces it will unveil the 24th heart addition to the family of HeArts in Loveland at 6:30 p.m. on Friday in the pocket park at Fourth Street and Lincoln Avenue during Night on Town Festivities. “For God So Loved” was created by Ross Lampshire and is sponsored by Michael Eckert. The heart will have a permanent home at 924 N Cleveland Ave. Eckert hopes to create an opportunity for an artists to live, work and retail in the bright blue house on Cleveland. “I love Loveland and was captivated by the City with a HeART project,” said Eckert, “and I wanted to add a piece of public art that was inspired by John 3:16.” For information regarding the Loveland: A City with HeART project, please contact Kristine Koschke at kristine@engagingloveland.org or visit www.engagingloveland.org. Article Comments We reserve the right to remove any comment that violates our ground rules, is spammy, NSFW, defamatory, rude, reckless to the community, etc. We expect everyone to be respectful of other commenters. It's fine to have differences of opinion, but there's no need to act like a jerk. Use your own words (don't copy and paste from elsewhere), be honest and don't pretend to be someone (or something) you're not. Our commenting section is self-policing, so if you see a comment that violates our ground rules, flag it (mouse over to the far right of the commenter's name until you see the flag symbol and click that), then we'll review it.
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Make Use of Infrared Thermometers for All Electric Solutions Infrared Thermometers are known since noncontact thermometers for their capability to evaluate heat by using infrared sun rays. They are really perfect for utilization in almost commercial industries and in the electrical market especially. Over the full years thermometers took over all classic temperature gauging instruments just for features just like lightweight, stability, and simplicity of use. Indeed today the greatest products for the purpose of figuring out They are simply, and forecasting complications in electric powered systems. They are today broadly utilized in gear repair inspection and procedure and also they can gauge the surface area heating of an thing from a secure range. Among the numerous electric powered software areas where they may be used will be in fittings to examine for dislodging and so on. that happen because of excessive heat generation as a total result of repeated heating system, credited to dirt deposit or as a result of corrosion. Infrared thermometers determine extra temperature and allow the consumer understand once there is certainly era of warmth. They may be used in the maintenance of electrical power engines also, as keeping a standard temps with respect to motors, electric power circuit and connections breakers are extremely essential for that. Thermometers are essential with regards to detecting warm plan and spots repairs in order to prevent equipment failure in engine bearings. You may also lengthen the durability of engine turning insulation simply by keeping the needed warmth range through the usage of these no get in touch with thermometers. For discovering the windings of air-cooled models to find hot-spots found in transformers that indicate turning defects the infrared thermometer is normally certainly better than most additional choices. For availing continuous power materials Once again, infrared thermometers would be the finest. This kind of is usually mainly because with this kind of you can determine the warm localised contacts in the UPS result filter systems. It is to become pointed out here that a chilly place might show an open POWER filtration system signal. Employ infrared thermometers to resolve all of your electro-mechanical problems price and with the highest accuracy possible effectively.
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adult completely dating site - How i can chat with sexi garel [Read: 20 sexy questions to text a guy and seduce him] [Read: 20 dirty questions to text a girl and make her wet] And once you’ve mastered the art of sending sexy texts, read on.Sending a sexy text to a sexy someone should come naturally.You can say anything you feel like, and as long as you feel horny, chances are, you’ll say all the right things. And in this article I am going to share with you how you can enjoy a satisfying sexual life even from distance, how to get your girlfriend comfortable with online sex, and how to keep things nice and sexy over the whole period of your relationship. If you want a girl to be comfortable having sex with you, be it in normal circumstances or online in long distance relationships – You have to be comfortable with your sexuality first! It’s too direct and as exciting as it seems, it’s still boring because you leave nothing to surprise. Your partner may read it, smile and just play along with your mood. Before I learned the key principles of communicating with women I had countless dates that were nothing but staring contests until I desperately tried to impress her with some irrelevant bullshit that neither her nor I actually cared about. When I think back to all the dating failures I only had, because I was unable to find the right topics to talk about, I somehow feel sorry for the girls who had to sit next to me for hours while they pretended to be interested in a conversation that doesn’t even deserve to be called a conversation. But have you ever felt awkward to start a naughty conversation through text messages? Or at another time, did your mind ever go blank when your partner asked you to say something sexy in a text? [Read: Easy ways to start text flirting with a friend] Using sexy text messages to seduce your lover Firstly, if you want to seduce a sexy friend or a new lover, or want to start talking dirty for the first time through text messages, you need to read these features. Read next: Man jailed for gang's rape and sale of boy, 14, for sex Observing the two sets of parents had sorted things out, the judge said: “Of course, if the defendant was older it would be entirely different, but he was 18 and she was fifteen-and-a-half, and it was a consensual relationship.
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Q: Does dissolving features improve geoprocessing efficiency? I have a large set of line data (>140,000 features). Is there a processing advantage, in either time required or (more importantly) memory used: to running Dissolve on the data before running Buffer? to running Dissolve on the inputs to two Identity operations? I would generally just wait until all the geoprocessing is finished and then do one Dissolve at the end. However, I'm debugging somebody else's very old script, and I am unclear on whether he was repeatedly dissolving everything for a reason (back in Arc 9.3), or just didn't think about the alternatives. (The same script repeatedly projects data between geoprocessing tools, so the logic is already questionable.) A: A Dissolve operation will usually reduce the number of features, arcs and nodes within a layer, particularly for layers with significant lengths of shared boundaries. Since the time spent during a Buffering operation is highly dependent on the number of nodes, pre-processing with Dissolve may significantly reduce the running time (and memory requirements). Whether or not it is worthwhile in your case will depend on the extent to which you will be able to reduce the number of nodes (dependent on your data layer) and the efficiency of the Dissolve operation compared with the Buffering. In my experience, using the Java Topology Suite, a Dissolve operation can be quite fast compared to Buffering, although the performance of Dissolve varies significantly by library. The other consideration is that Dissolve is strongly affected by topological errors. If you layer contains errors, you will need to perform vector cleaning prior to the Dissolve operation, which will add to the workflow run time. A: If memory use is your prime concern, then lots of little (low vertex count) features is probably going to be more to your liking than a few very large (high vertex count) features. But you may find that "too many features" may eventually overwhelm even "too many vertices" for processing speed. If you think about how the algorithms must be structured to process all features against all features between two feature classes, you're working with multiply-nested loops (for features in FC1 and FC2, and for the vertices in Feature1 and Feature2). In operations like drawing, the number of draw requests is of often greater concern than the vertices in each request, but with theme-on-theme operations, the key algorithms are likely to be based on the counts of vertices in each F1/F2 pair, with a "big O notation" of "O(N*M)" (the time to complete the operation is related to the factor of the number of vertices involved), which, for large features in both datasets, is close enough to O(N^2) to make you worry about the job ever completing. I've had success by overlaying massive features (like Russia, Canada, US, Australia, Brazil, Norway) with a 5 degree grid (fishnet) to reduce feature complexity for intermediate processing. I've seen point-in-polygon operations on a vertex-restricted 1:15m COUNTRIES layer run 100-1000 times faster than the original table (with only a 20x feature count increase). You do need to be careful in your processing logic to handle one-to-many and many-to-many relationships correctly though, especially in cases where a false boundary exists. There's also a "diminishing returns" aspect to the savings of working with smaller features -- I settled on a 5-degree grid by testing performance of intersecting with 90, 45, 30, 20, 15, 10, 5, 3, 2 and 1-degree grids, which showed an alarming increase in processing time as the number of total features ballooned. There are times where fewer features with more vertices are more efficient, so it is probably worth the effort to do some testing on order of operation with real data (not simplified test subsets) before committing to one approach over the other (balancing RAM utilization with run time). NOTE: I re-ran the gridding exercise with modern hardware, and got optimal performance with a 30-degree overlay, so that increases the risk of too-small features, and increases the importance of evaluation with production data.
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Q: "This site can’t be reached" Docker container on Digital Ocean I have this React/Nodejs application which I'm trying to deploy it on Digital Ocean using Docker. I've created a Docker Droplet with 2GB RAM, cloned the project and trying to run it. By now, I'm not getting any error logs when building the image and running it. But, when I try to access it I get the error in the browser "This site can’t be reached". I'm building my image like this: docker build -t myImage . And runnig it and passing my env variables like this: docker run -p 80:3000 -e NODE_ENV="production" -e MONGO_URI="URI" -e SECRET_OR_KEY="KEY" myImage Everything seems to be working fine (build and running). I get the log that my mongodb connected and the server is running. But I can't actually see the application. This is my Dockerfile: FROM node:11.10.0 WORKDIR /usr/src RUN git clone https://github.com/repo.git WORKDIR /usr/src/project RUN npm install WORKDIR /usr/src/project/client RUN npm install RUN npm run build WORKDIR /usr/src/project EXPOSE 80 3000 ENTRYPOINT npm run server I've created this based on another application that runs on Digital Ocean as well. And this is my server.js: const express = require('express'); const mongoose = require('mongoose'); const bodyParser = require('body-parser'); const passport = require('passport'); const path = require('path'); //Route files const users = require('./routes/api/users'); const fpsos = require('./routes/api/fpsos'); const bids = require('./routes/api/bids'); const news = require('./routes/api/news'); const app = express(); //Body parser middlewares app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({extended: false})); app.use(bodyParser.json ()); //DB config const db = require('./config/keys').mongoURI; //Connect to MongoDB mongoose .connect(db) .then(() => console.log('MongoDB connected')) .catch(err => console.log(err)); //Passport middleware app.use(passport.initialize()); //Passport Config require('./config/passport')(passport); app.use('/api/users', users); app.use('/api/news', news); app.use('/api/fpso', fpsos); app.use('/api/bid', bids); // Server static assets if in production if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production') { // Set static folder app.use(express.static('client/build')); app.get('*', (req, res) => { res.sendFile(path.resolve(__dirname, 'client', 'build', 'index.html')); }); } const port = process.env.PORT || 5000; app.listen(port, () => console.log(`Server running on port ${port}`)) What am I missing here? I appreciate any help. Thanks in advance! A: It appears that you have docker listening on a port different (5000) from your node application (3000), which is why node will not return any data to the browser.
{ "pile_set_name": "StackExchange" }
20
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Infrared spectroscopy as a rapid tool to detect methylglyoxal and antibacterial activity in Australian honeys. Methylglyoxal (2-oxopropanal) is a compound known to contribute to the non-peroxide antimicrobial activity of honeys. The feasibility of using infrared spectroscopy as a predictive tool for honey antibacterial activity and methylglyoxal content was assessed. A linear relationship was found between methylglyoxal content (279-1755 mg/kg) in Leptospermum polygalifolium honeys and bacterial inhibition for Escherichiacoli (R(2) = 0.80) and Staphylococcusaureus (R(2) = 0.64). A good prediction of methylglyoxal (R(2) 0.75) content in honey was achieved using spectroscopic data from the mid infrared (MIR) range in combination with partial least squares regression. These results indicate that robust predictive equations could be developed using MIR for commercial application where the prediction of bacterial inhibition is needed to 'value' honeys with methylglyoxal contents in excess of 200mg/kg.
{ "pile_set_name": "PubMed Abstracts" }
6
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Studies of neurochemistry have examined aspects of serotonergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic systems in individuals with autism and other severe developmental disabilities. A major focus of investigation has been the explanation of the well replicated finding of elevated peripheral serotonin in about 40% of autistic individuals.
{ "pile_set_name": "NIH ExPorter" }
0
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Elena Kitić Elena Kitić (; born 11 August 1997) is a Serbian singer-songwriter. Life and career Elena Kitić was born in 1997 in Hanover, Germany to turbo-folk singers Mile Kitić and Marta Savić. She quickly acquired popularity upon her debut single with Jala Brat, titled "Folira" (Plying), in July 2016. In November, she was featured on the track "Ne Volim" (I Don't Love) by Jala Brat and Buba Corelli from their album Kruna (Crown). The following year in June, Elena released her solo single "Zlato" (Precious) under IDJTunes, written by Jala Brat. In April of 2018, she released "Geto princeza" (Ghetto Princess) produced by Rasta. A year later, she collaborated with Macedonian trap duo 2Bona on "Columbiana". In July, Elena announced her upcoming debut album with "Zabranjujem" (I Forbid) produced by Darko Dimitrov, which featured a vertical music video for the first time by a Serbian artist. In December, she released "2000s" alongside an interactive music video in which viewers choose the ending. Discography Singles As a leading artist "Folira" feat. Jala Brat (2016) "Zlato" (2017) "Geto princeza" (2018) "Columbiana" feat. 2Bona (2019) "Zabranjujem" (2019) "2000s" (2019) As a featured artist "Ne volim" (2016) – Jala Brat and Buba Corelli feat. Elena References External links Category:1997 births Category:Living people Category:Serbian female singers
{ "pile_set_name": "Wikipedia (en)" }
69
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/* Copyright (C) 2004 - 2009 Ivo van Doorn <IvDoorn@gmail.com> <http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com> This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details. You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA. */ /* Module: rt2x00pci Abstract: rt2x00 generic pci device routines. */ #include <linux/dma-mapping.h> #include <linux/kernel.h> #include <linux/module.h> #include <linux/pci.h> #include <linux/slab.h> #include "rt2x00.h" #include "rt2x00pci.h" /* * PCI driver handlers. */ static void rt2x00pci_free_reg(struct rt2x00_dev *rt2x00dev) { kfree(rt2x00dev->rf); rt2x00dev->rf = NULL; kfree(rt2x00dev->eeprom); rt2x00dev->eeprom = NULL; if (rt2x00dev->csr.base) { iounmap(rt2x00dev->csr.base); rt2x00dev->csr.base = NULL; } } static int rt2x00pci_alloc_reg(struct rt2x00_dev *rt2x00dev) { struct pci_dev *pci_dev = to_pci_dev(rt2x00dev->dev); rt2x00dev->csr.base = pci_ioremap_bar(pci_dev, 0); if (!rt2x00dev->csr.base) goto exit; rt2x00dev->eeprom = kzalloc(rt2x00dev->ops->eeprom_size, GFP_KERNEL); if (!rt2x00dev->eeprom) goto exit; rt2x00dev->rf = kzalloc(rt2x00dev->ops->rf_size, GFP_KERNEL); if (!rt2x00dev->rf) goto exit; return 0; exit: rt2x00_probe_err("Failed to allocate registers\n"); rt2x00pci_free_reg(rt2x00dev); return -ENOMEM; } int rt2x00pci_probe(struct pci_dev *pci_dev, const struct rt2x00_ops *ops) { struct ieee80211_hw *hw; struct rt2x00_dev *rt2x00dev; int retval; u16 chip; retval = pci_enable_device(pci_dev); if (retval) { rt2x00_probe_err("Enable device failed\n"); return retval; } retval = pci_request_regions(pci_dev, pci_name(pci_dev)); if (retval) { rt2x00_probe_err("PCI request regions failed\n"); goto exit_disable_device; } pci_set_master(pci_dev); if (pci_set_mwi(pci_dev)) rt2x00_probe_err("MWI not available\n"); if (dma_set_mask(&pci_dev->dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) { rt2x00_probe_err("PCI DMA not supported\n"); retval = -EIO; goto exit_release_regions; } pci_enable_msi(pci_dev); hw = ieee80211_alloc_hw(sizeof(struct rt2x00_dev), ops->hw); if (!hw) { rt2x00_probe_err("Failed to allocate hardware\n"); retval = -ENOMEM; goto exit_disable_msi; } pci_set_drvdata(pci_dev, hw); rt2x00dev = hw->priv; rt2x00dev->dev = &pci_dev->dev; rt2x00dev->ops = ops; rt2x00dev->hw = hw; rt2x00dev->irq = pci_dev->irq; rt2x00dev->name = pci_name(pci_dev); if (pci_is_pcie(pci_dev)) rt2x00_set_chip_intf(rt2x00dev, RT2X00_CHIP_INTF_PCIE); else rt2x00_set_chip_intf(rt2x00dev, RT2X00_CHIP_INTF_PCI); retval = rt2x00pci_alloc_reg(rt2x00dev); if (retval) goto exit_free_device; /* * Because rt3290 chip use different efuse offset to read efuse data. * So before read efuse it need to indicate it is the * rt3290 or not. */ pci_read_config_word(pci_dev, PCI_DEVICE_ID, &chip); rt2x00dev->chip.rt = chip; retval = rt2x00lib_probe_dev(rt2x00dev); if (retval) goto exit_free_reg; return 0; exit_free_reg: rt2x00pci_free_reg(rt2x00dev); exit_free_device: ieee80211_free_hw(hw); exit_disable_msi: pci_disable_msi(pci_dev); exit_release_regions: pci_release_regions(pci_dev); exit_disable_device: pci_disable_device(pci_dev); pci_set_drvdata(pci_dev, NULL); return retval; } EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(rt2x00pci_probe); void rt2x00pci_remove(struct pci_dev *pci_dev) { struct ieee80211_hw *hw = pci_get_drvdata(pci_dev); struct rt2x00_dev *rt2x00dev = hw->priv; /* * Free all allocated data. */ rt2x00lib_remove_dev(rt2x00dev); rt2x00pci_free_reg(rt2x00dev); ieee80211_free_hw(hw); pci_disable_msi(pci_dev); /* * Free the PCI device data. */ pci_set_drvdata(pci_dev, NULL); pci_disable_device(pci_dev); pci_release_regions(pci_dev); } EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(rt2x00pci_remove); #ifdef CONFIG_PM int rt2x00pci_suspend(struct pci_dev *pci_dev, pm_message_t state) { struct ieee80211_hw *hw = pci_get_drvdata(pci_dev); struct rt2x00_dev *rt2x00dev = hw->priv; int retval; retval = rt2x00lib_suspend(rt2x00dev, state); if (retval) return retval; pci_save_state(pci_dev); pci_disable_device(pci_dev); return pci_set_power_state(pci_dev, pci_choose_state(pci_dev, state)); } EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(rt2x00pci_suspend); int rt2x00pci_resume(struct pci_dev *pci_dev) { struct ieee80211_hw *hw = pci_get_drvdata(pci_dev); struct rt2x00_dev *rt2x00dev = hw->priv; if (pci_set_power_state(pci_dev, PCI_D0) || pci_enable_device(pci_dev)) { rt2x00_err(rt2x00dev, "Failed to resume device\n"); return -EIO; } pci_restore_state(pci_dev); return rt2x00lib_resume(rt2x00dev); } EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(rt2x00pci_resume); #endif /* CONFIG_PM */ /* * rt2x00pci module information. */ MODULE_AUTHOR(DRV_PROJECT); MODULE_VERSION(DRV_VERSION); MODULE_DESCRIPTION("rt2x00 pci library"); MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");
{ "pile_set_name": "Github" }
30
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