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bloom-lm

Task Categories: sequence-modeling
Multilinguality: multilingual
Size Categories: 10K<n<100K
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Si Aya
cc-by
Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose - Recoletos
12
5d569039-e295-429f-9883-b838f2689e3c
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "f0434a0b-791f-408e-b6e6-ee92f0f02f2d" ]
[ "eng" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Naghisgot kini bahin ni Aya. Gigamit na mga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay Mga pulong na sige og gamit: si, naay, ang, nag Mga bag-ong pulong na makat-onan: kama, saya, sakto, maya Gisulat ni: Marites G. Cimafranca Gidibuho ni: Jasper Momo
16 - The Big Book of Nature
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2021, SIL-PNG
24
eed4fe41-fc47-4fd2-a481-e3e9db151e22
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "a8f010c4-b4ed-4399-94bd-c8cb1b389419", "13887fc8-8160-4567-a8df-b7123c6b278f", "da506770-a7e8-4531-9d7b-1b2eea303dc4", "864e1f55-39c5-4b47-9a1d-ab3404573a9a", "805142d3-f4c8-4822-8d78-ce5d94f22b7b" ]
[ "eng", "tpi" ]
16 - The Big Book of Nature Level 1, Book 16, Version 2.0 Butterfly Dragonfly Grasshopper Caterpillar Dog Horse Snake Cow Pig Chicken Parrot Lizard Ant Goat Check Your Understanding 1. What animal is on the front of the book? a) Fish b) Turtle c) Jellyfish d) Butterfly Comprehension Questions 2. Why do you think the grasshopper is coloured all green? 3. What do you think the dog is thinking about in the picture? 4. Where do you think the green snake might live? Why? 5. What two animals in the pictures have horns? Comprehension Questions 6. Can you think of another animal that has scales? 7. Discuss which animals you have seen before and where you have seen them. 8. What is your favourite animal? Draw a picture and write a sentence about why you like it. 16 - The Big Book of Nature By Lucy Vitaliti English Narration by Petra Totome Tok Pisin Narration by Emos Tobiana Adapted by Save the Children, Callan Services National Unit and SIL PNG as part of the Rapidly Improving Standards in Elementary (RISE) PNG project with support from the Australian Government. eBook Layout & Audio-recordings by SIL-Education for Life Adapted from original, Copyright © 2017, Lucy Vitaliti. If you have feedback (spelling corrections, sentence order, or other changes) that should be made to this book, please contact SIL PNG. Email: mytalkingbooks@gmail.com Or stop by an SIL office Go to www.mytalkingbooks.org for more books.
ตำนานวัดแหลมวัง
cc-by-nc-nd
Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย
20
d99cd63c-aa27-4e9d-887a-0370ce913d3c
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "tha", "eng" ]
THE STORY OF LAEMWANG TEMPLE THE STORY OF LAEMWANG TEMPLE เค้าโครงเรื่อง ปราชญ์ชาวบ้านและเยาวชนวัดแหลมวัง ตำบลคูขุด  อำเภอสทิงพระ  จังหวัดสงขลา เรียบเรียงและวาดภาพ กลุ่มพระนอน สนับสนุนโดย มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย หนังสือนิทานเล่มนี้เป็นส่วนหนึ่งของการอบรม "สรรสร้างสื่อ เติมเต็มการเรียนรู้" แต่งและเรียบเรียงภาพโดย ปราชญ์ชาวบ้านและเยาวชน วัดแหลมวัง และกลุ่มพระนอน โดยมีวัตถุประสงค์เพื่อส่งเสริมทักษะการอ่านของเด็ก ระดับชั้นประถมศึกษาปีที่ ๔ - ๖ มิได้ทำเพื่อจำหน่าย แต่ทำเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้ เค้าโครงเรื่อง : ปราชญ์ชาวบ้าน ๑. นางอรจิรา  หนูสงค์                             ๔. เด็กชายอัซซาน  หีมหละ ๒. นางสาวสรารัตน์  จุลนวล                       ๕. ภัคพล  หนูสงค์ ๓.  เด็กชายศุภณัฐ  เจ๊ะโส๊ะ คณะผู้จัดทํา ๑. นางสมใจ  ขาวสนิท                              ครูโรงเรียนวัดท่าหิน ๒. นายมูญาเฮด  ยะเอ๊ะ                             ครูโรงเรียนวัดท่าหิน ๓. นางสาวอักษร  รุ่งเรือง                           ครูโรงเรียนวัดผาสุกาวาสพาล ๔. ว่าที่ร้อยตรีหญิงอาภรณ์  ชนะพาล             ครูโรงเรียนวัดโพธิ์กลาง ๕. นางสาวระพีพรรณ  ไพบูลย์                     ครูโรงเรียนวัดโพธิ์กลาง ๖. นางสาวฐิติรัตน์  จํานง                           ครูโรงเรียนวัดศรีไชย ๗. นางสาวชุติมา  ทองคณารักษ์                   ครูโรงเรียนวัดห้วยลาด
Helping is Fun!
cc-by-nc
Copyright © 2021, Jơrai Bible Association
11
504d2de4-45e9-4743-b700-c5e955ee8975
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "5597206f-ab7d-408e-a929-d9a50dabd557" ]
[ "eng", "jra", "fra", "bkm" ]
Helping is Fun! Helping is Fun! Written by Chuo Kain Godfrey Kristine Roth Trammell Illustrations by Bawe Ernest Mbanji SIL International Translated by Daih Siu Excerpt from the SIL Cameroon Science and Citizenship Levelled, Integrated Reader: Class 1, Book 1 Subject Citizenship (Moral Education) Content Objectives The pupil will: 1. understand the value of pleasing  people by doing good things. 2. understand the virtues of obedience, honesty, truthfulness, and kindness. 3.  practice certain ethical values of the society: love, obedience, hoTEachernesty, truthfulness. Moral Value: Kindness "Help each other be loving and good."             Hebrews 10:24 I help you. You help me. We help each other. Helping is fun! Possible activities: 1. Have a discussion about how players on a football team help each other and what would happen if they did not. Then go play football. 2. As a class, make a project that requires students to help each other to achieve it. 3. Ask students to draw in their notebooks people who help each other and write words or phrases that describe their drawing. 4. LMemorize the Bible verse: "Help each other be loving and good." Hebrews 10.24 5. Compose a song about helping each other work.
06 - Cat and Dog and the Yam
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2020, SIL-PNG
21
fae05679-eea5-478d-99c7-3f94202dc0be
[]
[ "omw", "eng", "tpi" ]
06 - Cat and Dog and the Yam v2.0 This is Cat. This is Dog. Cat and Dog are hungry. Cat and Dog want to eat. Cat and Dog want to eat yam. They want to eat tomatoes. They want to eat corn. Cat and Dog get water. They get water to cook the yam, tomatoes and corn. Cat and Dog put the water on the fire. Then they wait. But then... the yam walks away! Oh no! Cat and Dog run after the yam. But they cannot catch the yam. Cat and Dog cry. Then Elephant comes by. Elephant hears Cat and Dog cry. And Elephant sees the running yam. Elephant gets the yam. Elephant takes the running yam. And then... Elephant sees Mouse! Mouse is under the yam. Mouse is hungry. Mouse wants to eat. Cat, Dog, Elephant, and Mouse walk back to the house. Then they eat. Cat, Dog, Elephant, and Mouse eat the yam. They eat tomatoes. They eat corn. Bye-bye Cat. Bye-bye Dog. Bye-bye Elephant. Bye-bye Mouse. 06 - Cat and Dog and the Yam concept, text, illustrations and design by Elke and René Leisink Narrated by Aiden Kipefa  eBook layout, audio recording, and activities by SIL - Education for life www.mytalkingbooks.org Activities in this book were made with Active Presenter 8. The activities are licenced CC-BY-NC-SA. Download the activity from: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1jA_UmpI6kM1e2G8-YqmrYXx2PCR0RfNa?usp=sharing Adapted from original; Copyright 2017 - African Storybook Initiative CC-BY
12 Dəlabiya
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2021, Calvary Ministries and Nya Huba Bible translation team
22
ae3f22dd-65e1-4825-bb49-504ea0ad5744
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "26094c7a-2bc1-4da3-b0f1-8bd5a6147bf3", "7f01729e-0c4b-4974-839f-0cf70a5c7212" ]
[ "fra", "hau", "deu", "spa", "swh", "hbb", "eng" ]
A Bible story from Exodus 12:33 – 15:21 Distant Shores Media and the Door43 World Missions Community. Illustrations are © Sweet Publishing. Nya Huba Bible Translation and Language Deveoment Project Nya Huba Bible Translators This work is a derivative of "Creative Commons Open Bible Stories" attributed to unfoldingWord.org used under CC BY SA 4.0. All included images originate from “Bible Images from Sweet Publishing” attributed to Sweet Publishing used under CC BY SA 3.0.
Browny The Horse
cc-by
Copyright © 2016, Pratham Books
16
bade6135-15e3-484a-8d1f-39a94522fda9
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "c4f1c38d-72ba-4dcb-9055-72ab2c7e060e", "78b71cc1-af53-4af7-80da-e9cd077d4cfc" ]
[ "eng" ]
Browny The Horse Browny The Horse Author: Rajalakshmi Paramasivam Illustrators: Greystroke, Jagdish Joshi, Prashant Miranda, Reshma Barve, Ruchi Shah, Rupa Prakash, Sanjay Sarkar, Zainab Tambawalla, aditi rajaraman Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books Browny The Horse Author: Rajalakshmi Paramasivam Illustrators: Greystroke, Jagdish Joshi, Prashant Miranda, Reshma Barve, Ruchi Shah, Rupa Prakash, Sanjay Sarkar, Zainab Tambawalla, aditi rajaraman Browny was the favourite horse of a King.The majestic look of the horse, Browny, attracted everyone in the palace. He was a lucky horse for the king. But Browny was not happy. Browny thought that he had lost his freedom in the palace, though he was well taken care of. One day, he managed to escape from the palace. He was galloping as fast as he could. But he could hear the king's guards chasing him. Without stopping to see, he galloped fast and reached a forest. Only after getting into the forest, he breathed a little. Lucky for him, the guards did not enter the forest. There he saw, many animals wandering here and there. Browny joined them. He was feeling the joy of freedom. He even made friends with a deer and both Browny and the deer were chatting. Suddenly there was a loud roar. Immediately, the deer shouted," Browny, run for your life. The leopard is on its way hunting for food." Realising the danger he was in, he started galloping again. He galloped as fast as he could. He reached a city. There was a huge crowd in a place.That was the 'Sea World', theme park. He pushed the crowd and entered the place. Seeing the horse,some boys started hitting him with stones. To escape from stones, he started running again. Not knowing where to run, he ran into a large gathering. There was a big pool of water around which people were seated. That was a 'Dolphin Show'. Browny was running with such great speed that he jumped into the water in the pool. Water splashed everywhere around the pool. Dolphin, ready for the show also jumped outside. Organisers of the show tried to catch Browny. The fully wet Browny somehow managed to get outside and started galloping again. He started running outside. The king's guards, searching for him, spotted him and shouted "Browny Browny". Tired Browny recognised the guards. Unable to run further, Browny decided to return to the palace. After returning to the palace stable, he thought to himself," No other place on this earth is as safe and comfortable as this stable". He also realised that escaping from the palace, is like jumping into the fire from the frying pan.
Lost and Found
cc-by
Copyright © 2014, Pratham Books
17
e7ca8f34-267b-4cca-a238-0e46ef5e5857
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ecd391a6-1b68-47e8-9f9d-8a7c2aa34937" ]
[ "eng" ]
Lost and Found Lost and Found Author: Sukhada Rahalkar Illustrator: Sukhada Rahalkar Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books Lost and Found Author: Sukhada Rahalkar Illustrator: Sukhada Rahalkar Not here, not there. Where have you gone? Not on the sofa. Not under the cot. Not in the box. Not under my sister's frock. Not under the pillow. Not in my bag. Sob, sob, where have you gone? I have looked in every room, l have looked under every book. I have looked under the chair, I have looked under the stool. Where have you gone? Soon granny came back from her walk. "Look what I found in the park." "It can sway, it can bounce. It can spin, it can dangle. Ha-ha, hee-hee," said Granny with a giggle. Oh Granny! Thank you so much! You have found my dear yo-yo! "Yo-yo? What a funny name! What a funny toy! I want to play with it, It gives me so much joy!" Giggle, giggle, giggling away, Granny played, with my little toy. For the rest of the day!
Маленькая козочка
cc-by
Copyright © 2021, Эта работа лицензирована по международной лицензии Creative Commons Attribution 4.0. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
18
83364cde-214d-4568-bc11-7208f04e9038
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "33eaf0cb-7e05-4324-92cf-7b1d97bc3b32" ]
[ "rus", "eng" ]
Маленькая козочка Маленькая козочка Маленькая Козочка отправилась на поиски сладкой травы. Над нею сияло голубое небо. Но Маленькой Козочке не было до него никакого дела. Река бежала по камням и бурлила. Но Маленькая Козочка не слышала её песни. Птичка увидела Козочку и спросила: -Как твои дела? Но Маленькая Козочка ничего не ответила птичке. Она была слишком занята поиском сладкой травы. Маленькая Козочка искала траву, и всё дальше и дальше уходила от своей матери-козы. Маленькая Козочка нашла сладкую траву. Она всё ела, и ела. Козочка потеряла свою мать из виду. Мама-Коза потеряла свою дочь. Она стала искать её среди кукурузы, но Маленькой Козочки там не было. Мама-Коза побежала к реке, но и там Маленькой Козочки не было. "Где же ты, Маленькая Козочка?" - заблеяла Мама -Коза. Птичка сказала Маме-Козе: -Маленькая Козочка спит в траве, за мостом! Мама-Коза перешла через мост и увидела в траве сладко спящую Козочку. -Проснись! Я тебя потеряла, - заблеяла Мама-Коза. -Я не потерялась... Я была здесь всё время!- сказала Маленькая Козочка.
Kuya Empoy
cc-by
Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers’ Project – University of San Jose-Recoletos
12
d81f6fb6-1ba8-40a6-92d0-141a5786af90
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "cgc" ]
Sugilanon sa Libro: Istorya kini ni Kuya Empoy.  Gigamit nga mga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h, w, r, ng, pr, gr, tr, kw, ñ, C, j, f Mga sige ug gamit nga mga pulong: tabang, pamilya, estudyante, swkela Mga bag-ong pulong nga makat-unan: trabaho, adlaw, gabie Gisuwat ni: Jenith Q. Balsicas Level 2 (Grade 1)        Personal Development
Wheels
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2020, SIL Cameroon
14
be4caa29-83e4-4f43-b621-83cf148545c8
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "fra" ]
Wheels Wheels Wheels A wheelbarrow has 1 wheel. A bicycle has 2 wheels. An aeroplane has 3 wheels. A car has 4 wheels. A lorry can have 6 wheels. An articulated truck has many wheels. A boat has no wheels.
39 Nja Tlanda nyi Nəuma nə Yesu
cc-by-sa
Copyright © 2021, Calvary Ministries and Nya Huba Bible translation team
20
9ee7d665-21f2-463f-8fba-64ac578e5562
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "455a8ff9-dd0e-42ce-a8d7-ce05b14313c8", "dff04ecd-5642-422f-948f-976765799dec" ]
[ "fra", "hau", "deu", "spa", "swh", "hbb", "eng" ]
A Bible story from Matthew 26:5- 27:26; Mark 14:53-15:15; Luke 22:54-23:25; John 18:12-19:16 Distant Shores Media, Wycliffe Associates, and the Door43 World Missions Community. Illustrations are © Sweet Publishing. Nya Huba Bible Translation and Language Development Project Nya Huba Bible Translators This work is a derivative of "Creative Commons Open Bible Stories" attributed to unfoldingWord.org used under CC BY SA 4.0. All included images originate from “Bible Images from Sweet Publishing” attributed to Sweet Publishing used under CC BY SA 3.0.
La feria
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2021, Juárez & Associates Inc.
29
7b89145f-d48a-48ba-bc83-560a54aa7730
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "lad", "spa", "eng" ]
Autoras: Sophia Maldonado Bode y Ana Lucia Morales Sierra Editora: Silvia Yela Colaboradores: Virgilio Ramírez Ramírez, Vilma Haydee Gómez de León, Sebastián Simón Pascual, Luis Alfonso López Ordóñez, Maura Lourdes Bartolomé López, Jeremías Cristóbal Mateo, Tony Alexander Macajola Archila, Mayra Yanet Barrios Gálvez, Mynor Alexander Martínez, María Ordoñez Ortíz, Leticia Gerónimo Xutuc, Moisés Franco, Enrique Francisco Diego, Luis de Jesús Cristóbal Mateo, Juan Eduardo Lorenzo, Maurilia Simón, Verónica López, Doris Gómez, Cristina García, William Agustín Palacios, Juana Cano, Romeo Fuentes, Rony López, Peter Ramiro Juan Pedro, Anastacio Méndez García, Vilma Julissa Sales Argueta, Catalina Ortíz, Lorenzo Francisco Valladares, Leonel Mateo Simón, Abner Arcadio Samayoa, Mateo Pedro Mateo, Andrea Adelaida Diego, Osmar Alexander López Carrillo, Augusto Emmanuel López Ramírez, Marycruz Galicia Alvarado, Gerardo Palacios, Sonia Raymundo, Ruperto Montejo y Pablo Díaz Sales. Validación: Marycruz Galicia Alvarado (Especialista en Nutrición-PCI), Ana Luisa Guillén (Sesan), Marian Dávila (Sesan), Karen Ileana Kestler Farfán (Mineduc), Silvia Rosal (Especialista en Currículo y Ciencias Naturales), Mercedes Barrios (Especialista en Género). Ilustrador: Herman Montenegro Diagramadora: Claudia Roche de Barrios 978-9929-780-41-5
A House
cc-by
Copyright © 2021, Jơrai Bible Association
14
a5691295-98a8-4e2c-ae8e-0666ec3449bf
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "5808fe96-749a-425a-83df-52feea14ee9c", "ba17024d-4d96-4e7b-a58e-0d06529cd8bb", "3b995851-58d0-4683-928f-ddef22b42daf", "fe94f200-85a3-4382-ace8-c408e8ed1555" ]
[ "eng", "jra" ]
A House Writer: Clare Verbeek, Thembani Dladla and Zanele Buthelezi Illustration: Kathy Arbuckle A House Writer: Clare Verbeek, Thembani Dladla and Zanele Buthelezi Illustration: Kathy Arbuckle Translated by Daih Siu Houses Writer: Clare Verbeek, Thembani Dladla and Zanele Buthelezi Illustration: Kathy Arbuckle The original version of this story in isiZulu is available at: http://cae.ukzn.ac.za/Resources/ SeedBooks.aspx Saide, South African Institute for Distance Education www.africanstorybook.org A Saide Initiative Mzi lives in a thatched house. Thulani lives in a square house. This house is a rectangle. The roof of this house is a triangle. This man is building his own house. This house is new. This house is old. I wish I lived in this house.
"Ake na Sidda!" "Dili imo! Ake na Sidda ni."
cc-by
Copyright © 2019, SIL International
19
64b08548-9ba8-4f1f-af32-c71003a4014f
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ce9d10ad-b67e-4818-adbe-23e0ba0def0e", "813ae6c4-f5cc-4964-9d27-4ad2dcfbe2a4", "2edbd397-2761-423f-8088-64b562181717", "31da15cb-2450-4da1-9b4f-ff2e605f47c4" ]
[ "cgc", "eng", "spa" ]
Author: Suraj J Menon Illustrator: Soumya Menon Author: Suraj J Menon Illustrator: Soumya Menon Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books Kiley Gove Translated into Kagayanen by Melanie B. Fresnillo "My fish!" "No,  my fish!" Author: Suraj J Menon Illustrator: Soumya Menon Early one morning Nicolas woke up. “Aaah! It is time to catch some fish,” he said yawning. He met Marco on the way to the pond. They were best friends and always played together all day long. Juana saw them marching off with their fishing rods. “We are going to the pond to catch fish. Do you want to come along Juana?” Juana thought for sometime. “Please, don’t do that,” she said, “without water, the fish will die.” They did not listen to what Juana said. They headed straight to the pond. Nicolas and Marco sat at the edge of the pond. Two fish swam pass them. One was small and the other was big. Then came the third fish which was the biggest they had seen today. Juana laughed saying, “It is bigger than the feet of Colas!” Colas and Marco held on tightly to their fishing rods. Colas shouted, “MY FISH!” Marco also shouted, “NOT YOURS! THIS IS MY FISH!” Nicolas was pulling hard. Marco was also pulling hard. CRAAAACK! Both of their fishing rods broke. THUDDD! Nicolas fell to the ground. SPLAAASH! Marco fell into the water. What happened? What do you think happened? The fish tangled their fishing lines on a rock! Who is the hero in this story? A. Colas B. Marco C. Juana D. The fish F. The rock What do you think? Why did Juan not want the two of them Colas and Marco to go fishing in the fishpond?
นายคง สวัสดิ์สุข
cc-by-nc
Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย
16
e719cec2-8ce5-44e9-b73b-1f3dcb998636
[ "8B8C1838-64E3-4989-93AB-251F960907FC" ]
[ "tha", "eng" ]
Mr. Kong Sawatsuk Mr. Kong Sawatsuk เค้าโครงเรื่อง คณะครูโรงเรียนบ้านเสาหงษ์ เรียบเรียงและวาดภาพ โรงเรียนบ้านเสาหงษ์ สนับสนุนโดย มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย หนังสือนิทานเล่มนี้เป็นส่วนหนึ่งของการอบรม "สรรสร้างสื่อ เติมเต็มการเรียนรู้" ซึ่งผู้แต่งและเรียบเรียงโดยคณะครูโรงเรียนบ้านเสาหงษ์ โดยมีวัตถุประสงค์เพื่อเสริมทักษะการอ่านออกของนักเรียนชั้นประถมศึกษาปีที่ ๔ - ๖ มิได้ทำเพื่อจำหน่าย แต่จัดทำเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้
Be Safe in Your Boat
cc-by-nc-nd
Copyright © 2021, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea
20
13bdda5a-e2fa-47e8-a052-58b9ff2f5e92
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Be Safe in Your Boat School Journal Senior 1, 2009 - V1.1 Be Safe in Your Boat Before travelling to sea, always check that your boat is safe. 1) Ensure that the engine is working well. 2) Check that there is extra fuel and a tool kit for the engine. 3) See that the boat has spare paddles and a bailer. 4) Have enough water and food for the journey. 5) Check that the boat is not overloaded. 6) Check the weather. Don't go if the weather might be getting worse. 7) When you are satisfied with the above, you are set to travel. 8) If you have engine problems, do the following: a) stay with the boat unless you are very close to the shore; b) comfort one another until you're safe; c) wave clothes to attract attention. 9) If you remember these rules, they will help you to be safe as you travel on the water. Check Your Understanding 1)     What can you use to move the boat if the engine breaks down? Check Your Understanding 2)    What might happen if the boat is overloaded? Check Your Understanding 3)    What would you do if the weather gets bad just as your setting off on your journey? Check Your Understanding 4)      Why should you stay in your boat if your engine breaks down? Check Your Understanding 5)      Can you think of another situation when it would be safe to have spare fuel? Check Your Understanding 6)      What piece of safety equipment could you use if the boat is leaking? Check Your Understanding 7)      Look at the picture of the people in the boat. What safety concern can you see? Check Your Understanding 8)    Imagine a friend is inviting you to go fishing in their boat and they have not followed this safety advice. Write a short play to demonstrate how you would act in this situation. Secretary's Message The Papua New Guinea School Journal (Senior) is a collection of writing suitable for children in Grades 6-8. The Journal is intended as supplementary reading and should be available for children to read in the classroom. Teachers are encouraged to read a story from the Journal to their class every day. In this way their children will become familiar with the stories and will want to read them for themselves. The Journal was written and illustrated by Papua New Guinean writers and illustrators and was produced with the assistance of the New Zealand — Papua New Guinea School Journals Project. The Department of Education wishes to acknowledge the support of the New Zealand Government in making these Journals available for the children of this country. DR JOSEPH PAGELIO Secretary for Education Be Safe in Your Boat Written by Martin Lesley Illustrated by by Joseph Ivolo PNG Sign interpretation by Lucia Rifu Video Recording by Sauma Totome eBook layout and audio recording by SIL-Education for Life This school journal story was produced by the National Department of Education and digitized and translated by SIL PNG, Callan Services for the Disabled National Unit and Save the Children with support from the Sustainable Development Program. Adapted from original; School Journal 2009. Copyright © 2009, DoE, Papua New Guinea
Q’a’nb’il joqomaq
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Copyright © 2016, Ministerio de Educación de Guatemala y USAID
7
abd73c48-bf01-4854-a705-907d178154a7
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "mam", "eng" ]
9789929781160 Isaías Benedicto López Díaz
Estilo de vida saludable
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2021, Juárez & Associates Inc.
31
c374ee4c-e4d8-4d81-ac41-4998ad34e333
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "spa", "eng", "lad" ]
Autoras: Sophia Maldonado Bode y Ana Lucia Morales Sierra Editora: Silvia Yela Colaboradores: Virgilio Ramírez Ramírez, Vilma Haydee Gómez de León, Sebastián Simón Pascual, Luis Alfonso López Ordóñez, Maura Lourdes Bartolomé López, Jeremías Cristóbal Mateo, Tony Alexander Macajola Archila, Mayra Yanet Barrios Gálvez, Mynor Alexander Martínez, María Ordoñez Ortíz, Leticia Gerónimo Xutuc, Moisés Franco, Enrique Francisco Diego, Luis de Jesús Cristóbal Mateo, Juan Eduardo Lorenzo, Maurilia Simón, Verónica López, Doris Gómez, Cristina García, William Agustín Palacios, Juana Cano, Romeo Fuentes, Rony López, Peter Ramiro Juan Pedro, Anastacio Méndez García, Vilma Julissa Sales Argueta, Catalina Ortíz, Lorenzo Francisco Valladares, Leonel Mateo Simón, Abner Arcadio Samayoa, Mateo Pedro Mateo, Andrea Adelaida Diego, Osmar Alexander López Carrillo, Augusto Emmanuel López Ramírez, Marycruz Galicia Alvarado, Gerardo Palacios, Sonia Raymundo, Ruperto Montejo y Pablo Díaz Sales. Validación: Marycruz Galicia Alvarado (Especialista en Nutrición-PCI), Ana Luisa Guillén (Sesan), Marian Dávila (Sesan), Karen Ileana Kestler Farfán (Mineduc), Silvia Rosal (Especialista en Currículo y Ciencias Naturales), Mercedes Barrios (Especialista en Género). Ilustrador: Herman Montenegro Diagramadora: Claudia Roche de Barrios 978-9929-780-41-5
Ang Kaniadto ug ang Karon
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose- Recoletos
18
708470de-a374-4dec-9b22-b2f34c89cf6f
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328" ]
[ "eng" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Naghisgot kini bahin sa kaniadto ug ang karon Gigamit nga mga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h, w, r, ng, pr, gr, tr, kw, ñ, c, f, q, v, x, z Mga sige ug gamit nga mga pulong: ang, mga, kay, na, kaniadto, karon, daghan Mga bag-ong pulong nga makat-unan: kuryente, sakyanan, bughaw Sinulat ni: Marvin A. Halawig Level 3  (Grade 2)         Community Living
ईद
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Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
16
561f7d75-7c40-4057-aee8-9030792f27c8
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "d21812c5-12ff-4ea0-8063-6f3093a77658" ]
[ "eng", "awa", "nep" ]
Eid-ul-Fitra Eid-ul-Fitra
Uusi'a
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2021, Solomon Islands Translation Advisory Group (SITAG)
13
e8e1b563-f72a-4d98-942b-6f511eb960b1
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ac199501-8ada-42a5-bd69-f8286a0f5964" ]
[ "kwd", "eng" ]
Market Market Author: Grace Tan Illustrator: Gibson anak Rana Illustrations adapted by: Deonisio da Silva Sipa Advisors: Karla J. Smith, PhD; James A. Smith Translated by David Fonosimae Solomon Islands Translation Advisory Group (SITAG) Printed: June 2021 One day, my mom and I went to the market. My mom bought rice. My mom bought fish. My mom bought chilli. My mom bought veggies. My mom bought ginger. What do you think she cooked that day?
07 - Cat and Dog: Dog is Cold
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2021, SIL-PNG Education for Life
25
61ef0fc1-6a61-4ada-ac7d-093399b99cab
[ "e43852e6-811c-4f1d-a669-eb708d13b558" ]
[ "omw", "eng", "tpi" ]
07 - Cat and Dog: Dog is Cold v1.0 This is Cat. This is Dog. It is night. It is dark. It is cold. It is very cold.  It is too cold for Dog. Cat gives Dog an undershirt. One undershirt is dirty. One undershirt is clean. Dog takes the clean undershirt. But he is still too cold. Cat gives Dog shirts. One shirt is big. One shirt is small. Dog takes the big shirt. But he is still too cold. Cat gives Dog trousers. One pair of trousers is long. One pair of trousers is short. Dog takes the short pair of trousers. But he is still too cold. Cat gives Dog vests. One vest is wet. One vest is dry. Dog takes the dry vest, but he is still too cold. Cat gives Dog jackets. One jacket is thick. One jacket is thin. Dog takes the thick jacket, but he is still too cold. Cat gives dog hats. One hat is tall. One hat is short. Dog takes the tall hat, but he is still too cold. Cat gives Dog shoes. One pair of shoes is new. One pair of shoes is old. Dog takes the new shoes, and then . . . it is not too cold for Dog. The night is over. The moon goes down. The sun comes up. It is day. It is light. It is warm. It is very warm. For Dog, it is too warm. Bye-bye Cat. Bye-bye hot Dog. 07 - Cat and Dog: Dog is Cold Concept, text, illustrations and design by Elke and René Leisink Narrated by Aiden Kipefa  eBook layout, audio recording, and activities by SIL - Education for life www.mytalkingbooks.org Adapted from original; Copyright 2017 - African Storybook Initiative CC-BY
Ri vaꞌen richin ri Pascua
cc-by-sa
Copyright © 2022, Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc.
19
c6f8d5d1-070c-40dc-bfbe-f953341d5b9c
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "7d39beab-077f-42a5-8982-7a15f75844bd" ]
[ "kor", "fra", "cak", "spa", "por", "eng" ]
144 The Last Supper 144 The Last Supper The disciples had prepared everything for the Passover meal as Jesus told them. As they were eating, Jesus got up from the dinner, took off his outer clothing and wrapped a towel around his waist. As they were eating, Jesus got up from the dinner, took off his outer clothing and wrapped a towel around his waist. He poured some water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet, drying them with the towel that was around his waist. Jesus came to Simon Peter, who said to him, “Lord, are you going to wash my feet?” Jesus replied to him, “If I do not wash you, then you have nothing to do with me.” So Simon Peter said to him, “Lord, wash not only my feet! Wash my hands and my head also!” Jesus said to him, “One who has taken a bath needs only to wash his feet. The rest of his body is already clean.” After he finished washing their feet, Jesus put his outer clothing on again. Then he sat down at his place again and asked, “Do you understand what I have done for you?” During the meal, Jesus said, “I tell you the truth, one of you here will betray me.” The disciples looked at one another, confused as to which one of them Jesus was talking about. Jesus said, “It is the one to whom I will give this bread.” “You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord.’ You are right to say this, for that is what I am. If I, your teacher and Lord, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. I have given you an example to follow.” “A servant is not greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who has sent him. If you know these things, how fortunate you will be if you do them.” During the meal, Jesus said, “I tell you the truth, one of you here will betray me.” The disciples looked at one another, confused as to which one of them Jesus was talking about. Jesus said, “It is the one to whom I will give this bread.” “I will not drink wine again until the day I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.” Then Jesus gave a piece of bread to Judas Iscariot. After receiving the bread, Judas went immediately out into the night. No one else knew why Jesus had done this.
Literacy International:Special Women: Eleanor Roosevelt
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Copyright © 2018, Literacy International
15
4cfe5c27-1381-4bec-a22a-2bb2788b1638
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Literacy International: Special Women: Eleanor Roosevelt Copyright © 2018 Literacy International info@LiteracyInternational.net Literacy International: Special Women: Eleanor Roosevelt Copyright © 2018 Literacy International info@LiteracyInternational.net Can a shy, fearful, plain-looking little girl grow up to be famous? Eleanor Roosevelt did. Eleanor Roosevelt was a president’s wife. She was married to President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the United States. Franklin was president for over twelve years. That was longer than any other president. No one else was the First Lady for as long as Eleanor. Eleanor spoke out for people who were being mistreated. She was the main writer of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. That is a paper used all over the world to bring better life to all people. She encouraged the United States to take part in the United Nations. She became the first person to represent her country there. Eleanor’s life was hard. She was not a pretty child. She felt alone. Her mother called her “Granny” (Grandmother) because she looked older than her age. She was very serious. Her mother died when Eleanor was 8 years old. Her father died two years later. He had been drinking too much alcohol. After that, Eleanor lived with her grandmother. But she did not feel loved. She felt that others were staring at her because she was very tall. It was easy to see her in a crowd. When Eleanor was 14 she wrote, “Even if a person is not beautiful, she can have a good life. Other people will listen to her if she is truthful and loyal.” That writing showed what a strong person Eleanor was. At age 15 Eleanor went to a school for girls in England. The Director of the school told the students to think for themselves. She said they should be true to what they believed. Eleanor remembered those things. She learned French, German, music, dance and other subjects at that school. She became more sure of herself. Then she was not so afraid of people. When she was 17, Eleanor returned to the United States. Her family wanted her to come back so that she could be with other American young people. But again Eleanor felt very much alone. She did not know the other girls her age because she had been in England for so long. Eleanor heard about a group called the Junior League. They were women who worked in poor neighborhoods of New York City. They saw people working very hard for very little pay. The workplaces were uncomfortable and not safe. The homes were crowded and dirty. The Junior League ladies tried to make life better for workers. Eleanor joined these ladies. She visited homes and places of work. She took notes on the bad conditions. Then she showed her notes to newspaper reporters. They wrote articles about the bad conditions. Eleanor told people to buy “white label” products. To have a white label, products had to be made by people who received fair pay. The workers had to have good working conditions. The products had to be made by workers at least 16 years old. At that time many young children were working in factories. Eleanor spent many hours at a community center for the workers and their families. She taught them dancing and exercise. She showed them how movement, after long hours working in a small space, could improve their health. In the Junior League, Eleanor learned many things that would help her in her later life. She learned to make plans and carry them out. She saw that a person can bring changes. She learned to make speeches. In 1902, Eleanor fell in love with her cousin Franklin. His mother Sara did not want them to marry. But they had their wedding in 1905. The President of the United States at that time was Theodore Roosevelt, Eleanor’s uncle. He walked Eleanor into the marriage service. She was 21 years old then. The married couple lived in New York state. Sara moved in with them and tried to make decisions for them. She made Eleanor’s life unhappy. Franklin and Eleanor had six children. One of them died. While Eleanor was raising their five children, she helped her husband in his work. He was elected to the State Senate in 1910 and re-elected in 1912. Then he became Assistant Secretary of the Navy. In 1920 he tried to become the Vice-President of the United States, but lost the election. In 1928 he became Governor of New York. Franklin and Eleanor talked together about the changes he wanted to make. Eleanor encouraged her husband in all this. During World War I, from 1914 to 1918, Eleanor worked with soldiers. She spent many hours in a “canteen” where soldiers came to eat and relax when off duty. She visited a mental hospital. The patients were soldiers who had suffered greatly in the war. In 1921 there was a very big change in Eleanor’s life. Franklin became sick with polio. After that he could not walk by himself. He had to walk with metal braces or use a wheelchair. His mother wanted him to retire from public service. She wanted him to be comfortable. But Eleanor and Franklin did not agree with her. Franklin stayed in government work. Eleanor said, “I became Franklin’s legs and ears.” She met with people he could not meet with himself. She gave speeches for him. Eleanor often took her husband’s place at public events. Because of her help, he could continue his work. In all her activity, Eleanor found a new freedom. She became even stronger than she was before. People loved her. In the 1920’s Eleanor spoke out for more changes in work conditions. She said some workers were still not being paid enough. She said no one should have to work more than 48 hours a week. She wanted child labor to end. No child should have to work in adult jobs. For a while Eleanor held a special picnic every year. The picnic was for boys who were in trouble with the law. They had good times in the fresh air. She challenged them to stay out of trouble. Franklin was elected President of the United States in 1932. He was re-elected in 1936, again in 1940 and again in 1944. He tried hard to make life better for those who had little money. He helped farmers get higher prices for their crops. Franklin's “New Deal” included many programs to fight poverty. People without jobs could go to work. They made roads, bridges, dams, and government buildings. They built schools, hospitals and airports. The government paid them. President Roosevelt started Social Security. This gave money to people after they stopped working at age 65 or older. If they died, it gave money to their wives. Roosevelt started another program for people who had lost their jobs but were still able to work. The government paid them for a period of time, as long as they kept looking for other jobs. Some Americans did not like these new programs. They said the programs made people lazy. They felt that the government gave them too much when they could get it for themselves. But most Americans liked the programs. As a result of the programs, many people had much more money than they had before. They were better able to take care of their families. Eleanor helped Franklin make important decisions. She urged him to include women in his New Deal. He agreed. Eleanor wrote a daily newspaper column called “My Day.” In it she told about her activities and the things she wanted to change. Newspapers in many different cities used this column. It began in 1936 and continued until her death in 1962. She also wrote a magazine column every month. In it she answered mail from readers. She had a weekly radio show. She was the first president’s wife to hold regular press conferences, meetings with newspaper reporters. Then came the Second World War. The United States entered it in December 1941. Eleanor wanted all women, even if they were poor, to learn a trade. She herself did what she could to help America in the war. She visited American troops in England and in the South Pacific. Eleanor spoke out against racial prejudice. Many Americans believed that black people could not do difficult work. They said they could not fly airplanes safely. Eleanor knew that was not true. She flew with black pilots. She helped to get government money for the Tuskegee Airmen. These airmen were all black. They handled airplanes with great skill. They won many battles in World War II. Thousands of children in Europe lost their houses in the war. Eleanor worked to bring many of them to homes in the United States. She did the same for Jews who were mistreated by the Nazis. Franklin was also a strong leader during the war. Many soldiers were dying. He spoke on the radio often to encourage the American people. Franklin died in April 1945, just a few months before the war was over. Eleanor did some of her greatest work after her husband’s death. She said that the United States should be in the United Nations. The next American president sent her to take America’s part in the U. N. She did this from 1946 to 1952. One group in the United Nations worked for human rights. She helped to write a paper for this group. The paper was called the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It said that every person in the world should have certain basic things. He should be able to own property, get married and have children. He should have fair treatment in court and freedom of religion. In 1948 Eleanor supported the new nation of Israel. She wanted a homeland for the Jews. She started the National Youth Administration to help young people with school and jobs. At the age of 75 Eleanor began to teach at a school called Brandeis University. At the age of 77 she went back to the United Nations to speak for the United States. President Kennedy sent her there. The next year she led Kennedy’s Commission on the Status of Women. That group helped to make things better for women. Even as an older women, Eleanor still took part in public events. She continued to give speeches and to appear on television. She died from tuberculosis at the age of 78. It is amazing that one person could do as much as Eleanor Roosevelt did. Her life made a huge difference to the United States of America and to the whole world.
Ang Kaka
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project- University of San Jose - Recoletos
12
049386a3-487c-4b84-a0b9-0d2ce8978f84
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "ceb" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Kini nga libro bahin sa kaka Gigamit nga mga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, Mga sige ug gamit nga mga pulong; saya, ok-ok, nanay, mga, si, nag, ug Mga bag- ong makat- unan nga mga pulong: sako, saya Sinulat ni: Cecile S. Boyonas Gidibuho ni: Elizar C. Gacang Stage 2 (Decodable)     Animal Stories
Shongololo'S shoes
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Copyright © 2016, Book Dash
18
5b41ba00-8653-4d73-b8ec-5811b68c4a9d
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Shongololo'S shoes Shongololo'S shoes Illustrated by Megan Lötter Written by Jacqui L’Ange Designed by Marteli Kleyn Megan Lötter Jacqui L'Ange Marteli Kleyn Shongololo’s Shoes Illustrated by Megan Lötter Written by Jacqui L’Ange Designed by Marteli Kleyn with the help of the Book Dash participants in Cape Town on 5 March 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Where are all my shoes? I know I left them here! I haven’t seen your shoes. Go ask Snail! No shoes here. Go ask Giraffe. I’m in a hurry – go ask Frog. Shoes? How many? Go ask Flamingo. Seen your shoes? No, not me. Will I ever find my shoes? Shoes, eh? You should ask the Monkeys. We’re busy. Go ask Owl, she knows everything! Hmm. I have an idea. Why don’t you ask Lion? These are yours? I’ll give them all back if you come to my party!
Дур – ин чӣ қадар дур аст?
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Copyright © 2021, Ин кор таҳти иҷозатномаи Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial- International ShareAlike 4.0 иҷозатнома гирифтааст (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/)
19
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[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "fc9eaac7-3995-412e-a319-d963af16e0a5", "6f8ccce4-874d-4ee5-afe8-e28d63f37e4d", "091074f2-1373-4c36-b930-75e59b2ab30d" ]
[ "tgk", "rus", "eng" ]
How Far is Far? How Far is Far?
Hazi Ndziro
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Copyright © 2019, Andy Nimeh
15
8aec164e-a036-4ee2-b209-b0eaadfd1dc7
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "wni" ]
Hard Work Hard Work Samahani, nahika uwono nkosa, awu usitsaha shiyo shangina, awu una fikira la hwangiha shiyo... tafadhwali unambie harimwa: pcvcwhcomoros@gmail.com     If you see any mistakes, want another book, or want helping writing your own book please contact me at: pcvcwhcomoros@gmail.com    Marahaba ivo wasoma!    Thanks for reading!       Cam - Bako Mkoni  
Sane in the market
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Copyright © 2014, Alice Kapalondo
16
effae9bb-ad80-4b10-817c-afab890acff1
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "c6230c99-5f3e-4cc8-b473-e1c4af49f2ae", "72e28418-19b6-40d3-9dbd-8f5c6f9be1d9" ]
[ "eng" ]
Sane in the market Sane in the market Writer: Alice Kapolondo Illustration: Cathy Feek, Wiehan de Jager, Catherine Groenewald, Felicity Bell and Melany Pieterse Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Sane in the market Writer: Alice Kapolondo Illustration: Cathy Feek, Wiehan de Jager, Catherine Groenewald, Felicity Bell and Melany Pietersen Language: English Saide, South African Institute for Distance Education www.africanstorybook.org A Saide Initiative Sane at home. It is Sane’s birthday. Sane at the bus stop. Sane in the bus. Sane at the market. Ooh! Many fruits. Sweet apples. But where is mother mother? I went to buy a birthday present for you. Thank you mum!
La vieille femme sage et le serviteur stupide
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Copyright © 2021, SIL International
12
06d30865-fb49-4a3e-a3fd-3def85a44d7d
[]
[ "fra", "eng", "hau" ]
The Wise Old Woman and the Foolish Servant The Wise Old Woman and the Foolish Servant Images by © 2017 FHI 360. CC BY 4.0. Images de © 2017 FHI 360. CC BY 4.0. This product was made possible possible by the UK Department for International Development (DfID) and the United Nation's Children's Fund (UNICEF) as part of the Reading and Numeracy Activity (RANA), implemented by FHI 360. Ce produit était rendu possible grâce au DfID du Royaume-Uni (UK Department for International Development) (DfID) et l’UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund) dans le cadre de Reading and Numeracy Activity (RANA), mis en œuvre par FHI 360. Translator: Elisabeth Gerger Math topic: Subtraction The Wise Old Woman and the Foolish Servant Once upon a time, there lived a wise old woman in a village called Banga. She had 32 silver coins, which she hid in a box under her bed. Every morning the old woman counted her silver coins to make sure she had all 32. One morning, the old woman counted her silver coins. There were only 22. “Who stole my silver coins?” wondered the old woman. She thought about her many servants. There was one who was foolish and dishonest. It was likely that he had taken the coins. However, the old woman had to have proof. After thinking for a while, the old woman had an idea. She called all of her servants together. She said to them, “I am an old and forgetful woman. I had a certain number of silver coins. I can’t remember the number, but now I have only 22 coins. I will give a reward to anyone who tells me how many silver coins I had and how many I misplaced.” “No one can know this,” one of the servants protested. But the foolish servant shouted, “I know!” Everyone turned to him in amazement. The foolish servant said confidently, “You had 32 silver coins, and you misplaced 10. That is why you have 22 left.” The old woman looked at the servant and smiled. “You are right. But unfortunately for you, only the thief himself could know that. So now you will have your reward!” The old woman’s guards came and escorted the foolish servant out of the house. The old woman became known in the village for her wisdom. Comprehension Questions How many coins did the old woman have originally? How did the old woman know who the thief was? Why do you think the old woman tricked the servant instead of asking him directly? Math Exercises 1. Explain that we use subtraction when we want to show an amount that is taken away. Write the following equation on the board, explaining that these numbers represent the silver coins. Then ask pupils to help solve it.   32 -10 2. Ask pupils how many coins would remain if 20 were stolen. Then ask a pupil to write the equation on the board and solve it.   32 -20 3. Ask pupils to imagine that they had 45 coins, and they find that 15 are missing. Then ask a pupil to write the equation on the board and solve it. Math Exercises EXTENSION: Use 32 coins (or you may substitute another small object, such as stones, nuts, pieces of paper, leaves, etc). Tell pupils you have 32, and then ask a volunteer to take a certain amount away. After the volunteer tells the class how many were taken, the class should guess how many remain. Then check the answer in two ways: use an equation, and count the remaining objects.
ปีไม้ อางก่าอางตูม
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Copyright © 2020, Bisu Language and Culture Committee
19
45a816aa-66d9-4b85-afdb-32688e66f9b0
[ "8B8C1838-64E3-4989-93AB-251F960907FC" ]
[ "bzi", "eng" ]
This Big Book is designed to be used for two weeks. It promotes enjoyment of storybooks, development of vocabulary, the skills of prediction, sequencing and main idea, and the understanding that books are made up of words. On Monday, the teacher On Tuesday, the teacher On Wednesday, the teacher On Thursday, the teacher On Friday, the children
Zawˇ ma-ehˇ jawˇ muiˬ-eu uˬ jiˇ nymˇ
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Copyright © 2020, This book is a product of Akha Literature and Cultural Committee
23
203d8a94-f7b9-4706-9f9f-3ae56c0c8be2
[ "8B8C1838-64E3-4989-93AB-251F960907FC" ]
[ "ahk", "eng" ]
Thatch Houses are Comfortable  09 250 777 357 Thatch Houses are Comfortable  Phaˇ dmˬ tsawˇ myahˇ: Zawˇ ma-ehˇ jawˇ muiˬ-eu uˬ jiˇ nymˇ    Boꞈ-euˬ ghaˬ : Sm. Aˇsm Aˇ baˇ : S. Sawˇluˆ Yaˬ beh beh-eu poˆ : 2021 September Book title: Thatch Houses are Comfortable          Author : Ah Suhn Pictures by : Saul First edition : 2021 September
धिमय्‌ बाजं
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Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
16
3cbfeddb-64b3-4068-9b9b-79dc84466a17
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "d21812c5-12ff-4ea0-8063-6f3093a77658" ]
[ "eng", "new", "nep" ]
dhime baja dhime baja
Grandpa Fish and the Radio
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Copyright © 2004, Pratham Books
28
32916f6b-02bd-4e0b-9b2b-d971096259b7
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Grandpa Fish and the Radio Grandpa Fish and the Radio Author: Venkatramana Gowda Illustrator: Srikrishna Kedilaya Translator: Divaspathy Hegde Once upon a time, there was a little village. In the little village was a little stream. In the stream, several families of frogs, tortoises, and fish lived happily in each other's company. The fish family was the largest of them all. The fish family was also the most respected. The reason? A big fat radio that occupied pride of place in their underwater home. Grandpa Fish was the head of the fish family. He was obeyed in most things, not just by the younger fish but also by the frog and tortoise families. But there was one thing over which he simply had no control: the family radio. Never did Grandpa Fish get a chance to listen to the news. The younger fish, frogs, and tortoises simply adored film music, and would not move from the radio's side as long as it was playing. By the time he had convinced the younger ones to let him listen to the news, it was usually too late. Most often, all Grandpa Fish heard was the newscaster saying, “And that is the end of the news…” It was very annoying. One day, Grandpa managed to convince the younger ones a little earlier than usual. Rushing to the radio, he tuned in to the news, and heard the newscaster say, “And before we end, the headlines once again…” The Breaking News on the River Radio network that morning was very frightening.  “A group of humans are using a new technique to capture the maximum number of fish possible!” said the newscaster. “They are poisoning the water of the rivers one by one! When the fish die, the humans just trap them all in their nets and take them away!They could be coming to your river very soon!" Grandpa Fish was stunned. He quickly relayed the information to the rest of the fish and to the other river creatures. Numb with fear, everyone sat quietly thinking about the next course of action. No one wanted to listen to film music now. Meanwhile, the daughter of the village headman came to the river to fetch some water. Grandpa Fish and the headman had been friends for a long time. Swimming quickly to the surface, Grandpa Fish informed the girl that there was an emergency. "Please tell your father to come and see me immediately," he said anxiously. The headman came at once. Grandpa Fish first made sure his guest was comfortable and even offered him a cup of coffee. Only then did he bring up the subject of the frightening news he had heard on the radio. Now the headman was worried too. Thinking quickly, he came up with a plan to make sure the river in his village, and all the creatures in it, would be safe. The headman quickly reassured the old fish and his clan. “Don’t worry, Grandpa Fish,” he said. “I will see to it that you and your fellow creatures will be safe from those terrible human beings.” The younger fish, frogs, and tortoises realized what a huge disaster it would have been had Grandpa Fish not listened to the news on the River Radio network that day. Ashamed of their earlier behaviour, they resolved to mend their ways in the future. Use  your  imagination  and  colour  this  picture  any way  YOU  like. Use  your  imagination  and  colour  this  picture  any way  YOU  like.
Baha sa Tunghaan sa Inayagan
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose - Recoletos
15
c469cffb-783f-4a4e-934e-74bc65aab637
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "ceb" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Isturya sa isa ka baha sa tunghaan sa Inayagan. Mga gigamit nga letra: m, a, t, k,s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h, w, r, e, ng, pr, gr, tr, kw, ñ, c, j, f,  Mga sige ug gamit nga pulong: ang, sa, kung Mga bag-ong pulong nga makat-unan: tunghaan, magguol, angayan, suliran Gisuwat ni: Jovenia Cabiana Level 2, Grade 1     Environment
Naughty Children
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Copyright © 2015, Ajay Chandel ,
7
8c483006-b157-401d-92f6-9287cea35cfc
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Naughty Children Naughty Children Author: Ajay Chandel Illustrator: Soumya Menon Naughty Children Author: Ajay Chandel Illustrator: Soumya Menon One day teacher was absent. All the naughty students were playing in the class. One of the student writing on the board and he said all the students come here. That boy teaching a lesson and all the students enjoying the day.
001 Widow’s Gift
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© 2021 Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc.
16
e916ecf2-97dd-4824-9229-e874bc1fc395
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
001 Widow’s Gift Mark 12; Luke 21 gray-background Mark 12:41-44;; Luke 21:1-4 Title ideas: Jesus honored [praised] a poor widow. Can poor people please God? Little is much! One day, Jesus and his disciples went into the temple courtyard [public space]. They sat down near the offering container where people were putting money as a gift to God. Mark 12:41;; Luke 21:1 Many rich people came and put much money into the offering container. Mark 12:41;; Luke 21:1 A poor widow woman came to that place. Jesus indicated to his disciples that they should watch that woman. She put into the offering container two very small coins [worth very little]. Mark 12:42;; Luke 21:2 Jesus said to his disciples, “Some people gave much money, but they still had much money left. This woman is very poor. Yet, she gave all the money she had [which she might have used for food today and tomorrow]!” Mark 12:43-44;; Luke 21:3-4 “God considers this woman’s [poor widow’s] offering to be worth much more [value] than all the other people’s gifts! [And he has accepted her gift with full joy!]” Mark 12:43;; Luke 21:3 001 Widow’s Gift Original illustrations by Jim Padgett, © Sweet Publishing licensed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. www.sweetpublishing.com Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc. has skin darkened all of the Jim Padgett illustrations in our collection, and has modified some of them. Story script © 2018 Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc. licensed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. Template © 2017 Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc. licensed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. Music © 2017 Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc. licensed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. A special thanks to the 50+ unnamed people who worked on the story scripts, templates, adapted illustrations and music.
Omwana omusiani aba omuruchi
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Copyright © 2021, Marlene Custer. Licenced under CC BY40.
14
648ef418-a345-4f0d-836e-b74417e08e4f
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "50fd442f-afd6-423c-8353-c7ef7fdc652f" ]
[ "lkb", "eng" ]
A Boy Becomes King Primer A Boy Becomes King Author:  Marlene Custer Illustrations:  International Illustrations:  Art of Reading 3.0 Kabarasi  translation team Scripture taken from the Holy Bible, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION.  Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society.  Used by permission of Zondervan Publishing House.  All rights reserved. All Art of Reading illustrations are cc by-nd.     Do you know any young boys?  Are any of them eight years old?  What do most eight- year-old boys like to do?     They like to eat, that is for sure!  They like to run and play with friends.  And most young boys like to climb trees.     Josiah lived a long, long time ago.  His father was a king.  But I am sure Josiah liked to do things that most boys his age like to do.    He probably played in the dirt, swam with his friends, and did a little fishing.     He most likely helped his mother with simple chores.  And, of course, boys his age had lessons to learn.     So what is different about Josiah?  Well, when Josiah was just eight years old, his father died. Josiah became the king of Judah!     Interestingly, Josiah was a better king than his father.  Josiah did what was right in the eyes of the LORD.     Very early in his reign, Josiah ordered that all idols and evil altars be destroyed.     Then he ordered that the temple of God be repaired and restored.      While the workmen were working on the temple, they found the Book of the Law.     When King Josiah heard the words in the Book of the Law, he was very upset.  He called all the people together and read the words to them. The people agreed to live by the words Josiah read to them.  They destroyed all the bad, evil things in the whole land.  They destroyed all the evil places in the land.     Josiah also ordered all the people to celebrate the Passover as it was described in the precious Book.  No  other king had ever celebrated the Passover like Josiah and the people did that year.      "Neither before nor after Josiah was there a king like him who turned to the LORD as he did---with all his heart and with all his soul and with all his strength, in accordance with all the Law of Moses."                        2 Kings 23:25 (NIV)
Мечтательная Кыял
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Copyright © 2021, Эта работа лицензирована по международной лицензии Creative Commons Attribution 4.0. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
24
b756bcc6-9ccd-4d58-9284-f970fa8fda94
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[ "rus", "kir", "eng" ]
Кыялкеч Кыял              Кыялкеч Кыял              Быйыл кыялкеч Кыял төрткө чыкты. Ал эшиги жашыл түстүү үйдө жашайт. Бала бакчасынын терезелери ачык сары, каалгасы болсо кызыл сыр менен боёлгон. Кыял бала бакчага барганды аябай жактырат. Алар достору менен ырдап, бийлеп, сабактарды окушат. Бул кечте ал аябай чарчады. Көзүн жумар замат, калың токойду көздөй жылып бара жатканын сезди. Ойгон! Кыял ойгон! Кыял көзүн ачты. Аны кебетелери башкача топ балдар курчап турушкан. Жада калса алардын баш кийимдери да өзгөчө болучу. Балдар аны тегеректеп "Биз сени жыл бою күткөнбүз! Кош келдиң! Кош келдиң!" − деп ырдап жатышты. "Бир жыл, күттүңөр беле?” − Кыял таң кала шыбырады. − Сен түшүңдө сууда сүзөөрүңдү, ырдаарыңды билебиз. − Мен азыр уктап жатамбы? Ал муну текшермекке өзүн чымчып да көрдү. − Керек болсо сен уча да аласың", − алар ырын улантышты.  − Уча алам? Кантип эле?" − Кыял таң калды. − Колдоруңду чымчыктын канатындай жай, асманга булут сымал учуп чык, −  дешти балдар. Кыял жаңы досторуна кошулуп асманга көтөрүлүп, токойдун үстүнөн учуп өтүштү. Ылдый жактан жүздөгөн балбылдаган жарыктарды көрүп, аларга умтулушту. Шаар үйлөрү түстөрү жашыл, сары, сыя жана кызыл эле козу карынга окшошуп турду. Кыял бир үйгө баш бакты, анын жумшактыгы килемден кем эмес болчу. Балдар кызды шаарга алып чыгышты. Кыял козу карындын укмуштуудай даамына таң калды. Балдар кызды шаарга алып чыгышты. Кыял козу карындын укмуштуудай даамына таң калды. Күтүлбөгөн жерден козу карын китеп болуп ачыла баштады. Ал жактагы сандар: "Бизге тезиреек кел", − деп чакырып жатышты. Алар кызга хандар, ханышалар, феялар жана каарман жоокерлер жөнүндө кызыктуу окуяларын баяндашты.  Кыз кытыраган чипсы жей берип суусай түшкөндө, достору аны булакка ээрчитип келишти. Бул булакта лимонад, кийинки булакта апельсин, андан кийинкиде манго ширеси агып жаткан. Ал жанга жагымдуу муздак ширелердин баарын даамдап көрдү. Анан ал обон салган козу карындарга жолукту. Ал Учтукуй деген бала менен бий бийледи. Анын баш кийими, жада калса жүзү да учтукуй эле. Экинчи болуп кичинекей кыз аны бийге чакырды. Ал кыздын баш жана бут кийимдери, көйнөгү да жүрөккө түспөлдөш болчу. "Мен кичинекей жүрөкмүн", − деп ал созолонто ырдап жиберди. Кыял ыр бийден чарчай түштү. "Мен чарчадым, эс алалы", − деп ал балдардан суранды. "Убакыт тар, андан көрө лимонад иче кой", − дешти балдар. Кыял суу жутуп, кайрадан күчтөндү. "Эми тоону көздөй учалык", − деген достору сунуш киргизди . Алар тоодой болгон балмуздак, таттууларды жандап учушту.  Ошентип достор үйүлгөн ар түстүү оюнчуктарга келишти. Ойноп болгон соң, оюнчук машине аларды салып кетти. "Биз каткан табышмакты чечмелеп, пазлдарды курап ойно", −  дешти кийинки оюнчуктар. Кыял алар менен көпкө жыргап ойноду. Үйгө кайтаар мезгил келди. Оюнчуктар "Кыял жакшы кал, жолукканга чейин", − деп үйлөрүнө кайтышты. Ошентип кыз жаздыкка башы тиер замат катуу уйкуга чөмүлдү. Кыялкеч Кыял ойгонгондо:"Ушундай керемет түш да кирет экен да?" − деп ойлонду. Бирок анын алаканында бир нерсе бар эле, ал эмне болду экен? Мүмкүн силер бул жөнүндө кызыктуу аңгеме жазып жүрбөгүлө?!
Hawarra Kitawu Kudus (Tahir) be KANURIN 27. Hawar Kam Samariyabe Ngǝlama
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Copyright © 2020, Sweet Publishing
18
a5f0891c-edd0-4dc6-a7c9-c72478af6e04
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "kau", "eng" ]
Images by Sweet Publishing, © 2007 Sweet Publishing. CC BY-SA 4.0. CALVARY MINISTRIES (CAPRO)
Hawa and the Lion
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2019, SIL Cameroon
20
b1c83520-7aaa-4e18-b100-7497bdc7809a
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Hawa and the Lion Hawa and the Lion A traditional story retold by Carol Smith This story is from 'Stories for Children Book 7' used in the SIL MLE Curriculum in Cameroon Images by Susan Rose, MBANJI Bawe Ernest, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. Images on pages Front Cover, 1, 5 by Susan Rose, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0. Images on pages 2–4, 6–7, 10 by MBANJI Bawe Ernest, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0. Image on page 8 by Susan Rose - Lion, MBANJI Bawe Ernest - woman, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 Hawa and the Lion Long ago there was a woman called Hawa who lived in an African village. Hawa married a man who had a little son. The boy’s mother was dead, so Hawa became his stepmother. Hawa was a kind woman and she was very pleased to have a child to look after. But the little boy would not make friends with her. Hawa cooked good food for him, she tried to cuddle him, and she tried to tell him stories. But he would not eat the food, he ran away when she tried to cuddle him, and he would not listen to the stories. Poor Hawa was very sad. She asked her friends what she should do, and they said she should cook good food for him, cuddle him and tell him stories. When she said that she had tried all these things they told her they did not know what else she could do. Hawa’s husband often had to go away from home on long journeys to work. Hawa was afraid that he would think she had been cruel to the little boy when he was not there to see. So she was very worried, and at last she went to see the wise man. “My little stepson does not like me,” she said, “I try to cook the kind of food that he likes but he won’t eat it. I would like to cuddle him but he runs away. I would like to tell him stories but he won’t listen. So I feel sad. What am I to do?”  “I think I can help you,” said the wise man. “You must bring me some hairs from the tail of a lion. Hawa thanked the wise man and went away but she did not know how she was going to get those hairs. She knew that a wild lion lived in a cave on the mountain but she was frightened because it was so big and strong, and she was not very brave. That evening the little boy would not speak to her at all. He turned his head away when she looked at him. He did not eat his food and went off to bed without speaking to her. When the boy had gone to bed Hawa was sad. “I will do it,” she said, “I will get those hairs from the lion’s tail.” Next day she took some meat with her and left it near the lion’s cave. She was too frightened to wait and see what happened. Next evening she did the same thing again, but this time she did not run away. She hid behind a tree to watch, and soon the lion came out. He saw the meat and sniffed it and lay down quietly to eat it.  Hawa saw that he was a big lion with black hairs on the end of his tail. She thought he was beautiful but she was very much afraid of him. Next day she brought meat again. She stood far away but she let the lion see her. She was shaking with fear but she did not run away. After that she came nearer and nearer every day and at last the lion took the meat from her hand. Then every day she was able to sit beside him while he ate and she was able to snip one or two hairs from the end of his tail. He did not seem to mind at all. Hawa kept the hairs very carefully and when she had a little bunch of them she took them to the wise man. The wise man said, “Well done Hawa, it must have been difficult to get those hairs. How did you do it?” So Hawa told him how she had come nearer and nearer to the lion each day very, very slowly until he knew and trusted her. “At last we were friends,” she said, “He was quite tame in the end and I knew he would not hurt me.”  “Well done,” said the Wise Man, “You were very slow and careful and gentle. In the end he trusted you.” “Now you make friends with the little boy in the same way as you did with the lion. Be gentle and patient and in the end he will trust you.” So Hawa went back home and tried again to make friends with her little stepson. She was very gentle and patient with him and at last he smiled at her and ate his food and came to sit on her knee while she told him stories. And do you know which story he liked best? It was the one about the lion with the black hairs in his tail. Text in English: Hawa and the Lion - Long ago there was a woman called Hawa who lived in an African village. Hawa married a man who had a little son. The boy’s mother was dead, so Hawa became his stepmother. Hawa was a kind woman and she was very pleased to have a child to look after. But the little boy would not make friends with her. Hawa cooked good food for him, she tried to cuddle him, and she tried to tell him stories. But he would not eat the food, he ran away when she tried to cuddle him, and he would not listen to the stories. Poor Hawa was very sad. She asked her friends what she should do, and they said she should cook good food for him, cuddle him and tell him stories. When she said that she had tried all these things they told her they did not know what else she could do. Hawa’s husband often had to go away from home on long journeys to work. Hawa was afraid that he would think she had been cruel to the little boy when he was not there to see. So she was very worried, and at last she went to see the wise man. “My little stepson does not like me,” she said, “I try to cook the kind of food that he likes but he won’t eat it. I would like to cuddle him but he runs away. I would like to tell him stories but he won’t listen. So I feel sad. What am I to do?” “I think I can help you,” said the wise man. “You must bring me some hairs from the tail of a lion. Hawa thanked the wise man and went away but she did not know how she was going to get those hairs. She knew that a wild lion lived in a cave on the mountain but she was frightened because it was so big and strong, and she was not very brave. That evening the little boy would not speak to her at all. He turned his head away when she looked at him. He did not eat his food and went off to bed without speaking to her. When the boy had gone to bed Hawa was sad. “I will do it,” she said, “I will get those hairs from the lion’s tail.” Next day she took some meat with her and left it near the lion’s cave. She was too frightened to wait and see what happened. Next evening she did the same thing again, but this time she did not run away. She hid behind a tree to watch, and soon the lion came out. He saw the meat and sniffed it and lay down quietly to eat it. Hawa saw that he was a big lion with black hairs on the end of his tail. She thought he was beautiful but she was very much afraid of him. Next day she brought meat again. She stood far away but she let the lion see her. She was shaking with fear but she did not run away. After that she came nearer and nearer every day and at last the lion took the meat from her hand. Then every day she was able to sit beside him while he ate and she was able to snip one or two hairs from the end of his tail. He did not seem to mind at all. Hawa kept the hairs very carefully and when she had a little bunch of them she took them to the wise man. The wise man said, “Well done Hawa, it must have been difficult to get those hairs. How did you do it?” So Hawa told him how she had come nearer and nearer to the lion each day very, very slowly until he knew and trusted her. “At last we were friends,” she said, “He was quite tame in the end and I knew he would not hurt me.”  “Well done,” said the Wise Man, “You were very slow and careful and gentle. In the end he trusted you.” “Now you make friends with the little boy in the same way as you did with the lion. Be gentle and patient and in the end he will trust you.” So Hawa went back home and tried again to make friends with her little stepson. She was very gentle and patient with him and at last he smiled at her and ate his food and came to sit on her knee while she told him stories. And do you know which story he liked best? It was the one about the lion with the black hairs in his tail.
कछुवा आ खरहा
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Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
18
e5226b39-1d0a-4ea6-a615-292048c28125
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[ "eng", "bho", "nep" ]
Tortoise and Rabbit Tortoise and Rabbit
Ũwau wa Kolona
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Copyright © 2020, SIL Africa Area
27
883e7727-5e88-4a3e-8185-31052d090d07
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[ "kam", "eng" ]
About Coronavirus About Coronavirus  SIL Africa Area Translated by Ruth Munguti Created by Weiman Kow, instagram: weimankow
Ang Unlan ni Aya
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project- University of San Jose- Recoletos
12
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[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "cgc" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Ang unlan ni Aya nga gasa sa iyahang nanay ug tatay. Gigamit nga mga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h  Mga sige ug gamit nga mga pulong: Unlan, gasa Mga bag-ong pulong nga makat-unan: gasa, asul, pula, gasa Sinulat ni: Ma. Alona E. Maghanoy Gidibuho ni: Amiemon Godmalin Stage 4 (Decodable) Community Living Stage 4 (Decodable)       Community Living
Ni'i nehe, naran Gogo
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Copyright © 2010, SIL International (MLB)
13
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[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "gal", "eng", "ddg", "tdt" ]
Panbisil and his friends Panbisil and his friends
NJERI
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Copyright © 2015, Emmanuel cheruiyot.
21
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[ "eng" ]
NJERI NJERI NJERI Writer: EMMANUEL CHERUIYOT Illustration: Catherine Groenewald, Silva Afonso, Vusi Malindi, José Jochicala and Silva Afonso and Vusi Malindi It is a nice story to read. Saide, South African Institute for Distance Education www.africanstorybook.org A Saide Initiative My name is NJERI, I am in standard six. My school is called UZALENDO primary school. My favorite subject is Drawing. Madam KARIMI teaches us English and drawing. DAVID is my best friend. He is older than me. I love playing football when I am not in class. After taking lunch, we go back to home to assist our parents. I love my mother, she is called TERESA. Everyday, we go to the market with her to buy food. We buy Unga from Kariuki's posho mill. I like eating potatoes,Teacher Rehema said they are important for our health. Waiyaki is my elder brother; he loves playing alone. On holidays we visit the Game park to see the Elephants, cheetahs and Giraffes. We plant Maize in our Shamba. My mother loves eating Maize. Every morning I wake up early to go to school.
Ti bangaehe tasir Ineter tua
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Copyright © 2021, SIL-PNG
15
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[ "tpi", "nsn", "eng" ]
(07) Look at the Animals Level 1, Book 7, Version 2.0 (07) Look at the Animals Writer: Jenny Katz  Illustrator: Sandy Campbell Narrator: Petra Totome eBook Layout & Audio-recordings: SIL-Education for Life You are free to download, copy, translate or adapt this story and use the illustrations as long as you attribute or credit the original writer/s and illustrator/s. You may not use this story for commercial purposes (for profit). Look at the animals. Moo The cow says, "Moo". Meh Meh The goat says, "Meh, meh." The horse says, "Neigh." "Neigh" The pig says, "Oink, oink." Oink oink The chicken says, "Cluck, cluck." Cluck, cluck Woof The dog says, "Woof." And the farmer says, "Shhh!" Shhh Comprehension Questions: 1. What does the cow say? 2. What does the goat say? 3. Why does the farmer say, 'Shhh'? If you have feedback (spelling corrections, sentence order, or other changes) that should be made to this book, please contact SIL PNG. Email: mytalkingbooks@gmail.com Or stop by an SIL office Go to www.mytalkingbooks.org for more books.
เจ้ามดน้อยจอมซน
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Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตเเห่งประเทศไทย
21
eb26535d-98a0-4ef9-982a-3df15e1c5461
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[ "tha", "eng" ]
The Naughty Ant The Naughty Ant เรียบเรียงและวาดภาพ ราวชัยโย  อำเภอกาบเชิง  จังหวัดสุรินทร์ สนับสนุนโดย มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย หนังสือนิทานเรื่องนี้เป็นส่วนหนึ่งของการอบรม "สรรสร้างสื่อ เติมเต็มการเรียนรู้" ซึ่งเเต่งและเรียบเรียงภาพโดย คณะครูโรงเรียนบ้านหนองโย-โคกปืดและโรงเรียนบ้านราวนคร อำเภอกาบเชิง จังหวัดสุรินทร์ โดยมีวัตถุประสงค์ส่งเสริมทักษะการอ่านของนักเรียนระดับชั้นประถมศึกษาปีที่ ๑ - ๓ มิได้ทำสื่อเพื่อจัดจำหน่าย เเต่จัดทำเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้
16 - The Underwater Kingdom
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Copyright © 2021, Department of Education Papua New Guinea
21
b2088cea-f0d3-465a-82c4-5f0e47b0d33b
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "7bf4e398-be80-47fe-8cac-86f2c996815d" ]
[ "eng" ]
16 - The Underwater Kingdom School Journal Senior 2, 2008 - V1.1 “Wake up! Wake up!" It was Riolee's father. It's fishing time.” He shouted. The place was still, cold, and quiet. Riolee got out of bed. She collected her fishing gear, and set off. Her paddle splashed water back as her canoe split the waves in front. After twenty minutes of paddling, she reached her fishing spot. She lowered her anchor. Down, down it went till it was resting on the bottom. She put bait on the hook, and threw her line into the sea to the north. She held tightly to the reel and waited and waited.  There were no bites. She threw the line out to the east. Again she waited. Nothing. She put more bait on her hook and tried to the west. Still nothing. Suddenly a big fish jumped out of the water in front of her. "Little girl! If you give me all your bait, I'll take you to my kingdom," it said. "Help! Help!" Riolee shouted. But there was no one to hear her. “Don't be scared. I won't hurt you," said the fish. "You only have to give me your bait. There are a lot of good things in my kingdom." Riolee agreed at last. She gave all her bait to the fish, and pulled up her anchor. The fish ate the bait. "Now follow me," it said. Riolee paddled after the fish. After a while, they came to a large rock. "Anchor here," said the fish, “Now do as I tell you. Stand up. Close both eyes, and step out into the water.” Riolee was frightened, but she did as the fish told her. She sank down into the sea. When she reached the bottom, she opened her eyes. She was in a beautiful kingdom. “Welcome!" said the chief. “I am happy to have you as my daughter. Please make yourself at home. My daughter, Rosser, will be your friend. You can do what you like. You can have whatever you want. But there is one thing which you must not touch." He pointed to a glass fish in a glass bowl. "You must not touch this glass fish.” For a long time, Riolee enjoyed playing with her new friend Rosser. She loved the happy friendly kingdom. There was no sickness, and there was always plenty to eat. But she kept looking at the glass fish in the glass bowl. "What can happen if I just touch it?" she thought. And one day, she did touch it. She waited till no one was looking. She crept up. She reached into the glass bowl and touched the glass fish with her finger. At once the kingdom vanished. The sea rushed in on her. Riolee couldn't breathe. She swam upwards. Water filled her mouth. Just as she thought she was going to drown, her head broke the surface. She was beside her canoe. Sadly she climbed in, pulled up the anchor, and paddled home. Check Your Understanding 1) Who woke Riolee up to go fishing? a) An alarm b) Her father c) Her uncle d) Her mother Check Your Understanding 2) What was Riolee not allowed to touch in the kingdom? a) The large fish b) The Chief’s daughter c) The glass fish d) The kingdom Check Your Understanding 3) What time of day did Riolee go fishing? How do you know? Check Your Understanding 4) Who led Riolee to the Underwater Kingdom? Check Your Understanding 5) How do you think Riolee felt when the kingdom disappeared? Check Your Understanding 6) Who greeted Riolee when she entered the underwater kingdom? Check Your Understanding 7) What did Riolee like about the underwater kingdom? Check Your Understanding 8) Write a description of how you imagine the Underwater Kingdom would be. Secretary's Message The Papua New Guinea School Journal (Senior) is a collection of writing suitable for children in Grades 6-8. The Journal is intended as a teaching and reading resource and as supplementary reading and should be available for children to read in the classroom. Teachers are encouraged to read a story from the Journal to their class every day, in this way their children will become familiar with the stories and will want to read them for themselves. The Journal was written and illustrated by Papua New Guinean writers and illustrators. The Department of Education wishes to acknowledge the support of the New Zealand Government in making these Journals available for the children of this country. DR JOSEPH PAGELIO Secretary for Education Issued free to schools by the Department of Education First published 2008, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea Copyright © 2008, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea School Journal coordinated by Darusilla Arazi All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be sold, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission of the publisher. ISSN 1561-3402 16 - The Underwater Kingdom Author: Leslie Martin Illustrator: Kris Tangot Adapted by Save the Children, Callan Services National Unit and SIL PNG as part of the Western Province eLearning Project with support from funding partner PNG SDP. eBook layout, activities and audio recordings by: SIL - Education for life www.mytalkingbooks.org Adapted from original; School Journal 2008. Copyright © 2008, DoE, Papua New Guinea
Letsatsi le Letle
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Copyright © 2021, SIL-PNG
23
ef73ea4d-463c-45b5-8c78-8231e436feb5
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[ "xho", "ven", "tpi", "sot", "eng" ]
(40) A Beautiful Day Level 3, Book 40, Version 2.0 “What a beautiful day,” says Mum.  “Wake up, Nicholas.” “Hello sun,” says Nicholas.  “Good morning birds.” “It’s a lovely day,” says Dad. “Let’s have a picnic by the river.” “Can my friend Jacob come?” asks Nicholas. “Don’t forget me. I love picnics!” says Donkey. “Follow us,” say the birds. “And me. I want to come too!” says Dog. “I’ll race you to that tree,” Nicholas says. “I won, I won,” says Donkey. “Not fair,” says Nicholas. “You’ve got four legs.” “Look what I can do,” says Nicholas. “I bet you can’t do this,” says Jacob. “Here’s our picnic spot,” says Dad. “Race you to the water!” says Jacob. “Come and eat, boys and girls,” says Mum. “Time to go home,” says Mum. “Say goodbye to Jacob.” Check Your Understanding 1. Why did Dad suggest they have a picnic by the river? a) He was hungry. b) It was a lovely day. c) He wanted to go swimming. Check Your Understanding 2. Why did Donkey not want to be forgotten? a) He loves picnics. b) He was very hungry. c) He would otherwise be lonely. Check Your Understanding 3. Who did they follow to reach the picnic spot? a) The dog b) The donkey c) The birds Check Your Understanding 4. Why did Nicholas think it was unfair that Donkey won the race to the tree? a) Donkey was older. b) Donkey has four legs. c) Donkey cheated. (40) A Beautiful Day Illustrated by Lindy Pelzl Written by Elana Bregin Designed by Raeesah Vawda English Narration by Helen Sahl    eBook layout and audio recording by SIL - Education for Life App development  by SIL - Education for Life A Beautiful Day Illustrated by Lindy Pelzl, Written by Elana Bregin Designed by Raeesah Vawda with the help of the Book Dash participants in Durban on 7/11/15.
The Wonderous Journey of Marks Birthday Ball
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Copyright © Asafeer Education Technologies FZ LLC, 2018
17
a7c361d4-7ca0-4c7e-957e-e71fd7bee2eb
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
The Wonderous Journey of Marks Birthday Ball Author: Michelle Hanna Illustrator: Sara Wafeeq The Wonderous Journey of Marks Birthday Ball Written by Michelle Hanna. Images by Sara Wafeeq. © Asafeer Education Technologies FZ LLC, 2018. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. The original work of this book was made possible through the generous support of the All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development (ACR GCD) Partners (the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), World Vision, and the Australian Government). It was prepared by Asafeer Education Technologies FZ LLC and does not necessarily reflect the views of the ACR GCD Partners. Any adaptation or translation of this work should not be considered an official ACR GCD translation and ACR GCD shall not be liable for any content or error in this translation. The ball flew into the air, it flew to a distance Mark himself couldn’t even imagine. Mark had challenged John before. He told him he couldn’t kick the ball as well as he did, but it was really a great kick. The ball flew from over the school fence, but neither Mark or John managed to figure out where the ball went exactly. Mark tried to go and search for the ball, but the gate man prevented him from going out of the school yard. So, he had to wait until the end of the school day to search for his ball. Mark usually sneaked his ball into school without his parents knowing so that he could play with it during breaks. He was certain that he wouldn’t find the ball after school. It won’t wait for him outside that long. Someone will sure take it. Sometimes, when the ball would fly over the school fence, usually someone would kick it back. But you don’t always find someone good enough to do so. This ball was so special to Mark. It was his birthday present. His father got him the ball and as soon as he saw it, he said, “What a lovely ball!” It was, it was really a very beautiful ball. His father also wrote a dedication on the ball with a permanent marker and wrote Mark’s full name and phone number on it. He did this so it could be easily returned if it was lost when Mark played. Mark was so happy that night as he cuddled the ball to sleep. After the school day was over, Mark and John left school and searched for the ball on the other side of the fence. They didn’t find it there, so they decided to search the entire neighbourhood until Mark said, “it seems like someone silly took the ball this time.” This was not exactly what happened. When Mark kicked the ball, that great kick that took the ball out of school, the ball ended up on the roof of one of the nearby buildings. The ball rested there until evening. Only then, the porter saw it and gave to it his three-year old son. The boy was so happy and started kicking it here and there until he grew tired with it and threw it from the roof where it fell in a dustbin. The ball stayed in the dirt until twelve in the morning when the cleaning company came to take the boxes. Soothe ball moved to the recycling centre outside the city where the truck dumped it. Now the ball rested in a huge container for sorting and treating trash. A group of workers sort the trash items into, paper, plastic and glass to be recycled, while the rest are shredded and thrown in the desert. While one worker was sorting the contents of the container, he noticed that this beautiful ball was placed among the trash. He said, “I’ll give it to my son to play with.” At the end of the day, the employee took the ball with him as he took the bus back home. The ball was dirty because it had been covered in trash, so he took a handkerchief from his pocket and started cleaning the ball. While he was cleaning the ball, the driver stopped suddenly to avoid an accident with another car. All the people on the bus bumped into one another as the bus stopped suddenly. Unfortunately, the ball fell out of the workers arms, out the window, and fell down into an open cesspool! He stood up after the bus stopped and searched for the ball through the window, but it disappeared in the cesspool. The ball remained there for two days. Meanwhile, the people living on the street complained about the open cesspool. They complained that anyone could fall in it if it remains open. A worker from the sanitation department came to cover the cesspool but before he did so, he placed a stick in it to make sure it’s not plugged. As soon as he did so, the ball slid and floated through the pipes under the city buildings. The ball floated for ten days until it reached the water treatment station outside the city. It got stuck in one of the filters that prevents solids from getting into the machines. When one of the workers came to see what happened to the filter, he found the ball and took it using a long stick he had. The ball was extremely dirty, but the worker was used to work with all this amount of dirt. He said, “what a beautiful ball!” I’ll clean it and take it to play with my friends next Friday. At the end of the day, he left with a clean ball. He went back home and left the ball on the table and slept as he thought of the surprise he’d prepared for his friends. The week passed and Friday was finally here. He took the bus and went to the desert area where they usually play. There he surprised them with the beautiful ball he got with him. They said, “finally we got rid of our worn-out ball, and we’ll play with a beautiful ball.” They put their old ball aside and prepared the goals using rocks. They started the game and the worker who found the ball was the first to shoot. He was used to playing with the worn-out ball which he had to kick so hard to make it move. When he kicked the new ball with a similar kick it flew away towards the main road. One of them followed the ball, but a car was there before them. The car struck the ball so quickly that it flew like a bullet and no one could tell where it went. The team returned to their old ball and that was it for them. The ball was lost in the desert once more. The day passed and evening came. A lonely evening wolf passed by the ball. He smelled it several times until he was sure it was not food. He tried to hold it in his mouth, but he couldn’t, and he got frustrated, so he decided to kick it using his front leg. When he was tired of this, he left the ball again and he continued to look for food. There the ball remained amidst the desert, for two long days. It was pushed around by the wind from place to place until it reached a rocky landing and got stuck between a few rocks and some spiders came to make it their shelter. Another day passed and the beautiful ball was stuck in the rocky landing. Shortly, a scout team found it, and were so happy to find it. This is exactly what they were looking for. They played with it all day long during camp. Then Len, who first saw it, took it with him. At home he told his father, “Look at this beautiful ball I came back with it from the scout camp?” Len’s father was too busy reading the newspaper, he didn’t reply. Len entered the room and bounced the ball against the wall. The noise bothered his father and so he went to ask Len to stop. When he opened the door he found that the dirty ball had made large, dirty spots all over his newly painted white walls! He was so angry at what his son did that he screamed at him asking him to stop and where he got this dirty ball from. But before Len had a chance to reply, his father opened the window and threw the ball out. Len was so sad about losing the ball, but this was not the problem right now. The ball fell quickly from the twelfth floor and broke the window of one of the cars parked below. The car belonged to Mr. Charles, the maths teacher in Mark’s school. He lived in the building next door. When Mr. Charles saw his car the next morning, he became very angry. He said to himself “One of those silly children, broke my window and whoever it is, he won’t get away with it.” Mr. Charles saw a ball in his car and when he held it, he turned it around till he saw the dedication written on it. Mr. Charles knew Mark very well, he’s his maths teacher. He doesn’t like Mark because he doesn’t know how to solve difficult maths equations and gives the others the opportunity to make fun of him. Mr. Charles thought “now Mark is in real trouble. First, he broke my car window with his ball, and then he runs away without even apologizing. He played with the ball in the street. Why would he go to play with the ball in a place far away from his house? Of course, it’s because he doesn’t want his parents to know that he spends the day playing with the ball. That’s why he lies and says he’s going to study with his friend, while he goes to play. Now, he’s in real trouble.” He decided to tell Mark’s parents about lying about losing the ball, while he played with it secretly all month long. He also promised he’ll severely punish him. Mark couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw the ball. This was enough proof that he wasn’t a liar. How could anyone blame him for seeing his ball after all this time. He thought he would never see it again. How it disappeared and how did it show up again, no one knows. Mark clarified the issue with his parents and with Mr. Charles. He didn’t mind if they didn’t believe him as long as he was true to himself. Mark held the ball in his hand and thought deeply. He didn’t know the distances it travelled, the places it crossed and the hands that held it since he kicked it that morning. Any way, it doesn’t matter as long as the ball is with him now. THE END
Kovid – 19 lang: yoem” noo
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Copyright © 2020, Lacid Literacy
27
73eeae30-3e91-41c5-92cc-fbec50a0d62d
[]
[ "ahk", "spa", "lsi", "eng" ]
About Coronavirus About Coronavirus About Coronavirus Translate by Zone Call
05 - Cat and Dog: Where is Cat?
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Copyright © 2020, SIL-PNG
24
ec104f28-a3e6-47ad-aa8c-f1f7be76be09
[]
[ "omw", "eng", "tpi" ]
05 - Cat and Dog: Where is Cat? v2.0 This is Cat's house. This is Dog. Dog walks to Cat's house. The door of the house is open. Dog walks through the door. Dog is now inside Cat's house. But Cat is not inside the house. Uh oh! Where is Cat? Dog looks in the bed.  But Cat is not in the bed. Dog looks under the table. But Cat is not under the table. Dog looks in front of the chair. But Cat is not in front of the chair. Dog looks behind the door. But Cat is not behind the door. Then Dog sees a ladder. He sees a ladder next to the tree. The ladder is broken. Dog looks up. Dog looks up at the tree. Dog looks up at the leaves of the tree. Dog sees a foot. There is a foot between the leaves. And Dog sees a hand. There is a hand between the leaves. And then Dog sees a face... Dog sees Cat's face! Cat is sitting in the tree. Cat is sitting in the tree with a ball. Cat cannot get out of the tree. Cat cannot get out of the tree because the ladder is broken. Dog helps Cat. Dog helps Cat get out of the tree. When Cat is down, she gives Dog a big kiss. Bye-bye Cat. Bye-bye Dog. 05 - Cat and Dog: Where is Cat? Concept, text, illustrations and design by Elke and René Leisink Narrated by Aiden Kipefa  eBook layout, audio recording, and activities by SIL - Education for life www.mytalkingbooks.org Activities in this book were made with Active Presenter 8. The activities are licenced CC-BY-NC-SA. Download the activity from: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1jA_UmpI6kM1e2G8-YqmrYXx2PCR0RfNa?usp=sharing Adapted from original; Copyright 2017 - African Storybook Initiative CC-BY
Ang Mananagat
cc-by
Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose - Recoletos
12
2af4d5ec-44b9-4022-9ab1-ff3b6b0083af
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Ang baroto ni lolo nga iyang gamiton sa pagpanagat sa kadlawon. Gigamit nga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h, w, r, ng, pr, gr, tr, kw Mga ga sige ug gamit nga mga pulong: kini, ang, baroto, sa, dili, nga Mga bag-ong pulong na makat-onan: baroto, pagpanagat, kadlawn, atimanon, makatabang Sinulat ni: Beverly G. Galo Stage 7, Grade 1 Story Book
Joseph Interprets the Prisoners' Dreams
cc-by-nc
Copyright © 2005, Kartidaya
26
99239e66-2ab7-478f-9758-be829bc50e1f
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "bba75480-6536-4b3f-ad7b-a6dea8201960", "862bf9d0-571c-499e-9dfe-333b28a20333" ]
[ "eng", "enc" ]
Joseph Interprets the Prisoners' Dreams Joseph Interprets the Prisoners' Dreams THE LIFE OF JOSEPH: PART 3 GENESIS 40 Illustrated by: Noel Dapit Jacob had twelve sons. His favorite son was Joseph. This made his brothers very jealous. They captured and sold Joseph to Ishmaelites traveling to Egypt.  The Ishmaelites sold Joseph to Potiphar, a rich and powerful Egyptian. Potiphar’s wife tried to seduce Joseph. When she failed, she convinced her husband to have Joseph thrown into prison. The LORD was with Joseph and blessed him even in prison. The jailer was kind to Joseph and put him in charge of all the prisoners. And the LORD made Joseph succeed in everything he did.  Some time later the king of Egypt's wine steward and his chief baker offended the king.  Genesis 40:1 He was angry with these two officials and put them in prison in the house of the captain of the guard, in the same place where Joseph was being kept. They spent a long time in prison, and the captain assigned Joseph as their servant.  Genesis 40:2-4 One night there in prison the wine steward and the chief baker each had a dream, and the dreams had different meanings.  Genesis 40:5 When Joseph came to them in the morning, he saw that they were upset. He asked them, “Why do you look so worried today?”  Genesis 40:6-7 They answered, “Each of us had a dream, and there is no one here to explain what the dreams mean.”  “It is God who gives the ability to interpret dreams,” Joseph said. “Tell me your dreams.”  Genesis 40:8 So the wine steward said, “In my dream there was a grapevine in front of me with three branches on it.  Genesis 40:9-10a As soon as the leaves came out, the blossoms appeared, and the grapes ripened.  Genesis 40:10b I was holding the king's cup; so I took the grapes and squeezed them into the cup and gave it to him.”  Genesis 40:11 Joseph said, “This is what it means: the three branches are three days. Genesis 40:12 In three days the king will release you, pardon you, and restore you to your position. You will give him his cup as you did before when you were his wine steward. Genesis 40:13 But please remember me when everything is going well for you, and please be kind enough to mention me to the king and help me get out of this prison.   Genesis 40:14 After all, I was kidnapped from the land of the Hebrews, and even here in Egypt I didn't do anything to deserve being put in prison.”  Genesis 40:15 When the chief baker saw that the interpretation of the wine steward's dream was favorable, he said to Joseph, “I had a dream too; I was carrying three breadbaskets on my head.  Genesis 40:16 In the top basket there were all kinds of baked goods for the king, and the birds were eating them.”  Genesis 40:17 Joseph answered, “This is what it means: the three baskets are three days. Genesis 40:18 In three days the king will release you—and have your head cut off! Then he will hang your body on a pole, and the birds will eat your flesh.”  Genesis 40:19 On his birthday three days later the king gave a banquet for all his officials; he released his wine steward and his chief baker and brought them before his officials. Genesis 40:20 He restored the wine steward to his former position,  Genesis 40:21 but he executed the chief baker. It all happened just as Joseph had said.  Genesis 40:22 But the wine steward never gave Joseph another thought—he forgot all about him. Genesis 40:23
Имрӯз ман кистам?
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Copyright © 2021, Ин кор таҳти иҷозатномаи Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial- International ShareAlike 4.0 иҷозатнома гирифтааст (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/)
18
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[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "328ce370-65e2-47e9-bf16-2ed6668a2906" ]
[ "tgk", "rus", "eng" ]
Today I am Today I am
Tiu id nor solaia id.
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2008, SIL International (MLB)
13
6b7a5d6c-c30a-4cd3-8ad9-2ee66c98ee0e
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "mgm", "eng", "tdt" ]
Uncle and the snake Uncle and the snake One day, uncle was sitting on his bench, and a snake was under it. The snake crawled up to the bench. Uncle jumped down from the table. The snake also crawled down from the table.  Uncle ran outside. The snake also crawled outside. Uncle jumped down from the car. The snake also crawled down from the car.  Uncle went back to the house. The snake crawled back into the bush.  Uncle didn't want to be friends with the snake.
Saya Pohon
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Copyright © 2017, Yayasan Sulinama
14
b30ea113-2e87-462f-a8b3-56d239a10b5a
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "5dafee49-51ea-4f33-a8cc-8bffaaa98f64" ]
[ "ind", "eng" ]
Buku Berjenjang (Leveled Books) Buku berjenjang dirancang khusus terutama untuk meningkatkan kelancaran membaca, menambah kosa kata, dan daya pemahaman. Buku berjenjang dipakai setelah anak mampu membaca buku-buku ramah cerna kata. Ada 3 jenjang, dari yang mudah ke sulit: Tingkat 1 cocok untuk anak setara SD kelas 1 akhir, sedangkan 2a dan 2b untuk anak setara kelas 2 SD. SAYA POHON Buku ini adalah buku berjenjang Tingkat 1c, dengan ciri-ciri sebagai berikut: 6-12 halaman per buku. 2 kalimat per halaman. 4-6 kata per kalimat. Maksimum 12 kata per halaman. Bisa lebih dari 2 suku kata. Jenis kalimat: kalimat tunggal sederhana.   Kurang pola pengulangan. 75% kata akrab. 1 gambar per halaman, tidak banyak detail. Teks di bawah gambar. Gambar sepenuhnya menggambarkan arti teks. Topik sehari-hari.  Buku ini bisa dipakai dengan cara sebagai berikut: 1.    Dalam kelompok besar dan kecil. 2.    Secara sendiri-sendiri oleh setiap anak. 3.    Untuk mulai, berdiskusi atau bertanya-jawab dengan anak mengenai hal-hal yang anak sudah ketahui mengenai topik dari isi buku. 4.    Bahas gambar-gambar yang ada dalam tiap halaman untuk membantu anak memahami apa kira-kira yang menjadi topik dari buku tersebut. 5.    Guru atau orang tua sebaiknya membacakan kalimat di setiap halaman terlebih dahulu, sebagai model atau contoh bagi anak.  6.    Kemudian anak diberikan kesempatan untuk membaca sendiri. 7.    Diskusikan isi buku. Pakai kata-kata tanya: ada apa, siapa, kapan, bagaimana, mengapa. Penulis: Tim Sulinama Gambar oleh Nugroho Dwi Hartawan Buku ini diproduksi melalui proyek Enabling Writers yang disponsori oleh USAID. Yayasan Sulinama 2017 Hubungi yayasansulinama@gmail.com untuk informasi lanjut.
Jak- Dezyèm volim- Gajè a
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Copyright © 2018, NABU.ORG, Smith Desrosiers
14
beceb1d2-df61-4af1-8790-f3f97bc466ac
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "f3159ce3-6b5d-4a53-aa11-2826ee6f43de" ]
[ "hat", "eng" ]
Imaj: Audeva Joseph epi Bibliyotèk Imaj Bloom Gwo mèsi pou NABU.ORG
Si Lilay
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose-Recoletos
16
9c645257-978b-40db-b3a1-b7d35783c8bb
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "cgc", "eng" ]
Sugilanon sa Libro: Ang maong libro nag-istorya bahin kay Lilay ug sa iyang pagkahugawan. Gigamit nga mga letra: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h, w, r, ng, pr, gr, tr, kw, ñ, C, j, f, q, v, x, z  Mga sige ug gamit nga mga pulong: ang, siya, si, ni, ka, kini, na, sa Mga bag-ong pulong nga makat-unan: manudlay, busa Gisulat ni: Nimfa E. Magsayo Level 3, Leveled (Health)
It's All the Cat's Fault!
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Copyright © 2015, Storyweaver, Pratham Books
15
fdb0494f-a56d-4b06-8a68-6af703172781
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "4361244e-5671-498a-a411-ffae3c6f79d5" ]
[ "eng" ]
It's All the Cat's Fault! It's All the Cat's Fault! Author: Anushka Ravishankar Illustrator: Priya Kuriyan Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books It's all the Cat's Fault Written by: Anushka Ravishankar Illustrated by: Priya Kuriyan Why haven’t you done your homework? Miss, it’s all the cat’s fault. If she had not got stuck on the tree, I would not have taken the ladder to climb it. If I had not taken the ladder to climb it, I would not have needed to fix it. If I had not needed to fix it, I wouldn’t have woken up the baby. If I had not woken up the baby, my mother would not have rushed out of the kitchen. If my mother had not rushed out of the kitchen, the monkey would not have got in. If the monkey had not got in, he would not have eaten up all the food. If he had not eaten up all the food, my father would not have bought rotis and chicken curry at the tea-shop. If my father had not bought rotis and chicken curry at the tea-shop, the dog would not have followed him home. If the dog had not followed him home, he would not have eaten my homework. So, you’re saying the dog ate your homework? Yes, Miss, it’s all the cat’s fault!
Jesus is the Light of the World
cc-by
Copyright © 2018, Wycliffe Bible Translators
26
34a49024-b06b-4731-a1ff-ebe4784a180d
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Jesus is the Light of the World John 8:12-30 Jesus spoke to the people again. He said, "I am the light of the world. Anyone who follows me will have the light that gives life, and he will never walk in darkness again. So the Pharisees said to him, "It sounds as though you are trying to convince us to trust you by talking about yourself more and more! What you say about yourself does not prove anything!" Jesus replied, "Even if I were the only one to say these things about myself, what I say is true because I know where I came from and I know where I am going. Nevertheless, you do not know where I came from and you do not know where I am going. You judge people according to human standards and the laws of men. I have not come at this time to judge anyone. When I do judge, it will be right and just because I am not the only one who will bring justice. I and the Father who sent me, we will execute justice together. It is written in your law that a matter can be settled only when there are at least two witnesses to give evidence in the case. I am bringing evidence to you about myself, and my Father who sent me also brings evidence about me. So you should believe that what we tell you is true." Then they asked him, "Where is your father?" Jesus replied, "You do not know me, and you do not know my Father. If you knew me, you would also know my Father." He said these things when he was near the treasury within the temple courtyard, the place where the people brought in their offerings. Yet no one arrested him because it was not yet time for him to die. Jesus also said to them, "I am going away, and you will seek me, but it is certain that you will die in your sin. Where I am going, you cannot come." His Jewish opponents said among themselves, "Perhaps he is thinking that he will kill himself, and that is what he means when he says, 'Where I am going you cannot come.'" Jesus continued saying to them, "You are from this earth below, but I am from heaven above. You belong to this world. I do not belong to this world. I told you that you will die and that God will condemn you for your sins. This will certainly happen unless you trust that I am God, as I say I am." "Who are you?" they asked him. Jesus said to them, "Ever since the very beginning, I have been telling you! I could judge you and say that you are guilty of many things. Instead, I will say only this: The one who sent me tells the truth, and I tell the people in the world only what I have heard from him." They did not understand that he was talking about the Father. So Jesus said, "When you have lifted me up on a cross to kill me—me, the Son of Man,— you will know that I am God, and you will know that I do not do anything on my own authority. Instead, I only say what my Father has taught me to say. He who sent me is with me, and he has not left me alone because I do only the things that delight him." As Jesus was saying these things, many more people trusted in him. Jesus is the Light of the World English: Unlocked Dynamic Bible John 8:12-30
Come Stay with Me
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Copyright © 2021, SIL-PNG Education for Life
22
17d6746d-6c8a-46bb-ae5e-95b8d0da7bda
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "tpi" ]
Come Stay with Me Tendai Turtle lives in the water. Tendai’s best friend is Bunny Busi. She lives in a tree. "Granny Turtle has hurt her shell," says Tendai's dad and mum. “We have to go to help Granny,” says Mum. “Come stay with me, Tendai,” calls Bunny Busi. Tendai stays with Bunny Busi in the tree. They play all day. They sleep all night. Mum and Dad come back with Granny. “How are you, Granny?” asks Tendai. “I am better now,” says Granny with a smile. “We fixed her shell,” answers Mum. Granny gives Tendai her favourite flute. Tendai plays the flute and everybody dances. Come Stay with Me Illustrated by Subi Bosa Written by Nasrin Siege Designed by Job Mubinya Edited by Nabeela Kalla with the help of the Book Dash participants in Johannesburg on 26 October 2019. Bloom formatting by SIL-PNG Education for Life Adapted from original: © 2021 - BookDash CC-BY 4.0 https://bookdash.org/
गेंद खेलाजाय
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Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
12
fd4a9923-83da-4c01-a3b5-2f9373a7b5d6
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "d21812c5-12ff-4ea0-8063-6f3093a77658" ]
[ "eng", "awa", "nep" ]
ball ball
Balahang
cc-by
Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project-University of San Jose-Recoletos
13
ccf7464e-f937-4c3e-b353-4980a8b4c3f3
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "kak", "eng" ]
Deskripsyon ni libro: Ihtolya a mamilin ni hakey a balahang di ili. Listaan a ahel: i, h, g, p, ng, b Nauhal a ahel: bii, ihida, bolong, likna, nateng, gaya Ballo a ahel: Balahang, napili, piyan, ik-ikot, bakbak Inhulat nihi: Rachael B. Naneng Stage 6, Decodable Agriculture
Talaken Kiko
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - Univeristy of San Jose - Recoletos
16
626554c3-e755-4625-a8eb-71272277a0d5
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328" ]
[ "eng", "kak" ]
Deskripsyon ni Libro: Hiya a libro men presentasyon ida nunta talaken Kiko. Listaan ni Letra: a, i, m, n, k, o, t, e, y, ay, ey, oy, d, l, h, g, p, ng, b, w, aw, ew, iw, ow, s, u, n (enye), r Nauhal a Ahel: gawgawa, paltan, uppa, kanding Ballo a Ahel: killum, uppa, gawgawa, titit Inhulat ni hi: Brenda B. Ananayo Stage 9 Decodable Animal Stories
My Home
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Copyright © 2007, Pratham Books
21
8ce8d61d-4951-4aba-92fd-079b9c7825bd
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "d9ba10ac-b1ce-4fcf-9021-1561e4605a70" ]
[ "eng" ]
My Home My Home Author: Rukmini Banerji Illustrator: Rajeev Verma 'Banjara' Translator: Manisha Chaudhry Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books My Home Author: Rukmini Banerji Illustrator: Rajeev Verma 'Banjara' Translator: Manisha Chaudhry This is my home. I live here with my whole family. We take off our shoes and chappals here. This is where we wash our face and hands. I hang my clothes on the hook. My grandfather keeps his stick in the corner. We also keep our mats there. My father keeps his motorcycle outside. But his helmet is on the cupboard. My mother and grandmother keep their saris in the trunk. Tasty food is cooked in the kitchen. When it is cold, we bring out quilts. When it is hot, we use a fan. When we have important guests, we bring out the chairs. You must come and visit my home. Come soon.
We Are All Animals
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Copyright © 2004, Pratham Books
35
42de5830-ce6c-4f4f-9400-2cffa2d58d88
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "3a034832-4e4a-410a-9f6d-c210c11bbf3f" ]
[ "eng" ]
We Are All Animals We Are All Animals Authors: Madhav Chavan, Meera Tendolkar Illustrator: Santosh Pujari Translator: Rohini Nilekani Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books We Are All Animals Authors: Madhav Chavan, Meera Tendolkar Illustrator: Santosh Pujari Translator: Rohini Nilekani                                                    Act 1 Look at me, animals! I am a human being! I know everything! Look, these are my eyes. I can see everything with them. So what? We have eyes too. And we can see in the dark! Fine, but look at my nose. I breathe through my nose. So what? We also have noses and ours are prettier than yours! And yes, my teeth. I use my teeth to chew and bite. Teeth? Ha! Ha! Have you seen our teeth? You can chew. But WE CAN BITE! Hiee..Hiee…Hiee… Yes, but listen! I can hear a lot with my ears! Little one! We can hear sounds which you cannot imagine at all! And I can walk, run and even dance with my feet. Oh! We have four feet! We can jump, we can dance and we can parade too! I can plait my hair. Uh! Our hair is pretty too. We could plait it if we wanted to. Maybe! Look! I can work with my hands! Hands! Keep your hands to yourself!                                     Act 2 Aha! I told you! I am the best! I know it all! Really? Have you seen our sharp claws? Yes! But your nails will pick up dirt! Now see, these are our lovely tails. Tails! We gave them up long ago! How else could we wear our shorts? And we can roar! Roar? Have you heard my mother? So then! You are only animals - I know that! So then! You are only animals - I know that! Humans are animals too. We know that! You may be right. Look at my brother! Mother says he is wild. He is definitely an animal. Humans are animals too. We know that!
Hawarra Kitawu Kudus (Tahir) be  KANURIN 44. Biturus-a Yahaya-a Maskin Ngodoma Ngazaana
cc-by-sa
Copyright © 2020, Sweet Publishing
16
b086c99e-c733-49a5-a8f6-c269d38e59e2
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "kau", "eng" ]
Images by Sweet Publishing, © 2007 Sweet Publishing. CC BY-SA 4.0. CALVARY MINISTRIES (CAPRO)
TEST BOOK Puerto Rican Sign Language
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Copyright © 2020, colin
7
78bd12fd-82ed-459c-9d7e-7b7d2403d8d5
[ "1a648b00-1ec0-46a7-be11-b0dec22fa0f4" ]
[ "eng" ]
TEST BOOK Puerto Rican Sign Language TEST BOOK Puerto Rican Sign Language Big tree.
ชายหาปลากับนางฟ้าแสนสวย
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Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย 2019
21
66533ed2-6f5c-440b-a5c4-862b6773294a
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "2ed05797-08b7-493a-93b3-c58e25fec413" ]
[ "tha", "eng" ]
FISHERMAN & ANGEL FISHERMAN & ANGEL เค้าโครงเรื่อง ปราชญ์ชาวบ้านหมู่บ้านป่าบง หมู่ 2  ตำบลป่าตึง  อําเภอแม่จัน  จังหวัดเชียงราย เรียบเรียงและวาดภาพ กลุ่มกล้วยฉาบ สนับสนุนโดย มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย                                                   มิได้ทําเพื่อจัดจําหน่าย แต่จัดทําเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้
Literacy International: The Ram Who Took  Another's Place
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Copyright © 2018, Literacy International
12
98a3eb0a-b88b-4376-8f78-873d07afe95e
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Literacy International: The Ram Who Took  Another's Place Copyright © 2018 Literacy International info@LiteracyInternational.net Literacy International: The Ram Who Took  Another's Place Part 12 of 12 in a series about Creation "Praise the Lord, You Wild Animals and all Cattle, Small Creatures and flying Birds!" - Psalm 148:7, 10 Copyright © 2018 Literacy International info@LiteracyInternational.net                 The Ram Who Took Another’s Place                                  Genesis 22:1-19 The ram wouldn’t have been expected to be on a mountain top by itself, for shepherds kept a close eye on their flocks of sheep. There he was grazing on Mount Moriah, moving from one clump of grass to another. He was strong and confident. His horns were the type which were used by men to blow on like a trumpet, and it was his horns and not a wild beast which got this ram into trouble. He moved into a thicket, pressing through the branches, when he discovered that his horns were caught so tightly that he couldn’t move them. Oddly he didn’t thrash around. He just settled down where he was and waited. He was partly out of sight should anyone come there. Two people did. It was an old man, Abraham, and his son Isaac. Isaac was carrying some wood, and Abraham had a metal dish with a wooden handle in his hand. This is where some coals were burning, and in his belt he had a knife. They had come to worship God on the top of this mountain because God had told them to come to this place. They had been traveling for three days, and they had left two young men companions behind at the bottom of the mountain. Abraham was a friend of God, and for many years God had been teaching him to trust the Lord. Again and again Abraham had seen God make promises to him and then keep them in wonderful and miraculous ways. Even now after he had learned so much about God, the Lord was still teaching him to trust Him. That is why God on this day had brought the ram and both Abraham and Isaac together. He was going to teach Abraham and Isaac that He was going to provide the Savior who would take the place of sinners who disobeyed God and receive the punishment they deserved. And if they believed and received the Savior, they would be forgiven and restored to be in God’s family. Abraham’s son, Isaac, didn’t know this then, but soon he would learn it from his father. He was puzzled and asked Abraham, “We have all the preparations to make a sacrifice for our sins -- but where is the sacrifice; where is the lamb?” The two men down at the foot of the mountain were wondering about that, too. Why had Abraham gone up the mountain without a sacrifice for sin to offer to God? Abraham said to Isaac, “God will provide the lamb for the sacrifice. I don’t know why He is doing it this way, or how He is going to help. He has always provided a way, and we have to trust Him. I know that He loves us, and even when we don’t understand, we can trust His love.” On the top of the mountain they found a flat rock which would do for an altar or place for prayer and sacrifice. They made preparations, but one thing was still missing -- the sacrifice. Then Abraham with tears in his eyes said to Isaac, “Do you trust our God, and do you trust me?” And Isaac replied, “Of course, I trust our God, and I trust you, Father.” “God has been talking to me, and He wants to test our faith in His love,” said Abraham. “He wants you to lie down on this altar and be the sacrifice, since I have no other gift to give God. You are the greatest gift He has given to me, and now He wants you back. This puzzles me, as I’m sure it puzzles you. But I believe that if I offer you to Him that He would give you back to me. You see, He promised that from you would come a great people, and He always does what He says He will do.” “You have always taught me about God’s great love, and I trust Him, too. So whatever you want me to do, Father, I will do,” said Isaac. Abraham then went ahead as Isaac laid on the altar, but suddenly a voice from Heaven said, “Abraham, Abraham!” Abraham looked up and said, “Here I am!” And then to his joy he heard this, “Don’t stretch out your hand against the boy, and do nothing to him; for now I know that you fear God, since you have not held back your son, your only son from Me.” At that point Abraham was looking up and around, and while he did not see God, for the first time, looking behind him at the bushes, he saw the ram. He understood immediately. “God has provided this ram,” he called out to Isaac. And quickly he helped Isaac off the altar. God had indeed provided a substitute to take Isaac’s place. As Abraham reached over by the altar and placed his hands on the ram’s head, he thanked God that God had spared his son. God had done more than that. He had taught Abraham and other faithful servants of God that this gift of the ram was a picture of the much greater gift God would give once and for all -- His only Son, Jesus Christ. Of Jesus the prophets spoke again and again. Isaiah, in speaking at the coming Savior, Jesus, said, “Like a lamb that is led to slaughter ... He did not open His mouth.” And that God the Father would say of Him, “My Servant will Justify the many as He will bear their sins.” And when Jesus came to save us, John the Baptist said of Him, “Behold the lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world.” Jesus, who willingly laid down His life when He was placed on the cross, took His life back again and rose from the dead. This is good news for every one of us. In a small way the ram took the place of Isaac, but Jesus in a final and complete way died to save us from our sins and to offer us new life forever with Him. Jesus Himself said, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have everlasting life.” Those words of Jesus are a promise from God. God loves us so much that He provides us with the answer to our sin problem and our death problem and our need for a good relationship with Him. Abraham was thankful for the provision of the ram, but he was most thankful God provided Himself as Abraham’s best friend. As he went down the mountain with his son Isaac, he said, “I know the name by which I will call that place up there where we met God. Its name from now on will be ‘The Lord Will Provide.’ What a good name! Not only has the Lord God provided, but also He will continue to provide all that we ever need.”
ดีเซลผู้พลาดพลั้ง
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Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย
20
e512efdb-9fff-4de9-998a-854a3ddbe474
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "tha" ]
DIESEL MAKE A MISTAKE DIESEL MAKE A MISTAKE เรียบเรียงและแต่งภาพ โรงเรียนบ้านวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ สนับสนุนโดย มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย     หนังสือนิทานเล่มนี้เป็นส่วนหนึ่งของการอบรม "สรรสร้างสื่อ เติมเต็มการเรียนรู้"      ซึ่งแต่งและเรียบเรียงภาพโดย โรงเรียนบ้านวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ และคณะครู โดยมีวัตถุประสงค์ เพื่อส่งเสริมทักษะการอ่านของเด็กระดับชั้นประถมศึกษาปีที่ ๔-๖                      มิได้ทำเพื่อจัดจำหน่าย แต่จัดทำเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้ คณะผู้จัดทำ : ๑. ว่าที่ร้อยตรีหญิง ปวีณา   ทองจันทร์          ครูอัตราจ้าง โรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์ ๒. ว่าที่ร้อยตรีหญิง จริยา     มาผิว                ครูอัตราจ้าง โรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์ ๓. เด็กหญิง ภิริษา              โสปัญญะ           นักเรียนโรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์ ๔. เด็กหญิง สายธาร           จันทา                นักเรียนโรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์ ๕. เด็กหญิง วรรณวลี           อินจันดี            นักเรียนโรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์ ๖. เด็กหญิง สุภาพัฒน์         ประทิ                นักเรียนโรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์ ๗. เด็กชาย รัฐภูมิ                บุญนาค            นักเรียนโรงเรียนวังเบนภูธรอุปถัมภ์ จังหวัดอุตรดิตถ์
Who is Big?
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Copyright © 2015, Sara Saunders
13
c4b0dee3-efa5-46dd-ab72-83711bade9ae
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Who is Big? Who is Big? Writer: Sara Saunders Illustration: Wiehan de Jager, Karen Lilje and blackmoondev.com Who is Big? Writer: Sara Saunders Illustration: Wiehan de Jager, Karen Lilje and blackmoondev.com Ant looked at the little plants and pebbles around him. "I am big!" he said. "No, Ant. You are not big," said Squirrel. "I am big!" "No, Squirrel. You are not big," said Cat. "I am big!" "No, Cat. You are not big," said Hyena, "I am big!" "No, Hyena. You are not big," said Rhinoceros, "I am big!" "No, Rhinoceros. You are not big," said Elephant, "I am big!" Then Elephant looked up at the sky. The sky was full of stars. The sky was big and wide. It stretched forever in every direction. "No, I am not big, either! All of us are small!" smiled Elephant.
Curious Lou
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30
b8990c33-f023-4e3a-a1dd-cdddac365df3
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "6ceccdbe-c3b0-435b-87ae-8bf2b41c3ca6" ]
[ "eng" ]
Curious Lou Author: Hijra Al-Sawi                                                        Illustrator: Ahmad Shaltoot Deep down in the ocean lived a little crab called Lou. Wait a minute… His name is … Curious Lou. What did he do to be called Curious Lou? Well, he asked his friends a million questions. He asked, “Is the sea really blue?” “In the ocean, who is who?” “Who is the inventor of glue?” What could Curious Lou be trying to discover today? A big grouchy octopus! As he played with his friends and hid from them in the sand, he looked around. There he saw something that looked like a rope. Curious Lou stared at the rope and said to himself, “This rope wasn’t here before!” Curious Lou walked over the rope and brushed away the sand. He walked and walked. The rope seemed to go on for- ever. It was so very long. Curious Lou walked and walked and walked. He was now so far from home, but it still seemed as if the rope had no end. Then Curious Lou said, “I‘ll discover the mystery that lies at the end of this rope.” Lou started asking his neighbors. Perhaps someone could tell him. He asked a coral fish, “Do you know the mystery at the end of the rope buried in the sand? As you can see, it’s very long.” The coral fish said, “Maybe it’s a snake that recently moved into the neighborhood.” Curious Lou thought, “No way! There are no snakes that are that long.” So he asked the grouper fish. “Do you know the mystery at the end of the rope buried in the sand? It’s very long as you can see.” The grouper fish replied, “We don’t know about these things. You could ask the turtle. She sees a lot during her annual migration.” Lou quickly went to the turtle’s house but did not find her. A clown fish told him that today she is migrating to lay her eggs. Lou ran to catch with her before she left. Curious Lou found her with many other turtles so he asked her, “My dear, do you know the mystery at the end of the rope buried in the sand? It’s very long as you can see.” Mrs. Turtle said, “You’re such a curious crab, Lou. It’s not a rope. It’s called a cable. There are hundreds of them in the ocean and they go on for thousands of kilometres.” “They help people exchange information via a tele- communication network called the Internet.” “Come with me. I’ll show you. I still have some time.” “Look at this ship. It’s repairing a broken cable. Maybe one of sharks bit it. Lou asked, “But what do human beings do with the Internet?” Mrs. Turtle said, “They learn, send messages to each other and even play games. It’s a network that quickly transmits information, no matter how far the distance.” Curious Lou thanked Mrs. Turtle and then he set out on a very important mission. Curious Lou used some extensions from the cables... ...and opened a telecommunications center for all the ocean creatures! The End Curious Lou Written by Hegra Al-Sawi. Images by Ahmed Shaltoot. © Asafeer Education Technologies FZ LLC, 2018. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. The original work of this book was made possible through the generous support of the All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development (ACR GCD) Partners (the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), World Vision, and the Australian Government). It was prepared by Asafeer Education Technologies FZ LLC and does not necessarily reflect the views of the ACR GCD Partners. Any adaptation or translation of this work should not be considered an official ACR GCD translation and ACR GCD shall not be liable for any content or error in this translation.
Lima ni Galomot
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose Recoletos
12
830b9a56-1269-4c7b-a3a8-56cb44fce16e
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "f0434a0b-791f-408e-b6e6-ee92f0f02f2d" ]
[ "kak", "eng" ]
Deskripsyon ni Libro: Istorya ni galumot. Listaan ni Letra: a, n, i, m, k, o, t, e, yey, ay, oy, d, l, h, g, p, ng, b, w, aw, ew, iw, ow Nauhal a Ahel: hi, niya, nen, i Ballo a Ahel: hinga, haya, ngo Inhulat  nen:  Claudette  A.  Diclas Stage 7 Decodable Community Living
Sisina ma fulaoa
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Copyright © 2021, Solomon Islands Translation Advisory Group (SITAG)
15
14617ae5-1ba6-4d7d-b70c-ad0300d7fb18
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "f53f5b74-9390-47f2-b659-fad0c74c58bb", "7ee46cf5-bc7f-4444-893a-6c3c116e3f3e" ]
[ "tpi", "kwd", "eng" ]
(3-8) The Sun and the Flowers Grade 1, Term 3, Week 8, Version 2.0 (3-8) The Sun and the Flowers Written & Illustrated by David Orim Coloured by Gillian Mork Translated by David Fonosimae PNG Sign interpreted by Heidi Otiwani eBook Layout & Video-recordings by SIL- Education for Life Solomon Islands Translation Advisory Group (SITAG) Adapted from original; Copyright © 1996, PNG Department of Education. The Sun and the Flowers This is the sun, so big and round. This is a seed under the ground. These are the flowers that wave in the breeze. These are the canoes that sail on the seas. These are the flowers shut so tight. This is the sun that shines so bright. These are the rain drops, down they come. Open flowers, one by one! If you have feedback (spelling corrections, sentence order, or other changes) that should be made to this book, please contact SIL PNG. Email: mytalkingbooks@gmail.com Or stop by an SIL office Go to www.mytalkingbooks.org for more books.
Nahitabo ni Otep
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project - University of San Jose-Recoletos
23
46978cc8-1ede-433d-afa2-85df1324c2f4
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Sugilanon sa libro: Ang estorya tungod sa nahitabo ni Otep. Mga letra na gigamit: m, a, t, k, s, y, o, -, n, ay, p, g, i, d, l, u, b, h, w, r, ng, pr, gr, tr, kw, ñ, c, f, q, v, x, z Mga pulong na sige og gamit: Otep, usa, ka, papa, niya, adlaw, siya, gayud, Mga bag-ong pulong na makat-onan: eskwelahan Sinulat ni: Cleofe Diacor Gidibuho ni: Jasper Momo
16. Rεε Zang Yuu Tannang
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Copyright © 2020, Mumuye Bible TranslationTeam and Calvary Ministries (CAPRO) Jos, Nigeria.
25
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[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "77a1c797-d199-4d7f-bb0c-3f4393be7739", "3dd6dfef-917b-48da-af80-7e79d7c4dff1" ]
[ "fli", "fra", "hau", "deu", "spa", "swh", "eng" ]
After Joshua died, the Israelites disobeyed God and did not drive out the rest of the Canaanites or obey God’s laws. The Israelites began to worship the Canaanite gods instead of Yahweh, the true God. The Israelites had no king, so everyone did what they thought was right for them. Because the Israelites kept disobeying God, he punished them by allowing their enemies to defeat them. These enemies stole things from the Israelites, destroyed their property, and killed many of them. After many years of disobeying God and being oppressed by their enemies, the Israelites repented and asked God to rescue them. Then God provided a deliverer who rescued them from their enemies and brought peace to the land. But then the people forgot about God and started worshiping idols again. So God allowed the Midianites, a nearby enemy people group, to defeat them. The Midianites took all of the Israelites’ crops for seven years. The Israelites were so scared; they hid in caves so the Midianites would not find them. Finally, they cried out to God to save them. One day, a man of Israel named Gideon was threshing grain secretly so the Midianites would not steal it. The angel of Yahweh came to Gideon and said, “God is with you, mighty warrior. Go and save Israel from the Midianites.” Gideon’s father had an altar dedicated to an idol. God told Gideon to tear down that altar. But Gideon was afraid of the people, so he waited until nighttime. Then he tore down the altar and smashed it to pieces. He built a new altar to God near where the altar to the idol used to be and made a sacrifice to God on it. The next morning the people saw that someone had torn down and destroyed the altar, and they were very angry. They went to Gideon’s house to kill him, but Gideon’s father said, “Why are you trying to help your god? If he is a god, let him protect himself!” Because he said this, the people did not kill Gideon. Then the Midianites came again to steal from the Israelites. There were so many of them that they could not be counted. Gideon called the Israelites together to fight them. Gideon asked God for two signs so he could be sure that God would use him to save Israel. For the first sign, Gideon laid a sheep skin on the ground and asked God to let the morning dew fall only on the sheep skin and not on the ground. God did that. The next night, he asked that the ground be wet but the sheep skin dry. God did that too. These two signs convinced Gideon that God would use him to save Israel from the Midianites. 32,000 Israelite soldiers came to Gideon, but God told him this was too many. So Gideon sent home 22,000 who were afraid to fight. God told Gideon that he still had too many men. So Gideon sent all of them home except for 300 soldiers. That night God told Gideon, “Go down to the Midianite camp and when you hear what they say, you will no longer be afraid.” So that night, Gideon went down to the camp and heard a Midianite soldier telling his friend about something he had dreamed. The man’s friend said, “This dream means that Gideon’s army will defeat the Midianite army!” When Gideon heard this, he worshiped God. Then Gideon returned to his soldiers and gave each of them a horn, a clay pot, and a torch. They surrounded the camp where the Midianite soldiers were sleeping. Gideon’s 300 soldiers had the torches in the pots so the Midianites could not see the light of the torches. Then, all of Gideon’s soldiers broke their pots at the same moment, suddenly revealing the fire of the torches. They blew their horns and shouted, “A sword for Yahweh and for Gideon!” God confused the Midianites, so that they started attacking and killing each other. Immediately, the rest of the Israelites were called from their homes to come help chase the Midianites. They killed many of them and chased the rest of them out of the Israelites’ land. 120,000 Midianites died that day. God had saved Israel. The people wanted to make Gideon their king. Gideon did not allow them to do this, but he asked them for some of the gold rings that each of them had taken from the Midianites. The people gave Gideon a large amount of gold. Then Gideon used the gold to make a special garment like the high priest used to wear. But the people started worshiping it as if it were an idol. So God punished Israel again because they worshiped idols. God allowed their enemies to defeat them. They finally asked God for help again, and God sent them another deliverer. This pattern repeated many times: the Israelites would sin, God would punish them, they would repent, and God would send a deliverer to save them. Over many years, God sent many deliverers who saved the Israelites from their enemies. Finally, the people asked God for a king like all the other nations had. They wanted a king who was tall and strong, and who could lead them into battle. God did not like this request, but he gave them a king just as they had asked.
Going Home
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Copyright © 2004, Pratham Books
17
3d32919a-23af-4f1c-9f4c-7d608d315302
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "2d2063bf-7398-4cee-b5b2-5efa114d9d57", "1fddd41f-2c8f-46f4-944d-0ee800f71e92" ]
[ "eng" ]
Going Home Going Home Author: Rukmini Banerji Illustrators: Ketan Raut, Santosh Pujari Reformatted for Bloom By: Cara Ediger Pratham Books Going Home Author: Rukmini Banerji Illustrators: Ketan Raut, Santosh Pujari School is over. Children are leaving. Teachers are leaving. Everyone is going home. I come out of the gate. I am in a hurry. I do not have time to play. I do not have time to talk. I want to get home fast. I walk down the lane. It is a narrow lane. I can see crowds up ahead. There is a big road there. The big road has lots of traffic. Cars, trucks and cycles, motorcycles, scooters and auto rickshaws. Some are going this way. Some are going that way. I know how to find the gap and run to the other side. I have reached the divider. There is traffic in front. There is traffic behind. I must be careful. I am on the other side. I almost crash into the chanawallah. He growls. I say, “Sorry,” and run along. I walk faster and faster. Now there are fish shops. Big fish, small fish, long fish, flat fish. Shiny fish, dull fish. So many fish in every shop. I walk faster and faster. Now there are fish shops. Big fish, small fish, long fish, flat fish. Shiny fish, dull fish, So many fish in every shop. Now I must run. Past the video shops, past the barber shop, past the cloth shop, past the pan shop. Running, running, running down the lane. Finally I reach home. Oh good! I am not late. My father goes to work in the afternoon. He has not left as yet. His cycle is still here. My father comes outside, my mother is behind him. I give my father a big hug. My father gives me a big hug. Then he goes to work. Now there is no hurry. I have lots of time.
Кыялкеч Кыял
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Copyright © 2020, Бул чыгарма Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Эл аралык лицензиясы (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) боюнча лицензияланган
24
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[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "3fd14434-4785-482c-b4b9-658513e6d8a0", "c36edc78-b53d-4c98-b2a4-7242a7a3e6f8", "8c649df8-8343-4285-98a7-e9fe9bd9141c" ]
[ "kir", "eng" ]
Кыялкеч Кыял              Кыялкеч Кыял              Быйыл кыялкеч Кыял төрткө чыкты. Ал эшиги жашыл түстүү үйдө жашайт. Бала бакчасынын терезелери ачык сары, каалгасы болсо кызыл сыр менен боёлгон. Кыял бала бакчага барганды аябай жактырат. Алар достору менен ырдап, бийлеп, сабактарды окушат. Бул кечте ал аябай чарчады. Көзүн жумар замат, калың токойду көздөй жылып бара жатканын сезди. Ойгон! Кыял ойгон! Кыял көзүн ачты. Аны кебетелери башкача топ балдар курчап турушкан. Жада калса алардын баш кийимдери да өзгөчө болучу. Балдар аны тегеректеп "Биз сени жыл бою күткөнбүз! Кош келдиң! Кош келдиң!" − деп ырдап жатышты. "Бир жыл, күттүңөр беле?” − Кыял таң кала шыбырады. − Сен түшүңдө сууда сүзөөрүңдү, ырдаарыңды билебиз. − Мен азыр уктап жатамбы? Ал муну текшермекке өзүн чымчып да көрдү. − Керек болсо сен уча да аласың", − алар ырын улантышты.  − Уча алам? Кантип эле?" − Кыял таң калды. − Колдоруңду чымчыктын канатындай жай, асманга булут сымал учуп чык, −  дешти балдар. Кыял жаңы досторуна кошулуп асманга көтөрүлүп, токойдун үстүнөн учуп өтүштү. Ылдый жактан жүздөгөн балбылдаган жарыктарды көрүп, аларга умтулушту. Шаар үйлөрү түстөрү жашыл, сары, сыя жана кызыл эле козу карынга окшошуп турду. Кыял бир үйгө баш бакты, анын жумшактыгы килемден кем эмес болчу. Балдар кызды шаарга алып чыгышты. Кыял козу карындын укмуштуудай даамына таң калды. Балдар кызды шаарга алып чыгышты. Кыял козу карындын укмуштуудай даамына таң калды. Күтүлбөгөн жерден козу карын китеп болуп ачыла баштады. Ал жактагы сандар: "Бизге тезиреек кел", − деп чакырып жатышты. Алар кызга хандар, ханышалар, феялар жана каарман жоокерлер жөнүндө кызыктуу окуяларын баяндашты.  Кыз кытыраган чипсы жей берип суусай түшкөндө, достору аны булакка ээрчитип келишти. Бул булакта лимонад, кийинки булакта апельсин, андан кийинкиде манго ширеси агып жаткан. Ал жанга жагымдуу муздак ширелердин баарын даамдап көрдү. Анан ал обон салган козу карындарга жолукту. Ал Учтукуй деген бала менен бий бийледи. Анын баш кийими, жада калса жүзү да учтукуй эле. Экинчи болуп кичинекей кыз аны бийге чакырды. Ал кыздын баш жана бут кийимдери, көйнөгү да жүрөккө түспөлдөш болчу. "Мен кичинекей жүрөкмүн", − деп ал созолонто ырдап жиберди. Кыял ыр бийден чарчай түштү. "Мен чарчадым, эс алалы", − деп ал балдардан суранды. "Убакыт тар, андан көрө лимонад иче кой", − дешти балдар. Кыял суу жутуп, кайрадан күчтөндү. "Эми тоону көздөй учалык", − деген достору сунуш киргизди . Алар тоодой болгон балмуздак, таттууларды жандап учушту.  Ошентип достор үйүлгөн ар түстүү оюнчуктарга келишти. Ойноп болгон соң, оюнчук машине аларды салып кетти. "Биз каткан табышмакты чечмелеп, пазлдарды курап ойно", −  дешти кийинки оюнчуктар. Кыял алар менен көпкө жыргап ойноду. Үйгө кайтаар мезгил келди. Оюнчуктар "Кыял жакшы кал, жолукканга чейин", − деп үйлөрүнө кайтышты. Ошентип кыз жаздыкка башы тиер замат катуу уйкуга чөмүлдү. Кыялкеч Кыял ойгонгондо:"Ушундай керемет түш да кирет экен да?" − деп ойлонду. Бирок анын алаканында бир нерсе бар эле, ал эмне болду экен? Мүмкүн силер бул жөнүндө кызыктуу аңгеме жазып жүрбөгүлө?!
ฮีดฮอยดอยบ้านไร่
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตเเห่งประเทศไทย
21
706d64bc-3e37-4095-b339-b871ca54ae6e
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "tha", "eng" ]
Heat   Hoi   Doi   Ban   Rai Heat   Hoi   Doi   Ban   Rai เค้าโครงเรื่อง ปราชญ์ชาวบ้าน  บ้านไร่ ตำบลหัวเมือง อำเภอเมืองปาน จังหวัดลำปาง เรียบเรียงและวาดภาพ คุณครูและนักเรียนโรงเรียนบ้านไร่ สนับสนุนโดย มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย       หนังสือนิทานเล่มนี้ แต่งและเรียบเรียง ภาพโดยปราชญ์ชาวบ้าน บ้านไร่ ครูและนักเรียนโรงเรียนบ้านไร่ โดยมีวัตถุประสงค์เพื่อส่งเสริมทักษะการอ่านของเด็ก ชั้นประถมศึกษาปีที่ 4-6 มิได้ทำเพื่อจัดจำหน่าย แต่จัดทำเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้
Asi uli
cc-by-nc
Copyright © 2009, SIL International
13
fa4fb738-1669-4806-b188-a59a10d448ac
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "mkz", "eng", "tdt" ]
My skin My skin My skin is soft. A crab's skin is hard. My skin is brown. A frog's skin is green. My skin is thin. A turtle's skin is thick. My skin is smooth. A crocodile's skin is bumpy. My skin is dry. A worm's skin is wet. Animals' skin looks best on them!  My skin looks best on me!
वन
cc-by
Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
12
271cc384-5c66-4ddb-a8d3-7aba4371daf6
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "d21812c5-12ff-4ea0-8063-6f3093a77658" ]
[ "eng", "dty", "nep" ]
Forest Forest
Как Зебра стала полосатой
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Copyright © 2020, Эта работа лицензирована по международной лицензии Creative Commons Attribution 4.0. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
17
2890f6d9-047e-4ab1-9536-f2113bd500a8
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng", "rus" ]
Автор Яко Якобс   Иллюстрации Стивен Уоллес адаптация Карлыгач Байгазиевой Автор Яко Якобс   Иллюстрации Стивен Уоллес адаптация Карлыгач Байгазиевой
My Flower Garden - SL
cc-by-nc-nd
Copyright © 2020, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea
22
12031aa6-2e18-440d-bfaf-703026247dc9
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
My Flower Garden - SL School Journal Junior 2-SL, 2009 - V1.0 One afternoon, my grandmother called me from the vegetable garden. "Can you bring me some cold water, Cletus?" I went to the freezer, but it was locked and Mum was in town shopping. Mum always locked the freezer and took the key with her, because otherwise, my little brothers and sisters would steal her ice blocks. I filled a container from the water supply and took it out to Grandmother. "Sorry, no ice," I told her. I looked at the vegetables she was weeding around. They were growing well, but everything was green. There were no flowers anywhere in the garden.  Suddenly I had an idea.  "Can I have the spade if you've finished with it?" I asked her. "What do you want it for?" "I want to build a flower garden by the house." "All right, but be careful with the stones." I rushed into the house and drove the wheelbarrow out.  Then I went around collecting big stones. Early next morning I said a word of prayer, then went out to clear the area where my flower bed would be. I dug a trench in a circle, then placed the biggest stones in it to form a ring. Now I needed good soil. I took the barrow and spade to the back of our toilet where the loamy soil was, and started to fill the barrow.  While I was digging, my friend Kubilo came by. “Hey, friend, can I help?” he asked. “OK, I told him. You can be my wheelbarrow driver for this construction job.” “Yeah!” yelled Kubilo. “Give it to me! I’ll drive!” He helped me to dump the soil into the circle of big stones, then we built another circle on top. We filled that with more good soil, and kept going till we had built up four layers of stones. “That’s the hard work done,” Kubilo said. “What do you think?” “Now we plant it!  I want to put in lots of morning glories … and I think I’ll put red and green striped taro in the middle. “The choice is yours,” said Kubilo. My cousin gave me some spare morning glory plants from her garden, and I got some red and green taro plants that were growing down by the stream.  We planted them carefully and watered them. Mum and Dad came out to see what we were doing. “That’s a fine job, son,” Dad told me. After a few months, the morning glories were growing well and hanging down the stones, and the taro had grown lots of new red and green striped leaves. Not long after that, the morning glory started flowering: yellow, orange, pink, red, and white. But then, I started seeing caterpillars on the taro leaves. I searched along each leaf and tried to kill them all. Then I noticed that my friend, the praying mantis was also on the leaves. It was also looking for the pests that were eating my plants. “I’ll leave you to carry on the good work,” I thought.   A few days later when I looked, there were no caterpillars. The praying mantis had done a good job.    I stood back and looked at my flower bed and smiled. My grandmother came out and stood beside me. “It makes the whole garden look bright,” she told me. I think it even makes my vegetables taste better!” Check Your Understanding 1) Why did his mother always lock the freezer? a) To keep his siblings out b) To keep it cold c) To stop insects getting in d) In case the house was robbed Check Your Understanding 2) Where did Cletus get the striped taro plants from? a) Behind the toilet b) His cousin c) By the stream d) His grandmother's garden Check Your Understanding 3) Why did Cletus want to build a flower garden? Check Your Understanding 4) Was Kubilo happy to be his wheelbarrow driver? How do you know? Check Your Understanding 5) How many layers of stones did Cletus build? Why do you think he built so many? Check Your Understanding 6) What problem did Cletus face in his garden? Check Your Understanding 7) How do you think Cletus felt about his flower garden? Check Your Understanding 8) Design and label your own flower garden. Secretary's Message The Papua New Guinea School Journal (Junior) is a collection of writing suitable for children in Grades 3-5. For those children bridging into English at Grade 3 level, a new bridging issue with simpler material is now being produced. The Journal is intended as a teaching and reading resource and as supplementary reading and should be available for children to read in the classroom. Teachers are encouraged to read a story from the Journal to their class every day. In this way their children will become familiar with the stories and will want to read them for themselves. The Journal was written and illustrated by Papua New Guinean writers and illustrators. The Department of Education wishes to acknowledge the support of the New Zealand Government in making these Journals available for the children of this country. DR JOSEPH PAGELIO Secretary for Education My Flower Garden - SL Written by Cletus Gere Illustrated by Robert Riba PNG Sign language by Heidi Otiwani This school journal story was produced by the National Department of Education and digitized and translated by SIL PNG, Callan Services for the Disabled National Unit and Save the Children with support from the Sustainable Development Program. Adapted from original; School Journal 2009. Copyright © 2009, DoE, Papua New Guinea
Hi Milyo
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Copyright © 2018, Enabling Writers Project- University of San Jose- Recoletos
17
c905b36b-06c7-4046-b707-8ed9552de2a7
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328" ]
[ "eng", "kak" ]
Deskripsyon ni Libro: Ihtolya iya ni duwa a han-agi. Listaan ni Letra: a,i, m, n, k, o, t, e, y, ay, ey, oy, d, l, h, g, p, ng, b, w, aw, ew, iw, ow, ow, s, u, n (enye), r, c, f, q, v, x, z, ñ Nauhal a Ahel: waday, duwa, pamilya, nanbaley Ballo a Ahel: Milyo, Julio Inhulat ni hi: Maricel B. Belingon Indrowing ni hi: Dawn Pamela Keith M. Sunga Level 3 (Grade 1) Storybook
ติ๊ดตี่ไม่ชอบกินผัก
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Copyright © 2019, มูลนิธีศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย
20
395ce810-d5be-4a61-a81e-619f58a8913e
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "tha", "eng" ]
Tidtee doesn't like eating vegetables. Tidtee doesn't like eating vegetables. เค้าโครงเรื่อง เรียบเรียงและวาดภาพโดย นางสาวรุจิรัตน์  จันทร์ทรัพย์ นางสาวเตือนใจ  แจ่มประโคน นางสาวมุฑิตา  เตชะปิยะพร  สนับสนุนโดย  มูลนิธิศุภนิมิตแห่งประเทศไทย       หนังสือนิทานเล่มนี้เป็นส่วนหนึ่งของการอบรม "สรรสร้างสื่อ เติมเต็มการเรียนรู้" ซึ่งแต่งและเรียบเรียงโดย ครูโรงเรียนบ้านกุดหิน อ.อรัญประเทศ จ.สระแก้ว โดยมีวัตถุประสงค์เพื่อส่งเสริมทักษะการอ่านของเด็กชั้นประถมศึกษาปีที่ 1-3       มิได้ทำเพื่อจัดจำหน่าย แต่จัดทำเพื่อส่งเสริมการเรียนรู้ ‌
The Day I Disappeared
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Copyright © 2021, Department of Education Papua New Guinea
19
187a7167-9176-4717-b9b8-33486f96efbb
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "a4526aa5-6725-4572-895b-e075eb94166f" ]
[ "eng" ]
The Day I Disappeared School Journal Senior 1, 2008 - V1.1 Tamo was feeling hot and dizzy. She had a fever. Mama told her to stay in bed.  "Can someone stay with me, Mama?" Tama asked. "No, we're all going to the garden," she said. Tamo heard everyone leaving. Then she was all by herself in her room, too sick to get up. Tamo lay in bed all day long, with no one to talk to. She was just starting to go to sleep, when she heard a strange whistle, and there was a bright flash of light. An old woman with long grey hair stood in the middle of the room. She held out a big juicy mango to Tamo. "Yum yum," Tamo thought. While she was eating it, the old woman grabbed her hand. "Come!" she demanded in her squeaky voice. "I'll take care of you." Then came that strange whistle again, and they were floating in the air. Soon they were above the clouds, flying with the wind. Tamo held tightly to the old woman's long grey hair. At last they flew down into a valley and landed beside a creek. All of a sudden the whole valley came to life. People were singing and dancing. Everyone was enjoying themselves. Tamo found herself sitting with the old woman at a table in the middle of the dancing group. There was delicious food on the table. Tamo ate till she was full. Then the woman said in her squeaky voice, "It's time for you to return, little one." She tapped Tamo on the shoulder, and as quick as a flash, Tamo was lying in her bed. She heard her mother in the kitchen, talking to her father. "I've searched her room- I've searched the whole  house. She's not there." I realised Mama was crying. "I'm here, Mama! I called from my bed. "How did you get there?" demanded Mama. I searched your room. You weren't there." I told her about the old woman. "Nonsense," said Mama. "You've been dreaming. And what's this mango stone doing on the floor. It isn't even mango season. What's going on around here?" There was a strange, long whistle from behind the wall. Mama and Papa looked at each other. "Never leave your daughter when she is sick!" came a squeaky voice. Check Your Understanding 1)      What did the old woman in the story give Tamo? a)   A Mango b)   A party c)   Medicine d)   Kaukau Check Your Understanding 2)      Where did Tamo’s family go? a)   To the shops b)   To the garden c)   To the village d)   To the beach Check Your Understanding 3)      How do you think Tamo felt when her family all went off to the garden? Check Your Understanding 4)      Do you think the parents would leave Tamo again if she was sick? Check Your Understanding 5)      What came to life in the story? Check Your Understanding 6)   How long were Tamo’s parents at the garden? Check Your Understanding 7)     Adjectives are words which describe a noun. For example Squeaky voice. Find 5 other examples of adjectives used in the story. How do adjectives help improve the story? Check Your Understanding 8)    Write a detailed explanation of how you would look after a sibling who is sick with fever. Secretary’s Message  The Papua New Guinea School Journal (Senior) is a collection of writing suitable for children in Grades 6-8. The Journal is intended as a teaching and reading resource and as supplementary reading and should be available for children to read in the classroom. Teachers are encouraged to read a story from the Journal to their class every day. in this way their children will become familiar with the stories and will want to read them for themselves. The Journal was written and illustrated by Papua New Guinean writers and illustrators. The Department of Education wishes to acknowledge the support of the New Zealand Government in making these Journals available for the children of this country. DR JOSEPH PAGELIO Secretary for Education The Day I Disappeared Written by: Rita Puli Illustrated by: Jon Kombeng Adapted by Save the Children, Callan Services National Unit and SIL PNG as part of the Western Province eLearning Project with support from funding partner PNG SDP. eBook layout, activities and audio recordings by: SIL - Education for life www.mytalkingbooks.org Adapted from original; School Journal 2008. Copyright © 2008, DoE, Papua New Guinea
Обещание
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Copyright © 2017, Victoria Sookoo, Elina Maharjan, Aida Solomon, Anna Kelina
12
035f4bdd-f12d-4fe7-8fdf-4e24fcd20751
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "rus", "eng" ]
The Promise The Promise
Houses
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2019, SIL Cameroon
14
cfe396a9-dfee-43bb-999c-56cbff01bedd
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Houses Houses written by Chou Kain Godfrey + Kristine Roth Trammell Images by MBANJI Bawe Ernest. Images by MBANJI Bawe Ernest, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. Adapted from original, Copyright © 2008, SIL Cameroon. Licensed under CC-BY-NC 4.0. Excerpt from the SIL Cameroon Science and Citizenship Levelled, Integrated Reade Houses I live in a round house with a thatched roof. I live in a two-story house. I live in a house on stilts. I live in a mud-brick house with a thatched roof. What kind of house do you live in? Text in English: Houses - I live in a round house with a thatched roof. I live in a two-story house. I live in a house on stilts. I live in a mud-brick house with a thatched roof. What kind of house do you live in?
Nesans Moyiz
cc-by-nc
Copyright © 2004, Kartidaya
30
649dde36-6a8d-4053-bc8f-dae2b50bb987
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "bba75480-6536-4b3f-ad7b-a6dea8201960", "862bf9d0-571c-499e-9dfe-333b28a20333", "7e5a5d31-8fcf-4c54-b845-8bd60f2e0bf7" ]
[ "hat", "eng" ]
Moses is Born Moses is Born THE LIFE OF MOSES: PART 1 EXODUS 2:1-25 Illustrated by: Noel Dapit A Connected Planet English Scriptures quoted are from the Good News Bible © 1994 published by the Bible Societies/Harper Collins Publishers Ltd UK, Good News Bible © American Bible Society 1966, 1971, 1976, 1992. Used with permission. Jacob and his family moved to Egypt and lived there for almost 400 years. The present king of Egypt did not remember Jacob or his son, Joseph, any longer. He was afraid since the Hebrew people, that is the people of Israel, had increased to a great number and spread throughout the land they would be more powerful than the Egyptians. Because of that, the king of Egypt made the Hebrews his slaves and oppress them. But even though the king oppressed them, the Hebrews kept increasing in number. Therefore the king made a decree saying, “When a Hebrew woman gives birth to a male child, kill him!” This is the account of one baby boy named Moses. During this time a man from the tribe of Levi married a woman of his own tribe, and she bore him a son.  Exodus 2:1-2a When she saw what a fine baby he was, she hid him for three months. Exodus 2:2b But when she could not hide him any longer, she took a basket made of reeds and covered it with tar to make it watertight.  Exodus 2:3a She put the baby in it and then placed it in the tall grass at the edge of the Nile River. The baby's sister stood some distance away to see what would happen to him. Exodus 2:3b-4 The king's daughter came down to the river to bathe, while her servants walked along the bank. Suddenly she noticed the basket in the tall grass and sent a slave woman to get it. Exodus 2:5 The princess opened it and saw a baby boy. He was crying, and she felt sorry for him. “This is one of the Hebrew babies,” she said. Exodus 2:6 Then his sister asked her, “Shall I go and call a Hebrew women to nurse the baby for you?” Exodus 2:7 “Please do,” she answered. So the girl went and brought the baby's own mother. Exodus 2:8 The princess told the woman, “Take this baby and nurse him for me, and I will pay you.” So she took the baby and nursed him. Exodus 2:9 Later, when the child was old enough, she took him to the king's daughter, who adopted him as her own son. She said to herself, ”I pulled him out of the water, and so I name him Moses.” Exodus 2:10 When Moses had grown up, he went out to visit his people, the Hebrews, and he saw how they were forced to do hard labor.  Exodus 2:11a He even saw an Egyptian kill a Hebrew, one of Moses' own people. Exodus 2:11b Moses looked all around, and when he saw that no one was watching, he killed the Egyptian and hid his body in the sand. Exodus 2:12 The next day he went back and saw two Hebrew men fighting. He said to the one who was in the wrong, “Why are you beating up a fellow Hebrew?” Exodus 2:13 The man answered, “Who made you our ruler and judge? Are you going to kill me just as you killed that Egyptian?” Then Moses was afraid and said to himself, “People have found out what I have done.” Exodus 2:14 When the king heard about what had happened, he tried to have Moses killed, but Moses fled and went to live in the land of Midian. Exodus 2:15 One day, when Moses was sitting by a well, seven daughters of Jethro, the priest of Midian, came to draw water and fill the troughs for their father's sheep and goats. Exodus 2:16 But some shepherds drove Jethro's daughters away. Then Moses went to their rescue and watered their animals for them. Exodus 2:17 When they returned to their father, he asked, “Why have you come back so early today?” “An Egyptian rescued us from the shepherds,” they answered, ”and he even drew water for us and watered our animals.” Exodus 2:18-19 “Where is he?” he asked his daughters. “Why did you leave the man out there? Go and invite him to eat with us.” Exodus 2:20 So Moses decided to live there, and Jethro gave him his daughter Zipporah in marriage, who bore him a son. Moses said to himself, “I am a foreigner in this land, and so I name him Gershom.”  Exodus 2:21-22 Years later the king of Egypt died, but the Israelites were still groaning under their slavery and cried out for help.  Exodus 2:23 Their cry went up to God, who heard their groaning and remembered his covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. He saw the slavery of the Israelites and was concerned for them. Exodus 2:24-25
What is a Liquid?
cc-by-nc-sa
Copyright © 2019, SIL Cameroon
16
c5b0ddd7-56ce-4bb6-81fe-0f09970f6bb2
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
What is a Liquid? What is a Liquid? written by Carol Smith Images by MBANJI Bawe Ernest and Tony Smith © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0. Images on pages Front Cover, 1–4, 7 by MBANJI Bawe Ernest, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0. Images on pages 5–6, 8 by Tony Smith, © 2019 SIL Cameroon. CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0. Excerpt from the SIL Cameroon Science and Citizenship Levelled, Integrated Reader. What is a Liquid? Rain is a liquid. A liquid is wet. A liquid can be poured. A liquid takes the shape  of its container. A liquid is always at the same level. Some things float on a  liquid. What kind of liquid might go in each of these containers? Text in English:   What is a liquid? - Rain is a liquid.  A liquid is wet.  A liquid can be poured.  A liquid takes the shape of its container.  A liquid is always at the same level.  Some things float on a liquid.  What kind of liquid might go in each of these containers?
Missing Classes
cc-by-nc-nd
Copyright © 2020, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea
34
762b40e7-7def-4565-b8f1-590678142679
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "eng" ]
Missing Classes School Journal Junior 1-SL, 2008 - V1.0 Characters: Topia Hariti Topia's parents Hariti's parents Mr Taromo Scene: In the village under a mango tree, the girls' parents are sitting down discussing the letters from the class teacher. Topia's father: Topia! Hariti! Come here! Your teacher sent us a message. Topia: Oh! What's the message?                                    Hariti's father: You have not been going to school. Listen to this: "Your daughters have missed several days' lessons this term. Please tell them to come to school every day." Well! is that correct? Topia & Hariti: Yes, but...  Hariti's mother: But why? We've been thinking you were at school. Topia's mother: I thought you liked school. Topia: We do like school, but... Hariti: Sometimes we just like collecting shellfish on the reef. Topia's father: You are not going collecting shellfish. You have to go to school.  Topia & Hariti: OK, OK! We will go to school tomorrow. Hariti's father: Do you promise? Topia & Hariti: Yes, we promise! The next day ... Topia: Hariti, the tide is low and there's dry reef out there. It's a good day to collect shellfish.  Hariti: But what about what our parents said? Topia: They won't find out. Hariti (whispering): OK! Let's wait until the other children have gone. The girls hide until all the children have gone to school and their parents have gone to the gardens ... Topia: Hariti! They've all gone. Hurry! Our baskets, quick! Hariti: I'll race you down to the reef. Topia: Watch out for the sharp corals. Hariti: Look! There's a lot of shellfish everywhere! They collect plenty of shellfish ... Hariti: We've got enough. Let's go home now. Topia: I can't wait for the taste of delicious shellfish. Hariti: Hey! There's no one around. Topia: That's good. No one has seen us. Hariti: Topia, get the firewood. I'll get the shells ready in the pot. Now let's make the fire and put the pot on. There. Topia: There's too much smoke. Let's go outside. Hariti: Topia, did you see the one I found under a small coral? I like eating that kind. It tastes really nice. Topia: When they are cooked, I'll taste a bit of it, Hariti. Hariti: You know what, Topia! It's good to be on our own, with no one to ask us why we haven't been to school and so on. Topia: I agree, Hariti. School is good but this is more fun. Still, we'd better be careful. Our parents will scold us if they find out we are missing classes again. The girls continue to talk. They do not see a man approaching on a bicycle ... Hariti: Quick Topia! Get into the house. Mr Taromo is coming. Topia: Is he coming towards the house? Hariti (peering through a hole in the wall and whispering): Yes! Topia: What's he doing now? Hariti: He's getting closer! Topia: Is he coming up our path? Hariti: Yes! Quick! Hide! Mr Taromo (knocking on the door): Who is inside? Open the door! Topia. Hariti, I know you are in there!  Topia: What should we do?   Hariti: Don't open the door Mr Taromo: If you girls don't open the door, I will wait here until your parents come. Topia: If we don't let him in, we'll be in worse trouble.  Hariti: OK. You open it. Topia (signalling to Hariti ): No, you do it! Quietly, Hariti opens the door ... Mr Taromo (looking in and seeing the pot of shellfish): Aha! So you have been collecting shellfish again. Hariti: We're sorry, Mr Taromo. Mr Taromo: You certainly will be if your parents catch you here. Come on. Your shellfish can wait. Get on the bicycle. I'm taking you back to school. Check Your Understanding 1) Why did Topia and Hariti’s parents receive a letter from school? a) Because the girls were doing well at school. b) To invite their parents into school. c) Because the girls were not going to school. d) It asked them to collect shellfish. Check Your Understanding 2) Do Hariti and Topia live by the sea? How do you know? Check Your Understanding 3) Does Topia like school? Where in the play does it tell you this? Check Your Understanding 4) Who caught the girls not in school? Check Your Understanding 5) Why were the girls hiding in the house? How do you think they were feeling when Mr Taromo knocked on the door? Check Your Understanding 6) Tell me the story again in your own words. What are the main parts of the story? Check Your Understanding 7) Do you think Topia and Hariti were making a good choice? Why is it important to go to school? Check Your Understanding 8) Imagine you are Topia or Hariti. Write a letter of apology to My Taromo for missing school. Secretary’s Message The Papua New Guinea School journal (Junior) is a collection of writing suitable for children in Grades 3-5. The journal is intended as supplementary reading and should be available for children to read in the classroom. Teachers are encouraged to read a story from the journal to their class every day. In this way their children will become familiar with the stories and will want to read them for themselves. The journal was written and illustrated by Papua New Guinean Writers and illustrators and was produced with the assistance of the New Zealand — Papua New Guinea School Journals Project. The Department of Education wishes to acknowledge the support of the New Zealand Government in making these journals available for the children of this country. DR JOSEPH PAGELIO Secretary for Education Issued free to schools by the Department of Education First published 2008, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea Copyright @ 2008, Department of Education, Papua New Guinea School Journal coordinated by Darusilla Arazi This issue was designed by Rupuna Pikita All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be sold, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission of the publisher. Please note: Apart from official journal Office sales to private schools, it is an offence to sell or buy School Journals. ISSN 1561-3402 Teachers and Students We enjoyed choosing the stories and articles for this journal, and we hope you enjoy reading them. If there is a particular story that you liked reading, or that helped you to do some interesting work in class, or if you have any other comments about the journal, please write and tell us. This will help us choose the best sorts of stories to put in the journal. Write to: The School Journal Coordinator Curriculum Development Division Department of Education  PO Box 446 Waigani, NCD Papua New Guinea Missing Classes Written by Aida Lagis Jujumo Sign Language: Noah Agino This school journal story was produced by the National Department of Education and digitized and translated by SIL PNG, Callan Services for the Disabled National Unit and Save the Children with support from the Sustainable Development Program. Adapted from original; School Journal 2008. Copyright © 2008, DoE, Papua New Guinea
ران پو
cc-by
Copyright © 2019, SIL
15
aa4cc7b1-00f5-4125-b558-9ac3c81d6b6f
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "4325c0c6-8b94-4117-9e2d-97d81a6b3ad8" ]
[ "gwc", "san", "deu", "eng" ]
A Kind Boy Level 3 A Kind Boy Author:  Arushi Raj Illustrators:  Kaveri Gopalakrishnan, Madhuvanti Anantharajan, Rajiv Eipe, Rijuta Ghate, Soumya Menon, Suvidha Mistry Reformatted for Bloom by:  Marlene Custer Pratham Books Translated by Gawri Community Development Program Published on StoryWeaver by Pratham Books. Written by Arushi Raj (ten years old).  A class trip to the museum becomes an unforgettable event in Raj's life.      There once was a boy called Raj.  He lived with his mother in a small house.  He had no father, and was very poor.      His mother was very kind and taught Raj about helping other people.      One day at Raj's school, his teacher said that they would go and visit the Museum.      Raj's mother gave him a small back- pack with a water bottle and his lunch.  She also gave him 20 rupees and told him, "Use this money only for an emergency.  This is not to buy sweets."       Raj thought about what his mother said as he looked out the window of  the bus on the way to the museum.  It was not long until he was getting off with the other children.      The Museum was a lot of fun.  Three hours later as he and his class were leaving, Raj had to tie his shoelace.  He bent down to tie it, and as he was get- ting up, he saw a man fall down.      "HELP! HELP!" the man called.       Raj ran and asked if he was okay.  He then hurried to a nearby shop and bought a bottle of water.  He went back and gave it to the old man.  The man drank it slowly, then thanked Raj.      Raj quickly ran back to his school bus.      His teacher was very upset that Raj was late getting back to the bus.       "Where were you?"  she asked stern- ly.      When he got home he told his mother what had happened.  She was very happy that he had helped someone in need.      A few months later, Raj's school had a big event.  Raj asked his mother to come.      "Ok," she said.       At the event, Raj had a lot of fun playing with all his friends.  Soon it was time for prizes to be given out.      Raj got to the ceremony just in time to hear his name called.  As he walked to the stage to get his prize, he thought he recognized the man on stage.  But he could not remember where he had seen him.      As he went to get the prize, the man asked, "Do you remember me?"       Raj shook his head.      "You helped me," he said.      Now Raj remembered.       "You did a very nice and kind deed," the man said.  And he gave Raj a huge trophy that said, "The Most Kindest Person".      Then the man continued, "I would like to help you with anything you need.  Please come and meet me later with your mother."      Raj was very happy, and his mother was very proud of her son.                         THE END
सिंह आ गाय
cc-by
Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
16
b30f632f-15bf-4490-b4b4-adee230c0637
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "d21812c5-12ff-4ea0-8063-6f3093a77658" ]
[ "eng", "mai", "nep" ]
Cow and Lion Cow and Lion
रमुवा आ गाए
cc-by
Copyright © 2019, Enabling Writers Project - World Education-Nepal
12
c091ed4c-d3af-49c3-aad2-6a5b17330e27
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "ea43ce61-a752-429d-ad1a-ec282db33328", "327050e8-76ae-4ed9-903a-cd11ce71a093" ]
[ "eng", "bho", "nep" ]
Ramuwa Cow Ramuwa Cow
दुनिया माय पेली अत्या
cc-by-sa
Copyright © 2017, NLCI
18
dd1c27e5-e8eb-49b1-93bc-737ac8ec09fe
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3" ]
[ "wbr", "eng" ]
The First Death  The First Death  Big Book in Wagri language ( Red Level Book -2 ) NLCI प्रकाशन :  वागड़ी मसीह मण्डली  Website:- www.wagri.org यह किताब राजस्‍थान इनिशिएटिव के द्वारा तैयार की गयी है।हम कलीसिया आधारित साक्षरता में कार्यरत हैं। जिसके अंतर्गत हम कलीसियाओं के साथ मिलकर अलग अलग रीती की सेवकाई करते हैं। जिसमें हमारा उद्‍देश्‍य यह है कि, हमारे क्षेत्र की कलीसिया के विश्‍वासी लोग और बच्‍चे साक्षर हो सकें और परमेश्‍वर के जीवित वचन को पढ़कर अपने विश्‍वास में मजबूत हो सकें। हम जानते हैं कि हमारे क्षेत्र के विश्‍वासी लोग अधिकतर बोल-चाल हो या काम-काज उसमें अपनी मातृभाषा का उपयोग करते है। इसलिये हम अपने विश्‍वासी लोगों के लिये जो भी पाठ्य सामग्री तैयार करते है उसे उन्‍हीं की मातृभाषा में तैयार करते हैं। जिससे उन्‍हें पढ़ने और लिखने में आसानी हो और वो जल्‍दी ही पढ़ना और लिखना सीख सकें। हम अपनी संस्था में कलीसिया आधारित साक्षरता के द्वारा मातृभाषा में वयस्क शिक्षण ही नहीं चलाते बल्कि, कलीसियाओं में पढ़े-लिखे विश्‍वासियों के लिए तथा बच्‍चों के लिए संडे स्कूल और वी.बि.एस. आदि के लिये पाठ्य सामग्री भी उन्हीं की मातृभाषा में उपलब्ध कराते हैं। जिससे कि बच्‍चे अपने बचपन से ही मसीह में बढ़ सकें और परमेश्‍वर के वचन में परिपक्‍व होते जायें। हम प्रार्थना करते हैं कि, हमारे क्षेत्र की कलीसिया के सभी लोग विश्‍वास में और परमेश्‍वर की विशालता में गहराई तक पहुँच सकें। ॥आमेन॥
Kreyasyon Mond Lan
cc-by-nc
Copyright © 2004, Kartidaya
21
3f69c50c-c0fe-4b4d-b66c-a14e54610b56
[ "056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3", "bba75480-6536-4b3f-ad7b-a6dea8201960", "862bf9d0-571c-499e-9dfe-333b28a20333", "dff129cd-1291-4e93-9034-938cad28dcae" ]
[ "hat", "eng" ]
The Creation of the World The Creation of the World Illustrations by: Noel Dapit A Connected Planet English Scriptures quoted are from the Good News Bible © 1994 published by the Bible Societies/Harper Collins Publishers Ltd UK, Good News Bible © American Bible Society 1966, 1971, 1976, 1992. Used with permission. In the beginning, when God created the universe, the earth was formless and desolate. The raging ocean that covered everything was engulfed in total darkness, and the Spirit of God was moving over the water. Genesis 1:1-2 Then God commanded, “Let there be light”—and light appeared. God was pleased with what he saw. Then he separated the light from the darkness, and he named the light “Day” and the darkness “Night”. Evening passed and morning came—that was the first day. Genesis 1:3-5 Then God commanded, “Let there be a dome to divide the water and to keep it in two separate places”—and it was done. So God made a dome, and it separated the water under it from the water above it. He named the dome “Sky”. Evening passed and morning came—that was the second day. Genesis 1:6-8 Then God commanded, “Let the water below the sky come together in one place, so that the land will appear”—and it was done. He named the land “Earth”, and the water which had come together he named “Sea”. And God was pleased with what he saw. Genesis 1:9-10 Then he commanded, “Let the earth produce all kinds of plants, those that bear grain and those that bear fruit”—and it was done. So the earth produced all kinds of plants, and God was pleased with what he saw. Evening passed and morning came—that was the third day. Genesis 1:11-13 Then God commanded, “Let lights appear in the sky to separate day from night and to show the time when days, years, and religious festivals begin; they will shine in the sky to give light to the earth”—and it was done. Genesis 1:14-15 So God made the two larger lights, the sun to rule over the day and the moon to rule over the night; he also made the stars. Genesis 1:16 He placed the lights in the sky to shine on the earth, to rule over the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God was pleased with what he saw. Evening passed and morning came—that was the fourth day. Genesis 1:17-19 Then God commanded, “Let the water be filled with many kinds of living beings, and let the air be filled with birds.” So God created the great sea monsters, all kinds of creatures that live in the water, and all kinds of birds. And God was pleased with what he saw. Genesis 1:20-21 He blessed them all and told the creatures that live in the water to reproduce and to fill the sea, and he told the birds to increase in number. Evening passed and morning came—that was the fifth day. Genesis 1:22-23 Then God commanded, “Let the earth produce all kinds of animal life: domestic and wild, large and small”—and it was done. So God made them all, and he was pleased with what he saw. Genesis 1:24-25 Then God said, “And now we will make human beings; they will be like us and resemble us. They will have power over the fish, the birds, and all animals, domestic and wild, large and small.” So God created human beings, making them to be like himself.  Genesis 1:26-27a He created them male and female, blessed them, and said, “Have many children, so that your descendants will live all over the earth and bring it under their control. I am putting you in charge of the fish, the birds, and all the wild animals.” Genesis 1:27b-28 “I have provided all kinds of grain and all kinds of fruit for you to eat; but for all the wild animals and for all the birds I have provided grass and leafy plants for food”—and it was done. God looked at everything he had made, and he was very pleased. Evening passed and morning came—that was the sixth day. Genesis 1:29-31 And so the whole universe was completed. By the seventh day God finished what he had been doing and stopped working. He blessed the seventh day and set it apart as a special day, because by that day he had completed his creation and stopped working. And that is how the universe was created. Genesis 2:1-4a
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Dataset Card for BloomLM

Dataset Summary

This version of the Bloom Library data is developed specifically for the language modeling task. It includes data from nearly 400 languages across 35 language families, with many of the languages represented being extremely low resourced languages.

Note: If you speak one of these languages and can help provide feedback or corrections, please let us know! https://huggingface.co/sil-ai

Languages

Of the 484 languages listed at BloomLibrary.org, there are 399 languages available in this dataset. Here are the corresponding ISO codes:

['eng', 'nep', 'fra', 'ceb', 'dty', 'ind', 'tpi', 'kir', 'rus', 'hat', 'spa', 'quc', 'tha', 'khb', 'tgl', 'snk', 'kor', 'por', 'nsp', 'mam', 'cgc', 'new', 'thl', 'omw', 'awa', 'lad', 'bho', 'rue', 'mal', 'ben', 'kak', 'hau', 'wnk', 'deu', 'hig', 'swh', 'kjb', 'cry', 'mai', 'sgd', 'tgk', 'bkm', 'cbr', 'qaa', 'xkg', 'mhx', 'mya', 'jmx', 'hro', 'kmu', 'kwu', 'tnp', 'cak', 'kek', 'tdt', 'tkd', 'kan', 'bzi', 'lan', 'enc', 'ahk', 'jra', 'khm', 'som', 'kau', 'nso', 'ame', 'mdr', 'tpu', 'eee', 'afr', 'dje', 'fuh', 'lgg', 'nhx', 'pea', 'hin', 'agq', 'lhm', 'rme', 'war', 'fub', 'kvt', 'qvh', 'bis', 'tnn', 'nlv', 'ymp', 'myk', 'kwd', 'shn', 'ddg', 'stk', 'cmo', 'mgm', 'bra', 'idt', 'nod', 'the', 'fli', 'zul', 'mkz', 'sat', 'wni', 'sdk', 'buo', 'nxa', 'hbb', 'krr', 'bxa', 'aaa', 'bwx', 'pnz', 'wbr', 'guc', 'bod', 'dag', 'yet', 'aph', 'uzb', 'bkx', 'kik', 'nsn', 'zho', 'fil', 'mzm', 'xmg', 'pag', 'acy', 'kmg', 'tdg', 'brb', 'lsi', 'pkb', 'pwg', 'ekm', 'san', 'abn', 'dtp', 'zlm', 'msa', 'pis', 'tnl', 'bfn', 'guj', 'mar', 'pan', 'lwl', 'psp', 'yin', 'qvo', 'gwc', 'mry', 'ilo', 'amh', 'gaz', 'nyu', 'nyo', 'tio', 'hil', 'ori', 'abc', 'bkh', 'nxl', 'nwi', 'wms', 'tam', 'lkb', 'nco', 'lhu', 'bef', 'oji', 'mgo', 'lth', 'qxh', 'mlk', 'cuh', 'ann', 'myx', 'teo', 'vie', 'seq', 'nza', 'dug', 'kqr', 'tet', 'tzj', 'pce', 'tel', 'bcc', 'csn', 'mfj', 'isu', 'boz', 'chd', 'clo', 'gal', 'gbj', 'ozm', 'urd', 'lgr', 'qub', 'mgg', 'laj', 'tsn', 'ngn', 'ino', 'nas', 'kbq', 'ike', 'yid', 'etr', 'egl', 'nuj', 'yix', 'chp', 'csw', 'ksw', 'bax', 'bxk', 'ken', 'amp', 'sea', 'qve', 'swa', 'bgf', 'mmu', 'bfd', 'xmm', 'ags', 'hao', 'luy', 'tuz', 'nge', 'quz', 'azn', 'ada', 'adq', 'sox', 'nwe', 'ins', 'nld', 'taj', 'lin', 'pae', 'bjn', 'npi', 'llg', 'lts', 'ssn', 'nst', 'aeu', 'mxl', 'hla', 'gou', 'bec', 'azo', 'sxb', 'xty', 'ron', 'mdh', 'ajz', 'bam', 'bze', 'gsw', 'odk', 'vif', 'zgh', 'kxp', 'bim', 'ven', 'tza', 'oki', 'pex', 'hds', 'miy', 'nla', 'kur', 'mnw', 'kbx', 'bss', 'mve', 'tom', 'zaw', 'iba', 'rug', 'cmn', 'kms', 'dig', 'tso', 'xho', 'kin', 'bag', 'quf', 'rnl', 'aka', 'kyq', 'mne', 'mqj', 'lmp', 'qvm', 'sml', 'tbj', 'xmd', 'tpx', 'hre', 'pmf', 'ewo', 'kxm', 'fon', 'lug', 'kwx', 'syw', 'tod', 'gsm', 'bwt', 'bri', 'yav', 'snl', 'mfh', 'bfm', 'vra', 'hna', 'ndv', 'mle', 'pcg', 'gwr', 'ssp', 'tpl', 'dmg', 'tuv', 'kmr', 'bya', 'sps', 'loh', 'msq', 'ded', 'rel', 'dnw', 'dtr', 'baw', 'cim', 'ita', 'bud', 'bkc', 'bce', 'lao', 'tth', 'msb', 'njy', 'mrn', 'kam', 'hye', 'bhs', 'zuh', 'nsk', 'tvs', 'yea', 'pdu', 'sot', 'thk', 'aiw', 'jpn', 'bqm', 'wbm', 'bjr', 'guz', 'lns', 'mnf', 'lfa', 'roo', 'thy', 'jgo', 'udg', 'wsk', 'muv', 'xog', 'dde', 'unr', 'mxu', 'saq', 'bob', 'sok', 'awb', 'mlw', 'wtk', 'tsb', 'ydd', 'tnt', 'phl', 'ybb', 'brv', 'fal', 'tuk', 'yas', 'bbk', 'uuu', 'sor', 'cuv']

Dataset Statistics

Language display name "Alpha 3" (aka ISO 639-3) books pages
Ghotuo aaa 2 24
Ambala Ayta abc 1 15
Abua abn 1 15
Cypriot Arabic acy 18 333
Adangme ada 2 21
Adangbe adq 1 9
Akeu aeu 6 136
Afrikaans afr 28 464
Aghem agq 1 15
Esimbi ags 1 15
Akha ahk 91 1741
Aari aiw 1 7
Amri Karbi ajz 3 104
Akan aka 1 11
Yanesha' ame 4 64
Amharic amh 2 34
Alamblak amp 3 64
Obolo ann 2 31
Athpariya aph 35 616
Awadhi awa 163 2351
Awa (Papua New Guinea) awb 1 22
Western Durango Nahuatl azn 7 121
Awing azo 1 15
Tuki bag 1 15
Bambara bam 16 456
Bambili-Bambui baw 2 30
Bamun bax 1 15
Babanki bbk 1 15
Southern Balochi bcc 3 38
Bamenyam bce 1 15
Iceve-Maci bec 1 29
Benabena bef 1 22
Bangla ben 237 3840
Bafut bfd 1 15
Mmen bfm 1 15
Bunak bfn 15 217
Bangandu bgf 1 15
Bhojpuri bho 173 2431
Buwal bhs 1 15
Bimoba bim 1 8
Bislama bis 29 573
Banjar bjn 8 161
Binumarien bjr 1 20
Baka (Cameroon) bkc 1 37
Bakoko bkh 1 15
Kom bkm 26 395
Baikeno bkx 14 207
Aweer bob 1 17
Tibetan bod 36 614
Tiéyaxo Bozo boz 17 479
Wumboko bqm 1 15
Braj bra 7 110
Lave brb 22 544
Mokpwe bri 1 15
Western Bru brv 1 14
Akoose bss 1 15
Ntcham bud 2 39
Terei buo 1 22
Bafaw-Balong bwt 2 30
Bu-Nao Bunu bwx 15 285
Tairaha bxa 3 39
Bukusu bxk 1 7
Batak bya 1 14
Jenaama Bozo bze 16 456
Bisu bzi 66 1160
Kaqchikel cak 86 1838
Cashibo-Cacataibo cbr 14 215
Cebuano ceb 265 3723
Kagayanen cgc 204 3231
Highland Oaxaca Chontal chd 4 279
Chipewyan chp 1 20
Cimbrian cim 3 52
Lowland Oaxaca Chontal clo 1 49
Mandarin Chinese cmn 1 12
Central Mnong cmo 21 427
Cori cry 1 10
Colombian Sign Language csn 12 254
Swampy Cree csw 2 44
Chuka cuh 3 40
Cuvok cuv 1 15
Dagbani dag 4 72
Doondo dde 1 8
Fataluku ddg 35 517
Dedua ded 2 57
German deu 153 2728
Digo dig 1 27
Zarma dje 26 546
Upper Kinabatangan dmg 1 21
Western Dani dnw 3 56
Central Dusun dtp 17 345
Lotud dtr 1 17
Dotyali dty 172 2518
Duruma dug 1 27
E eee 2 36
Emilian egl 2 39
Elip ekm 1 15
En enc 64 1552
English eng 7197 128508
Edolo etr 1 18
Ewondo ewo 2 51
South Fali fal 1 8
Filipino fil 17 291
Fali fli 11 207
Fon fon 2 61
French fra 810 16101
Adamawa Fulfulde fub 1 15
Western Niger Fulfulde fuh 29 606
Galolen gal 15 215
West Central Oromo gaz 1 9
Bodo Gadaba gbj 3 77
Gavar gou 1 15
Guatemalan Sign Language gsm 1 14
Swiss German gsw 1 8
Wayuu guc 1 19
Gujarati guj 7 106
Gusii guz 1 16
Gawri gwc 10 126
Gwere gwr 1 7
Hakö hao 2 42
Haitian Creole hat 275 4739
Hausa hau 386 5966
Huba hbb 34 657
Honduras Sign Language hds 3 69
Kamwe hig 15 282
Hiligaynon hil 3 47
Hindi hin 22 379
Halia hla 1 22
Mina (Cameroon) hna 1 15
Hre hre 1 42
Haroi hro 3 61
Armenian hye 1 16
Iban iba 2 31
Idaté idt 13 186
Eastern Canadian Inuktitut ike 1 17
Iloko ilo 2 26
Indonesian ind 292 4930
Inoke-Yate ino 1 22
Indian Sign Language ins 1 24
Isu (Menchum Division) isu 1 15
Italian ita 3 52
Ngomba jgo 1 15
Western Juxtlahuaca Mixtec jmx 14 225
Japanese jpn 1 12
Jarai jra 135 2474
Kalanguya kak 193 2753
Kamba kam 2 43
Kannada kan 18 288
Kanuri kau 44 841
Kamano kbq 4 82
Ap Ma kbx 1 16
Kekchí kek 48 1313
Kenyang ken 1 15
khb 32 429
Khmer khm 163 3537
Kikuyu kik 12 246
Kinyarwanda kin 1 21
Kyrgyz kir 476 8908
Q'anjob'al kjb 108 2302
Kâte kmg 21 381
Northern Kurdish kmr 2 51
Kamasau kms 1 22
Kanite kmu 9 202
Korean kor 196 5211
Kimaragang kqr 4 56
Krung krr 32 762
S'gaw Karen ksw 2 35
Kurdish kur 4 81
Lahta Karen kvt 2 39
Kwaio kwd 23 365
Kwakum kwu 25 587
Khirwar kwx 1 11
Northern Khmer kxm 2 30
Wadiyara Koli kxp 1 11
Kenga kyq 1 15
Ladino lad 104 3124
Lango (Uganda) laj 3 81
Laru lan 2 62
Lao lao 2 41
Lefa lfa 1 15
Lugbara lgg 33 685
Lengo lgr 4 62
Lhomi lhm 2 24
Lahu lhu 9 150
Lingala lin 1 17
Kabras lkb 3 50
Lole llg 1 27
Limbum lmp 3 61
Lamnso' lns 1 15
Narim loh 1 21
Lashi lsi 11 238
Thur lth 8 149
Tachoni lts 3 71
Ganda lug 2 54
Luyia luy 1 14
Eastern Lawa lwl 7 116
Maithili mai 179 2453
Malayalam mal 15 218
Mam mam 169 3066
Marathi mar 11 170
Maguindanaon mdh 1 17
Mandar mdr 1 15
Matal mfh 1 15
Mefele mfj 1 15
Mpumpong mgg 1 15
Mambae mgm 17 239
Metaʼ mgo 2 30
Metaʼ mgq ERROR ERROR
Maru mhx 65 1119
Ayutla Mixtec miy 1 12
Makasae mkz 25 364
Manambu mle 1 20
Ilwana mlk 2 37
Moloko mlw 1 15
Mmaala mmu 1 15
Naba mne 2 51
Mundani mnf 1 15
Mon mnw 5 50
Mamasa mqj 1 26
Cheke Holo mrn 1 15
Mandaya mry 7 151
Malay msa 6 78
Masbatenyo msb 1 17
Caac msq 1 6
Muthuvan muv 1 13
Marwari (Pakistan) mve 3 32
Maxi Gbe mxl 1 25
Mada (Cameroon) mxu 1 15
Burmese mya 81 1355
Mamara Senoufo myk 35 603
Masaaba myx 7 121
Mumuye mzm 13 237
Naasioi nas 3 61
Sibe nco 3 50
Ndut ndv 1 33
Nepali nep 1297 18686
Newari new 177 2489
Ngemba nge 1 15
Ngwo ngn 1 15
Isthmus-Mecayapan Nahuatl nhx 32 716
Njyem njy 1 15
Ngombale nla 1 15
Dutch nld 5 70
Orizaba Nahuatl nlv 14 405
Northern Thai nod 3 77
Nepali (individual language) npi 5 91
Naskapi nsk 1 22
Nehan nsn 12 218
Northern Sotho nso 10 217
Nepalese Sign Language nsp 9 139
Tase Naga nst 3 49
Nyole nuj 3 63
Ngwe nwe 1 15
Southwest Tanna nwi 11 238
Nauete nxa 16 229
South Nuaulu nxl 3 59
Nyoro nyo 1 14
Nyungwe nyu 5 70
Tigon Mbembe nza 1 15
Od odk 3 49
Ojibwa oji 1 27
Okiek oki 7 157
South Tairora omw 35 894
Odia ori 1 14
Koonzime ozm 1 15
Pagibete pae 1 17
Pangasinan pag 1 14
Punjabi pan 5 81
Ruching Palaung pce 16 254
Paniya pcg 1 13
Kayan pdu 1 16
Peranakan Indonesian pea 27 561
Petats pex 3 59
Phalura phl 1 10
Pijin pis 21 457
Pokomo pkb 2 54
Pamona pmf 1 19
Pana (Central African Republic) pnz 1 15
Portuguese por 221 5793
Philippine Sign Language psp 9 133
Gapapaiwa pwg 2 35
Unknown language [qaa] qaa 35 629
Huallaga Huánuco Quechua qub 5 98
Kʼicheʼ quc 143 2154
Lambayeque Quechua quf 2 24
Cusco Quechua quz 1 13
Eastern Apurímac Quechua qve 3 57
Huamalíes-Dos de Mayo Huánuco Quechua qvh 2 28
Margos-Yarowilca-Lauricocha Quechua qvm 1 16
Napo Lowland Quechua qvo 3 39
Panao Huánuco Quechua qxh 2 29
Rendille rel 1 27
Angloromani rme 2 18
Ranglong rnl 1 22
Romanian ron 1 12
Rotokas roo 1 22
Rusyn rue 6 88
Roviana rug 1 22
Russian rus 552 10547
Sanskrit san 3 45
Samburu saq 1 27
Santali sat 5 89
Sos Kundi sdk 13 294
Semai sea 2 59
Senara Sénoufo seq 1 19
Surigaonon sgd 14 206
Shan shn 3 61
Central Sama sml 2 62
Soninke snk 34 587
Sangil snl 1 13
Sokoro sok 1 17
Somali som 5 139
Somrai sor 1 49
Southern Sotho sot 3 69
Swo sox 1 31
Spanish spa 1207 23601
Saposa sps 2 38
Waata ssn 1 27
Spanish Sign Language ssp 1 13
Arammba stk 5 97
Swahili swa 11 161
Swahili (individual language) swh 192 3686
Suba sxb 1 27
Kagate syw 1 10
Eastern Tamang taj 1 17
Tamil tam 15 213
Tiang tbj 1 14
Western Tamang tdg 33 490
Tetun Dili tdt 113 1657
Telugu tel 3 51
Teso teo 4 59
Tetum tet 13 181
Tajik tgk 30 548
Filipino tgl 82 1332
Thai tha 295 5576
Chitwania Tharu the 13 235
Tharaka thk 1 11
Dangaura Tharu thl 185 2861
Tha thy 1 15
Teop tio 4 82
Tukudede tkd 10 135
Lenakel tnl 16 306
North Tanna tnn 10 210
Whitesands tnp 10 195
Tontemboan tnt 1 26
Toma tod 1 20
Tombulu tom 2 52
Tok Pisin tpi 490 10127
Tlacoapa Me'phaa tpl 1 13
Tampuan tpu 32 921
Acatepec Me'phaa tpx 1 14
Tsamai tsb 1 25
Tswana tsn 5 123
Tsonga tso 5 78
Upper Ta'oih tth 1 27
Turkmen tuk 1 31
Turkana tuv 1 16
Turka tuz 11 199
Taveta tvs 1 27
Tanzanian Sign Language tza 4 384
Tz'utujil tzj 2 33
Muduga udg 1 13
Mundari unr 1 10
Urdu urd 11 132
U uuu 1 12
Uzbek uzb 30 549
Venda ven 5 111
Vietnamese vie 3 56
Vili vif 3 61
Vera'a vra 1 14
Waray war 20 299
Wa wbm 2 39
Wagdi wbr 12 206
Wambon wms 1 26
Ndzwani Comorian wni 16 307
Wanukaka wnk 1 27
Waskia wsk 1 22
Watakataui wtk 1 22
Xhosa xho 4 88
Kagoro xkg 20 301
Mbudum xmd 1 15
Mengaka xmg 1 15
Manado Malay xmm 1 27
Soga xog 2 48
Yoloxochitl Mixtec xty 1 12
Nugunu (Cameroon) yas 1 15
Yangben yav 1 15
Yemba ybb 1 15
Eastern Yiddish ydd 1 17
Ravula yea 1 13
Yetfa yet 3 61
Yiddish yid 1 17
Riang Lai yin 2 39
Axi Yi yix 1 7
Yamap ymp 6 84
Mitla Zapotec zaw 4 94
Standard Moroccan Tamazight zgh 1 27
Chinese zho 5 88
Malay (individual language) zlm 13 280
Tokano zuh 1 22
Zulu zul 27 491
TOTAL: 19693 354757

Dataset Structure

Data Instances

The examples look like this for Hindi:

from datasets import load_dataset

# Specify the language code.
dataset = load_dataset("sil-ai/bloom-lm", 'hin')

# A data point consists of books in the specified language code.
# To see a book, run:
print(dataset['train']['text'][0])

This would produce an output:

>>> dataset['train'][0]
{'title': 'Going to Buy a Book', 'license': 'cc-by-nc', 'copyright': 'Copyright © 2004, Pratham Books', 'pageCount': 15, 'bookInstanceId': 'af86eefd-f69c-4e06-b8eb-e0451853aab9', 'bookLineage': ['056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3'], 'contentLanguages': ['eng', 'kan', 'mar', 'pan', 'ben', 'guj', 'hin'], 'text': 'चलो किताबें खरीदने\nचलो किताबें खरीदने\n\n\n\nएक दिन दादाजी ने मेरे भाई और मुझे कुछ पैसे दिये।\n                                “जाओ! किताबें खरीद लाओ,” उन्होंने कहा।\n                                हम दोनों बहुत खुश हुए।\n                                हम दोनों को पढ़ना बहुत अच्छा लगता है।\nक्या हम अभी जायें? \xa0क्या हम बाद में जायें?\n                                क्या हम आज चलें? \xa0क्या हम कल जायें?\n                                हमने तय कर लिया कि अभी जाते हैं।\nक्या हमें बड़े बाज़ार जाना चाहिए? \xa0क्या हमें छोटी दुकान में जाना चाहिए?\n                                क्या हमें किसी के साथ जाना चाहिए? \xa0क्या हमें अकेले जाना चाहिए?\n                                हमने तय किया कि केवल हम दोनों छोटी दुकान में जायेंगे।\nहमें किताबों की छोटी दुकान पसंद है।\n                                यह छोटी ज़रूर है लेकिन यहाँ बहुत सी किताबें हैं।\nदुकानदार हमें पहचानता है।\n                                        वह हमेशा हमारी मदद करता है।\nक्या हमें ऐसी किताब खरीदनी चाहिए जिसमें ढेर सारे चित्र हों?\n                                क्या हमें वह किताब खरीदनी चाहिए जिसमें खूब कहानियाँ हों?\n                                क्या हम पतली सी किताब खरीदें?\nहम तय नहीं कर पाये। \xa0\nदुकानदार हमें देखकर मुस्कराया। \xa0“बच्चों, आओ मेरे साथ,” उसने कहा। \xa0“यह किताबें जानवरों के बारे में हैं। वे परियों के बारे में हैं। \xa0ऊपर वाली लड़ाइयों के बारे में हैं। तुम्हें जो चाहिए, ले लो।”\nमैंने कुछ किताबें उठायीं। \xa0मेरे भाई ने कुछ किताबें उठायीं।\n                                मैं फ़र्श पर बैठ गई। \xa0वह कुर्सी पर बैठ गया।\n                                और हम दोनों पढ़ते गये, पढ़ते गये और पढ़ते गये।\nकितनी शान्ति थी वहाँ! \xa0कहीं कोई आवाज़ नहीं।\n                                एक घंटा बीता। \xa0दो घंटे बीते।\n                                आखिर में, हम जान गये कि कौन सी किताबें खरीदनी हैं।\nदुकानदार हमें देखकर मुस्कराया। मैंने एक मोटी किताब खरीदी जिसमें बहुत सी कहानियाँ थीं।\n                                मेरे भाई ने एक बड़ी किताब खरीदी जिसमें बहुत सी तसवीरें थीं।\nहम दौड़कर दादाजी के पास घर आये। उनके बिस्तर पर चढ़कर बैठ गये।\n                                        उन्होंने अपने पास बैठा लिया। \xa0हम पढ़ते रहे, पढ़ते रहे, पढ़ते रहे...'}

which shows the various fields.

To view the text from one book you can use

dataset['train'][0]['text']

Whereas if you wish to gather all the text for a language you may use this:

dataset['train']['text']

Data Fields

  • id: id of the sample
  • title: title of the book, e.g. "Going to Buy a Book".
  • license: specific license used, e.g. "cc-by-sa" for "Creative Commons, by attribution, share-alike".
  • copyright: copyright notice from the original book on bloomlibrary.org
  • pageCount: page count from the metadata on the original book on bloomlibrary.org.
  • bookInstanceId: unique ID for each book/translation assigned by Bloom. For example the Hindi version of 'Going to Buy a Book' is 'af86eefd-f69c-4e06-b8eb-e0451853aab9'.
  • bookLineage: Unique bookInstanceIDs of other Bloom books that this book is in some way based on. For example, the Hindi version in the example above is based on '056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3'. It's quite possible for this to be either empty, or have multiple entries. For example, the book 'Saboo y Jojo' with ID '5b232a5f-561d-4514-afe7-d6ed2f6a940f' is based on two others, ['056B6F11-4A6C-4942-B2BC-8861E62B03B3', '10a6075b-3c4f-40e4-94f3-593497f2793a']
  • contentLanguages: Other languages this book may be available in. "Going to Buy a Book" is available in ['eng', 'kan', 'mar', 'pan', 'ben', 'guj', 'hin'] for example.
  • text: the text of the book, concatenated together from the different pages.

Data Splits

For all languages, there is only a single train set.

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