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as of december 31, 2017, the company had gross state income tax credit carry-forwards of approximately $20 million, which expire from 2018 through 2020. a deferred tax asset of approximately $16 million (net of federal benefit) has been established related to these state income tax credit carry-forwards, with a valuation allowance of $7 million against such deferred tax asset as of december 31, 2017. the company had a gross state net operating loss carry-forward of $39 million, which expires in 2027. a deferred tax asset of approximately $3 million (net of federal benefit) has been established for the net operating loss carry-forward, with a full valuation allowance as of december 31, 2017. other state and foreign net operating loss carry-forwards are separately and cumulatively immaterial to the company 2019s deferred tax balances and expire between 2026 and 2036. 14. debt long-term debt consisted of the following:. ($in millions) | december 31 2017 | december 31 2016 senior notes due december 15 2021 5.000% (5.000%) | 2014 | 600 senior notes due november 15 2025 5.000% (5.000%) | 600 | 600 senior notes due december 1 2027 3.483% (3.483%) | 600 | 2014 mississippi economic development revenue bonds due may 1 2024 7.81% (7.81%) | 84 | 84 gulf opportunity zone industrial development revenue bonds due december 1 2028 4.55% (4.55%) | 21 | 21 less unamortized debt issuance costs | -26 (26) | -27 (27) total long-term debt | 1279 | 1278 credit facility - in november 2017, the company terminated its second amended and restated credit agreement and entered into a new credit agreement (the "credit facility") with third-party lenders. the credit facility includes a revolving credit facility of $1250 million, which may be drawn upon during a period of five years from november 22, 2017. the revolving credit facility includes a letter of credit subfacility of $500 million. the revolving credit facility has a variable interest rate on outstanding borrowings based on the london interbank offered rate ("libor") plus a spread based upon the company's credit rating, which may vary between 1.125% (1.125%) and 1.500% (1.500%). the revolving credit facility also has a commitment fee rate on the unutilized balance based on the company 2019s leverage ratio. the commitment fee rate as of december 31, 2017 was 0.25% (0.25%) and may vary between 0.20% (0.20%) and 0.30% (0.30%). the credit facility contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, as well as a financial covenant based on a maximum total leverage ratio. each of the company's existing and future material wholly owned domestic subsidiaries, except those that are specifically designated as unrestricted subsidiaries, are and will be guarantors under the credit facility. in july 2015, the company used cash on hand to repay all amounts outstanding under a prior credit facility, including $345 million in principal amount of outstanding term loans. as of december 31, 2017, $15 million in letters of credit were issued but undrawn, and the remaining $1235 million of the revolving credit facility was unutilized. the company had unamortized debt issuance costs associated with its credit facilities of $11 million and $8 million as of december 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. senior notes - in december 2017, the company issued $600 million aggregate principal amount of unregistered 3.483% (3.483%) senior notes with registration rights due december 2027, the net proceeds of which were used to repurchase the company's 5.000% (5.000%) senior notes due in 2021 in connection with the 2017 redemption described below. in november 2015, the company issued $600 million aggregate principal amount of unregistered 5.000% (5.000%) senior notes due november 2025, the net proceeds of which were used to repurchase the company's 7.125% (7.125%) senior notes due in 2021 in connection with the 2015 tender offer and redemption described below. interest on the company's senior notes is payable semi-annually. the terms of the 5.000% (5.000%) and 3.483% (3.483%) senior notes limit the company 2019s ability and the ability of certain of its subsidiaries to create liens, enter into sale and leaseback transactions, sell assets, and effect consolidations or mergers. the company had unamortized debt issuance costs associated with the senior notes of $15 million and $19 million as of december 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively.. what was the change in the unamortized debt issuance costs associated with the senior notes between 2016 and 2017? -4.0 so what was the percentage change during this time? -0.21053 what was the change associated with credit facilities during that time? 3.0 so what was the percentage change?
0
0.375
we have adequate access to capital markets to meet any foreseeable cash requirements, and we have sufficient financial capacity to satisfy our current liabilities. cash flows millions 2014 2013 2012. cash flowsmillions | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 cash provided by operating activities | $7385 | $6823 | $6161 cash used in investing activities | -4249 (4249) | -3405 (3405) | -3633 (3633) cash used in financing activities | -2982 (2982) | -3049 (3049) | -2682 (2682) net change in cash and cashequivalents | $154 | $369 | $-154 (154) operating activities higher net income in 2014 increased cash provided by operating activities compared to 2013, despite higher income tax payments. 2014 income tax payments were higher than 2013 primarily due to higher income, but also because we paid taxes previously deferred by bonus depreciation (discussed below). higher net income in 2013 increased cash provided by operating activities compared to 2012. in addition, we made payments in 2012 for past wages as a result of national labor negotiations, which reduced cash provided by operating activities in 2012. lower tax benefits from bonus depreciation (as discussed below) partially offset the increases. federal tax law provided for 100% (100%) bonus depreciation for qualified investments made during 2011 and 50% (50%) bonus depreciation for qualified investments made during 2012-2013. as a result, the company deferred a substantial portion of its 2011-2013 income tax expense, contributing to the positive operating cash flow in those years. congress extended 50% (50%) bonus depreciation for 2014, but this extension occurred in december and did not have a significant benefit on our income tax payments during 2014. investing activities higher capital investments, including the early buyout of the long-term operating lease of our headquarters building for approximately $261 million, drove the increase in cash used in investing activities compared to 2013. significant investments also were made for new locomotives, freight cars and containers, and capacity and commercial facility projects. capital investments in 2014 also included $99 million for the early buyout of locomotives and freight cars under long-term operating leases, which we exercised due to favorable economic terms and market conditions. lower capital investments in locomotives and freight cars in 2013 drove the decrease in cash used in investing activities compared to 2012. included in capital investments in 2012 was $75 million for the early buyout of 165 locomotives under long-term operating and capital leases during the first quarter of 2012, which we exercised due to favorable economic terms and market conditions.. what was the cash provided by operating activities in 2013? 6823.0 and in 2012? 6161.0 so what was the difference in this value between the years?
1
662.0
entergy new orleans, inc. management's financial discussion and analysis net revenue 2008 compared to 2007 net revenue consists of operating revenues net of: 1) fuel, fuel-related expenses, and gas purchased for resale, 2) purchased power expenses, and 3) other regulatory charges. following is an analysis of the change in net revenue comparing 2008 to 2007. amount (in millions). - | amount (in millions) 2007 net revenue | $231.0 volume/weather | 15.5 net gas revenue | 6.6 rider revenue | 3.9 base revenue | -11.3 (11.3) other | 7.0 2008 net revenue | $252.7 the volume/weather variance is due to an increase in electricity usage in the service territory in 2008 compared to the same period in 2007. entergy new orleans estimates that approximately 141000 electric customers and 93000 gas customers have returned since hurricane katrina and are taking service as of december 31, 2008, compared to approximately 132000 electric customers and 86000 gas customers as of december 31, 2007. billed retail electricity usage increased a total of 184 gwh compared to the same period in 2007, an increase of 4% (4%). the net gas revenue variance is primarily due to an increase in base rates in march and november 2007. refer to note 2 to the financial statements for a discussion of the base rate increase. the rider revenue variance is due primarily to higher total revenue and a storm reserve rider effective march 2007 as a result of the city council's approval of a settlement agreement in october 2006. the approved storm reserve has been set to collect $75 million over a ten-year period through the rider and the funds will be held in a restricted escrow account. the settlement agreement is discussed in note 2 to the financial statements. the base revenue variance is primarily due to a base rate recovery credit, effective january 2008. the base rate credit is discussed in note 2 to the financial statements. gross operating revenues and fuel and purchased power expenses gross operating revenues increased primarily due to: an increase of $58.9 million in gross wholesale revenue due to increased sales to affiliated customers and an increase in the average price of energy available for resale sales; an increase of $47.7 million in electric fuel cost recovery revenues due to higher fuel rates and increased electricity usage; and an increase of $22 million in gross gas revenues due to higher fuel recovery revenues and increases in gas base rates in march 2007 and november 2007. fuel and purchased power increased primarily due to increases in the average market prices of natural gas and purchased power in addition to an increase in demand.. what was the number of gas customers in 2008? 93000.0 and what was it in 2007? 86000.0 what was, then, the change in that number over the year?
2
7000.0
note 17. accumulated other comprehensive losses: pmi's accumulated other comprehensive losses, net of taxes, consisted of the following:. (losses) earnings (in millions) | (losses) earnings 2015 | (losses) earnings 2014 | 2013 currency translation adjustments | $-6129 (6129) | $-3929 (3929) | $-2207 (2207) pension and other benefits | -3332 (3332) | -3020 (3020) | -2046 (2046) derivatives accounted for as hedges | 59 | 123 | 63 total accumulated other comprehensive losses | $-9402 (9402) | $-6826 (6826) | $-4190 (4190) reclassifications from other comprehensive earnings the movements in accumulated other comprehensive losses and the related tax impact, for each of the components above, that are due to current period activity and reclassifications to the income statement are shown on the consolidated statements of comprehensive earnings for the years ended december 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013. the movement in currency translation adjustments for the year ended december 31, 2013, was also impacted by the purchase of the remaining shares of the mexican tobacco business. in addition, $1 million, $5 million and $12 million of net currency translation adjustment gains were transferred from other comprehensive earnings to marketing, administration and research costs in the consolidated statements of earnings for the years ended december 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, upon liquidation of subsidiaries. for additional information, see note 13. benefit plans and note 15. financial instruments for disclosures related to pmi's pension and other benefits and derivative financial instruments. note 18. colombian investment and cooperation agreement: on june 19, 2009, pmi announced that it had signed an agreement with the republic of colombia, together with the departments of colombia and the capital district of bogota, to promote investment and cooperation with respect to the colombian tobacco market and to fight counterfeit and contraband tobacco products. the investment and cooperation agreement provides $200 million in funding to the colombian governments over a 20-year period to address issues of mutual interest, such as combating the illegal cigarette trade, including the threat of counterfeit tobacco products, and increasing the quality and quantity of locally grown tobacco. as a result of the investment and cooperation agreement, pmi recorded a pre-tax charge of $135 million in the operating results of the latin america & canada segment during the second quarter of 2009. at december 31, 2015 and 2014, pmi had $73 million and $71 million, respectively, of discounted liabilities associated with the colombian investment and cooperation agreement. these discounted liabilities are primarily reflected in other long-term liabilities on the consolidated balance sheets and are expected to be paid through 2028. note 19. rbh legal settlement: on july 31, 2008, rothmans inc. ("rothmans") announced the finalization of a cad 550 million settlement (or approximately $540 million, based on the prevailing exchange rate at that time) between itself and rothmans, benson & hedges inc. ("rbh"), on the one hand, and the government of canada and all 10 provinces, on the other hand. the settlement resolved the royal canadian mounted police's investigation relating to products exported from canada by rbh during the 1989-1996 period. rothmans' sole holding was a 60% (60%) interest in rbh. the remaining 40% (40%) interest in rbh was owned by pmi.. what were the total accumulated other comprehensive losses in 2015? 9402.0 and what were they in 2014? 6826.0 by what amount, then, did they increase over the year? 2576.0 what is this increase as a percent of the 2014 losses? 0.37738 and over the precedent year, from 2013 to 2014, what was that increase in those losses?
3
2636.0
entergy corporation notes to consolidated financial statements (a) consists of pollution control revenue bonds and environmental revenue bonds, certain series of which are secured by non-interest bearing first mortgage bonds. (b) the bonds are subject to mandatory tender for purchase from the holders at 100% (100%) of the principal amount outstanding on september 1, 2005 and can then be remarketed. (c) the bonds are subject to mandatory tender for purchase from the holders at 100% (100%) of the principal amount outstanding on september 1, 2004 and can then be remarketed. (d) the bonds had a mandatory tender date of october 1, 2003. entergy louisiana purchased the bonds from the holders, pursuant to the mandatory tender provision, and has not remarketed the bonds at this time. entergy louisiana used a combination of cash on hand and short-term borrowing to buy-in the bonds. (e) on june 1, 2002, entergy louisiana remarketed $55 million st. charles parish pollution control revenue refunding bonds due 2030, resetting the interest rate to 4.9% (4.9%) through may 2005. (f) the bonds are subject to mandatory tender for purchase from the holders at 100% (100%) of the principal amount outstanding on june 1, 2005 and can then be remarketed. (g) pursuant to the nuclear waste policy act of 1982, entergy's nuclear owner/licensee subsidiaries have contracts with the doe for spent nuclear fuel disposal service. the contracts include a one-time fee for generation prior to april 7, 1983. entergy arkansas is the only entergy company that generated electric power with nuclear fuel prior to that date and includes the one-time fee, plus accrued interest, in long-term (h) the fair value excludes lease obligations, long-term doe obligations, and other long-term debt and includes debt due within one year. it is determined using bid prices reported by dealer markets and by nationally recognized investment banking firms. the annual long-term debt maturities (excluding lease obligations) for debt outstanding as of december 31, 2003, for the next five years are as follows:. - | (in thousands) 2004 | $503215 2005 | $462420 2006 | $75896 2007 | $624539 2008 | $941625 in november 2000, entergy's non-utility nuclear business purchased the fitzpatrick and indian point 3 power plants in a seller-financed transaction. entergy issued notes to nypa with seven annual installments of approximately $108 million commencing one year from the date of the closing, and eight annual installments of $20 million commencing eight years from the date of the closing. these notes do not have a stated interest rate, but have an implicit interest rate of 4.8% (4.8%). in accordance with the purchase agreement with nypa, the purchase of indian point 2 resulted in entergy's non-utility nuclear business becoming liable to nypa for an additional $10 million per year for 10 years, beginning in september 2003. this liability was recorded upon the purchase of indian point 2 in september 2001, and is included in the note payable to nypa balance above. in july 2003, a payment of $102 million was made prior to maturity on the note payable to nypa. under a provision in a letter of credit supporting these notes, if certain of the domestic utility companies or system energy were to default on other indebtedness, entergy could be required to post collateral to support the letter of credit. covenants in the entergy corporation notes require it to maintain a consolidated debt ratio of 65% (65%) or less of its total capitalization. if entergy's debt ratio exceeds this limit, or if entergy or certain of the domestic utility companies default on other indebtedness or are in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, an acceleration of the notes' maturity dates may occur.. what is the sum of long-term debt due in 2004 and 2005?
4
965635.0
credit facility, which was amended in 2013 and 2012. in march 2014, the company 2019s credit facility was further amended to extend the maturity date to march 2019. the amount of the aggregate commitment is $3.990 billion (the 201c2014 credit facility 201d). the 2014 credit facility permits the company to request up to an additional $1.0 billion of borrowing capacity, subject to lender credit approval, increasing the overall size of the 2014 credit facility to an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $4.990 billion. interest on borrowings outstanding accrues at a rate based on the applicable london interbank offered rate plus a spread. the 2014 credit facility requires the company not to exceed a maximum leverage ratio (ratio of net debt to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, where net debt equals total debt less unrestricted cash) of 3 to 1, which was satisfied with a ratio of less than 1 to 1 at december 31, 2014. the 2014 credit facility provides back-up liquidity, funds ongoing working capital for general corporate purposes and funds various investment opportunities. at december 31, 2014, the company had no amount outstanding under the 2014 credit facility. commercial paper program. on october 14, 2009, blackrock established a commercial paper program (the 201ccp program 201d) under which the company could issue unsecured commercial paper notes (the 201ccp notes 201d) on a private placement basis up to a maximum aggregate amount outstanding at any time of $3.0 billion. blackrock increased the maximum aggregate amount that could be borrowed under the cp program to $3.5 billion in 2011 and to $3.785 billion in 2012. in april 2013, blackrock increased the maximum aggregate amount for which the company could issue unsecured cp notes on a private-placement basis up to a maximum aggregate amount outstanding at any time of $3.990 billion. the cp program is currently supported by the 2014 credit facility. at december 31, 2014, blackrock had no cp notes outstanding. long-term borrowings the carrying value and fair value of long-term borrowings estimated using market prices at december 31, 2014 included the following: (in millions) maturity amount unamortized discount carrying value fair value. (in millions) | maturity amount | unamortized discount | carrying value | fair value 1.375% (1.375%) notes due 2015 | $750 | $2014 | $750 | $753 6.25% (6.25%) notes due 2017 | 700 | -1 (1) | 699 | 785 5.00% (5.00%) notes due 2019 | 1000 | -2 (2) | 998 | 1134 4.25% (4.25%) notes due 2021 | 750 | -3 (3) | 747 | 825 3.375% (3.375%) notes due 2022 | 750 | -3 (3) | 747 | 783 3.50% (3.50%) notes due 2024 | 1000 | -3 (3) | 997 | 1029 total long-term borrowings | $4950 | $-12 (12) | $4938 | $5309 long-term borrowings at december 31, 2013 had a carrying value of $4.939 billion and a fair value of $5.284 billion determined using market prices at the end of december 2013. 2024 notes. in march 2014, the company issued $1.0 billion in aggregate principal amount of 3.50% (3.50%) senior unsecured and unsubordinated notes maturing on march 18, 2024 (the 201c2024 notes 201d). the net proceeds of the 2024 notes were used to refinance certain indebtedness which matured in the fourth quarter of 2014. interest is payable semi-annually in arrears on march 18 and september 18 of each year, or approximately $35 million per year. the 2024 notes may be redeemed prior to maturity at any time in whole or in part at the option of the company at a 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price. the 2024 notes were issued at a discount of $3 million that is being amortized over the term of the notes. the company incurred approximately $6 million of debt issuance costs, which are being amortized over the term of the 2024 notes. at december 31, 2014, $6 million of unamortized debt issuance costs was included in other assets on the consolidated statement of financial condition. 2015 and 2022 notes. in may 2012, the company issued $1.5 billion in aggregate principal amount of unsecured unsubordinated obligations. these notes were issued as two separate series of senior debt securities, including $750 million of 1.375% (1.375%) notes maturing in june 2015 (the 201c2015 notes 201d) and $750 million of 3.375% (3.375%) notes maturing in june 2022 (the 201c2022 notes 201d). net proceeds were used to fund the repurchase of blackrock 2019s common stock and series b preferred from barclays and affiliates and for general corporate purposes. interest on the 2015 notes and the 2022 notes of approximately $10 million and $25 million per year, respectively, is payable semi-annually on june 1 and december 1 of each year, which commenced december 1, 2012. the 2015 notes and 2022 notes may be redeemed prior to maturity at any time in whole or in part at the option of the company at a 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price. the 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price represents a price, subject to the specific terms of the 2015 and 2022 notes and related indenture, that is the greater of (a) par value and (b) the present value of future payments that will not be paid because of an early redemption, which is discounted at a fixed spread over a comparable treasury security. the 2015 notes and 2022 notes were issued at a discount of $5 million that is being amortized over the term of the notes. the company incurred approximately $7 million of debt issuance costs, which are being amortized over the respective terms of the 2015 notes and 2022 notes. at december 31, 2014, $4 million of unamortized debt issuance costs was included in other assets on the consolidated statement of financial condition. 2021 notes. in may 2011, the company issued $1.5 billion in aggregate principal amount of unsecured unsubordinated obligations. these notes were issued as two separate series of senior debt securities, including $750 million of 4.25% (4.25%) notes maturing in may 2021 and $750 million of floating rate notes (201c2013 floating rate notes 201d), which were repaid in may 2013 at maturity. net proceeds of this offering were used to fund the repurchase of blackrock 2019s series b preferred from affiliates of merrill lynch & co., inc. (201cmerrill lynch 201d). interest. what's the portion of fair value to carrying value?
5
1.07513
backlog applied manufactures systems to meet demand represented by order backlog and customer commitments. backlog consists of: (1) orders for which written authorizations have been accepted and assigned shipment dates are within the next 12 months, or shipment has occurred but revenue has not been recognized; and (2) contractual service revenue and maintenance fees to be earned within the next 12 months. backlog by reportable segment as of october 27, 2013 and october 28, 2012 was as follows: 2013 2012 (in millions, except percentages). - | 2013 | 2012 | - | (in millions except percentages) silicon systems group | $1295 | 55% (55%) | $705 | 44% (44%) applied global services | 591 | 25% (25%) | 580 | 36% (36%) display | 361 | 15% (15%) | 206 | 13% (13%) energy and environmental solutions | 125 | 5% (5%) | 115 | 7% (7%) total | $2372 | 100% (100%) | $1606 | 100% (100%) applied 2019s backlog on any particular date is not necessarily indicative of actual sales for any future periods, due to the potential for customer changes in delivery schedules or cancellation of orders. customers may delay delivery of products or cancel orders prior to shipment, subject to possible cancellation penalties. delays in delivery schedules and/or a reduction of backlog during any particular period could have a material adverse effect on applied 2019s business and results of operations. manufacturing, raw materials and supplies applied 2019s manufacturing activities consist primarily of assembly, test and integration of various proprietary and commercial parts, components and subassemblies (collectively, parts) that are used to manufacture systems. applied has implemented a distributed manufacturing model under which manufacturing and supply chain activities are conducted in various countries, including the united states, europe, israel, singapore, taiwan, and other countries in asia, and assembly of some systems is completed at customer sites. applied uses numerous vendors, including contract manufacturers, to supply parts and assembly services for the manufacture and support of its products. although applied makes reasonable efforts to assure that parts are available from multiple qualified suppliers, this is not always possible. accordingly, some key parts may be obtained from only a single supplier or a limited group of suppliers. applied seeks to reduce costs and to lower the risks of manufacturing and service interruptions by: (1) selecting and qualifying alternate suppliers for key parts; (2) monitoring the financial condition of key suppliers; (3) maintaining appropriate inventories of key parts; (4) qualifying new parts on a timely basis; and (5) locating certain manufacturing operations in close proximity to suppliers and customers. research, development and engineering applied 2019s long-term growth strategy requires continued development of new products. the company 2019s significant investment in research, development and engineering (rd&e) has generally enabled it to deliver new products and technologies before the emergence of strong demand, thus allowing customers to incorporate these products into their manufacturing plans at an early stage in the technology selection cycle. applied works closely with its global customers to design systems and processes that meet their planned technical and production requirements. product development and engineering organizations are located primarily in the united states, as well as in europe, israel, taiwan, and china. in addition, applied outsources certain rd&e activities, some of which are performed outside the united states, primarily in india. process support and customer demonstration laboratories are located in the united states, china, taiwan, europe, and israel. applied 2019s investments in rd&e for product development and engineering programs to create or improve products and technologies over the last three years were as follows: $1.3 billion (18 percent of net sales) in fiscal 2013, $1.2 billion (14 percent of net sales) in fiscal 2012, and $1.1 billion (11 percent of net sales) in fiscal 2011. applied has spent an average of 14 percent of net sales in rd&e over the last five years. in addition to rd&e for specific product technologies, applied maintains ongoing programs for automation control systems, materials research, and environmental control that are applicable to its products.. what was the change in the rd&e spendings from 2013 to 2014? 0.1 and what is this change as a percentage of those spendings in 2013? 0.08333 in this same year, what were these spendings as a percentage of the total net sales?
6
0.18
american tower corporation and subsidiaries notes to consolidated financial statements 2014 (continued) a description of the company 2019s reporting units and the results of the related transitional impairment testing are as follows: verestar 2014verestar was a single segment and reporting unit until december 2002, when the company committed to a plan to dispose of verestar. the company recorded an impairment charge of $189.3 million relating to the impairment of goodwill in this reporting unit. the fair value of this reporting unit was determined based on an independent third party appraisal. network development services 2014as of january 1, 2002, the reporting units in the company 2019s network development services segment included kline, specialty constructors, galaxy, mts components and flash technologies. the company estimated the fair value of these reporting units utilizing future discounted cash flows and market information as to the value of each reporting unit on january 1, 2002. the company recorded an impairment charge of $387.8 million for the year ended december 31, 2002 related to the impairment of goodwill within these reporting units. such charge included full impairment for all of the goodwill within the reporting units except kline, for which only a partial impairment was recorded. as discussed in note 2, the assets of all of these reporting units were sold as of december 31, 2003, except for those of kline and our tower construction services unit, which were sold in march and november 2004, respectively. rental and management 2014the company obtained an independent third party appraisal of the rental and management reporting unit that contains goodwill and determined that goodwill was not impaired. the company 2019s other intangible assets subject to amortization consist of the following as of december 31, (in thousands):. - | 2004 | 2003 acquired customer base and network location intangibles | $1369607 | $1299521 deferred financing costs | 89736 | 111484 acquired licenses and other intangibles | 43404 | 43125 total | 1502747 | 1454130 less accumulated amortization | -517444 (517444) | -434381 (434381) other intangible assets net | $985303 | $1019749 the company amortizes its intangible assets over periods ranging from three to fifteen years. amortization of intangible assets for the years ended december 31, 2004 and 2003 aggregated approximately $97.8 million and $94.6 million, respectively (excluding amortization of deferred financing costs, which is included in interest expense). the company expects to record amortization expense of approximately $97.8 million, $95.9 million, $92.0 million, $90.5 million and $88.8 million, respectively, for the years ended december 31, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, respectively. 5. notes receivable in 2000, the company loaned tv azteca, s.a. de c.v. (tv azteca), the owner of a major national television network in mexico, $119.8 million. the loan, which initially bore interest at 12.87% (12.87%), payable quarterly, was discounted by the company, as the fair value interest rate at the date of the loan was determined to be 14.25% (14.25%). the loan was amended effective january 1, 2003 to increase the original interest rate to 13.11% (13.11%). as of december 31, 2004, and 2003, approximately $119.8 million undiscounted ($108.2 million discounted) under the loan was outstanding and included in notes receivable and other long-term assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. the term of the loan is seventy years; however, the loan may be prepaid by tv. what is the net change in the balance of other intangible assets net from 2003 to 2004? -34446.0 what percentage change does this represent?
7
-0.03378
during the fourth quarter of 2010, schlumberger issued 20ac1.0 billion 2.75% (2.75%) guaranteed notes due under this program. schlumberger entered into agreements to swap these euro notes for us dollars on the date of issue until maturity, effectively making this a us denominated debt on which schlumberger will pay interest in us dollars at a rate of 2.56% (2.56%). during the first quarter of 2009, schlumberger issued 20ac1.0 billion 4.50% (4.50%) guaranteed notes due 2014 under this program. schlumberger entered into agreements to swap these euro notes for us dollars on the date of issue until maturity, effectively making this a us dollar denominated debt on which schlumberger will pay interest in us dollars at a rate of 4.95% (4.95%). 0160 on april 17, 2008, the schlumberger board of directors approved an $8 billion share repurchase program for shares of schlumberger common stock, to be acquired in the open market before december 31, 2011. on july 21, 2011, the schlumberger board of directors approved an extension of this repurchase program to december 31, 2013. schlumberger had repurchased $7.12 billion of shares under this program as of december 31, 2012. the following table summarizes the activity under this share repurchase program during 2012, 2011 and 2010: (stated in thousands except per share amounts) total cost of shares purchased total number of shares purchased average price paid per share. - | total cost of shares purchased | total number of shares purchased | average price paid per share 2012 | $971883 | 14087.8 | $68.99 2011 | $2997688 | 36940.4 | $81.15 2010 | $1716675 | 26624.8 | $64.48 0160 cash flow provided by operations was $6.8 billion in 2012, $6.1 billion in 2011 and $5.5 billion in 2010. in recent years, schlumberger has actively managed its activity levels in venezuela relative to its accounts receivable balance, and has recently experienced an increased delay in payment from its national oil company customer there. schlumberger operates in approximately 85 countries. at december 31, 2012, only five of those countries (including venezuela) individually accounted for greater than 5% (5%) of schlumberger 2019s accounts receivable balance of which only one, the united states, represented greater than 10% (10%). 0160 dividends paid during 2012, 2011 and 2010 were $1.43 billion, $1.30 billion and $1.04 billion, respectively. on january 17, 2013, schlumberger announced that its board of directors had approved an increase in the quarterly dividend of 13.6% (13.6%), to $0.3125. on january 19, 2012, schlumberger announced that its board of directors had approved an increase in the quarterly dividend of 10% (10%), to $0.275. on january 21, 2011, schlumberger announced that its board of directors had approved an increase in the quarterly dividend of 19% (19%), to $0.25. 0160 capital expenditures were $4.7 billion in 2012, $4.0 billion in 2011 and $2.9 billion in 2010. capital expenditures are expected to approach $3.9 billion for the full year 2013. 0160 during 2012, 2011 and 2010 schlumberger made contributions of $673 million, $601 million and $868 million, respectively, to its postretirement benefit plans. the us pension plans were 82% (82%) funded at december 31, 2012 based on the projected benefit obligation. this compares to 87% (87%) funded at december 31, 2011. schlumberger 2019s international defined benefit pension plans are a combined 88% (88%) funded at december 31, 2012 based on the projected benefit obligation. this compares to 88% (88%) funded at december 31, 2011. schlumberger currently anticipates contributing approximately $650 million to its postretirement benefit plans in 2013, subject to market and business conditions. 0160 there were $321 million outstanding series b debentures at december 31, 2009. during 2010, the remaining $320 million of the 2.125% (2.125%) series b convertible debentures due june 1, 2023 were converted by holders into 8.0 million shares of schlumberger common stock and the remaining $1 million of outstanding series b debentures were redeemed for cash.. as of december 31, 2012, what was the remaining amount under the share repurchase program for shares of schlumberger common stock? 0.88 and in the year before, what was the average price paid per share? 81.15 what was it in 2010? 64.48 by how much, then, did it increase over the year? 16.67 and how much did that increase represent in relation to the 2010 price?
8
0.25853
(in millions) 2010 2009 2008. (in millions) | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 net cash provided by operating activities | $3547 | $3173 | $4421 net cash used for investing activities | -319 (319) | -1518 (1518) | -907 (907) net cash used for financing activities | -3363 (3363) | -1476 (1476) | -3938 (3938) operating activities net cash provided by operating activities increased by $374 million to $3547 million in 2010 as compared to 2009. the increase primarily was attributable to an improvement in our operating working capital balances of $570 million as discussed below, and $187 million related to lower net income tax payments, as compared to 2009. partially offsetting these improvements was a net reduction in cash from operations of $350 million related to our defined benefit pension plan. this reduction was the result of increased contributions to the pension trust of $758 million as compared to 2009, partially offset by an increase in the cas costs recovered on our contracts. operating working capital accounts consists of receivables, inventories, accounts payable, and customer advances and amounts in excess of costs incurred. the improvement in cash provided by operating working capital was due to a decline in 2010 accounts receivable balances compared to 2009, and an increase in 2010 customer advances and amounts in excess of costs incurred balances compared to 2009. these improvements partially were offset by a decline in accounts payable balances in 2010 compared to 2009. the decline in accounts receivable primarily was due to higher collections on various programs at electronic systems, is&gs, and space systems business areas. the increase in customer advances and amounts in excess of costs incurred primarily was attributable to an increase on government and commercial satellite programs at space systems and air mobility programs at aeronautics, partially offset by a decrease on various programs at electronic systems. the decrease in accounts payable was attributable to the timing of accounts payable activities across all segments. net cash provided by operating activities decreased by $1248 million to $3173 million in 2009 as compared to 2008. the decline primarily was attributable to an increase in our contributions to the defined benefit pension plan of $1373 million as compared to 2008 and an increase in our operating working capital accounts of $147 million. partially offsetting these items was the impact of lower net income tax payments in 2009 as compared to 2008 in the amount of $319 million. the decline in cash provided by operating working capital primarily was due to growth of receivables on various programs in the ms2 and gt&l lines of business at electronic systems and an increase in inventories on combat aircraft programs at aeronautics, which partially were offset by increases in customer advances and amounts in excess of costs incurred on government satellite programs at space systems and the timing of accounts payable activities. investing activities capital expenditures 2013 the majority of our capital expenditures relate to facilities infrastructure and equipment that are incurred to support new and existing programs across all of our business segments. we also incur capital expenditures for it to support programs and general enterprise it infrastructure. capital expenditures for property, plant and equipment amounted to $820 million in 2010, $852 million in 2009, and $926 million in 2008. we expect that our operating cash flows will continue to be sufficient to fund our annual capital expenditures over the next few years. acquisitions, divestitures and other activities 2013 acquisition activities include both the acquisition of businesses and investments in affiliates. amounts paid in 2010 of $148 million primarily related to investments in affiliates. we paid $435 million in 2009 for acquisition activities, compared with $233 million in 2008. in 2010, we received proceeds of $798 million from the sale of eig, net of $17 million in transaction costs (see note 2). there were no material divestiture activities in 2009 and 2008. during 2010, we increased our short-term investments by $171 million compared to an increase of $279 million in 2009. financing activities share activity and dividends 2013 during 2010, 2009, and 2008, we repurchased 33.0 million, 24.9 million, and 29.0 million shares of our common stock for $2483 million, $1851 million, and $2931 million. of the shares we repurchased in 2010, 0.9 million shares for $63 million were repurchased in december but settled and were paid for in january 2011. in october 2010, our board of directors approved a new share repurchase program for the repurchase of our common stock from time-to-time, up to an authorized amount of $3.0 billion (see note 12). under the program, we have discretion to determine the dollar amount of shares to be repurchased and the timing of any repurchases in compliance with applicable law and regulation. we repurchased a total of 11.2 million shares under the program for $776 million, and as of december 31, 2010, there remained $2224 million available for additional share repurchases. in connection with their approval of the new share repurchase program, our board terminated our previous share repurchase program. cash received from the issuance of our common stock in connection with stock option exercises during 2010, 2009, and 2008 totaled $59 million, $40 million, and $250 million. those activities resulted in the issuance of 1.4 million shares, 1.0 million shares, and 4.7 million shares during the respective periods.. what is the net cash from operating and investing activities?
9
3228.0
part ii item 5. market for registrant 2019s common equity, related stockholder matters and issuer purchases of equity securities the following table presents reported quarterly high and low per share sale prices of our common stock on the new york stock exchange (201cnyse 201d) for the years 2010 and 2009.. 2010 | high | low quarter ended march 31 | $44.61 | $40.10 quarter ended june 30 | 45.33 | 38.86 quarter ended september 30 | 52.11 | 43.70 quarter ended december 31 | 53.14 | 49.61 2009 | high | low quarter ended march 31 | $32.53 | $25.45 quarter ended june 30 | 34.52 | 27.93 quarter ended september 30 | 37.71 | 29.89 quarter ended december 31 | 43.84 | 35.03 on february 11, 2011, the closing price of our common stock was $56.73 per share as reported on the nyse. as of february 11, 2011, we had 397612895 outstanding shares of common stock and 463 registered holders. dividends we have not historically paid a dividend on our common stock. payment of dividends in the future, when, as and if authorized by our board of directors, would depend upon many factors, including our earnings and financial condition, restrictions under applicable law and our current and future loan agreements, our debt service requirements, our capital expenditure requirements and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant from time to time, including the potential determination to elect reit status. in addition, the loan agreement for our revolving credit facility and term loan contain covenants that generally restrict our ability to pay dividends unless certain financial covenants are satisfied. for more information about the restrictions under the loan agreement for the revolving credit facility and term loan, our notes indentures and the loan agreement related to our securitization, see item 7 of this annual report under the caption 201cmanagement 2019s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations 2014liquidity and capital resources 2014factors affecting sources of liquidity 201d and note 6 to our consolidated financial statements included in this annual report.. what was the closing price of common stock as of 2/11/11? 56.73 and the high price for the quarter ended 12/31/10?
10
53.14
note 6: inventories we use the last-in, first-out (lifo) method for the majority of our inventories located in the continental u.s. other inventories are valued by the first-in, first-out (fifo) method. fifo cost approximates current replacement cost. inventories measured using lifo must be valued at the lower of cost or market. inventories measured using fifo must be valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. inventories at december 31 consisted of the following:. - | 2018 | 2017 finished products | $988.1 | $1211.4 work in process | 2628.2 | 2697.7 raw materials and supplies | 506.5 | 488.8 total (approximates replacement cost) | 4122.8 | 4397.9 increase (reduction) to lifo cost | -11.0 (11.0) | 60.4 inventories | $4111.8 | $4458.3 inventories valued under the lifo method comprised $1.57 billion and $1.56 billion of total inventories at december 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. note 7: financial instruments financial instruments that potentially subject us to credit risk consist principally of trade receivables and interest- bearing investments. wholesale distributors of life-science products account for a substantial portion of our trade receivables; collateral is generally not required. we seek to mitigate the risk associated with this concentration through our ongoing credit-review procedures and insurance. a large portion of our cash is held by a few major financial institutions. we monitor our exposures with these institutions and do not expect any of these institutions to fail to meet their obligations. major financial institutions represent the largest component of our investments in corporate debt securities. in accordance with documented corporate risk-management policies, we monitor the amount of credit exposure to any one financial institution or corporate issuer. we are exposed to credit-related losses in the event of nonperformance by counterparties to risk-management instruments but do not expect any counterparties to fail to meet their obligations given their high credit ratings. we consider all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less from the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. the cost of these investments approximates fair value. our equity investments are accounted for using three different methods depending on the type of equity investment: 2022 investments in companies over which we have significant influence but not a controlling interest are accounted for using the equity method, with our share of earnings or losses reported in other-net, (income) expense. 2022 for equity investments that do not have readily determinable fair values, we measure these investments at cost, less any impairment, plus or minus changes resulting from observable price changes in orderly transactions for the identical or similar investment of the same issuer. any change in recorded value is recorded in other-net, (income) expense. 2022 our public equity investments are measured and carried at fair value. any change in fair value is recognized in other-net, (income) expense. we review equity investments other than public equity investments for indications of impairment on a regular basis. our derivative activities are initiated within the guidelines of documented corporate risk-management policies and are intended to offset losses and gains on the assets, liabilities, and transactions being hedged. management reviews the correlation and effectiveness of our derivatives on a quarterly basis.. what was the total in raw materials and supplies in 2018? 506.5 and what was it in 2017? 488.8 what was, then, the change over the year? 17.7 what was the total in raw materials and supplies in 2017? 488.8 and how much does that change represent in relation to this 2017 total, in percentage?
11
0.03621
amortized over a nine-year period beginning december 2015. see note 2 to the financial statements for further discussion of the business combination and customer credits. the volume/weather variance is primarily due to the effect of more favorable weather during the unbilled period and an increase in industrial usage, partially offset by the effect of less favorable weather on residential sales. the increase in industrial usage is primarily due to expansion projects, primarily in the chemicals industry, and increased demand from new customers, primarily in the industrial gases industry. the louisiana act 55 financing savings obligation variance results from a regulatory charge for tax savings to be shared with customers per an agreement approved by the lpsc. the tax savings resulted from the 2010-2011 irs audit settlement on the treatment of the louisiana act 55 financing of storm costs for hurricane gustav and hurricane ike. see note 3 to the financial statements for additional discussion of the settlement and benefit sharing. included in other is a provision of $23 million recorded in 2016 related to the settlement of the waterford 3 replacement steam generator prudence review proceeding, offset by a provision of $32 million recorded in 2015 related to the uncertainty at that time associated with the resolution of the waterford 3 replacement steam generator prudence review proceeding. a0 see note 2 to the financial statements for a discussion of the waterford 3 replacement steam generator prudence review proceeding. entergy wholesale commodities following is an analysis of the change in net revenue comparing 2016 to 2015. amount (in millions). - | amount (in millions) 2015 net revenue | $1666 nuclear realized price changes | -149 (149) rhode island state energy center | -44 (44) nuclear volume | -36 (36) fitzpatrick reimbursement agreement | 41 nuclear fuel expenses | 68 other | -4 (4) 2016 net revenue | $1542 as shown in the table above, net revenue for entergy wholesale commodities decreased by approximately $124 million in 2016 primarily due to: 2022 lower realized wholesale energy prices and lower capacity prices, the amortization of the palisades below- market ppa, and vermont yankee capacity revenue. the effect of the amortization of the palisades below- market ppa and vermont yankee capacity revenue on the net revenue variance from 2015 to 2016 is minimal; 2022 the sale of the rhode island state energy center in december 2015. see note 14 to the financial statements for further discussion of the rhode island state energy center sale; and 2022 lower volume in the entergy wholesale commodities nuclear fleet resulting from more refueling outage days in 2016 as compared to 2015 and larger exercise of resupply options in 2016 as compared to 2015. see 201cnuclear matters - indian point 201d below for discussion of the extended indian point 2 outage in the second quarter entergy corporation and subsidiaries management 2019s financial discussion and analysis. how much did net revenue change between 2015 and 2016? 124.0 and the percentage change during this time?
12
0.08042
divestiture of our arrow and moores businesses, and an unfavorable sales mix of international plumbing products, which, in aggregate, decreased sales by two percent. net sales for 2016 were positively affected by increased sales volume of plumbing products, paints and other coating products and builders' hardware. net sales for 2016 were also positively affected by favorable sales mix of cabinets and windows, and net selling price increases of north american windows and north american and international plumbing products. net sales for 2016 were negatively affected by lower sales volume of cabinets and lower net selling prices of paints and other coating products. our gross profit margins were 32.2 percent, 34.2 percent and 33.4 percent in 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. the 2018 gross profit margin was negatively impacted by an increase in commodity costs, the recognition of the inventory step up adjustment established as a part of the the acquisition of kichler, an increase in other expenses (such as logistics costs and salaries) and unfavorable sales mix. these negative impacts were partially offset by an increase in net selling prices, the benefits associated with cost savings initiatives, and increased sales volume. the 2017 gross profit margin was positively impacted by increased sales volume, a more favorable relationship between net selling prices and commodity costs, and cost savings initiatives. selling, general and administrative expenses as a percent of sales were 17.7 percent in 2018 compared with 18.6 percent in 2017 and 18.7 percent in 2016. the decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses, as a percentage of sales, was driven by leverage of fixed expenses, due primarily to increased sales volume, and improved cost control. the following table reconciles reported operating profit to operating profit, as adjusted to exclude certain items, dollars in millions:. - | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 operating profit as reported | $1211 | $1194 | $1087 rationalization charges | 14 | 4 | 22 kichler inventory step up adjustment | 40 | 2014 | 2014 operating profit as adjusted | $1265 | $1198 | $1109 operating profit margins as reported | 14.5% (14.5%) | 15.6% (15.6%) | 14.8% (14.8%) operating profit margins as adjusted | 15.1% (15.1%) | 15.7% (15.7%) | 15.1% (15.1%) operating profit margin in 2018 was negatively affected by an increase in commodity costs, the recognition of the inventory step up adjustment established as a part of the the acquisition of kichler and an increase in other expenses (such as logistics costs, salaries and erp costs). these negative impacts were partially offset by increased net selling prices, benefits associated with cost savings initiatives and increased sales volume. operating profit margin in 2017 was positively impacted by increased sales volume, cost savings initiatives, and a more favorable relationship between net selling prices and commodity costs. operating profit margin in 2017 was negatively impacted by an increase in strategic growth investments and certain other expenses, including stock-based compensation, health insurance costs, trade show costs and increased head count. due to the recently-announced increase in tariffs on imported materials from china, and assuming tariffs rise to 25 percent in 2019, we could be exposed to approximately $150 million of potential annual direct cost increases. we will work to mitigate the impact of these tariffs through a combination of price increases, supplier negotiations, supply chain repositioning and other internal productivity measures. other income (expense), net other, net, for 2018 included $14 million of net periodic pension and post-retirement benefit cost and $8 million of realized foreign currency losses. these expenses were partially offset by $3 million of earnings related to equity method investments and $1 million related to distributions from private equity funds. other, net, for 2017 included $26 million related to periodic pension and post-retirement benefit costs, $13 million net loss related to the divestitures of moores and arrow and $2 million related to the impairment of a private equity fund, partially offset by $3 million related to distributions from private equity funds and $1 million of earnings related to equity method investments.. what was reporting operating profit in 2018? 1211.0 what was it in 2017?
13
1194.0
14. capital stock shares outstanding. the following table presents information regarding capital stock:. (in thousands) | december 31, 2017 | december 31, 2016 class a common stock authorized | 1000000 | 1000000 class a common stock issued and outstanding | 339235 | 338240 class b-1 common stock authorized issued and outstanding | 0.6 | 0.6 class b-2 common stock authorized issued and outstanding | 0.8 | 0.8 class b-3 common stock authorized issued and outstanding | 1.3 | 1.3 class b-4 common stock authorized issued and outstanding | 0.4 | 0.4 cme group has no shares of preferred stock issued and outstanding. associated trading rights. members of cme, cbot, nymex and comex own or lease trading rights which entitle them to access open outcry trading, discounts on trading fees and the right to vote on certain exchange matters as provided for by the rules of the particular exchange and cme group 2019s or the subsidiaries 2019 organizational documents. each class of cme group class b common stock is associated with a membership in a specific division for trading at cme. a cme trading right is a separate asset that is not part of or evidenced by the associated share of class b common stock of cme group. the class b common stock of cme group is intended only to ensure that the class b shareholders of cme group retain rights with respect to representation on the board of directors and approval rights with respect to the core rights described below. trading rights at cbot are evidenced by class b memberships in cbot, at nymex by class a memberships in nymex and at comex by comex division memberships. members of cbot, nymex and comex do not have any rights to elect members of the board of directors and are not entitled to receive dividends or other distributions on their memberships or trading permits. core rights. holders of cme group class b common shares have the right to approve changes in specified rights relating to the trading privileges at cme associated with those shares. these core rights relate primarily to trading right protections, certain trading fee protections and certain membership benefit protections. votes on changes to these core rights are weighted by class. each class of class b common stock has the following number of votes on matters relating to core rights: class b-1, six votes per share; class b-2, two votes per share; class b-3, one vote per share; and class b-4, 1/6th of one vote per share. the approval of a majority of the votes cast by the holders of shares of class b common stock is required in order to approve any changes to core rights. holders of shares of class a common stock do not have the right to vote on changes to core rights. voting rights. with the exception of the matters reserved to holders of cme group class b common stock, holders of cme group common stock vote together on all matters for which a vote of common shareholders is required. in these votes, each holder of shares of class a or class b common stock of cme group has one vote per share. transfer restrictions. each class of cme group class b common stock is subject to transfer restrictions contained in the certificate of incorporation of cme group. these transfer restrictions prohibit the sale or transfer of any shares of class b common stock separate from the sale of the associated trading rights. election of directors. the cme group board of directors is currently comprised of 20 members. holders of class b-1, class b-2 and class b-3 common stock have the right to elect six directors, of which three are elected by class b-1 shareholders, two are elected by class b-2 shareholders and one is elected by class b-3 shareholders. the remaining directors are elected by the class a and class b shareholders voting as a single class.. what is 1000 times the number of votes from class b-3 common stock authorized issued and outstanding in 2017? 1300.0 what is that times 1?
14
1300.0
entergy mississippi, inc. management 2019s financial discussion and analysis 2010 compared to 2009 net revenue consists of operating revenues net of: 1) fuel, fuel-related expenses, and gas purchased for resale, 2) purchased power expenses, and 3) other regulatory charges (credits). following is an analysis of the change in net revenue comparing 2010 to 2009. amount (in millions). - | amount (in millions) 2009 net revenue | $536.7 volume/weather | 18.9 other | -0.3 (0.3) 2010 net revenue | $555.3 the volume/weather variance is primarily due to an increase of 1046 gwh, or 8% (8%), in billed electricity usage in all sectors, primarily due to the effect of more favorable weather on the residential sector. gross operating revenues, fuel and purchased power expenses, and other regulatory charges (credits) gross operating revenues increased primarily due to an increase of $22 million in power management rider revenue as the result of higher rates, the volume/weather variance discussed above, and an increase in grand gulf rider revenue as a result of higher rates and increased usage, offset by a decrease of $23.5 million in fuel cost recovery revenues due to lower fuel rates. fuel and purchased power expenses decreased primarily due to a decrease in deferred fuel expense as a result of prior over-collections, offset by an increase in the average market price of purchased power coupled with increased net area demand. other regulatory charges increased primarily due to increased recovery of costs associated with the power management recovery rider. other income statement variances 2011 compared to 2010 other operation and maintenance expenses decreased primarily due to: a $5.4 million decrease in compensation and benefits costs primarily resulting from an increase in the accrual for incentive-based compensation in 2010 and a decrease in stock option expense; and the sale of $4.9 million of surplus oil inventory. the decrease was partially offset by an increase of $3.9 million in legal expenses due to the deferral in 2010 of certain litigation expenses in accordance with regulatory treatment. taxes other than income taxes increased primarily due to an increase in ad valorem taxes due to a higher 2011 assessment as compared to 2010, partially offset by higher capitalized property taxes as compared with prior year. depreciation and amortization expenses increased primarily due to an increase in plant in service. interest expense decreased primarily due to a revision caused by ferc 2019s acceptance of a change in the treatment of funds received from independent power producers for transmission interconnection projects.. what was the total increase in the volume/weather segment from 2009 to 2010? 18900000.0 and what is the average of this increase per gwh increased in the billed electricity usage? 18068.83365 in that same period, what was the total change in the net revenue? 18.6 and what is this change as a percentage of that net revenue in 2009?
15
555.3
stockholder return performance graphs the following graph compares the cumulative 5-year total stockholder return on our common stock relative to the cumulative total return of the nasdaq composite index and the s&p 400 information technology index. the graph assumes that the value of the investment in our common stock and in each index (including reinvestment of dividends) was $100 on december 29, 2007 and tracks it through december 29, 2012. comparison of 5 year cumulative total return* among cadence design systems, inc., the nasdaq composite index, and s&p 400 information technology cadence design systems, inc. nasdaq composite s&p 400 information technology 12/29/1212/31/111/1/111/2/101/3/0912/29/07 *$100 invested on 12/29/07 in stock or 12/31/07 in index, including reinvestment of dividends. indexes calculated on month-end basis. copyright a9 2013 s&p, a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved.. - | 12/29/2007 | 1/3/2009 | 1/2/2010 | 1/1/2011 | 12/31/2011 | 12/29/2012 cadence design systems inc. | 100.00 | 22.55 | 35.17 | 48.50 | 61.07 | 78.92 nasdaq composite | 100.00 | 59.03 | 82.25 | 97.32 | 98.63 | 110.78 s&p 400 information technology | 100.00 | 54.60 | 82.76 | 108.11 | 95.48 | 109.88 the stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance. for the five year period ended in 2012, what was the fluctuation of the stockholder return for cadence design systems inc.? -21.08 and what is this fluctuation as a percent of that return in 2007? -0.2108 in that same period, what was that fluctuation for the nasdaq composite? 10.78 and what was this nasdaq composite fluctuation as a percentage of the return of that stock in 2007? 0.1078 what was, then, the difference between the cadence design systems inc. percentage and this nasdaq composite one?
16
-31.86
entergy texas, inc. and subsidiaries management 2019s financial discussion and analysis results of operations net income 2016 compared to 2015 net income increased $37.9 million primarily due to lower other operation and maintenance expenses, the asset write-off of its receivable associated with the spindletop gas storage facility in 2015, and higher net revenue. 2015 compared to 2014 net income decreased $5.2 million primarily due to the asset write-off of its receivable associated with the spindletop gas storage facility and higher other operation and maintenance expenses, partially offset by higher net revenue and a lower effective tax rate. net revenue 2016 compared to 2015 net revenue consists of operating revenues net of: 1) fuel, fuel-related expenses, and gas purchased for resale, 2) purchased power expenses, and 3) other regulatory charges. following is an analysis of the change in net revenue comparing 2016 to 2015. amount (in millions). - | amount (in millions) 2015 net revenue | $637.2 reserve equalization | 14.3 purchased power capacity | 12.4 transmission revenue | 7.0 retail electric price | 5.4 net wholesale | -27.8 (27.8) other | -4.3 (4.3) 2016 net revenue | $644.2 the reserve equalization variance is primarily due to a reduction in reserve equalization expense primarily due to changes in the entergy system generation mix compared to the same period in 2015 as a result of the execution of a new purchased power agreement and entergy mississippi 2019s exit from the system agreement, each in november 2015, and entergy texas 2019s exit from the system agreement in august 2016. see note 2 to the financial statements for a discussion of the system agreement. the purchased power capacity variance is primarily due to decreased expenses due to the termination of the purchased power agreements between entergy louisiana and entergy texas in august 2016, as well as capacity cost changes for ongoing purchased power capacity contracts. the transmission revenue variance is primarily due to an increase in attachment o rates charged by miso to transmission customers and a settlement of attachment o rates previously billed to transmission customers by miso.. what was the net revenue in 2016 for entergy texas, inc.? 644.2 and what was it in 2015? 637.2 what was, then, the change over the year? 7.0 what was the net revenue in 2015 for entergy texas, inc.? 637.2 and how much does that change represent in relation to this 2015 net revenue?
17
0.01099
we have adequate access to capital markets to meet any foreseeable cash requirements, and we have sufficient financial capacity to satisfy our current liabilities. cash flows millions 2014 2013 2012. cash flowsmillions | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 cash provided by operating activities | $7385 | $6823 | $6161 cash used in investing activities | -4249 (4249) | -3405 (3405) | -3633 (3633) cash used in financing activities | -2982 (2982) | -3049 (3049) | -2682 (2682) net change in cash and cashequivalents | $154 | $369 | $-154 (154) operating activities higher net income in 2014 increased cash provided by operating activities compared to 2013, despite higher income tax payments. 2014 income tax payments were higher than 2013 primarily due to higher income, but also because we paid taxes previously deferred by bonus depreciation (discussed below). higher net income in 2013 increased cash provided by operating activities compared to 2012. in addition, we made payments in 2012 for past wages as a result of national labor negotiations, which reduced cash provided by operating activities in 2012. lower tax benefits from bonus depreciation (as discussed below) partially offset the increases. federal tax law provided for 100% (100%) bonus depreciation for qualified investments made during 2011 and 50% (50%) bonus depreciation for qualified investments made during 2012-2013. as a result, the company deferred a substantial portion of its 2011-2013 income tax expense, contributing to the positive operating cash flow in those years. congress extended 50% (50%) bonus depreciation for 2014, but this extension occurred in december and did not have a significant benefit on our income tax payments during 2014. investing activities higher capital investments, including the early buyout of the long-term operating lease of our headquarters building for approximately $261 million, drove the increase in cash used in investing activities compared to 2013. significant investments also were made for new locomotives, freight cars and containers, and capacity and commercial facility projects. capital investments in 2014 also included $99 million for the early buyout of locomotives and freight cars under long-term operating leases, which we exercised due to favorable economic terms and market conditions. lower capital investments in locomotives and freight cars in 2013 drove the decrease in cash used in investing activities compared to 2012. included in capital investments in 2012 was $75 million for the early buyout of 165 locomotives under long-term operating and capital leases during the first quarter of 2012, which we exercised due to favorable economic terms and market conditions.. what was the value included in the capital investments for buyout of locomotives in 2012, in dollars?
18
75000000.0
n o t e s t o t h e c o n s o l i d a t e d f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s 2013 (continued) ace limited and subsidiaries excluded from adjusted weighted-average shares outstanding and assumed conversions is the impact of securities that would have been anti-dilutive during the respective years. for the years ended december 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008, the potential anti-dilutive share conversions were 256868 shares, 1230881 shares, and 638401 shares, respectively. 19. related party transactions the ace foundation 2013 bermuda is an unconsolidated not-for-profit organization whose primary purpose is to fund charitable causes in bermuda. the trustees are principally comprised of ace management. the company maintains a non-interest bear- ing demand note receivable from the ace foundation 2013 bermuda, the balance of which was $30 million and $31 million, at december 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. the receivable is included in other assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. the borrower has used the related proceeds to finance investments in bermuda real estate, some of which have been rented to ace employees at rates established by independent, professional real estate appraisers. the borrower uses income from the investments to both repay the note and to fund charitable activities. accordingly, the company reports the demand note at the lower of its principal value or the fair value of assets held by the borrower to repay the loan, including the real estate properties. 20. statutory financial information the company 2019s insurance and reinsurance subsidiaries are subject to insurance laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which they operate. these regulations include restrictions that limit the amount of dividends or other distributions, such as loans or cash advances, available to shareholders without prior approval of the insurance regulatory authorities. there are no statutory restrictions on the payment of dividends from retained earnings by any of the bermuda subsidiaries as the minimum statutory capital and surplus requirements are satisfied by the share capital and additional paid-in capital of each of the bermuda subsidiaries. the company 2019s u.s. subsidiaries file financial statements prepared in accordance with statutory accounting practices prescribed or permitted by insurance regulators. statutory accounting differs from gaap in the reporting of certain reinsurance contracts, investments, subsidiaries, acquis- ition expenses, fixed assets, deferred income taxes, and certain other items. the statutory capital and surplus of the u.s. subsidiaries met regulatory requirements for 2010, 2009, and 2008. the amount of dividends available to be paid in 2011, without prior approval from the state insurance departments, totals $850 million. the following table presents the combined statutory capital and surplus and statutory net income of the bermuda and u.s. subsidiaries at and for the years ended december 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008.. (in millions of u.s. dollars) | bermuda subsidiaries 2010 | bermuda subsidiaries 2009 | bermuda subsidiaries 2008 | bermuda subsidiaries 2010 | bermuda subsidiaries 2009 | 2008 statutory capital and surplus | $11798 | $9164 | $6205 | $6266 | $5885 | $5368 statutory net income | $2430 | $2369 | $2196 | $1047 | $904 | $818 as permitted by the restructuring discussed previously in note 7, certain of the company 2019s u.s. subsidiaries discount certain a&e liabilities, which increased statutory capital and surplus by approximately $206 million, $215 million, and $211 million at december 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008, respectively. the company 2019s international subsidiaries prepare statutory financial statements based on local laws and regulations. some jurisdictions impose complex regulatory requirements on insurance companies while other jurisdictions impose fewer requirements. in some countries, the company must obtain licenses issued by governmental authorities to conduct local insurance business. these licenses may be subject to reserves and minimum capital and solvency tests. jurisdictions may impose fines, censure, and/or criminal sanctions for violation of regulatory requirements.. what was the amount of statutory capital and surplus for bermuda subsidiaries in 2010?
19
11798.0
the table below details cash capital investments for the years ended december 31, 2006, 2005, and 2004. millions of dollars 2006 2005 2004. millions of dollars | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 track | $1487 | $1472 | $1328 capacity and commercial facilities | 510 | 509 | 347 locomotives and freight cars | 135 | 98 | 125 other | 110 | 90 | 76 total | $2242 | $2169 | $1876 in 2007, we expect our total capital investments to be approximately $3.2 billion, which may include long- term leases. these investments will be used to maintain track and structures, continue capacity expansions on our main lines in constrained corridors, remove bottlenecks, upgrade and augment equipment to better meet customer needs, build and improve facilities and terminals, and develop and implement new technologies. we designed these investments to maintain infrastructure for safety, enhance customer service, promote growth, and improve operational fluidity. we expect to fund our 2007 cash capital investments through cash generated from operations, the sale or lease of various operating and non-operating properties, and cash on hand at december 31, 2006. we expect that these sources will continue to provide sufficient funds to meet our expected capital requirements for 2007. for the years ended december 31, 2006, 2005, and 2004, our ratio of earnings to fixed charges was 4.4, 2.9, and 2.1, respectively. the increases in 2006 and 2005 were driven by higher net income. the ratio of earnings to fixed charges was computed on a consolidated basis. earnings represent income from continuing operations, less equity earnings net of distributions, plus fixed charges and income taxes. fixed charges represent interest charges, amortization of debt discount, and the estimated amount representing the interest portion of rental charges. see exhibit 12 for the calculation of the ratio of earnings to fixed charges. financing activities credit facilities 2013 on december 31, 2006, we had $2 billion in revolving credit facilities available, including $1 billion under a five-year facility expiring in march 2009 and $1 billion under a five-year facility expiring in march 2010 (collectively, the "facilities"). the facilities are designated for general corporate purposes and support the issuance of commercial paper. neither of the facilities were drawn on in 2006. commitment fees and interest rates payable under the facilities are similar to fees and rates available to comparably rated investment-grade borrowers. these facilities allow for borrowings at floating rates based on london interbank offered rates, plus a spread, depending upon our senior unsecured debt ratings. the facilities require the maintenance of a minimum net worth and a debt to net worth coverage ratio. at december 31, 2006, we were in compliance with these covenants. the facilities do not include any other financial restrictions, credit rating triggers (other than rating-dependent pricing), or any other provision that could require the posting of collateral. in addition to our revolving credit facilities, we had $150 million in uncommitted lines of credit available, including $75 million that expires in march 2007 and $75 million expiring in may 2007. neither of these lines of credit were used as of december 31, 2006. we must have equivalent credit available under our five-year facilities to draw on these $75 million lines. dividends 2013 on january 30, 2007, we increased the quarterly dividend to $0.35 per share, payable beginning on april 2, 2007, to shareholders of record on february 28, 2007. we expect to fund the increase in the quarterly dividend through cash generated from operations, the sale or lease of various operating and non-operating properties, and cash on hand at december 31, 2006. dividend restrictions 2013 we are subject to certain restrictions related to the payment of cash dividends to our shareholders due to minimum net worth requirements under our credit facilities. retained earnings available. what was the percentage of the total investments amount attributable to the track in 2006?
20
0.66325
market price and dividends d u k e r e a l t y c o r p o r a t i o n 3 8 2 0 0 2 a n n u a l r e p o r t the company 2019s common shares are listed for trading on the new york stock exchange, symbol dre. the following table sets forth the high and low sales prices of the common stock for the periods indicated and the dividend paid per share during each such period. comparable cash dividends are expected in the future. on january 29, 2003, the company declared a quarterly cash dividend of $.455 per share, payable on february 28, 2003, to common shareholders of record on february 14, 2003.. quarter ended | 2002 high | 2002 low | 2002 dividend | 2002 high | 2002 low | dividend december 31 | $25.84 | $21.50 | $.455 | $24.80 | $22.00 | $.45 september 30 | 28.88 | 21.40 |.455 | 26.17 | 21.60 |.45 june 30 | 28.95 | 25.46 |.450 | 24.99 | 22.00 |.43 march 31 | 26.50 | 22.92 |.450 | 25.44 | 21.85 |.43 . what was the cash dividend per share in the last quarter of 2002? 0.455 and what was it in the first quarter? 0.45 what was, then, the change in that cash dividend throughout 2002?
21
0.005
the following graph compares the cumulative 5-year total return to shareholders of cadence design systems, inc. 2019s common stock relative to the cumulative total returns of the s & p 500 index, the nasdaq composite index and the s & p information technology index. the graph assumes that the value of the investment in the company 2019s common stock and in each of the indexes (including reinvestment of dividends) was $100 on december 29, 2001 and tracks it through december 30, 2006. comparison of 5 year cumulative total return* among cadence design systems, inc., the s & p 500 index, the nasdaq composite index and the s & p information technology index 12/30/0612/31/051/1/051/3/0412/28/0212/29/01 cadence design systems, inc. nasdaq composite s & p information technology s & p 500 * $100 invested on 12/29/01 in stock or on 12/31/01 in index-incuding reinvestment of dividends. indexes calculated on month-end basis. copyright b7 2007, standard & poor 2019s, a division of the mcgraw-hill companies, inc. all rights reserved. www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm december 29, december 28, january 3, january 1, december 31, december 30. - | december 29 2001 | december 28 2002 | january 3 2004 | january 1 2005 | december 31 2005 | december 30 2006 cadence design systems inc. | 100.00 | 54.38 | 81.52 | 61.65 | 75.54 | 79.96 s & p 500 | 100.00 | 77.90 | 100.24 | 111.15 | 116.61 | 135.03 nasdaq composite | 100.00 | 71.97 | 107.18 | 117.07 | 120.50 | 137.02 s & p information technology | 100.00 | 62.59 | 92.14 | 94.50 | 95.44 | 103.47 . what was the performance value of the cadence design systems inc in 2004? 81.52 what was, then, the change in its performance value, considering 2004 and the original amount invested in it in 2001?
22
-18.48
jpmorgan chase & co./2007 annual report 31 the following section provides a comparative discussion of jpmorgan chase 2019s consolidated results of operations on a reported basis for the three-year period ended december 31, 2007. factors that relate primarily to a single business segment are discussed in more detail within that business segment than they are in this consolidated sec- tion. for a discussion of the critical accounting estimates used by the firm that affect the consolidated results of operations, see pages 96 201398 of this annual report. revenue. year ended december 31 (in millions) | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 investment banking fees | $6635 | $5520 | $4088 principal transactions | 9015 | 10778 | 8072 lending & deposit-related fees | 3938 | 3468 | 3389 asset management administration and commissions | 14356 | 11855 | 9988 securities gains (losses) | 164 | -543 (543) | -1336 (1336) mortgage fees and related income | 2118 | 591 | 1054 credit card income | 6911 | 6913 | 6754 other income | 1829 | 2175 | 2684 noninterest revenue | 44966 | 40757 | 34693 net interest income | 26406 | 21242 | 19555 total net revenue | $71372 | $61999 | $54248 2007 compared with 2006 total net revenue of $71.4 billion was up $9.4 billion, or 15% (15%), from the prior year. higher net interest income, very strong private equity gains, record asset management, administration and commissions revenue, higher mortgage fees and related income and record investment banking fees contributed to the revenue growth. these increases were offset partially by lower trading revenue. investment banking fees grew in 2007 to a level higher than the pre- vious record set in 2006. record advisory and equity underwriting fees drove the results, partially offset by lower debt underwriting fees. for a further discussion of investment banking fees, which are primarily recorded in ib, see the ib segment results on pages 40 201342 of this annual report. principal transactions revenue consists of trading revenue and private equity gains. trading revenue declined significantly from the 2006 level, primarily due to markdowns in ib of $1.4 billion (net of hedges) on subprime positions, including subprime cdos, and $1.3 billion (net of fees) on leveraged lending funded loans and unfunded commitments. also in ib, markdowns in securitized products on nonsubprime mortgages and weak credit trading performance more than offset record revenue in currencies and strong revenue in both rates and equities. equities benefited from strong client activity and record trading results across all products. ib 2019s credit portfolio results increased compared with the prior year, primarily driven by higher revenue from risk management activities. the increase in private equity gains from 2006 reflected a significantly higher level of gains, the classification of certain private equity carried interest as compensation expense and a fair value adjustment in the first quarter of 2007 on nonpublic private equity investments resulting from the adoption of sfas 157 (201cfair value measurements 201d). for a further discussion of principal transactions revenue, see the ib and corporate segment results on pages 40 201342 and 59 201360, respectively, and note 6 on page 122 of this annual report. lending & deposit-related fees rose from the 2006 level, driven pri- marily by higher deposit-related fees and the bank of new york transaction. for a further discussion of lending & deposit-related fees, which are mostly recorded in rfs, tss and cb, see the rfs segment results on pages 43 201348, the tss segment results on pages 54 201355, and the cb segment results on pages 52 201353 of this annual report. asset management, administration and commissions revenue reached a level higher than the previous record set in 2006. increased assets under management and higher performance and placement fees in am drove the record results. the 18% (18%) growth in assets under management from year-end 2006 came from net asset inflows and market appreciation across all segments: institutional, retail, private bank and private client services. tss also contributed to the rise in asset management, administration and commissions revenue, driven by increased product usage by new and existing clients and market appreciation on assets under custody. finally, commissions revenue increased, due mainly to higher brokerage transaction volume (primarily included within fixed income and equity markets revenue of ib), which more than offset the sale of the insurance business by rfs in the third quarter of 2006 and a charge in the first quarter of 2007 resulting from accelerated surrenders of customer annuities. for additional information on these fees and commissions, see the segment discussions for ib on pages 40 201342, rfs on pages 43 201348, tss on pages 54 201355, and am on pages 56 201358, of this annual report. the favorable variance resulting from securities gains in 2007 compared with securities losses in 2006 was primarily driven by improvements in the results of repositioning of the treasury invest- ment securities portfolio. also contributing to the positive variance was a $234 million gain from the sale of mastercard shares. for a fur- ther discussion of securities gains (losses), which are mostly recorded in the firm 2019s treasury business, see the corporate segment discussion on pages 59 201360 of this annual report. consol idated results of operat ions. what was the change in investment banking fees from 2005 to 2006?
23
1432.0
republic services, inc. notes to consolidated financial statements 2014 (continued) employee stock purchase plan republic employees are eligible to participate in an employee stock purchase plan. the plan allows participants to purchase our common stock for 95% (95%) of its quoted market price on the last day of each calendar quarter. for the years ended december 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, issuances under this plan totaled 113941 shares, 130085 shares and 141055 shares, respectively. as of december 31, 2017, shares reserved for issuance to employees under this plan totaled 0.4 million and republic held employee contributions of approximately $1.8 million for the purchase of common stock. 12. stock repurchases and dividends stock repurchases stock repurchase activity during the years ended december 31, 2017 and 2016 follows (in millions except per share amounts):. - | 2017 | 2016 number of shares repurchased | 9.6 | 8.4 amount paid | $610.7 | $403.8 weighted average cost per share | $63.84 | $48.56 as of december 31, 2017, there were 0.5 million repurchased shares pending settlement and $33.8 million was unpaid and included within other accrued liabilities. in october 2017, our board of directors added $2.0 billion to the existing share repurchase authorization that now extends through december 31, 2020. before this, $98.4 million remained under a prior authorization. share repurchases under the program may be made through open market purchases or privately negotiated transactions in accordance with applicable federal securities laws. while the board of directors has approved the program, the timing of any purchases, the prices and the number of shares of common stock to be purchased will be determined by our management, at its discretion, and will depend upon market conditions and other factors. the share repurchase program may be extended, suspended or discontinued at any time. as of december 31, 2017, the remaining authorized purchase capacity under our october 2017 repurchase program was $1.8 billion. in december 2015, our board of directors changed the status of 71272964 treasury shares to authorized and unissued. in doing so, the number of our issued shares was reduced by the stated amount. our accounting policy is to deduct the par value from common stock and to reflect the excess of cost over par value as a deduction from additional paid-in capital. the change in unissued shares resulted in a reduction of $2295.3 million in treasury stock, $0.6 million in common stock, and $2294.7 million in additional paid-in capital. there was no effect on our total stockholders 2019 equity position as a result of the change. dividends in october 2017, our board of directors approved a quarterly dividend of $0.345 per share. cash dividends declared were $446.3 million, $423.8 million and $404.3 million for the years ended december 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, respectively. as of december 31, 2017, we recorded a quarterly dividend payable of $114.4 million to shareholders of record at the close of business on january 2, 2018. 13. earnings per share basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income attributable to republic services, inc. by the weighted average number of common shares (including vested but unissued rsus) outstanding during the. what is the weighted average cost per share in 2017? 63.84 what about in 2016? 48.56 what is the net change? 15.28 what is the weighted average cost per share in 2016?
24
48.56
impairment net unrealized losses on securities available for sale were as follows as of december 31:. (in millions) | 2009 | 2008 fair value | $72699 | $54163 amortized cost | 74843 | 60786 net unrealized loss pre-tax | $-2144 (2144) | $-6623 (6623) net unrealized loss after-tax | $-1316 (1316) | $-4057 (4057) the above net unrealized loss amounts at december 31, 2009 and december 31, 2008 excluded the remaining net unrealized loss of $1.01 billion, or $635 million after-tax, and $2.27 billion, or $1.39 billion after- tax, respectively, related to reclassifications of securities available for sale to securities held to maturity. these after-tax amounts are recorded in other comprehensive income. the decline in the remaining after-tax unrealized loss amounts related to transferred securities resulted from amortization and from the recognition of losses from other-than-temporary impairment on certain of the securities. we conduct periodic reviews of individual securities to assess whether other-than-temporary impairment exists. to the extent that other-than-temporary impairment is identified, the impairment is broken into a credit component and a non-credit component. the credit component is recognized in our consolidated statement of income, and the non-credit component is recognized in other comprehensive income to the extent that management does not intend to sell the security (see note 3 of the notes to consolidated financial statements included under item 8). the assessment of other-than-temporary impairment involves an evaluation of economic and security- specific factors, which are more fully described in note 3. such factors are based upon estimates, derived by management, which contemplate current market conditions and security-specific performance. to the extent that market conditions are worse than management 2019s expectations, other-than-temporary impairment could increase, in particular the credit component that would be recognized in our consolidated statement of income. national housing prices, according to the case-shiller national hpi, have declined to date approximately 30% (30%) peak-to-current. management currently estimates that national housing prices will continue to decline and bottom out during the second half of 2010, consistent with a peak-to-trough housing price decline of approximately 37% (37%). as an indication of the sensitivity of our portfolio with respect to our more significant assumptions underlying our assessment of impairment, if we were to increase our default estimates to 110% (110%) of management 2019s current expectations with a corresponding slowing of prepayment speeds to 90% (90%) of management 2019s current expectations, credit-related other-than-temporary impairment could increase by approximately $120 million to $125 million, which impairment would be recorded in our consolidated statement of income. excluding the securities for which other-than-temporary impairment was recorded, management considers the aggregate decline in fair value of the remaining securities and the resulting net unrealized losses to be temporary and not the result of any material changes in the credit characteristics of the securities. additional information about our assessment of impairment is provided in note 3 of the notes to consolidated financial statements included under item 8.. what was the change in amortized cost in 2009? 14057.0 so what was the percentage change during this time?
25
0.23125
management 2019s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations 2013 (continued) (amounts in millions, except per share amounts) liquidity and capital resources cash flow overview the following tables summarize key financial data relating to our liquidity, capital resources and uses of capital.. cash flow data | years ended december 31, 2015 | years ended december 31, 2014 | years ended december 31, 2013 net income adjusted to reconcile net income to net cashprovided by operating activities1 | $848.2 | $831.2 | $598.4 net cash used in working capital2 | -117.5 (117.5) | -131.1 (131.1) | -9.6 (9.6) changes in other non-current assets and liabilities using cash | -56.7 (56.7) | -30.6 (30.6) | 4.1 net cash provided by operating activities | $674.0 | $669.5 | $592.9 net cash used in investing activities | -202.8 (202.8) | -200.8 (200.8) | -224.5 (224.5) net cash used in financing activities | -472.8 (472.8) | -343.9 (343.9) | -1212.3 (1212.3) 1 reflects net income adjusted primarily for depreciation and amortization of fixed assets and intangible assets, amortization of restricted stock and other non-cash compensation, non-cash (gain) loss related to early extinguishment of debt, losses on sales of businesses and deferred income taxes. 2 reflects changes in accounts receivable, expenditures billable to clients, other current assets, accounts payable and accrued liabilities. operating activities net cash provided by operating activities during 2015 was $674.0, which was an improvement of $4.5 as compared to 2014, primarily as a result of an improvement in working capital usage of $13.6. due to the seasonality of our business, we typically generate cash from working capital in the second half of a year and use cash from working capital in the first half of a year, with the largest impacts in the first and fourth quarters. our net working capital usage in 2015 was primarily attributable to our media businesses. net cash provided by operating activities during 2014 was $669.5, which was an improvement of $76.6 as compared to 2013, primarily as a result of an increase in net income, offset by an increase in working capital usage of $121.5. our net working capital usage in 2014 was impacted by our media businesses. the timing of media buying on behalf of our clients affects our working capital and operating cash flow. in most of our businesses, our agencies enter into commitments to pay production and media costs on behalf of clients. to the extent possible, we pay production and media charges after we have received funds from our clients. the amounts involved substantially exceed our revenues and primarily affect the level of accounts receivable, expenditures billable to clients, accounts payable and accrued liabilities. our assets include both cash received and accounts receivable from clients for these pass-through arrangements, while our liabilities include amounts owed on behalf of clients to media and production suppliers. our accrued liabilities are also affected by the timing of certain other payments. for example, while annual cash incentive awards are accrued throughout the year, they are generally paid during the first quarter of the subsequent year. investing activities net cash used in investing activities during 2015 primarily related to payments for capital expenditures of $161.1, largely attributable to purchases of leasehold improvements and computer hardware. net cash used in investing activities during 2014 primarily related to payments for capital expenditures and acquisitions. capital expenditures of $148.7 related primarily to computer hardware and software and leasehold improvements. we made payments of $67.8 related to acquisitions completed during 2014, net of cash acquired.. what is the combined total of the net cash provided by operating activities and the one used in investing activities? 471.2 what was the net cash used in financing activities?
26
-472.8
the defined benefit pension plans 2019 trust and $130 million to our retiree medical plans which will reduce our cash funding requirements for 2007 and 2008. in 2007, we expect to make no contributions to the defined benefit pension plans and expect to contribute $175 million to the retiree medical and life insurance plans, after giving consideration to the 2006 prepayments. the following benefit payments, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid: (in millions) pension benefits benefits. (in millions) | pensionbenefits | otherbenefits 2007 | $1440 | $260 2008 | 1490 | 260 2009 | 1540 | 270 2010 | 1600 | 270 2011 | 1660 | 270 years 2012 2013 2016 | 9530 | 1260 as noted previously, we also sponsor nonqualified defined benefit plans to provide benefits in excess of qualified plan limits. the aggregate liabilities for these plans at december 31, 2006 were $641 million. the expense associated with these plans totaled $59 million in 2006, $58 million in 2005 and $61 million in 2004. we also sponsor a small number of foreign benefit plans. the liabilities and expenses associated with these plans are not material to our results of operations, financial position or cash flows. note 13 2013 leases our total rental expense under operating leases was $310 million, $324 million and $318 million for 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively. future minimum lease commitments at december 31, 2006 for all operating leases that have a remaining term of more than one year were $1.1 billion ($288 million in 2007, $254 million in 2008, $211 million in 2009, $153 million in 2010, $118 million in 2011 and $121 million in later years). certain major plant facilities and equipment are furnished by the u.s. government under short-term or cancelable arrangements. note 14 2013 legal proceedings, commitments and contingencies we are a party to or have property subject to litigation and other proceedings, including matters arising under provisions relating to the protection of the environment. we believe the probability is remote that the outcome of these matters will have a material adverse effect on the corporation as a whole. we cannot predict the outcome of legal proceedings with certainty. these matters include the following items, all of which have been previously reported: on march 27, 2006, we received a subpoena issued by a grand jury in the united states district court for the northern district of ohio. the subpoena requests documents related to our application for patents issued in the united states and the united kingdom relating to a missile detection and warning technology. we are cooperating with the government 2019s investigation. on february 6, 2004, we submitted a certified contract claim to the united states requesting contractual indemnity for remediation and litigation costs (past and future) related to our former facility in redlands, california. we submitted the claim consistent with a claim sponsorship agreement with the boeing company (boeing), executed in 2001, in boeing 2019s role as the prime contractor on the short range attack missile (sram) program. the contract for the sram program, which formed a significant portion of our work at the redlands facility, had special contractual indemnities from the u.s. air force, as authorized by public law 85-804. on august 31, 2004, the united states denied the claim. our appeal of that decision is pending with the armed services board of contract appeals. on august 28, 2003, the department of justice (the doj) filed complaints in partial intervention in two lawsuits filed under the qui tam provisions of the civil false claims act in the united states district court for the western district of kentucky, united states ex rel. natural resources defense council, et al v. lockheed martin corporation, et al, and united states ex rel. john d. tillson v. lockheed martin energy systems, inc., et al. the doj alleges that we committed violations of the resource conservation and recovery act at the paducah gaseous diffusion plant by not properly handling, storing. what is the total operating leases that have a remaining term of more than one year, in billions? 1.1 what about in millions?
27
1100.0
z i m m e r h o l d i n g s, i n c. a n d s u b s i d i a r i e s 2 0 0 3 f o r m 1 0 - k notes to consolidated financial statements (continued) the unaudited pro forma results for 2003 include events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying $90.4 million of expense related to centerpulse hip and knee value of an asset may not be recoverable. an impairment loss litigation, $54.4 million of cash income tax benefits as a result would be recognized when estimated future cash flows of centerpulse electing to carry back its 2002 u.s. federal net relating to the asset are less than its carrying amount. operating loss for 5 years versus 10 years, which resulted in depreciation of instruments is recognized as selling, general more losses being carried forward to future years and less and administrative expense, consistent with the classification tax credits going unutilized due to the shorter carry back of instrument cost in periods prior to january 1, 2003. period and an $8.0 million gain on sale of orquest inc., an prior to january 1, 2003, undeployed instruments were investment previously held by centerpulse. the unaudited carried as a prepaid expense at cost, net of allowances for pro forma results are not necessarily indicative either of the obsolescence ($54.8 million, net, at december 31, 2002), and results of operations that actually would have resulted had recognized in selling, general and administrative expense in the exchange offers been in effect at the beginning of the the year in which the instruments were placed into service. respective years or of future results. the new method of accounting for instruments was adopted to recognize the cost of these important assets of the transfx company 2019s business within the consolidated balance sheet on june 25, 2003, the company acquired the transfx and meaningfully allocate the cost of these assets over the external fixation system product line from immedica, inc. periods benefited, typically five years. for approximately $14.8 million cash, which has been the effect of the change during the year ended allocated primarily to goodwill and technology based december 31, 2003 was to increase earnings before intangible assets. the company has sold the transfx cumulative effect of change in accounting principle by product line since early 2001 under a distribution agreement $26.8 million ($17.8 million net of tax), or $0.08 per diluted with immedica. share. the cumulative effect adjustment of $55.1 million (net of income taxes of $34.0 million) to retroactively apply the implex corp. new capitalization method as if applied in years prior to 2003 on march 2, 2004, the company entered into an is included in earnings during the year ended december 31, amended and restated merger agreement relating to the 2003. the pro forma amounts shown on the consolidated acquisition of implex corp. (2018 2018implex 2019 2019), a privately held statement of earnings have been adjusted for the effect of orthopaedics company based in new jersey, for cash. each the retroactive application on depreciation and related share of implex stock will be converted into the right to income taxes. receive cash having an aggregate value of approximately $108.0 million at closing and additional cash earn-out 5. inventories payments that are contingent on the growth of implex inventories at december 31, 2003 and 2002, consist of product sales through 2006. the net value transferred at the following (in millions): closing will be approximately $89 million, which includes. - | 2003 | 2002 finished goods | $384.3 | $206.7 raw materials and work in progress | 90.8 | 50.9 inventory step-up | 52.6 | 2013 inventories net | $527.7 | $257.6 made by zimmer to implex pursuant to their existing alliance raw materials and work in progress 90.8 50.9 arrangement, escrow and other items. the acquisition will be inventory step-up 52.6 2013 accounted for under the purchase method of accounting. inventories, net $527.7 $257.6 reserves for obsolete and slow-moving inventory at4. change in accounting principle december 31, 2003 and 2002 were $47.4 million and instruments are hand held devices used by orthopaedic $45.5 million, respectively. provisions charged to expense surgeons during total joint replacement and other surgical were $11.6 million, $6.0 million and $11.9 million for the procedures. effective january 1, 2003, instruments are years ended december 31, 2003, 2002 and 2001, respectively. recognized as long-lived assets and are included in property, amounts written off against the reserve were $11.7 million, plant and equipment. undeployed instruments are carried at $7.1 million and $8.5 million for the years ended cost, net of allowances for obsolescence. instruments in the december 31, 2003, 2002 and 2001, respectively. field are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation. following the acquisition of centerpulse, the company depreciation is computed using the straight-line method established a common approach for estimating excess based on average estimated useful lives, determined inventory and instruments. this change in estimate resulted principally in reference to associated product life cycles, in a charge to earnings of $3.0 million after tax in the fourth primarily five years. in accordance with sfas no. 144, the quarter. company reviews instruments for impairment whenever. what was the total of inventories in 2003? 527.7 and what was it in 2002? 257.6 how much, then, did the 2003 amount represent in relation to this 2002 one? 2.04852 and what is that excluding the portion equivalent to the 2002 amount? 1.04852 between those same two years, what was the change in the total of finished goods, in millions?
28
177.6
long-term borrowings the carrying value and fair value of long-term borrowings estimated using market prices at december 31, 2013 included the following: (in millions) maturity amount unamortized discount carrying value fair value. (in millions) | maturity amount | unamortized discount | carrying value | fair value 3.50% (3.50%) notes due 2014 | $1000 | $2014 | $1000 | $1029 1.375% (1.375%) notes due 2015 | 750 | 2014 | 750 | 759 6.25% (6.25%) notes due 2017 | 700 | -2 (2) | 698 | 812 5.00% (5.00%) notes due 2019 | 1000 | -2 (2) | 998 | 1140 4.25% (4.25%) notes due 2021 | 750 | -3 (3) | 747 | 799 3.375% (3.375%) notes due 2022 | 750 | -4 (4) | 746 | 745 total long-term borrowings | $4950 | $-11 (11) | $4939 | $5284 long-term borrowings at december 31, 2012 had a carrying value of $5.687 billion and a fair value of $6.275 billion determined using market prices at the end of december 2012. 2015 and 2022 notes. in may 2012, the company issued $1.5 billion in aggregate principal amount of unsecured unsubordinated obligations. these notes were issued as two separate series of senior debt securities including $750 million of 1.375% (1.375%) notes maturing in june 2015 (the 201c2015 notes 201d) and $750 million of 3.375% (3.375%) notes maturing in june 2022 (the 201c2022 notes 201d). net proceeds were used to fund the repurchase of blackrock 2019s common stock and series b preferred from barclays and affiliates and for general corporate purposes. interest on the 2015 notes and the 2022 notes of approximately $10 million and $25 million per year, respectively, is payable semi-annually on june 1 and december 1 of each year, which commenced december 1, 2012. the 2015 notes and 2022 notes may be redeemed prior to maturity at any time in whole or in part at the option of the company at a 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price. the 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price represents a price, subject to the specific terms of the 2015 and 2022 notes and related indenture, that is the greater of (a) par value and (b) the present value of future payments that will not be paid because of an early redemption, which is discounted at a fixed spread over a comparable treasury security. the 2015 notes and 2022 notes were issued at a discount of $5 million that is being amortized over the term of the notes. the company incurred approximately $7 million of debt issuance costs, which are being amortized over the respective terms of the 2015 notes and 2022 notes. at december 31, 2013, $5 million of unamortized debt issuance costs was included in other assets on the consolidated statement of financial condition. 2013 and 2021 notes. in may 2011, the company issued $1.5 billion in aggregate principal amount of unsecured unsubordinated obligations. these notes were issued as two separate series of senior debt securities including $750 million of 4.25% (4.25%) notes maturing in may 2021 and $750 million of floating rate notes (201c2013 floating rate notes 201d), which were repaid in may 2013 at maturity. net proceeds of this offering were used to fund the repurchase of blackrock 2019s series b preferred from affiliates of merrill lynch & co., inc. (201cmerrill lynch 201d). interest on the 4.25% (4.25%) notes due in 2021 (201c2021 notes 201d) is payable semi-annually on may 24 and november 24 of each year, which commenced november 24, 2011, and is approximately $32 million per year. the 2021 notes may be redeemed prior to maturity at any time in whole or in part at the option of the company at a 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price. the 2021 notes were issued at a discount of $4 million that is being amortized over the term of the notes. the company incurred approximately $7 million of debt issuance costs for the $1.5 billion note issuances, which are being amortized over the respective terms of the notes. at december 31, 2013, $3 million of unamortized debt issuance costs was included in other assets on the consolidated statement of financial condition. in may 2011, in conjunction with the issuance of the 2013 floating rate notes, the company entered into a $750 million notional interest rate swap maturing in 2013 to hedge the future cash flows of its obligation at a fixed rate of 1.03% (1.03%). during the second quarter of 2013, the interest rate swap matured and the 2013 floating rate notes were fully repaid. 2012, 2014 and 2019 notes. in december 2009, the company issued $2.5 billion in aggregate principal amount of unsecured and unsubordinated obligations. these notes were issued as three separate series of senior debt securities including $0.5 billion of 2.25% (2.25%) notes, which were repaid in december 2012, $1.0 billion of 3.50% (3.50%) notes and $1.0 billion of 5.0% (5.0%) notes maturing in december 2014 and 2019, respectively. net proceeds of this offering were used to repay borrowings under the cp program, which was used to finance a portion of the acquisition of barclays global investors (201cbgi 201d) from barclays on december 1, 2009 (the 201cbgi transaction 201d), and for general corporate purposes. interest on the 2014 notes and 2019 notes of approximately $35 million and $50 million per year, respectively, is payable semi-annually in arrears on june 10 and december 10 of each year. these notes may be redeemed prior to maturity at any time in whole or in part at the option of the company at a 201cmake-whole 201d redemption price. these notes were issued collectively at a discount of $5 million, which is being amortized over the respective terms of the notes. the company incurred approximately $13 million of debt issuance costs, which are being amortized over the respective terms of these notes. at december 31, 2013, $4 million of unamortized debt issuance costs was included in other assets on the consolidated statement of financial condition. 2017 notes. in september 2007, the company issued $700 million in aggregate principal amount of 6.25% (6.25%) senior unsecured and unsubordinated notes maturing on september 15, 2017 (the 201c2017 notes 201d). a portion of the net proceeds of the 2017 notes was used to fund the initial cash payment for the acquisition of the fund of funds business of quellos and the remainder was used for general corporate purposes. interest is payable semi-annually in arrears on march 15 and september 15 of each year, or approximately $44 million per year. the 2017 notes may be redeemed prior. what is the difference between the fair and the carrying value of all notes?
29
345.0
the analysis of our depreciation studies. changes in the estimated service lives of our assets and their related depreciation rates are implemented prospectively. under group depreciation, the historical cost (net of salvage) of depreciable property that is retired or replaced in the ordinary course of business is charged to accumulated depreciation and no gain or loss is recognized. the historical cost of certain track assets is estimated using (i) inflation indices published by the bureau of labor statistics and (ii) the estimated useful lives of the assets as determined by our depreciation studies. the indices were selected because they closely correlate with the major costs of the properties comprising the applicable track asset classes. because of the number of estimates inherent in the depreciation and retirement processes and because it is impossible to precisely estimate each of these variables until a group of property is completely retired, we continually monitor the estimated service lives of our assets and the accumulated depreciation associated with each asset class to ensure our depreciation rates are appropriate. in addition, we determine if the recorded amount of accumulated depreciation is deficient (or in excess) of the amount indicated by our depreciation studies. any deficiency (or excess) is amortized as a component of depreciation expense over the remaining service lives of the applicable classes of assets. for retirements of depreciable railroad properties that do not occur in the normal course of business, a gain or loss may be recognized if the retirement meets each of the following three conditions: (i) is unusual, (ii) is material in amount, and (iii) varies significantly from the retirement profile identified through our depreciation studies. a gain or loss is recognized in other income when we sell land or dispose of assets that are not part of our railroad operations. when we purchase an asset, we capitalize all costs necessary to make the asset ready for its intended use. however, many of our assets are self-constructed. a large portion of our capital expenditures is for replacement of existing track assets and other road properties, which is typically performed by our employees, and for track line expansion and other capacity projects. costs that are directly attributable to capital projects (including overhead costs) are capitalized. direct costs that are capitalized as part of self- constructed assets include material, labor, and work equipment. indirect costs are capitalized if they clearly relate to the construction of the asset. general and administrative expenditures are expensed as incurred. normal repairs and maintenance are also expensed as incurred, while costs incurred that extend the useful life of an asset, improve the safety of our operations or improve operating efficiency are capitalized. these costs are allocated using appropriate statistical bases. total expense for repairs and maintenance incurred was $2.4 billion for 2014, $2.3 billion for 2013, and $2.1 billion for 2012. assets held under capital leases are recorded at the lower of the net present value of the minimum lease payments or the fair value of the leased asset at the inception of the lease. amortization expense is computed using the straight-line method over the shorter of the estimated useful lives of the assets or the period of the related lease. 13. accounts payable and other current liabilities dec. 31, dec. 31, millions 2014 2013. millions | dec. 31 2014 | dec. 312013 accounts payable | $877 | $803 dividends payable | 438 | 356 income and other taxes payable | 412 | 491 accrued wages and vacation | 409 | 385 accrued casualty costs | 249 | 207 interest payable | 178 | 169 equipment rents payable | 100 | 96 other | 640 | 579 total accounts payable and othercurrent liabilities | $3303 | $3086 . what was the total expense for repairs and maintenance incurred in 2013?
30
2.3
part ii item 5 2014market for registrant 2019s common equity and related stockholder matters market information. the common stock of the company is currently traded on the new york stock exchange (nyse) under the symbol 2018 2018aes. 2019 2019 the following tables set forth the high and low sale prices for the common stock as reported by the nyse for the periods indicated. price range of common stock. 2002 first quarter | high $17.84 | low $4.11 | 2001 first quarter | high $60.15 | low $41.30 second quarter | 9.17 | 3.55 | second quarter | 52.25 | 39.95 third quarter | 4.61 | 1.56 | third quarter | 44.50 | 12.00 fourth quarter | 3.57 | 0.95 | fourth quarter | 17.80 | 11.60 holders. as of march 3, 2003, there were 9663 record holders of the company 2019s common stock, par value $0.01 per share. dividends. under the terms of the company 2019s senior secured credit facilities entered into with a commercial bank syndicate, the company is not allowed to pay cash dividends. in addition, the company is precluded from paying cash dividends on its common stock under the terms of a guaranty to the utility customer in connection with the aes thames project in the event certain net worth and liquidity tests of the company are not met. the ability of the company 2019s project subsidiaries to declare and pay cash dividends to the company is subject to certain limitations in the project loans, governmental provisions and other agreements entered into by such project subsidiaries. securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans. see the information contained under the caption 2018 2018securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans 2019 2019 of the proxy statement for the annual meeting of stockholders of the registrant to be held on may 1, 2003, which information is incorporated herein by reference.. what was the variance in the price of common stock from low to high in the first quarter of 2002?
31
13.73
december 31, 2011, the company recognized a decrease of $3 million of tax-related interest and penalties and had approximately $16 million accrued at december 31, 2011. note 12 derivative instruments and fair value measurements the company is exposed to certain market risks such as changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, and commodity prices, which exist as a part of its ongoing business operations. management uses derivative financial and commodity instruments, including futures, options, and swaps, where appropriate, to manage these risks. instruments used as hedges must be effective at reducing the risk associated with the exposure being hedged and must be designated as a hedge at the inception of the contract. the company designates derivatives as cash flow hedges, fair value hedges, net investment hedges, and uses other contracts to reduce volatility in interest rates, foreign currency and commodities. as a matter of policy, the company does not engage in trading or speculative hedging transactions. total notional amounts of the company 2019s derivative instruments as of december 28, 2013 and december 29, 2012 were as follows:. (millions) | 2013 | 2012 foreign currency exchange contracts | $517 | $570 interest rate contracts | 2400 | 2150 commodity contracts | 361 | 320 total | $3278 | $3040 following is a description of each category in the fair value hierarchy and the financial assets and liabilities of the company that were included in each category at december 28, 2013 and december 29, 2012, measured on a recurring basis. level 1 2014 financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market. for the company, level 1 financial assets and liabilities consist primarily of commodity derivative contracts. level 2 2014 financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability. for the company, level 2 financial assets and liabilities consist of interest rate swaps and over-the-counter commodity and currency contracts. the company 2019s calculation of the fair value of interest rate swaps is derived from a discounted cash flow analysis based on the terms of the contract and the interest rate curve. over-the-counter commodity derivatives are valued using an income approach based on the commodity index prices less the contract rate multiplied by the notional amount. foreign currency contracts are valued using an income approach based on forward rates less the contract rate multiplied by the notional amount. the company 2019s calculation of the fair value of level 2 financial assets and liabilities takes into consideration the risk of nonperformance, including counterparty credit risk. level 3 2014 financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement. these inputs reflect management 2019s own assumptions about the assumptions a market participant would use in pricing the asset or liability. the company did not have any level 3 financial assets or liabilities as of december 28, 2013 or december 29, 2012.. what was the accrued value of tax related interest and penalties in 2011?
32
16.0
part ii item 5 2014market for registrant 2019s common equity and related stockholder matters market information. the common stock of the company is currently traded on the new york stock exchange (nyse) under the symbol 2018 2018aes. 2019 2019 the following tables set forth the high and low sale prices for the common stock as reported by the nyse for the periods indicated. price range of common stock. 2002 first quarter | high $17.84 | low $4.11 | 2001 first quarter | high $60.15 | low $41.30 second quarter | 9.17 | 3.55 | second quarter | 52.25 | 39.95 third quarter | 4.61 | 1.56 | third quarter | 44.50 | 12.00 fourth quarter | 3.57 | 0.95 | fourth quarter | 17.80 | 11.60 holders. as of march 3, 2003, there were 9663 record holders of the company 2019s common stock, par value $0.01 per share. dividends. under the terms of the company 2019s senior secured credit facilities entered into with a commercial bank syndicate, the company is not allowed to pay cash dividends. in addition, the company is precluded from paying cash dividends on its common stock under the terms of a guaranty to the utility customer in connection with the aes thames project in the event certain net worth and liquidity tests of the company are not met. the ability of the company 2019s project subsidiaries to declare and pay cash dividends to the company is subject to certain limitations in the project loans, governmental provisions and other agreements entered into by such project subsidiaries. securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans. see the information contained under the caption 2018 2018securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans 2019 2019 of the proxy statement for the annual meeting of stockholders of the registrant to be held on may 1, 2003, which information is incorporated herein by reference.. what was the variance in the price of shares in the first quarter of 2002? 13.73 and what was it in that same period in 2001? 18.85 which variance, then, was greater?
33
no
software and will give the company a comprehensive design-to-silicon flow that links directly into the semiconductor manufacturing process. integrating hpl 2019s yield management and test chip technologies into the company 2019s industry-leading dfm portfolio is also expected to enable customers to increase their productivity and improve profitability in the design and manufacture of advanced semiconductor devices. purchase price. the company paid $11.0 million in cash for all outstanding shares of hpl. in addition, the company had a prior investment in hpl of approximately $1.9 million. the total purchase consideration consisted of:. - | (in thousands) cash paid | $11001 prior investment in hpl | 1872 acquisition-related costs | 2831 total purchase price | $15704 acquisition-related costs of $2.8 million consist primarily of legal, tax and accounting fees of $1.6 million, $0.3 million of estimated facilities closure costs and other directly related charges, and $0.9 million in employee termination costs. as of october 31, 2006, the company had paid $2.2 million of the acquisition related costs, of which $1.1 million were for professional services costs, $0.2 million were for facilities closure costs and $0.9 million were for employee termination costs. the $0.6 million balance remaining at october 31, 2006 consists of professional and tax-related service fees and facilities closure costs. assets acquired. the company acquired $8.5 million of intangible assets consisting of $5.1 million in core developed technology, $3.2 million in customer relationships and $0.2 million in backlog to be amortized over two to four years. approximately $0.8 million of the purchase price represents the fair value of acquired in-process research and development projects that have not yet reached technological feasibility and have no alternative future use. accordingly, the amount was immediately expensed and included in the company 2019s condensed consolidated statement of operations for the first quarter of fiscal year 2006. additionally, the company acquired tangible assets of $14.0 million and assumed liabilities of $10.9 million. goodwill, representing the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired in the merger was $3.4 million. goodwill resulted primarily from the company 2019s expectation of synergies from the integration of hpl 2019s technology with the company 2019s technology and operations. other. during the fiscal year 2006, the company completed an asset acquisition for cash consideration of $1.5 million. this acquisition is not considered material to the company 2019s consolidated balance sheet and results of operations. fiscal 2005 acquisitions nassda corporation (nassda) the company acquired nassda on may 11, 2005. reasons for the acquisition. the company believes nassda 2019s full-chip circuit simulation and analysis software will broaden its offerings of transistor-level circuit simulation tools, particularly in the area of mixed-signal and memory design. purchase price. the company acquired all the outstanding shares of nassda for total cash consideration of $200.2 million, or $7.00 per share. in addition, as required by the merger agreement, certain nassda officers, directors and employees who were defendants in certain preexisting litigation. what was the value of goodwill, representing the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired in the merger by 1000? 3400.0 what was the total purchase price?
34
15704.0
notes to consolidated financial statements 2014 (continued) (amounts in millions, except per share amounts) a summary of the remaining liability for the 2007, 2003 and 2001 restructuring programs is as follows: program program program total. - | 2007 program | 2003 program | 2001 program | total liability at december 31 2006 | $2014 | $12.6 | $19.2 | $31.8 net charges (reversals) and adjustments | 19.1 | -0.5 (0.5) | -5.2 (5.2) | 13.4 payments and other1 | -7.2 (7.2) | -3.1 (3.1) | -5.3 (5.3) | -15.6 (15.6) liability at december 31 2007 | $11.9 | $9.0 | $8.7 | $29.6 net charges and adjustments | 4.3 | 0.8 | 0.7 | 5.8 payments and other1 | -15.0 (15.0) | -4.1 (4.1) | -3.5 (3.5) | -22.6 (22.6) liability at december 31 2008 | $1.2 | $5.7 | $5.9 | $12.8 1 includes amounts representing adjustments to the liability for changes in foreign currency exchange rates. other reorganization-related charges other reorganization-related charges relate to our realignment of our media businesses into a newly created management entity called mediabrands and the 2006 merger of draft worldwide and foote, cone and belding worldwide to create draftfcb. charges related to severance and terminations costs and lease termination and other exit costs. we expect charges associated with mediabrands to be completed during the first half of 2009. charges related to the creation of draftfcb in 2006 are complete. the charges were separated from the rest of our operating expenses within the consolidated statements of operations because they did not result from charges that occurred in the normal course of business.. what was the total liability by the end of 2008? 29.6 and what was it by the end of 2007?
35
12.8
item 1b. unresolved staff comments. item 2. properties. our corporate co-headquarters are located in pittsburgh, pennsylvania and chicago, illinois. our co-headquarters are leased and house our executive offices, certain u.s. business units, and our administrative, finance, and human resource functions. we maintain additional owned and leased offices throughout the regions in which we operate. we manufacture our products in our network of manufacturing and processing facilities located throughout the world. as of december 31, 2016, we operated 87 manufacturing and processing facilities. we own 83 and lease four of these facilities. our manufacturing and processing facilities count by segment as of december 31, 2016 was:. - | owned | leased united states | 43 | 2 canada | 3 | 2014 europe | 11 | 2014 rest of world | 26 | 2 we maintain all of our manufacturing and processing facilities in good condition and believe they are suitable and are adequate for our present needs. we also enter into co-manufacturing arrangements with third parties if we determine it is advantageous to outsource the production of any of our products. in the fourth quarter of 2016, we reorganized our segment structure to move our russia business from the rest of world segment to the europe segment. we have reflected this change in the table above. see note 18, segment reporting, to the consolidated financial statements for additional information. several of our current manufacturing and processing facilities are scheduled to be closed within the next year. see note 3, integration and restructuring expenses, to the consolidated financial statements for additional information. item 3. legal proceedings. we are routinely involved in legal proceedings, claims, and governmental inquiries, inspections or investigations (201clegal matters 201d) arising in the ordinary course of our business. on april 1, 2015, the commodity futures trading commission (201ccftc 201d) filed a formal complaint against mondel 0113z international (formerly known as kraft foods inc.) and kraft in the u.s. district court for the northern district of illinois, eastern division, related to activities involving the trading of december 2011 wheat futures contracts. the complaint alleges that mondel 0113z international and kraft (1) manipulated or attempted to manipulate the wheat markets during the fall of 2011, (2) violated position limit levels for wheat futures, and (3) engaged in non-competitive trades by trading both sides of exchange-for-physical chicago board of trade wheat contracts. as previously disclosed by kraft, these activities arose prior to the october 1, 2012 spin-off of kraft by mondel 0113z international to its shareholders and involve the business now owned and operated by mondel 0113z international or its affiliates. the separation and distribution agreement between kraft and mondel 0113z international, dated as of september 27, 2012, governs the allocation of liabilities between mondel 0113z international and kraft and, accordingly, mondel 0113z international will predominantly bear the costs of this matter and any monetary penalties or other payments that the cftc may impose. we do not expect this matter to have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or business. while we cannot predict with certainty the results of legal matters in which we are currently involved or may in the future be involved, we do not expect that the ultimate costs to resolve any of the legal matters that are currently pending will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. item 4. mine safety disclosures. not applicable.. what portion of the company owned facilities are in europe?
36
0.13253
south america. approximately 26% (26%) of 2017 net sales were to international markets. this segment sells directly through its own sales force and indirectly through independent manufacturers 2019 representatives, primarily to wholesalers, home centers, mass merchandisers and industrial distributors. in aggregate, sales to the home depot and lowe 2019s comprised approximately 23% (23%) of net sales of the plumbing segment in 2017. this segment 2019s chief competitors include delta (owned by masco), kohler, pfister (owned by spectrum brands), american standard (owned by lixil group), insinkerator (owned by emerson electronic company) and imported private-label brands. doors. our doors segment manufactures and sells fiberglass and steel entry door systems under the therma-tru brand and urethane millwork product lines under the fypon brand. this segment benefits from the long-term trend away from traditional materials, such as wood, steel and aluminum, toward more energy-efficient and durable synthetic materials. therma-tru products include fiberglass and steel residential entry door and patio door systems, primarily for sale in the u.s. and canada. this segment 2019s principal customers are home centers, millwork building products and wholesale distributors, and specialty dealers that provide products to the residential new construction market, as well as to the remodeling and renovation markets. in aggregate, sales to the home depot and lowe 2019s comprised approximately 14% (14%) of net sales of the doors segment in 2017. this segment 2019s competitors include masonite, jeld-wen, plastpro and pella. security. our security segment 2019s products consist of locks, safety and security devices, and electronic security products manufactured, sourced and distributed primarily under the master lock brand and fire resistant safes, security containers and commercial cabinets manufactured, sourced and distributed under the sentrysafe brand. this segment sells products principally in the u.s., canada, europe, central america, japan and australia. approximately 25% (25%) of 2017 net sales were to international markets. this segment manufactures and sells key-controlled and combination padlocks, bicycle and cable locks, built-in locker locks, door hardware, automotive, trailer and towing locks, electronic access control solutions, and other specialty safety and security devices for consumer use to hardware, home center and other retail outlets. in addition, the segment sells lock systems and fire resistant safes to locksmiths, industrial and institutional users, and original equipment manufacturers. in aggregate, sales to the home depot and lowe 2019s comprised approximately 18% (18%) of the net sales of the security segment in 2017. master lock competes with abus, w.h. brady, hampton, kwikset (owned by spectrum brands), schlage (owned by allegion), assa abloy and various imports, and sentrysafe competes with first alert, magnum, fortress, stack-on and fire king. annual net sales for each of the last three fiscal years for each of our business segments were as follows: (in millions) 2017 2016 2015. (in millions) | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 cabinets | $2467.1 | $2397.8 | $2173.4 plumbing | 1720.8 | 1534.4 | 1414.5 doors | 502.9 | 473.0 | 439.1 security | 592.5 | 579.7 | 552.4 total | $5283.3 | $4984.9 | $4579.4 for additional financial information for each of our business segments, refer to note 18, 201cinformation on business segments, 201d to the consolidated financial statements in item 8 of this annual report on form other information raw materials. the table below indicates the principal raw materials used by each of our segments. these materials are available from a number of sources. volatility in the prices of commodities and energy used in making and distributing our products impacts the cost of manufacturing our products.. in the year of 2017, what percentage of the net sales were for international markets? 0.25 and what were those net sales?
37
5283.3
federal realty investment trust schedule iii summary of real estate and accumulated depreciation 2014continued three years ended december 31, 2005 reconciliation of accumulated depreciation and amortization. balance december 31 2002 | $450697000 additions during period 2014depreciation and amortization expense | 68125000 deductions during period 2014disposition and retirements of property | -4645000 (4645000) balance december 31 2003 | 514177000 additions during period 2014depreciation and amortization expense | 82551000 deductions during period 2014disposition and retirements of property | -1390000 (1390000) balance december 31 2004 | 595338000 additions during period 2014depreciation and amortization expense | 83656000 deductions during period 2014disposition and retirements of property | -15244000 (15244000) balance december 31 2005 | $663750000 . what is the value of accumulated depreciation and amortization at the end of 2005? 663750000.0 what is the balance at the end of 2004? 595338000.0 what is the ratio of 2005 to 2004?
38
1.11491
entergy new orleans, inc. management's financial discussion and analysis net revenue 2008 compared to 2007 net revenue consists of operating revenues net of: 1) fuel, fuel-related expenses, and gas purchased for resale, 2) purchased power expenses, and 3) other regulatory charges. following is an analysis of the change in net revenue comparing 2008 to 2007. amount (in millions). - | amount (in millions) 2007 net revenue | $231.0 volume/weather | 15.5 net gas revenue | 6.6 rider revenue | 3.9 base revenue | -11.3 (11.3) other | 7.0 2008 net revenue | $252.7 the volume/weather variance is due to an increase in electricity usage in the service territory in 2008 compared to the same period in 2007. entergy new orleans estimates that approximately 141000 electric customers and 93000 gas customers have returned since hurricane katrina and are taking service as of december 31, 2008, compared to approximately 132000 electric customers and 86000 gas customers as of december 31, 2007. billed retail electricity usage increased a total of 184 gwh compared to the same period in 2007, an increase of 4% (4%). the net gas revenue variance is primarily due to an increase in base rates in march and november 2007. refer to note 2 to the financial statements for a discussion of the base rate increase. the rider revenue variance is due primarily to higher total revenue and a storm reserve rider effective march 2007 as a result of the city council's approval of a settlement agreement in october 2006. the approved storm reserve has been set to collect $75 million over a ten-year period through the rider and the funds will be held in a restricted escrow account. the settlement agreement is discussed in note 2 to the financial statements. the base revenue variance is primarily due to a base rate recovery credit, effective january 2008. the base rate credit is discussed in note 2 to the financial statements. gross operating revenues and fuel and purchased power expenses gross operating revenues increased primarily due to: an increase of $58.9 million in gross wholesale revenue due to increased sales to affiliated customers and an increase in the average price of energy available for resale sales; an increase of $47.7 million in electric fuel cost recovery revenues due to higher fuel rates and increased electricity usage; and an increase of $22 million in gross gas revenues due to higher fuel recovery revenues and increases in gas base rates in march 2007 and november 2007. fuel and purchased power increased primarily due to increases in the average market prices of natural gas and purchased power in addition to an increase in demand.. what was the increase observed in the net revenue from 2007 to 2008? 21.7 what was that net revenue in 2007? 231.0 how much, then, did that increase represent in relation to this 2007 amount?
39
0.09394
masco corporation notes to consolidated financial statements (continued) c. acquisitions on march 9, 2018, we acquired substantially all of the net assets of the l.d. kichler co. ("kichler"), a leader in decorative residential and light commercial lighting products, ceiling fans and led lighting systems. this business expands our product offerings to our customers. the results of this acquisition for the period from the acquisition date are included in the consolidated financial statements and are reported in the decorative architectural products segment. we recorded $346 million of net sales as a result of this acquisition during 2018. the purchase price, net of $2 million cash acquired, consisted of $549 million paid with cash on hand. since the acquisition, we have revised the allocation of the purchase price to identifiable assets and liabilities based on analysis of information as of the acquisition date that has been made available through december 31, 2018. the allocation will continue to be updated through the measurement period, if necessary. the preliminary allocation of the fair value of the acquisition of kichler is summarized in the following table, in millions.. - | initial | revised receivables | $101 | $100 inventories | 173 | 166 prepaid expenses and other | 5 | 5 property and equipment | 33 | 33 goodwill | 46 | 64 other intangible assets | 243 | 240 accounts payable | -24 (24) | -24 (24) accrued liabilities | -25 (25) | -30 (30) other liabilities | -4 (4) | -5 (5) total | $548 | $549 the goodwill acquired, which is generally tax deductible, is related primarily to the operational and financial synergies we expect to derive from combining kichler's operations into our business, as well as the assembled workforce. the other intangible assets acquired consist of $59 million of indefinite-lived intangible assets, which is related to trademarks, and $181 million of definite-lived intangible assets. the definite-lived intangible assets consist of $145 million related to customer relationships, which is being amortized on a straight-line basis over 20 years, and $36 million of other definite-lived intangible assets, which is being amortized over a weighted average amortization period of three years. in the fourth quarter of 2017, we acquired mercury plastics, inc., a plastics processor and manufacturer of water handling systems for appliance and faucet applications, for approximately $89 million in cash. this business is included in the plumbing products segment. this acquisition enhances our ability to develop faucet technology and provides continuity of supply of quality faucet components. in connection with this acquisition, we recognized $38 million of goodwill, which is tax deductible, and is related primarily to the expected synergies from combining the operations into our business.. what was the purchase price, net of what cash was acquired? 102.0 and including the impact of inventories? 268.0 and prepaid expenses and other? 273.0 what portion of the revised purchase price is dedicated to goodwill?
40
0.11658
2014 compared to 2013 mst 2019s net sales decreased $305 million, or 3% (3%), in 2014 as compared to 2013. net sales decreased by approximately $305 million due to the wind-down or completion of certain c4isr programs (primarily ptds); about $85 million for undersea systems programs due to decreased volume and deliveries; and about $55 million related to the settlements of contract cost matters on certain programs in 2013 that were not repeated in 2014 (including a portion of the terminated presidential helicopter program). the decreases were partially offset by higher net sales of approximately $80 million for integrated warfare systems and sensors programs due to increased volume (primarily space fence); and approximately $40 million for training and logistics solutions programs due to increased deliveries (primarily close combat tactical trainer). mst 2019s operating profit decreased $129 million, or 12% (12%), in 2014 as compared to 2013. the decrease was primarily attributable to lower operating profit of approximately $120 million related to the settlements of contract cost matters on certain programs in 2013 that were not repeated in 2014 (including a portion of the terminated presidential helicopter program); approximately $55 million due to the reasons described above for lower c4isr program sales, as well as performance matters on an international program; and approximately $45 million due to higher reserves recorded on certain training and logistics solutions programs. the decreases were partially offset by higher operating profit of approximately $45 million for performance matters and reserves recorded in 2013 that were not repeated in 2014; and about $60 million for various programs due to increased risk retirements (including mh-60 and radar surveillance programs). adjustments not related to volume, including net profit booking rate adjustments and other matters, were approximately $85 million lower for 2014 compared to 2013. backlog backlog increased in 2015 compared to 2014 primarily due to the addition of sikorsky backlog, as well as higher orders on new program starts (such as australian defence force pilot training system). backlog increased in 2014 compared to 2013 primarily due to higher orders on new program starts (such as space fence). trends we expect mst 2019s 2016 net sales to increase in the mid-double digit percentage range compared to 2015 net sales due to the inclusion of sikorsky programs for a full year, partially offset by a decline in volume due to the wind-down or completion of certain programs. operating profit is expected to be equivalent to 2015 on higher volume, and operating margin is expected to decline due to costs associated with the sikorsky acquisition, including the impact of purchase accounting adjustments, integration costs and inherited restructuring costs associated with actions committed to by sikorsky prior to acquisition. space systems our space systems business segment is engaged in the research and development, design, engineering and production of satellites, strategic and defensive missile systems and space transportation systems. space systems provides network-enabled situational awareness and integrates complex global systems to help our customers gather, analyze, and securely distribute critical intelligence data. space systems is also responsible for various classified systems and services in support of vital national security systems. space systems 2019 major programs include the trident ii d5 fleet ballistic missile (fbm), orion, space based infrared system (sbirs), aehf, gps-iii, geostationary operational environmental satellite r-series (goes-r), and muos. operating profit for our space systems business segment includes our share of earnings for our investment in ula, which provides expendable launch services to the u.s. government. space systems 2019 operating results included the following (in millions):. - | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 net sales | $9105 | $9202 | $9288 operating profit | 1171 | 1187 | 1198 operating margins | 12.9% (12.9%) | 12.9% (12.9%) | 12.9% (12.9%) backlog at year-end | $17400 | $20300 | $21400 2015 compared to 2014 space systems 2019 net sales in 2015 decreased $97 million, or 1% (1%), compared to 2014. the decrease was attributable to approximately $335 million lower net sales for government satellite programs due to decreased volume (primarily aehf) and the wind-down or completion of mission solutions programs; and approximately $55 million for strategic missile and defense systems due to lower volume. these decreases were partially offset by higher net sales of approximately $235 million for businesses acquired in 2014; and approximately $75 million for the orion program due to increased volume.. what was the average backlog in 2015? 17400.0 what was it in 2014? 20300.0 what is the sum of those years?
41
37700.0
market price and dividends d u k e r e a l t y c o r p o r a t i o n 3 8 2 0 0 2 a n n u a l r e p o r t the company 2019s common shares are listed for trading on the new york stock exchange, symbol dre. the following table sets forth the high and low sales prices of the common stock for the periods indicated and the dividend paid per share during each such period. comparable cash dividends are expected in the future. on january 29, 2003, the company declared a quarterly cash dividend of $.455 per share, payable on february 28, 2003, to common shareholders of record on february 14, 2003.. quarter ended | 2002 high | 2002 low | 2002 dividend | 2002 high | 2002 low | dividend december 31 | $25.84 | $21.50 | $.455 | $24.80 | $22.00 | $.45 september 30 | 28.88 | 21.40 |.455 | 26.17 | 21.60 |.45 june 30 | 28.95 | 25.46 |.450 | 24.99 | 22.00 |.43 march 31 | 26.50 | 22.92 |.450 | 25.44 | 21.85 |.43 . what is the net change in the cash dividend for the period ended march 31, 2002 to the period ended march 31, 2003?
42
0.005
entergy corporation and subsidiaries notes to financial statements (a) consists of pollution control revenue bonds and environmental revenue bonds, some of which are secured by collateral first mortgage bonds. (b) these notes do not have a stated interest rate, but have an implicit interest rate of 4.8% (4.8%). (c) pursuant to the nuclear waste policy act of 1982, entergy 2019s nuclear owner/licensee subsidiaries have contracts with the doe for spent nuclear fuel disposal service. the contracts include a one-time fee for generation prior to april 7, 1983. entergy arkansas is the only entergy company that generated electric power with nuclear fuel prior to that date and includes the one-time fee, plus accrued interest, in long-term debt. (d) see note 10 to the financial statements for further discussion of the waterford 3 and grand gulf lease obligations. (e) the fair value excludes lease obligations of $109 million at entergy louisiana and $34 million at system energy, long-term doe obligations of $181 million at entergy arkansas, and the note payable to nypa of $35 million at entergy, and includes debt due within one year. fair values are classified as level 2 in the fair value hierarchy discussed in note 16 to the financial statements and are based on prices derived from inputs such as benchmark yields and reported trades. the annual long-term debt maturities (excluding lease obligations and long-term doe obligations) for debt outstanding as of december 31, 2015, for the next five years are as follows: amount (in thousands). - | amount (in thousands) 2016 | $204079 2017 | $766451 2018 | $822690 2019 | $768588 2020 | $1631181 in november 2000, entergy 2019s non-utility nuclear business purchased the fitzpatrick and indian point 3 power plants in a seller-financed transaction. entergy issued notes to nypa with seven annual installments of approximately $108 million commencing one year from the date of the closing, and eight annual installments of $20 million commencing eight years from the date of the closing. these notes do not have a stated interest rate, but have an implicit interest rate of 4.8% (4.8%). in accordance with the purchase agreement with nypa, the purchase of indian point 2 in 2001 resulted in entergy becoming liable to nypa for an additional $10 million per year for 10 years, beginning in september 2003. this liability was recorded upon the purchase of indian point 2 in september 2001. as part of the purchase agreement with nypa, entergy recorded a liability representing the net present value of the payments entergy would be liable to nypa for each year that the fitzpatrick and indian point 3 power plants would run beyond their respective original nrc license expiration date. with the planned shutdown of fitzpatrick at the end of its current fuel cycle, entergy reduced this liability by $26.4 million in 2015 pursuant to the terms of the purchase agreement. under a provision in a letter of credit supporting these notes, if certain of the utility operating companies or system energy were to default on other indebtedness, entergy could be required to post collateral to support the letter of credit. entergy louisiana, entergy mississippi, entergy texas, and system energy have obtained long-term financing authorizations from the ferc that extend through october 2017. entergy arkansas has obtained long-term financing authorization from the apsc that extends through december 2018. entergy new orleans has obtained long-term financing authorization from the city council that extends through july 2016. capital funds agreement pursuant to an agreement with certain creditors, entergy corporation has agreed to supply system energy with sufficient capital to:. what is the net change in value of annual long-term debt maturities from 2016 to 2017? 562372.0 what was the 2016 value? 204079.0 what was the percent change?
43
2.75566
part ii item 5. market for registrant 2019s common equity, related stockholder matters and issuer purchases of equity securities the following table presents reported quarterly high and low per share sale prices of our common stock on the new york stock exchange (201cnyse 201d) for the years 2008 and 2007.. 2008 | high | low quarter ended march 31 | $42.72 | $32.10 quarter ended june 30 | 46.10 | 38.53 quarter ended september 30 | 43.43 | 31.89 quarter ended december 31 | 37.28 | 19.35 2007 | high | low quarter ended march 31 | $41.31 | $36.63 quarter ended june 30 | 43.84 | 37.64 quarter ended september 30 | 45.45 | 36.34 quarter ended december 31 | 46.53 | 40.08 on february 13, 2009, the closing price of our common stock was $28.85 per share as reported on the nyse. as of february 13, 2009, we had 397097677 outstanding shares of common stock and 499 registered holders. dividends we have never paid a dividend on our common stock. we anticipate that we may retain future earnings, if any, to fund the development and growth of our business. the indentures governing our 7.50% (7.50%) senior notes due 2012 (201c7.50% (201c7.50%) notes 201d) and our 7.125% (7.125%) senior notes due 2012 (201c7.125% (201c7.125%) notes 201d) may prohibit us from paying dividends to our stockholders unless we satisfy certain financial covenants. the loan agreement for our revolving credit facility and term loan, and the indentures governing the terms of our 7.50% (7.50%) notes and 7.125% (7.125%) notes contain covenants that restrict our ability to pay dividends unless certain financial covenants are satisfied. in addition, while spectrasite and its subsidiaries are classified as unrestricted subsidiaries under the indentures for our 7.50% (7.50%) notes and 7.125% (7.125%) notes, certain of spectrasite 2019s subsidiaries are subject to restrictions on the amount of cash that they can distribute to us under the loan agreement related to our securitization transaction. for more information about the restrictions under the loan agreement for the revolving credit facility and term loan, our notes indentures and the loan agreement related to our securitization transaction, see item 7 of this annual report under the caption 201cmanagement 2019s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations 2014liquidity and capital resources 2014factors affecting sources of liquidity 201d and note 6 to our consolidated financial statements included in this annual report.. what was the price of shares in february of 2009? 37.28 and what was it in by the end of 2008?
44
28.85
15. debt the tables below summarize our outstanding debt at 30 september 2016 and 2015: total debt. 30 september | 2016 | 2015 short-term borrowings | $935.8 | $1494.3 current portion of long-term debt | 371.3 | 435.6 long-term debt | 4918.1 | 3949.1 total debt | $6225.2 | $5879.0 short-term borrowings | - | - 30 september | 2016 | 2015 bank obligations | $133.1 | $234.3 commercial paper | 802.7 | 1260.0 total short-term borrowings | $935.8 | $1494.3 the weighted average interest rate of short-term borrowings outstanding at 30 september 2016 and 2015 was 1.1% (1.1%) and.8% (.8%), respectively. cash paid for interest, net of amounts capitalized, was $121.1 in 2016, $97.5 in 2015, and $132.4 in 2014.. what was the total cash paid for interest in the years of 2015 and 2016, combined?
45
218.6
62 general mills amounts recorded in accumulated other comprehensive loss unrealized losses from interest rate cash flow hedges recorded in aoci as of may 27, 2012, totaled $73.6 million after tax. these deferred losses are primarily related to interest rate swaps that we entered into in contemplation of future borrowings and other financ- ing requirements and that are being reclassified into net interest over the lives of the hedged forecasted transac- tions. unrealized losses from foreign currency cash flow hedges recorded in aoci as of may 27, 2012, were $1.7 million after-tax. the net amount of pre-tax gains and losses in aoci as of may 27, 2012, that we expect to be reclassified into net earnings within the next 12 months is $14.0 million of expense. credit-risk-related contingent features certain of our derivative instruments contain provisions that require us to maintain an investment grade credit rating on our debt from each of the major credit rat- ing agencies. if our debt were to fall below investment grade, the counterparties to the derivative instruments could request full collateralization on derivative instru- ments in net liability positions. the aggregate fair value of all derivative instruments with credit-risk-related contingent features that were in a liability position on may 27, 2012, was $19.9 million. we have posted col- lateral of $4.3 million in the normal course of business associated with these contracts. if the credit-risk-related contingent features underlying these agreements had been triggered on may 27, 2012, we would have been required to post an additional $15.6 million of collateral to counterparties. concentrations of credit and counterparty credit risk during fiscal 2012, wal-mart stores, inc. and its affili- ates (wal-mart) accounted for 22 percent of our con- solidated net sales and 30 percent of our net sales in the u.s. retail segment. no other customer accounted for 10 percent or more of our consolidated net sales. wal- mart also represented 6 percent of our net sales in the international segment and 7 percent of our net sales in the bakeries and foodservice segment. as of may 27, 2012, wal-mart accounted for 26 percent of our u.s. retail receivables, 5 percent of our international receiv- ables, and 9 percent of our bakeries and foodservice receivables. the five largest customers in our u.s. retail segment accounted for 54 percent of its fiscal 2012 net sales, the five largest customers in our international segment accounted for 26 percent of its fiscal 2012 net sales, and the five largest customers in our bakeries and foodservice segment accounted for 46 percent of its fis- cal 2012 net sales. we enter into interest rate, foreign exchange, and cer- tain commodity and equity derivatives, primarily with a diversified group of highly rated counterparties. we continually monitor our positions and the credit rat- ings of the counterparties involved and, by policy, limit the amount of credit exposure to any one party. these transactions may expose us to potential losses due to the risk of nonperformance by these counterparties; however, we have not incurred a material loss. we also enter into commodity futures transactions through vari- ous regulated exchanges. the amount of loss due to the credit risk of the coun- terparties, should the counterparties fail to perform according to the terms of the contracts, is $19.5 million against which we do not hold collateral. under the terms of master swap agreements, some of our transactions require collateral or other security to support financial instruments subject to threshold levels of exposure and counterparty credit risk. collateral assets are either cash or u.s. treasury instruments and are held in a trust account that we may access if the counterparty defaults. note 8. debt notes payable the components of notes payable and their respective weighted-average interest rates at the end of the periods were as follows:. in millions | may 27 2012 notes payable | may 27 2012 weighted- average interest rate | may 27 2012 notespayable | weighted-averageinterest rate u.s. commercial paper | $412.0 | 0.2% (0.2%) | $192.5 | 0.2% (0.2%) financial institutions | 114.5 | 10.0 | 118.8 | 11.5 total | $526.5 | 2.4% (2.4%) | $311.3 | 4.5% (4.5%) to ensure availability of funds, we maintain bank credit lines sufficient to cover our outstanding short- term borrowings. commercial paper is a continuing source of short-term financing. we have commercial paper programs available to us in the united states and europe. in april 2012, we entered into fee-paid commit- ted credit lines, consisting of a $1.0 billion facility sched- uled to expire in april 2015 and a $1.7 billion facility. for the year ended on may 27, 2012, what was the total interest expense, in millions?
46
12.636
page 15 of 100 shareholder return performance the line graph below compares the annual percentage change in ball corporation 2019s cumulative total shareholder return on its common stock with the cumulative total return of the dow jones containers & packaging index and the s&p composite 500 stock index for the five-year period ended december 31, 2010. it assumes $100 was invested on december 31, 2005, and that all dividends were reinvested. the dow jones containers & packaging index total return has been weighted by market capitalization. total return analysis. - | 12/31/05 | 12/31/06 | 12/31/07 | 12/31/08 | 12/31/09 | 12/31/10 ball corporation | $100.00 | $110.86 | $115.36 | $107.58 | $134.96 | $178.93 dj containers & packaging index | $100.00 | $112.09 | $119.63 | $75.00 | $105.34 | $123.56 s&p 500 index | $100.00 | $115.80 | $122.16 | $76.96 | $97.33 | $111.99 copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) | copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) | copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) | copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) | copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) | copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) | copyright a9 2011 standard & poor 2019s a division of the mcgraw-hill companies inc. all rights reserved. (www.researchdatagroup.com/s&p.htm) copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. | copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. | copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. | copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. | copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. | copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. | copyright a9 2011 dow jones & company. all rights reserved. . what is the price of ball corporation in 2010?
47
178.93
impairment the following table presents net unrealized losses on securities available for sale as of december 31:. (in millions) | 2011 | 2010 fair value | $99832 | $81881 amortized cost | 100013 | 82329 net unrealized loss pre-tax | $-181 (181) | $-448 (448) net unrealized loss after-tax | $-113 (113) | $-270 (270) the net unrealized amounts presented above excluded the remaining net unrealized losses related to reclassifications of securities available for sale to securities held to maturity. these unrealized losses related to reclassifications totaled $303 million, or $189 million after-tax, and $523 million, or $317 million after-tax, as of december 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and were recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income, or oci. refer to note 12 to the consolidated financial statements included under item 8. the decline in these remaining after-tax unrealized losses related to reclassifications from december 31, 2010 to december 31, 2011 resulted primarily from amortization. we conduct periodic reviews of individual securities to assess whether other-than-temporary impairment exists. to the extent that other-than-temporary impairment is identified, the impairment is broken into a credit component and a non-credit component. the credit component is recorded in our consolidated statement of income, and the non-credit component is recorded in oci to the extent that we do not intend to sell the security. our assessment of other-than-temporary impairment involves an evaluation, more fully described in note 3, of economic and security-specific factors. such factors are based on estimates, derived by management, which contemplate current market conditions and security-specific performance. to the extent that market conditions are worse than management 2019s expectations, other-than-temporary impairment could increase, in particular, the credit component that would be recorded in our consolidated statement of income. given the exposure of our investment securities portfolio, particularly mortgage- and asset-backed securities, to residential mortgage and other consumer credit risks, the performance of the u.s. housing market is a significant driver of the portfolio 2019s credit performance. as such, our assessment of other-than-temporary impairment relies to a significant extent on our estimates of trends in national housing prices. generally, indices that measure trends in national housing prices are published in arrears. as of september 30, 2011, national housing prices, according to the case-shiller national home price index, had declined by approximately 31.3% (31.3%) peak-to-current. overall, management 2019s expectation, for purposes of its evaluation of other-than-temporary impairment as of december 31, 2011, was that housing prices would decline by approximately 35% (35%) peak-to-trough. the performance of certain mortgage products and vintages of securities continues to deteriorate. in addition, management continues to believe that housing prices will decline further as indicated above. the combination of these factors has led to an increase in management 2019s overall loss expectations. our investment portfolio continues to be sensitive to management 2019s estimates of future cumulative losses. ultimately, other-than- temporary impairment is based on specific cusip-level detailed analysis of the unique characteristics of each security. in addition, we perform sensitivity analysis across each significant product type within the non-agency u.s. residential mortgage-backed portfolio. we estimate, for example, that other-than-temporary impairment of the investment portfolio could increase by approximately $10 million to $50 million, if national housing prices were to decline by 37% (37%) to 39% (39%) peak-to-trough, compared to management 2019s expectation of 35% (35%) described above. this sensitivity estimate is based on a number of factors, including, but not limited to, the level of housing prices and the timing of defaults. to the extent that such factors differ substantially from management 2019s current expectations, resulting loss estimates may differ materially from those stated. excluding the securities for which other-than-temporary impairment was recorded in 2011, management considers the aggregate decline in fair value of the remaining. what was the fair value in 2011? 99832.0 and what was it in 2010? 81881.0 what was, then, the change over the year? 17951.0 what was the fair value in 2010?
48
81881.0
the analysis of our depreciation studies. changes in the estimated service lives of our assets and their related depreciation rates are implemented prospectively. under group depreciation, the historical cost (net of salvage) of depreciable property that is retired or replaced in the ordinary course of business is charged to accumulated depreciation and no gain or loss is recognized. the historical cost of certain track assets is estimated using (i) inflation indices published by the bureau of labor statistics and (ii) the estimated useful lives of the assets as determined by our depreciation studies. the indices were selected because they closely correlate with the major costs of the properties comprising the applicable track asset classes. because of the number of estimates inherent in the depreciation and retirement processes and because it is impossible to precisely estimate each of these variables until a group of property is completely retired, we continually monitor the estimated service lives of our assets and the accumulated depreciation associated with each asset class to ensure our depreciation rates are appropriate. in addition, we determine if the recorded amount of accumulated depreciation is deficient (or in excess) of the amount indicated by our depreciation studies. any deficiency (or excess) is amortized as a component of depreciation expense over the remaining service lives of the applicable classes of assets. for retirements of depreciable railroad properties that do not occur in the normal course of business, a gain or loss may be recognized if the retirement meets each of the following three conditions: (i) is unusual, (ii) is material in amount, and (iii) varies significantly from the retirement profile identified through our depreciation studies. a gain or loss is recognized in other income when we sell land or dispose of assets that are not part of our railroad operations. when we purchase an asset, we capitalize all costs necessary to make the asset ready for its intended use. however, many of our assets are self-constructed. a large portion of our capital expenditures is for replacement of existing track assets and other road properties, which is typically performed by our employees, and for track line expansion and other capacity projects. costs that are directly attributable to capital projects (including overhead costs) are capitalized. direct costs that are capitalized as part of self- constructed assets include material, labor, and work equipment. indirect costs are capitalized if they clearly relate to the construction of the asset. general and administrative expenditures are expensed as incurred. normal repairs and maintenance are also expensed as incurred, while costs incurred that extend the useful life of an asset, improve the safety of our operations or improve operating efficiency are capitalized. these costs are allocated using appropriate statistical bases. total expense for repairs and maintenance incurred was $2.4 billion for 2014, $2.3 billion for 2013, and $2.1 billion for 2012. assets held under capital leases are recorded at the lower of the net present value of the minimum lease payments or the fair value of the leased asset at the inception of the lease. amortization expense is computed using the straight-line method over the shorter of the estimated useful lives of the assets or the period of the related lease. 13. accounts payable and other current liabilities dec. 31, dec. 31, millions 2014 2013. millions | dec. 31 2014 | dec. 312013 accounts payable | $877 | $803 dividends payable | 438 | 356 income and other taxes payable | 412 | 491 accrued wages and vacation | 409 | 385 accrued casualty costs | 249 | 207 interest payable | 178 | 169 equipment rents payable | 100 | 96 other | 640 | 579 total accounts payable and othercurrent liabilities | $3303 | $3086 . what was the difference in the total expense for repairs and maintenance incurred between 2013 and 2014?
49
0.1
equity compensation plan information the following table presents the equity securities available for issuance under our equity compensation plans as of december 31, 2017. equity compensation plan information plan category number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights (1) weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a)) (a) (b) (c) equity compensation plans approved by security holders 448859 $0.00 4087587 equity compensation plans not approved by security holders (2) 2014 2014 2014. plan category | number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options warrants and rights (1) (a) (b) | weighted-average exercise price of outstanding optionswarrants and rights | number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securitiesreflected in column (a)) (c) equity compensation plans approved by security holders | 448859 | $0.00 | 4087587 equity compensation plans not approved by security holders (2) | 2014 | 2014 | 2014 total | 448859 | $0.00 | 4087587 (1) includes grants made under the huntington ingalls industries, inc. 2012 long-term incentive stock plan (the "2012 plan"), which was approved by our stockholders on may 2, 2012, and the huntington ingalls industries, inc. 2011 long-term incentive stock plan (the "2011 plan"), which was approved by the sole stockholder of hii prior to its spin-off from northrop grumman corporation. of these shares, 27123 were stock rights granted under the 2011 plan. in addition, this number includes 28763 stock rights, 3075 restricted stock rights, and 389898 restricted performance stock rights granted under the 2012 plan, assuming target performance achievement. (2) there are no awards made under plans not approved by security holders. item 13. certain relationships and related transactions, and director independence information as to certain relationships and related transactions and director independence will be incorporated herein by reference to the proxy statement for our 2018 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed within 120 days after the end of the company 2019s fiscal year. item 14. principal accountant fees and services information as to principal accountant fees and services will be incorporated herein by reference to the proxy statement for our 2018 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed within 120 days after the end of the company 2019s fiscal year.. what is the total number of securities approved by security holders? 4536446.0 what about the number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options warrants and rights?
50
448859.0
the following performance graph shows the cumulative total return to a holder of the company 2019s common stock, assuming dividend reinvestment, compared with the cumulative total return, assuming dividend reinvestment, of the standard & poor ("s&p") 500 index and the dow jones us financials index during the period from december 31, 2009 through december 31, 2014.. - | 12/09 | 12/10 | 12/11 | 12/12 | 12/13 | 12/14 e*trade financial corporation | 100.00 | 90.91 | 45.23 | 50.85 | 111.59 | 137.81 s&p 500 index | 100.00 | 115.06 | 117.49 | 136.30 | 180.44 | 205.14 dow jones us financials index | 100.00 | 112.72 | 98.24 | 124.62 | 167.26 | 191.67 table of contents. what is the price of e*trade financial corporation in 2014 less an initial 100? 37.81 what is that divided by 100?
51
0.3781
item 7a. quantitative and qualitative disclosures about market risk (amounts in millions) in the normal course of business, we are exposed to market risks related to interest rates, foreign currency rates and certain balance sheet items. from time to time, we use derivative instruments, pursuant to established guidelines and policies, to manage some portion of these risks. derivative instruments utilized in our hedging activities are viewed as risk management tools and are not used for trading or speculative purposes. interest rates our exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to the fair market value and cash flows of our debt obligations. the majority of our debt (approximately 89% (89%) and 91% (91%) as of december 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively) bears interest at fixed rates. we do have debt with variable interest rates, but a 10% (10%) increase or decrease in interest rates would not be material to our interest expense or cash flows. the fair market value of our debt is sensitive to changes in interest rates, and the impact of a 10% (10%) change in interest rates is summarized below. increase/ (decrease) in fair market value as of december 31, 10% (10%) increase in interest rates 10% (10%) decrease in interest rates. as of december 31, | increase/ (decrease) in fair market value 10% (10%) increasein interest rates | increase/ (decrease) in fair market value 10% (10%) decreasein interest rates 2015 | $-33.7 (33.7) | $34.7 2014 | -35.5 (35.5) | 36.6 we have used interest rate swaps for risk management purposes to manage our exposure to changes in interest rates. we do not have any interest rate swaps outstanding as of december 31, 2015. we had $1509.7 of cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities as of december 31, 2015 that we generally invest in conservative, short-term bank deposits or securities. the interest income generated from these investments is subject to both domestic and foreign interest rate movements. during 2015 and 2014, we had interest income of $22.8 and $27.4, respectively. based on our 2015 results, a 100-basis-point increase or decrease in interest rates would affect our interest income by approximately $15.0, assuming that all cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities are impacted in the same manner and balances remain constant from year-end 2015 levels. foreign currency rates we are subject to translation and transaction risks related to changes in foreign currency exchange rates. since we report revenues and expenses in u.s. dollars, changes in exchange rates may either positively or negatively affect our consolidated revenues and expenses (as expressed in u.s. dollars) from foreign operations. the primary foreign currencies that impacted our results during 2015 included the australian dollar, brazilian real, british pound sterling and euro. based on 2015 exchange rates and operating results, if the u.s. dollar were to strengthen or weaken by 10% (10%), we currently estimate operating income would decrease or increase approximately 4% (4%), assuming that all currencies are impacted in the same manner and our international revenue and expenses remain constant at 2015 levels. the functional currency of our foreign operations is generally their respective local currency. assets and liabilities are translated at the exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date, and revenues and expenses are translated at the average exchange rates during the period presented. the resulting translation adjustments are recorded as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, in the stockholders 2019 equity section of our consolidated balance sheets. our foreign subsidiaries generally collect revenues and pay expenses in their functional currency, mitigating transaction risk. however, certain subsidiaries may enter into transactions in currencies other than their functional currency. assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the functional currency are susceptible to movements in foreign currency until final settlement. currency transaction gains or losses primarily arising from transactions in currencies other than the functional currency are included in office and general expenses. we regularly review our foreign exchange exposures that may have a material impact on our business and from time to time use foreign currency forward exchange contracts or other derivative financial instruments to hedge the effects of potential adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates arising from these exposures. we do not enter into foreign exchange contracts or other derivatives for speculative purposes.. what was the change in the interest income from 2014 to 2015? 4.6 and how much does this change represent in relation to that interest income in 2014?
52
0.16788
mandatorily redeemable securities of subsidiary trusts total mandatorily redeemable securities of subsidiary trusts (trust preferred securities), which qualify as tier 1 capital, were $23.899 billion at december 31, 2008, as compared to $23.594 billion at december 31, 2007. in 2008, citigroup did not issue any new enhanced trust preferred securities. the frb issued a final rule, with an effective date of april 11, 2005, which retains trust preferred securities in tier 1 capital of bank holding companies, but with stricter quantitative limits and clearer qualitative standards. under the rule, after a five-year transition period, the aggregate amount of trust preferred securities and certain other restricted core capital elements included in tier 1 capital of internationally active banking organizations, such as citigroup, would be limited to 15% (15%) of total core capital elements, net of goodwill, less any associated deferred tax liability. the amount of trust preferred securities and certain other elements in excess of the limit could be included in tier 2 capital, subject to restrictions. at december 31, 2008, citigroup had approximately 11.8% (11.8%) against the limit. the company expects to be within restricted core capital limits prior to the implementation date of march 31, 2009. the frb permits additional securities, such as the equity units sold to adia, to be included in tier 1 capital up to 25% (25%) (including the restricted core capital elements in the 15% (15%) limit) of total core capital elements, net of goodwill less any associated deferred tax liability. at december 31, 2008, citigroup had approximately 16.1% (16.1%) against the limit. the frb granted interim capital relief for the impact of adopting sfas 158 at december 31, 2008 and december 31, 2007. the frb and the ffiec may propose amendments to, and issue interpretations of, risk-based capital guidelines and reporting instructions. these may affect reported capital ratios and net risk-weighted assets. capital resources of citigroup 2019s depository institutions citigroup 2019s subsidiary depository institutions in the united states are subject to risk-based capital guidelines issued by their respective primary federal bank regulatory agencies, which are similar to the frb 2019s guidelines. to be 201cwell capitalized 201d under federal bank regulatory agency definitions, citigroup 2019s depository institutions must have a tier 1 capital ratio of at least 6% (6%), a total capital (tier 1 + tier 2 capital) ratio of at least 10% (10%) and a leverage ratio of at least 5% (5%), and not be subject to a regulatory directive to meet and maintain higher capital levels. at december 31, 2008, all of citigroup 2019s subsidiary depository institutions were 201cwell capitalized 201d under the federal regulatory agencies 2019 definitions, including citigroup 2019s primary depository institution, citibank, n.a., as noted in the following table: citibank, n.a. components of capital and ratios under regulatory guidelines in billions of dollars at year end 2008 2007. in billions of dollars at year end | 2008 | 2007 tier 1 capital | $71.0 | $82.0 total capital (tier 1 and tier 2) | 108.4 | 121.6 tier 1 capital ratio | 9.94% (9.94%) | 8.98% (8.98%) total capital ratio (tier 1 and tier 2) | 15.18 | 13.33 leverage ratio (1) | 5.82 | 6.65 leverage ratio (1) 5.82 6.65 (1) tier 1 capital divided by adjusted average assets. citibank, n.a. had a net loss for 2008 amounting to $6.2 billion. during 2008, citibank, n.a. received contributions from its parent company of $6.1 billion. citibank, n.a. did not issue any additional subordinated notes in 2008. total subordinated notes issued to citicorp holdings inc. that were outstanding at december 31, 2008 and december 31, 2007 and included in citibank, n.a. 2019s tier 2 capital, amounted to $28.2 billion. citibank, n.a. received an additional $14.3 billion in capital contribution from its parent company in january 2009. the impact of this contribution is not reflected in the table above. the substantial events in 2008 impacting the capital of citigroup, and the potential future events discussed on page 94 under 201ccitigroup regulatory capital ratios, 201d also affected, or could affect, citibank, n.a.. what is the total capital in 2008 less tier 1 capital? 37.4 what is total capital from 2007?
53
121.6
c o n s t e l l a t i o n b r a n d s, i n c. baroness philippine de rothschild announced an agree- ment to maintain equal ownership of opus one. opus one produces fine wines at its napa valley winery. the acquisition of robert mondavi supports the com- pany 2019s strategy of strengthening the breadth of its portfolio across price segments to capitalize on the overall growth in the premium, super-premium and fine wine categories. the company believes that the acquired robert mondavi brand names have strong brand recognition globally. the vast majority of sales from these brands are generated in the united states. the company is leveraging the robert mondavi brands in the united states through its selling, marketing and distribution infrastructure. the company also intends to further expand distribution for the robert mondavi brands in europe through its constellation europe infrastructure. the robert mondavi acquisition supports the com- pany 2019s strategy of growth and breadth across categories and geographies, and strengthens its competitive position in its core markets. the robert mondavi acquisition provides the company with a greater presence in the growing premium, super-premium and fine wine sectors within the united states and the ability to capitalize on the broader geographic distribution in strategic international markets. in particular, the company believes there are growth opportunities for premium, super-premium and fine wines in the united kingdom and other 201cnew world 201d wine markets. total con- sideration paid in cash to the robert mondavi shareholders was $1030.7 million. additionally, the company incurred direct acquisition costs of $12.0 million. the purchase price was financed with borrowings under the company 2019s 2004 credit agreement (as defined in note 9). in accordance with the purchase method of accounting, the acquired net assets are recorded at fair value at the date of acquisition. the purchase price was based primarily on the estimated future operating results of the robert mondavi business, including the factors described above, as well as an estimated benefit from operating cost synergies. the results of operations of the robert mondavi busi- ness are reported in the constellation wines segment and have been included in the consolidated statements of income since the acquisition date. the following table summarizes the fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the robert mondavi acquisition at the date of acquisition, as adjusted for the final appraisal: (in thousands). current assets | $513782 property plant and equipment | 438140 other assets | 124450 trademarks | 138000 goodwill | 634203 total assets acquired | 1848575 current liabilities | 310919 long-term liabilities | 494995 total liabilities assumed | 805914 net assets acquired | $1042661 the trademarks are not subject to amortization. none of the goodwill is expected to be deductible for tax purposes. following the robert mondavi acquisition, the company sold certain of the acquired vineyard properties and related assets, investments accounted for under the equity method, and other winery properties and related assets, during the years ended february 28, 2006, and february 28, 2005. the company realized net proceeds of $170.8 million from the sale of these assets during the year ended february 28, 2006. amounts realized during the year ended february 28, 2005, were not material. no gain or loss has been recognized upon the sale of these assets. hardy acquisition 2013 on march 27, 2003, the company acquired control of brl hardy limited, now known as hardy wine company limited (201chardy 201d), and on april 9, 2003, the company completed its acquisition of all of hardy 2019s outstanding capital stock. as a result of the acquisi- tion of hardy, the company also acquired the remaining 50% (50%) ownership of pacific wine partners llc (201cpwp 201d), the joint venture the company established with hardy in july 2001. the acquisition of hardy along with the remaining interest in pwp is referred to together as the 201chardy acquisition. 201d through this acquisition, the company acquired one of australia 2019s largest wine producers with interests in wineries and vineyards in most of australia 2019s major wine regions as well as new zealand and the united states and hardy 2019s marketing and sales operations in the united kingdom. in october 2005, pwp was merged into another subsidiary of the company. total consideration paid in cash and class a common stock to the hardy shareholders was $1137.4 million. additionally, the company recorded direct acquisition costs of $17.2 million. the acquisition date for accounting pur- poses is march 27, 2003. the company has recorded a $1.6 million reduction in the purchase price to reflect imputed interest between the accounting acquisition date and the final payment of consideration. this charge is included as interest expense in the consolidated statement of income for the year ended february 29, 2004. the cash portion of the purchase price paid to the hardy shareholders and optionholders ($1060.2 million) was financed with $660.2 million of borrowings under the company 2019s then existing credit agreement and $400.0 million of borrowings under the company 2019s then existing bridge loan agreement. addi- tionally, the company issued 6577826 shares of the com- pany 2019s class a common stock, which were valued at $77.2 million based on the simple average of the closing market price of the company 2019s class a common stock beginning two days before and ending two days after april 4, 2003, the day the hardy shareholders elected the form of consid- eration they wished to receive. the purchase price was based primarily on a discounted cash flow analysis that contemplated, among other things, the value of a broader geographic distribution in strategic international markets and a presence in the important australian winemaking regions. the company and hardy have complementary businesses that share a common growth orientation and operating philosophy. the hardy acquisition supports the company 2019s strategy of growth and breadth across categories. what is the current ratio of robert mondavi? 1.65246 what were the remaining mondovi net assets acquired following the sale of certain excess assets from the deal?
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1042490.2

Domain Adaptation of Large Language Models

This repo contains the evaluation datasets for our ICLR 2024 paper Adapting Large Language Models via Reading Comprehension.

We explore continued pre-training on domain-specific corpora for large language models. While this approach enriches LLMs with domain knowledge, it significantly hurts their prompting ability for question answering. Inspired by human learning via reading comprehension, we propose a simple method to transform large-scale pre-training corpora into reading comprehension texts, consistently improving prompting performance across tasks in biomedicine, finance, and law domains. Our 7B model competes with much larger domain-specific models like BloombergGPT-50B.

🤗 We are currently working hard on developing models across different domains, scales and architectures! Please stay tuned! 🤗

**************************** Updates ****************************

  • 2024/4/2: Released the raw data splits (train and test) of all the evaluation datasets
  • 2024/1/16: 🎉 Our research paper has been accepted by ICLR 2024!!!🎉
  • 2023/12/19: Released our 13B base models developed from LLaMA-1-13B.
  • 2023/12/8: Released our chat models developed from LLaMA-2-Chat-7B.
  • 2023/9/18: Released our paper, code, data, and base models developed from LLaMA-1-7B.

Domain-Specific LLaMA-1

LLaMA-1-7B

In our paper, we develop three domain-specific models from LLaMA-1-7B, which are also available in Huggingface: Biomedicine-LLM, Finance-LLM and Law-LLM, the performances of our AdaptLLM compared to other domain-specific LLMs are:

LLaMA-1-13B

Moreover, we scale up our base model to LLaMA-1-13B to see if our method is similarly effective for larger-scale models, and the results are consistently positive too: Biomedicine-LLM-13B, Finance-LLM-13B and Law-LLM-13B.

Domain-Specific LLaMA-2-Chat

Our method is also effective for aligned models! LLaMA-2-Chat requires a specific data format, and our reading comprehension can perfectly fit the data format by transforming the reading comprehension into a multi-turn conversation. We have also open-sourced chat models in different domains: Biomedicine-Chat, Finance-Chat and Law-Chat

For example, to chat with the finance-chat model:

from transformers import AutoModelForCausalLM, AutoTokenizer

model = AutoModelForCausalLM.from_pretrained("AdaptLLM/finance-chat")
tokenizer = AutoTokenizer.from_pretrained("AdaptLLM/finance-chat")

# Put your input here:
user_input = '''Use this fact to answer the question: Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, Par Value $.01 Per Share MMM New York Stock Exchange
MMM Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.
1.500% Notes due 2026 MMM26 New York Stock Exchange
1.750% Notes due 2030 MMM30 New York Stock Exchange
1.500% Notes due 2031 MMM31 New York Stock Exchange

Which debt securities are registered to trade on a national securities exchange under 3M's name as of Q2 of 2023?'''

# Apply the prompt template and system prompt of LLaMA-2-Chat demo for chat models (NOTE: NO prompt template is required for base models!)
our_system_prompt = "\nYou are a helpful, respectful and honest assistant. Always answer as helpfully as possible, while being safe.  Your answers should not include any harmful, unethical, racist, sexist, toxic, dangerous, or illegal content. Please ensure that your responses are socially unbiased and positive in nature.\n\nIf a question does not make any sense, or is not factually coherent, explain why instead of answering something not correct. If you don't know the answer to a question, please don't share false information.\n" # Please do NOT change this
prompt = f"<s>[INST] <<SYS>>{our_system_prompt}<</SYS>>\n\n{user_input} [/INST]"

# # NOTE:
# # If you want to apply your own system prompt, please integrate it into the instruction part following our system prompt like this:
# your_system_prompt = "Please, check if the answer can be inferred from the pieces of context provided."
# prompt = f"<s>[INST] <<SYS>>{our_system_prompt}<</SYS>>\n\n{your_system_prompt}\n{user_input} [/INST]"

inputs = tokenizer(prompt, return_tensors="pt", add_special_tokens=False).input_ids.to(model.device)
outputs = model.generate(input_ids=inputs, max_length=4096)[0]

answer_start = int(inputs.shape[-1])
pred = tokenizer.decode(outputs[answer_start:], skip_special_tokens=True)

print(f'### User Input:\n{user_input}\n\n### Assistant Output:\n{pred}')

Domain-Specific Tasks

Pre-templatized/Formatted Testing Splits

To easily reproduce our prompting results, we have uploaded the filled-in zero/few-shot input instructions and output completions of the test each domain-specific task: biomedicine-tasks, finance-tasks, and law-tasks.

Note: those filled-in instructions are specifically tailored for models before alignment and do NOT fit for the specific data format required for chat models.

Raw Datasets

We have also uploaded the raw training and testing splits, for facilitating fine-tuning or other usages:

The other datasets used in our paper have already been available in huggingface, and you can directly load them with the following code:

from datasets import load_dataset

# MQP:
dataset = load_dataset('medical_questions_pairs')
# PubmedQA:
dataset = load_dataset('bigbio/pubmed_qa')
# USMLE:
dataset=load_dataset('GBaker/MedQA-USMLE-4-options')
# SCOTUS
dataset = load_dataset("lex_glue", 'scotus')
# CaseHOLD
dataset = load_dataset("lex_glue", 'case_hold')
# UNFAIR-ToS
dataset = load_dataset("lex_glue", 'unfair_tos')

Citation

If you find our work helpful, please cite us:

@inproceedings{
cheng2024adapting,
title={Adapting Large Language Models via Reading Comprehension},
author={Daixuan Cheng and Shaohan Huang and Furu Wei},
booktitle={The Twelfth International Conference on Learning Representations},
year={2024},
url={https://openreview.net/forum?id=y886UXPEZ0}
}
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