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himc90
askacademia_train
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In an interview right before receiving the 2013 Nobel prize in physics, Peter Higgs stated that he wouldn't be able to get an academic job today, because he wouldn't be regarded as productive enough. > By the time he retired in 1996, he was uncomfortable with the new academic culture. "After I retired it was quite a long time before I went back to my department. I thought I was well out of it. It wasn't my way of doing things any more. Today I wouldn't get an academic job. It's as simple as that. I don't think I would be regarded as productive enough." Another interesting quote from the article is the following: > He doubts a similar breakthrough could be achieved in today's academic culture, because of the expectations on academics to collaborate and keep churning out papers. He said: "It's difficult to imagine how I would ever have enough peace and quiet in the present sort of climate to do what I did in 1964." Source (the whole article is pretty interesting): http://theguardian.com/science/2013/dec/06/peter-higgs-boson-academic-system
fwhnqat
fwhp8d4
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Currently wrapping up my PhD. There is a stark difference in work balance life between students in my lab who are focused on industry and those focused on academia. The ones in academia feel an immense stress to get high level publications (some staying 8+ years to try to push something into nature/science). The competition has become cut throat. This is a trend not just in America but in Europe, Asia and middle east. International graduate students tell me in China go back 20 years, having any ACS publication from american university is enough to get professorship. Now you better come stacked with publications and at least one nature/science. American universities are even more competitive. How many publications, how many conferences, how many patents...
It’s ironic to me that research has shown that productivity isn’t all it’s cracked up to be yet here we are.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
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If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlczr1
fqlldif
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And when your teacher doesn't listen or pay attention to your presentation even you do not go over time limit? I did experienced that a week ago with my group and I still feel frustrated. We were the only group that he didn't pay attention at all. We put so much effort in that presentation! I felt very useless and depressed when I noticed that he didn't have the effort to listen us.
I'm pretty strict on time, to the point where I'll cut off the presentation if it goes over the alloted time (typically, I'll also give them a warning when they're halfway through their time and another when a minute is left). Getting your point accross concisely is a valuable skill and important to master in a business environment. In a similar vein, I put a max word/page count on assignments instead of a minimum. Students often seem surprised at that.
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askacademia_train
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If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlln6q
fqlvtxc
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Profs can be oblivious? What’s new!
This sounds like a problem with a specific professor. If my grading rubric has a time incorporated, you lose just as many points for going over as you do for going way under.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
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If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlvtxc
fqlczr1
1,589,467,007
1,589,454,386
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This sounds like a problem with a specific professor. If my grading rubric has a time incorporated, you lose just as many points for going over as you do for going way under.
And when your teacher doesn't listen or pay attention to your presentation even you do not go over time limit? I did experienced that a week ago with my group and I still feel frustrated. We were the only group that he didn't pay attention at all. We put so much effort in that presentation! I felt very useless and depressed when I noticed that he didn't have the effort to listen us.
1
12,621
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlnn55
fqlvtxc
1,589,462,425
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This would be totally unacceptable in my class. Every 5% over (or under) time is 5% off the grade.
This sounds like a problem with a specific professor. If my grading rubric has a time incorporated, you lose just as many points for going over as you do for going way under.
0
4,582
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm6w3j
fqlln6q
1,589,472,521
1,589,461,159
7
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I did a poster presentation where the time limer was 5 mins, including questions. I presented within the time limits, but no one else in my group did. The « winner » was a student that went 5 minutes over time. It sucked because I could have done a lot better with that 5 extra minutes too...
Profs can be oblivious? What’s new!
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlnn55
fqlln6q
1,589,462,425
1,589,461,159
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5
This would be totally unacceptable in my class. Every 5% over (or under) time is 5% off the grade.
Profs can be oblivious? What’s new!
1
1,266
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlczr1
fqm6w3j
1,589,454,386
1,589,472,521
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And when your teacher doesn't listen or pay attention to your presentation even you do not go over time limit? I did experienced that a week ago with my group and I still feel frustrated. We were the only group that he didn't pay attention at all. We put so much effort in that presentation! I felt very useless and depressed when I noticed that he didn't have the effort to listen us.
I did a poster presentation where the time limer was 5 mins, including questions. I presented within the time limits, but no one else in my group did. The « winner » was a student that went 5 minutes over time. It sucked because I could have done a lot better with that 5 extra minutes too...
0
18,135
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm6w3j
fqlnn55
1,589,472,521
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7
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I did a poster presentation where the time limer was 5 mins, including questions. I presented within the time limits, but no one else in my group did. The « winner » was a student that went 5 minutes over time. It sucked because I could have done a lot better with that 5 extra minutes too...
This would be totally unacceptable in my class. Every 5% over (or under) time is 5% off the grade.
1
10,096
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm6w3j
fqm1ai6
1,589,472,521
1,589,469,773
7
4
I did a poster presentation where the time limer was 5 mins, including questions. I presented within the time limits, but no one else in my group did. The « winner » was a student that went 5 minutes over time. It sucked because I could have done a lot better with that 5 extra minutes too...
I don't. If you get 15 minutes, your presentation has to be between 14 and 16 minutes. If you run short, engage the audience with questions. If you're running long, which you shouldn't (you practiced, right?), wind it up. I penalize if you go over 16 minutes, and I'll cut you off at 20 (maybe sooner, depending on how tight we are for time for the day). I would never reward students for going three times the allotted time. They'd never come close to finishing their presentation by the time I stopped them.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm6w3j
fqlwmce
1,589,472,521
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7
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I did a poster presentation where the time limer was 5 mins, including questions. I presented within the time limits, but no one else in my group did. The « winner » was a student that went 5 minutes over time. It sucked because I could have done a lot better with that 5 extra minutes too...
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm64ya
fqm6w3j
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Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
I did a poster presentation where the time limer was 5 mins, including questions. I presented within the time limits, but no one else in my group did. The « winner » was a student that went 5 minutes over time. It sucked because I could have done a lot better with that 5 extra minutes too...
0
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlnn55
fqlczr1
1,589,462,425
1,589,454,386
6
5
This would be totally unacceptable in my class. Every 5% over (or under) time is 5% off the grade.
And when your teacher doesn't listen or pay attention to your presentation even you do not go over time limit? I did experienced that a week ago with my group and I still feel frustrated. We were the only group that he didn't pay attention at all. We put so much effort in that presentation! I felt very useless and depressed when I noticed that he didn't have the effort to listen us.
1
8,039
1.2
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm1ai6
fqlwmce
1,589,469,773
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I don't. If you get 15 minutes, your presentation has to be between 14 and 16 minutes. If you run short, engage the audience with questions. If you're running long, which you shouldn't (you practiced, right?), wind it up. I penalize if you go over 16 minutes, and I'll cut you off at 20 (maybe sooner, depending on how tight we are for time for the day). I would never reward students for going three times the allotted time. They'd never come close to finishing their presentation by the time I stopped them.
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmk1xx
fqmdm8f
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Yes. Part of what we are teaching at the college level is professionalism. You will not be praised in industry, nonprofits, or government if you regularly use up more than your allotted time slot for presentations. Not that this doesn’t happen everywhere quite a bit, especially in academia. But it’s just as irritating in a business setting as it is in a college setting.
brevity is beautiful.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlwmce
fqmk1xx
1,589,467,418
1,589,478,729
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I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
Yes. Part of what we are teaching at the college level is professionalism. You will not be praised in industry, nonprofits, or government if you regularly use up more than your allotted time slot for presentations. Not that this doesn’t happen everywhere quite a bit, especially in academia. But it’s just as irritating in a business setting as it is in a college setting.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmk1xx
fqm64ya
1,589,478,729
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Yes. Part of what we are teaching at the college level is professionalism. You will not be praised in industry, nonprofits, or government if you regularly use up more than your allotted time slot for presentations. Not that this doesn’t happen everywhere quite a bit, especially in academia. But it’s just as irritating in a business setting as it is in a college setting.
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
1
6,574
2
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmk1xx
fqmd5ha
1,589,478,729
1,589,475,484
4
2
Yes. Part of what we are teaching at the college level is professionalism. You will not be praised in industry, nonprofits, or government if you regularly use up more than your allotted time slot for presentations. Not that this doesn’t happen everywhere quite a bit, especially in academia. But it’s just as irritating in a business setting as it is in a college setting.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
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askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn94f4
fqn7c3a
1,589,490,763
1,589,489,892
4
2
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
People who go overtime by quite a bit - like more than 1-2 for a 10 min or 10+ for longer talks - are one of my pet peeves. Just respect everyone's time and stay within the limit... I was judging some 8 min presentations on Zoom a few days ago. The most interesting one got the lowest score because they barely made it half-way through their talk when their time was up. They would have won if they had stayed on target.
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn9vun
fqn7c3a
1,589,491,136
1,589,489,892
4
2
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
People who go overtime by quite a bit - like more than 1-2 for a 10 min or 10+ for longer talks - are one of my pet peeves. Just respect everyone's time and stay within the limit... I was judging some 8 min presentations on Zoom a few days ago. The most interesting one got the lowest score because they barely made it half-way through their talk when their time was up. They would have won if they had stayed on target.
1
1,244
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn7c3a
fqns00p
1,589,489,892
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2
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People who go overtime by quite a bit - like more than 1-2 for a 10 min or 10+ for longer talks - are one of my pet peeves. Just respect everyone's time and stay within the limit... I was judging some 8 min presentations on Zoom a few days ago. The most interesting one got the lowest score because they barely made it half-way through their talk when their time was up. They would have won if they had stayed on target.
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
0
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqo0p22
fqn7c3a
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If I give a 10 minute time limit, I cut them off after 12. And then I treat any material they did not present as if they didn't cover it and deduct accordingly. Time limits are very important and learning how to make your point concisely is just as important. We have time limits at conferences, I have a time limit when I am teaching, my students will one day have a time limit when they are pitching an idea to a client. We all have to learn to use the time given in the most efficient way possible.
People who go overtime by quite a bit - like more than 1-2 for a 10 min or 10+ for longer talks - are one of my pet peeves. Just respect everyone's time and stay within the limit... I was judging some 8 min presentations on Zoom a few days ago. The most interesting one got the lowest score because they barely made it half-way through their talk when their time was up. They would have won if they had stayed on target.
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmdm8f
fqn94f4
1,589,475,702
1,589,490,763
3
4
brevity is beautiful.
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
0
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1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn94f4
fqml16o
1,589,490,763
1,589,479,196
4
3
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
On a more general and pertinent tangent: If you're given a time limit, stick to it. Presenters have an implicit agreement with their audience where the audience is giving you a certain amount of their time. If you command their attention for longer, you're being rude and selfish in taking more than was agreed upon.
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmuioq
fqn94f4
1,589,483,749
1,589,490,763
3
4
All my professors have been extremely strict with the time limit. No presentation in a class of 20+ students should take up a 75% of class time.
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
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7,014
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn94f4
fqn3sid
1,589,490,763
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4
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I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
This is one of the perks of grading all assignments with a rubric, and students having the rubric a head of time. Adhering to the time limit is a column on my presentations rubric.
1
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1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlwmce
fqn94f4
1,589,467,418
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2
4
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm64ya
fqn94f4
1,589,472,155
1,589,490,763
2
4
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn94f4
fqmd5ha
1,589,490,763
1,589,475,484
4
2
I have a similar annoyance (though not as bad) with paper length. If it's a 1500-word paper, I don't mind 1250-1750 range, but then you get into stuff like, say, 2500 words and you start thinking "come on, these lengths are here for a reason." It's especially annoying if they're a really circuitous writer.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmdm8f
fqn9vun
1,589,475,702
1,589,491,136
3
4
brevity is beautiful.
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
0
15,434
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn9vun
fqml16o
1,589,491,136
1,589,479,196
4
3
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
On a more general and pertinent tangent: If you're given a time limit, stick to it. Presenters have an implicit agreement with their audience where the audience is giving you a certain amount of their time. If you command their attention for longer, you're being rude and selfish in taking more than was agreed upon.
1
11,940
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmuioq
fqn9vun
1,589,483,749
1,589,491,136
3
4
All my professors have been extremely strict with the time limit. No presentation in a class of 20+ students should take up a 75% of class time.
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
0
7,387
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn3sid
fqn9vun
1,589,488,187
1,589,491,136
3
4
This is one of the perks of grading all assignments with a rubric, and students having the rubric a head of time. Adhering to the time limit is a column on my presentations rubric.
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
0
2,949
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlwmce
fqn9vun
1,589,467,418
1,589,491,136
2
4
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
0
23,718
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn9vun
fqm64ya
1,589,491,136
1,589,472,155
4
2
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
1
18,981
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn9vun
fqmd5ha
1,589,491,136
1,589,475,484
4
2
Yikes. I tell my students that if they turn in a 30 minute presentation video (online class) I’m not watching it. 3-5 minutes for the first topic and 5-10 for the second. Anymore than that and I’m probably tuning out.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqns00p
fqmdm8f
1,589,500,304
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4
3
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
brevity is beautiful.
1
24,602
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqml16o
fqns00p
1,589,479,196
1,589,500,304
3
4
On a more general and pertinent tangent: If you're given a time limit, stick to it. Presenters have an implicit agreement with their audience where the audience is giving you a certain amount of their time. If you command their attention for longer, you're being rude and selfish in taking more than was agreed upon.
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
0
21,108
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmuioq
fqns00p
1,589,483,749
1,589,500,304
3
4
All my professors have been extremely strict with the time limit. No presentation in a class of 20+ students should take up a 75% of class time.
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
0
16,555
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqns00p
fqn3sid
1,589,500,304
1,589,488,187
4
3
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
This is one of the perks of grading all assignments with a rubric, and students having the rubric a head of time. Adhering to the time limit is a column on my presentations rubric.
1
12,117
1.333333
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlwmce
fqns00p
1,589,467,418
1,589,500,304
2
4
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
0
32,886
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gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm64ya
fqns00p
1,589,472,155
1,589,500,304
2
4
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
0
28,149
2
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqns00p
fqmd5ha
1,589,500,304
1,589,475,484
4
2
I've never encountered a professor who praises people for going over time - quite the opposite in fact, usually they cut the presentation short or deduct points. I usually go the "deduct points" route unless it looks like the class is gong to run out of time for other presenters. Was this the same professor both times? Do you know if they docked points for going over-time?
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
24,820
2
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqo0p22
fqlwmce
1,589,505,179
1,589,467,418
3
2
If I give a 10 minute time limit, I cut them off after 12. And then I treat any material they did not present as if they didn't cover it and deduct accordingly. Time limits are very important and learning how to make your point concisely is just as important. We have time limits at conferences, I have a time limit when I am teaching, my students will one day have a time limit when they are pitching an idea to a client. We all have to learn to use the time given in the most efficient way possible.
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
1
37,761
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqo0p22
fqm64ya
1,589,505,179
1,589,472,155
3
2
If I give a 10 minute time limit, I cut them off after 12. And then I treat any material they did not present as if they didn't cover it and deduct accordingly. Time limits are very important and learning how to make your point concisely is just as important. We have time limits at conferences, I have a time limit when I am teaching, my students will one day have a time limit when they are pitching an idea to a client. We all have to learn to use the time given in the most efficient way possible.
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
1
33,024
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqo0p22
fqmd5ha
1,589,505,179
1,589,475,484
3
2
If I give a 10 minute time limit, I cut them off after 12. And then I treat any material they did not present as if they didn't cover it and deduct accordingly. Time limits are very important and learning how to make your point concisely is just as important. We have time limits at conferences, I have a time limit when I am teaching, my students will one day have a time limit when they are pitching an idea to a client. We all have to learn to use the time given in the most efficient way possible.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
29,695
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmdm8f
fqlwmce
1,589,475,702
1,589,467,418
3
2
brevity is beautiful.
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
1
8,284
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmdm8f
fqm64ya
1,589,475,702
1,589,472,155
3
2
brevity is beautiful.
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
1
3,547
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmdm8f
fqmd5ha
1,589,475,702
1,589,475,484
3
2
brevity is beautiful.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
218
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqml16o
fqlwmce
1,589,479,196
1,589,467,418
3
2
On a more general and pertinent tangent: If you're given a time limit, stick to it. Presenters have an implicit agreement with their audience where the audience is giving you a certain amount of their time. If you command their attention for longer, you're being rude and selfish in taking more than was agreed upon.
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
1
11,778
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm64ya
fqml16o
1,589,472,155
1,589,479,196
2
3
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
On a more general and pertinent tangent: If you're given a time limit, stick to it. Presenters have an implicit agreement with their audience where the audience is giving you a certain amount of their time. If you command their attention for longer, you're being rude and selfish in taking more than was agreed upon.
0
7,041
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqml16o
fqmd5ha
1,589,479,196
1,589,475,484
3
2
On a more general and pertinent tangent: If you're given a time limit, stick to it. Presenters have an implicit agreement with their audience where the audience is giving you a certain amount of their time. If you command their attention for longer, you're being rude and selfish in taking more than was agreed upon.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
3,712
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmuioq
fqlwmce
1,589,483,749
1,589,467,418
3
2
All my professors have been extremely strict with the time limit. No presentation in a class of 20+ students should take up a 75% of class time.
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
1
16,331
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqm64ya
fqmuioq
1,589,472,155
1,589,483,749
2
3
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
All my professors have been extremely strict with the time limit. No presentation in a class of 20+ students should take up a 75% of class time.
0
11,594
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmuioq
fqmd5ha
1,589,483,749
1,589,475,484
3
2
All my professors have been extremely strict with the time limit. No presentation in a class of 20+ students should take up a 75% of class time.
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
1
8,265
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqlwmce
fqn3sid
1,589,467,418
1,589,488,187
2
3
I feel really lucky that I didn't experience this in my program. It was geared towards practitioners so the time limit on presentations was a hard limit. If a policy maker wouldn't sit through it because it was too long the faculty member would cut it off.
This is one of the perks of grading all assignments with a rubric, and students having the rubric a head of time. Adhering to the time limit is a column on my presentations rubric.
0
20,769
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqn3sid
fqm64ya
1,589,488,187
1,589,472,155
3
2
This is one of the perks of grading all assignments with a rubric, and students having the rubric a head of time. Adhering to the time limit is a column on my presentations rubric.
Absolutely, meeting a time limit is a skill that need to be practiced. I am in math and my supervisor is fond of quoting (well, paraphrasing) Pascal saying "I have made this letter longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter".
1
16,032
1.5
gjiz1j
askacademia_train
0.95
If any professor is reading this: please do not praise students keeping their presentations much longer than you said it should be because it covers more. It is unfair and an obvious sign of obliviousness. It is nonsense. Please. If you tell your students to keep their presentations at a certain length, do not praise the ones who go above the set time limit by half an hour and praise their work for its depth. This has happened to me second time now. My professor asks me to cover one of the most controversial and comprehensive subjects in social sciences in 10 minutes and rolls their eyes for it not having elaborated enough in certain aspects while praising the 40-minute-though-supposed-to-be-10-minute presentation of my classmate for covering more on the same subject. If there are any professors reading this; please don't do this. Some students put a lot of work into making the damn presentation as concise as possible and literally rehearse a few times so that they do not go over the time limit. Covering more by going waaaay above the limit you yourself set is not something to be encouraged. Nor is it fair.
fqmd5ha
fqn3sid
1,589,475,484
1,589,488,187
2
3
This is a terrible thing to let students get away with, in my view. When you're in the field presenting to clients, committees, etc., they typically prefer when you can wrap it up and get to the essentials fast. They never want to feel like they spent too much time on something. Shameful to let students go out into their fields with those habits.
This is one of the perks of grading all assignments with a rubric, and students having the rubric a head of time. Adhering to the time limit is a column on my presentations rubric.
0
12,703
1.5
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fntxrg9
fnu1ebo
1,587,250,631
1,587,252,663
157
246
Published on april 01, 2020. Hmm, april first, why does that date ring a bell?
"Scientific Journal of Research and Reviews" is the best name ever.
0
2,032
1.566879
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fntxrg9
fnu7wp6
1,587,250,631
1,587,256,379
157
209
Published on april 01, 2020. Hmm, april first, why does that date ring a bell?
Using WTF as a keyword surelly sets an impact factor over 9000
0
5,748
1.33121
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnu3gvg
fnu7wp6
1,587,253,799
1,587,256,379
50
209
Those acknowledgements though😂😂😂
Using WTF as a keyword surelly sets an impact factor over 9000
0
2,580
4.18
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnu7wp6
fnu32lo
1,587,256,379
1,587,253,588
209
8
Using WTF as a keyword surelly sets an impact factor over 9000
Lmao I am dead
1
2,791
26.125
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuf6qh
fnu3gvg
1,587,260,685
1,587,253,799
68
50
“More research is warranted” has always been the biggest cop out.
Those acknowledgements though😂😂😂
1
6,886
1.36
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnudecm
fnuf6qh
1,587,259,630
1,587,260,685
14
68
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
“More research is warranted” has always been the biggest cop out.
0
1,055
4.857143
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnu32lo
fnuf6qh
1,587,253,588
1,587,260,685
8
68
Lmao I am dead
“More research is warranted” has always been the biggest cop out.
0
7,097
8.5
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuf6qh
fnubl6z
1,587,260,685
1,587,258,568
68
2
“More research is warranted” has always been the biggest cop out.
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
2,117
34
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnu3gvg
fnu32lo
1,587,253,799
1,587,253,588
50
8
Those acknowledgements though😂😂😂
Lmao I am dead
1
211
6.25
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnul35i
fnuqbno
1,587,264,679
1,587,268,353
22
48
That fucking graph/figure. Hahahaha
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
0
3,674
2.181818
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuhlx2
fnuqbno
1,587,262,288
1,587,268,353
18
48
Probably more views than the typical publication
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
0
6,065
2.666667
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnupm1q
fnuqbno
1,587,267,846
1,587,268,353
19
48
added this to my mendeley
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
0
507
2.526316
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuqbno
fnudecm
1,587,268,353
1,587,259,630
48
14
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
1
8,723
3.428571
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnu32lo
fnuqbno
1,587,253,588
1,587,268,353
8
48
Lmao I am dead
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
0
14,765
6
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnug1ll
fnuqbno
1,587,261,248
1,587,268,353
4
48
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
0
7,105
12
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuqbno
fnubl6z
1,587,268,353
1,587,258,568
48
2
Perhaps a little less complex, but there's also the classic paper "Get Me Off Your Fucking Mailing List."
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
9,785
24
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnul35i
fnuhlx2
1,587,264,679
1,587,262,288
22
18
That fucking graph/figure. Hahahaha
Probably more views than the typical publication
1
2,391
1.222222
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnudecm
fnul35i
1,587,259,630
1,587,264,679
14
22
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
That fucking graph/figure. Hahahaha
0
5,049
1.571429
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnul35i
fnu32lo
1,587,264,679
1,587,253,588
22
8
That fucking graph/figure. Hahahaha
Lmao I am dead
1
11,091
2.75
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnul35i
fnug1ll
1,587,264,679
1,587,261,248
22
4
That fucking graph/figure. Hahahaha
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
1
3,431
5.5
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnul35i
fnubl6z
1,587,264,679
1,587,258,568
22
2
That fucking graph/figure. Hahahaha
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
6,111
11
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnupm1q
fnuhlx2
1,587,267,846
1,587,262,288
19
18
added this to my mendeley
Probably more views than the typical publication
1
5,558
1.055556
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnudecm
fnuhlx2
1,587,259,630
1,587,262,288
14
18
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
Probably more views than the typical publication
0
2,658
1.285714
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuhlx2
fnu32lo
1,587,262,288
1,587,253,588
18
8
Probably more views than the typical publication
Lmao I am dead
1
8,700
2.25
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnug1ll
fnuhlx2
1,587,261,248
1,587,262,288
4
18
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
Probably more views than the typical publication
0
1,040
4.5
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnuhlx2
fnubl6z
1,587,262,288
1,587,258,568
18
2
Probably more views than the typical publication
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
3,720
9
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnupm1q
fnudecm
1,587,267,846
1,587,259,630
19
14
added this to my mendeley
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
1
8,216
1.357143
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnu32lo
fnupm1q
1,587,253,588
1,587,267,846
8
19
Lmao I am dead
added this to my mendeley
0
14,258
2.375
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnug1ll
fnupm1q
1,587,261,248
1,587,267,846
4
19
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
added this to my mendeley
0
6,598
4.75
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnupm1q
fnubl6z
1,587,267,846
1,587,258,568
19
2
added this to my mendeley
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
9,278
9.5
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv4xtv
fnudecm
1,587,280,385
1,587,259,630
16
14
My new goal is to find a way to reference this paper somehow in one of my own.
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
1
20,755
1.142857
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv4xtv
fnu32lo
1,587,280,385
1,587,253,588
16
8
My new goal is to find a way to reference this paper somehow in one of my own.
Lmao I am dead
1
26,797
2
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv4xtv
fnug1ll
1,587,280,385
1,587,261,248
16
4
My new goal is to find a way to reference this paper somehow in one of my own.
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
1
19,137
4
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv4xtv
fnubl6z
1,587,280,385
1,587,258,568
16
2
My new goal is to find a way to reference this paper somehow in one of my own.
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
21,817
8
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnudecm
fnu32lo
1,587,259,630
1,587,253,588
14
8
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
Lmao I am dead
1
6,042
1.75
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnudecm
fnubl6z
1,587,259,630
1,587,258,568
14
2
Don’t these journals ask for a hefty fee? Did the professor actually pay money to get this published?
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
1,062
7
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnug1ll
fnv8o9b
1,587,261,248
1,587,284,111
4
6
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
Raminds me of my former PI who has a fun hobby: Getting predatory journals to include people like Hoss or Borat as an Editor. Why Fake Data When You Can Fake a Scientist? His point being: Virtual editors can significantly improve the visibility of junk journals
0
22,863
1.5
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv5syl
fnv8o9b
1,587,281,236
1,587,284,111
3
6
>eigenvalue | weird birds -Take a shot every time eigen/quantum/möbius/bent paper with a pencil etc. has been mentioned in the wrong context.
Raminds me of my former PI who has a fun hobby: Getting predatory journals to include people like Hoss or Borat as an Editor. Why Fake Data When You Can Fake a Scientist? His point being: Virtual editors can significantly improve the visibility of junk journals
0
2,875
2
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv8o9b
fnubl6z
1,587,284,111
1,587,258,568
6
2
Raminds me of my former PI who has a fun hobby: Getting predatory journals to include people like Hoss or Borat as an Editor. Why Fake Data When You Can Fake a Scientist? His point being: Virtual editors can significantly improve the visibility of junk journals
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
25,543
3
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnubl6z
fnug1ll
1,587,258,568
1,587,261,248
2
4
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
At my university (edit: I do not live in the US), if you publish even in lower tier legitimate journals, that counts against you. So this guy's resume must be bulletproof for him to take a hit like that
0
2,680
2
g3wn4t
askacademia_train
0.99
After receiving an email from a sketchy journal soliciting submissions, a professor sent in a joke paper titled "What's the Deal With Birds?", which got published. Here's a small excerpt from the paper: > *Abstract:* Many people wonder: what’s the deal with birds? This is a common query. Birds are pretty weird. I mean, they have feathers. WTF? Most other animals don’t have feathers. To investigate this issue, I looked at some birds. I looked at a woodpecker, a parrot, and a penguin. They were all pretty weird! In conclusion, we may never know the deal with birds, but further study is warranted. > *Keywords*: birds, ornithology, behavior, phenotype, WTF, genomics, climate change You can read the PDf version of the original article here: https://irispublishers.com/sjrr/pdf/SJRR.MS.ID.000540.pdf Alternatively, there's a press summary of the situation here: https://gizmodo.com/sketchy-science-journal-publishes-article-titled-whats-1842924936
fnv5syl
fnubl6z
1,587,281,236
1,587,258,568
3
2
>eigenvalue | weird birds -Take a shot every time eigen/quantum/möbius/bent paper with a pencil etc. has been mentioned in the wrong context.
This is great, love it! Thank you for sharing.
1
22,668
1.5
ifg59u
askacademia_train
0.98
How about we stop working for free? Just this month I was invited to review five new submissions from three different journals. I understand that we have an important role in improving the quality of science being published (specially during COVID times), but isn’t it unfair that we do all the work and these companies get all the money? Honestly, I feel like it’s passed time we start refusing to review articles without minimum compensation from these for-profit journals. ​ Field of research: Neuroscience/Biophysics Title: Ph.D. Country: USA
g2nf3na
g2nkfp3
1,598,234,898
1,598,238,046
105
269
I have three tenure reviews due soon. While I consider it part of my service, especially as I have a fairly rare specialty, it adds up.
I'm getting pretty sick of writing papers for free. For my PhD and postdoc I've worked on other people's big projects. Every time they strategically keep me in the lab for the entire duration of the fellowship with no time to write, knowing full well that I have to write papers to get a job, and that I'll do it for free when the fellowship is over just to try to keep up.
0
3,148
2.561905

🚢 Stanford Human Preferences Dataset (SHP)

If you mention this dataset in a paper, please cite the paper: Understanding Dataset Difficulty with V-Usable Information (ICML 2022).

Summary

SHP is a dataset of 385K collective human preferences over responses to questions/instructions in 18 different subject areas, from cooking to legal advice. The preferences are meant to reflect the helpfulness of one response over another, and are intended to be used for training RLHF reward models and NLG evaluation models (e.g., SteamSHP).

Each example is a Reddit post with a question/instruction and a pair of top-level comments for that post, where one comment is more preferred by Reddit users (collectively). SHP exploits the fact that if comment A was written after comment B but has a higher score nonetheless, then A is ostensibly more preferred to B. If A had been written before B, then we could not conclude this, since its higher score could have been the result of more visibility. We chose data where the preference label is intended to reflect which response is more helpful rather than which is less harmful, the latter being the focus of much past work.

How is SHP different from Anthropic's HH-RLHF dataset? Most notably, all the data in SHP is naturally occurring and human-written, whereas the responses in HH-RLHF are machine-written, giving us two very different distributions that can complement each other.

Dataset Size Input Label Domains Data Format Length
SHP 385K Naturally occurring human-written responses Collective Human Preference 18 (labelled) Question/Instruction + Response (Single-turn) up to 10.1K T5 tokens
HH-RLHF 91K Dialogue with LLM Individual Human Preference not labelled Live Chat (Multi-turn) up to 1.5K T5 tokens

How is SHP different from other datasets that have scraped Reddit, like ELI5? SHP uses the timestamp information to infer preferences, while ELI5 only provides comments and scores -- the latter are not enough to infer preferences since comments made earlier tend to get higher scores from more visibility. It also contains data from more domains:

Dataset Size Comments + Scores Preferences Number of Domains
SHP 385K Yes Yes 18
ELI5 270K Yes No 3

Data Structure

There are 18 directories, one for each subreddit, and each directory contains a JSONL file for the training, validation, and test data. Here's how to get the data using Huggingface's datasets library:

from datasets import load_dataset

# Load all the data 
dataset = load_dataset("stanfordnlp/shp")

# Load one of the subreddits
dataset = load_dataset("stanfordnlp/shp", data_dir="askculinary")

Here's an example from askculinary/train.json:

{
    `post_id`:"qt3nxl",
    `domain`:"askculinary_train",
    `upvote_ratio`:0.98,
    `history`:"What's the best way to disassemble raspberries? Like this, but down to the individual seeds: https:\/\/i.imgur.com\/Z0c6ZKE.jpg  I've been pulling them apart with tweezers and it's really time consuming. I have about 10 pounds to get through this weekend.",
    `c_root_id_A`:"hkh25sc",
    `c_root_id_B`:"hkh25lp",
    `created_at_utc_A`:1636822112,
    `created_at_utc_B`:1636822110,
    `score_A`:340,
    `score_B`:166,
    `human_ref_A`:"Pectinex, perhaps?  It's an enzyme that breaks down cellulose. With citrus, you let it sit in a dilute solution of pectinex overnight to break down the connective tissues. You end up with perfect citrus supremes. If you let the raspberries sit for a shorter time, I wonder if it would separate the seeds the same way...?  Here's an example: https:\/\/www.chefsteps.com\/activities\/perfect-citrus-supreme",
    `human_ref_B`:"Raspberry juice will make a bright stain at first, but in a matter of weeks it will start to fade away to almost nothing. It is what is known in the natural dye world as a fugitive dye, it will fade even without washing or exposure to light. I hope she gets lots of nice photos of these stains on her dress, because soon that will be all she has left of them!",
    `labels`:1,
    `seconds_difference`:2.0,
    `score_ratio`:2.0481927711
}

where the fields are:

  • post_id: the ID of the Reddit post (string)
  • domain: the subreddit and split the example is drawn from, separated by an underscore (string)
  • upvote_ratio: the percent of votes received by the post that were positive (aka upvotes) (float)
  • history: the post title concatented to the post body (string)
  • c_root_id_A: the ID of comment A (string)
  • c_root_id_B: the ID of comment B (string)
  • created_at_utc_A: utc timestamp of when comment A was created (integer)
  • created_at_utc_B: utc timestamp of when comment B was created (integer)
  • score_A: (# positive votes - # negative votes + 1) received by comment A (integer)
  • score_B: (# positive votes - # negative votes + 1) received by comment B (integer)
  • human_ref_A: text of comment A (string)
  • human_ref_B: text of comment B (string)
  • labels: the preference label -- it is 1 if A is preferred to B; 0 if B is preferred to A. This was randomized such that the label distribution is roughly 50/50. (integer)
  • seconds_difference: how many seconds after the less preferred comment the more preferred one was created (will always be >= 0) (integer)
  • score_ratio: the ratio of the more preferred comment's score to the less preferred comment's score (will be >= 1) (float)

Dataset Design

Domain Selection

The data is sourced from Reddit, which is a public forum organized into topic-specific fora called subreddits. For example, the askculinary subreddit is where users ask cooking-related questions and are answered by other users.

SHP contains a train, validation, and test split for comments scraped from 18 different subreddits. We chose subreddits based on:

  1. whether they were well-known (subscriber count >= 100K)
  2. whether posts were expected to pose a question or instruction
  3. whether responses were valued based on how helpful they were
  4. whether comments had to be rooted in some objectivity, instead of being entirely about personal experiences (e.g., askscience vs. AskAmericans)

The train/validation/test splits were created by splitting the post IDs of a subreddit in 90%/5%/5% proportions respectively, so that no post would appear in multiple splits. Since different posts have different numbers of comments, the number of preferences in each split is not exactly 90%/5%/5%:

subreddit train validation test total
askacademia 31450 2095 1708 35253
askanthropology 3910 203 268 4381
askbaking 44007 2096 1544 47647
askcarguys 3227 159 117 3503
askculinary 45710 2094 2563 50367
askdocs 6449 315 455 7219
askengineers 57096 3154 2638 62888
askhistorians 3264 113 164 3541
askhr 8295 641 395 9331
askphilosophy 10307 608 677 11592
askphysics 7364 409 587 8360
askscience 13316 899 977 15192
asksciencefiction 29382 1576 1987 32945
asksocialscience 2706 147 188 3041
askvet 3300 170 224 3694
changemyview 38173 1637 1836 41646
explainlikeimfive 19592 1014 1070 21676
legaladvice 21170 1106 1011 23287
ALL 348718 18436 18409 385563

Data Selection

The score of a post/comment is 1 plus the number of upvotes (approvals) it gets from users, minus the number of downvotes (disapprovals) it gets. The value of a score is relative; in subreddits(posts) with more traffic, there will be more higher-scoring posts(comments). Within a post, comments posted earlier will tend to have a higher score simply due to having more exposure, which is why using timestamp information is essential when inferring preferences.

Given a post P and two comments (A,B) we only included the preference A > B in the dataset if

  1. A was written no later than B and A has a higher score than B.
  2. The post is a self-post (i.e., a body of text and not a link to another page) made before 2023, was not edited, and is not NSFW (over 18).
  3. Neither comment was made by a deleted user, a moderator, or the post creator. The post was not made by a deleted user or moderator.
  4. The post has a score >= 10 and each comment has a score >= 2 (upvoted at least once).

A post with n comments could have up to (n choose 2) preferences in the data. Since the number of comments per post is Pareto-distributed, to prevent a relatively small number of posts from dominating the data, we limited the scraping to 50 comments per post. This means that each post could have up to (50 choose 2) comments in the dataset, though this is a much smaller number in practice, since all the criteria above need to be met.

Reddit makes it very difficult to get anything beyond the top 1000 posts for each subreddit. We started with the top-scoring 1000 posts (of all time) and searched for the 25 most similar posts to each one using Reddit's search function to get up to 7500 unique post IDs per subreddit.

Preprocessing

We tried to keep preprocessing to a minimum. Subreddit-specific abbreviations were expanded (e.g., "CMV" to "Change my view that"). In hyperlinks, only the referring text was kept and the URL was removed (if the URL was written out, then it was kept).

Building a Preference Model

Finetuning

If you want to finetune a model to predict human preferences (e.g., for NLG evaluation or an RLHF reward model), here are some helpful tips:

  1. Preprocess the data. The total input length should fit under the model's token limit (usually 512 tokens). Although models like FLAN-T5 use positional embeddings, we found that the loss would not converge if we finetuned it on inputs over 512 tokens. To avoid this, truncate the post text (in the history field) as much as possible, such that the whole input is under 512 tokens (do not truncate the comment(s) however). If this is still over 512 tokens, simply skip the example.
  2. Use a sufficiently large model. Finetuning a single FLAN-T5-xl model across all the training data should give you a test accuracy between 72-73% (across all domains on examples where the entire input fits within the token limit), ranging from 65-80% on individual subreddits.
  3. Do in-domain prediction. Out-of-domain performance will be poor if the subreddits are unrelated (e.g., if you fine-tune on askculinary preferences and test on askcarguys preferences).
  4. Train for fewer epochs. The InstructGPT paper paper suggests training a reward model for only 1 epoch. Since the same comment appears in multiple preferences, it is easy to overfit to the data.
  5. Training on less data may help. Preferences with a large score_ratio (e.g., comment A having 2x the score of comment B) will provide a stronger signal for finetuning the model, so you may only want to consider preferences above a certain score_ratio. The number of preferences per post is Pareto-distributed, so to prevent the model from over-fitting to certain posts, you may want to limit the number of preferences from a particular post.

Evaluating

Since it is easier to predict strongly-held preferences than weakly-held ones, instead of reporting a single accuracy value, we recommend reporting a performance curve as a function of the score_ratio. For example, here is the accuracy curve for a FLAN-T5-xl model trained on the askculinary data using the suggestions above. The orange line is from finetuning only on preferences with a 2+ score ratio and using no more than 5 preferences from each post to prevent overfitting:

Graph

We see that finetuning on less -- but higher quality -- data leads to higher accuracies on test data with a score ratio below 3.5, with no real downsides! Note that any examples whose inputs did not fit within the token limit were left out of the experiment, since the model could not be expected to handle them.

SteamSHP - An Open-Source Preference Model

We have finetuned two FLAN-T5 models on both the SHP dataset and the helpfulness data from Anthropic's HH-RLHF. They are

  • SteamSHP-XL, a 3B parameter model that achieves 72.8% on the test data.
  • SteamSHP-Large, a 780M parameter model that achieves 72.0% on the test data.

We encourage you to use SteamSHP for NLG evaluation, for building reward models for RLHF, or for another purpose you deem fit!

Biases and Limitations

Biases

Although we filtered out posts with NSFW (over 18) content, chose subreddits that were well-moderated and had policies against harassment and bigotry, some of the data may contain discriminatory or harmful language. The data does not reflect the views of the dataset creators. Reddit users on these subreddits are also not representative of the broader population. Although subreddit-specific demographic information is not available, Reddit users overall are disproportionately male and from developed, Western, and English-speaking countries (Pew Research). Please keep this in mind before using any models trained on this data.

Limitations

The preference label in SHP is intended to reflect how helpful one response is relative to another, given an instruction/question. SHP is not intended for use in harm-minimization, as it was not designed to include the toxic content that would be necessary to learn a good toxicity detector. If you are looking for data where the preference label denotes less harm, we would recommend the harmfulness split of Anthropic's HH-RLHF.

Another limitation is that the more preferred response in SHP is not necessarily the more factual one. Though some comments do provide citations to justify their response, most do not. There are exceptions to this, such as the askhistorians subreddit, which is heavily moderated and answers are expected to provide citations.

Note that the collective preference label in SHP is not necessarily what we would get if we asked users to independently vote on each comment before taking an unweighted sum. This is because comment scores on Reddit are public and are known to influence user preferences; a high score increases the likelihood of getting more positive votes (Muchnik et al., 2013). Whether this "herding effect" temporarily or permanently shifts a user's preference is unclear. Therefore, while SHP does reflect collective human preferences, models trained on SHP may not generalize to settings where individual preferences are aggregated differently (e.g., users vote independently without ever seeing the current comment score, users vote after conferring, etc.). Thanks to Greg Stoddard for pointing this out.

License

Last updated: 03/01/2023

This dataset was made by scraping Reddit in accordance with the Reddit API Terms of Use, without any direct communication or written agreements with Reddit. According to the Terms of Use, "User Content" is owned by the users themselves -- not by Reddit -- and Reddit grants a "non-exclusive, non-transferable, non-sublicensable, and revocable license to copy and display the User Content".

Datasets made by scraping Reddit are widely used in the research community: for example, Facebook AI Research used data scraped from Reddit to make the ELI5 dataset in 2019, which was made available without a license. Anthropic AI has also attested to scraping Reddit for preferences using a different methodology, though this data was not made public. The PushShift Reddit dataset, which makes entire dumps of Reddit available on a regular schedule, is also made available without a license (to our knowledge).

We take no responsibility for and we do not expressly or implicitly endorse any downstream use of this dataset. We reserve the right to modify the SHP dataset and this license at any point in the future.

Contact

Please contact kawin@stanford.edu if you have any questions about the data. This dataset was created by Kawin Ethayarajh, Heidi (Chenyu) Zhang, Yizhong Wang, and Dan Jurafsky.

Citation

SHP was created using the techniques proposed in the following paper. Please cite this work if you use SHP or the SteamSHP models:

@InProceedings{pmlr-v162-ethayarajh22a,
  title = 	 {Understanding Dataset Difficulty with $\mathcal{V}$-Usable Information},
  author =       {Ethayarajh, Kawin and Choi, Yejin and Swayamdipta, Swabha},
  booktitle = 	 {Proceedings of the 39th International Conference on Machine Learning},
  pages = 	 {5988--6008},
  year = 	 {2022},
  editor = 	 {Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Jegelka, Stefanie and Song, Le and Szepesvari, Csaba and Niu, Gang and Sabato, Sivan},
  volume = 	 {162},
  series = 	 {Proceedings of Machine Learning Research},
  month = 	 {17--23 Jul},
  publisher = {PMLR},
}

References

Ethayarajh, K., Choi, Y. & Swayamdipta, S. (2022). Understanding Dataset Difficulty with $\mathcal{V}$-Usable Information. Proceedings of the 39th International Conference on Machine Learning, in Proceedings of Machine Learning Research. 162:5988-6008 Available from https://proceedings.mlr.press/v162/ethayarajh22a.html.

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