Datasets:
race

Task Categories: multiple-choice
Languages: English
Multilinguality: monolingual
Size Categories: 10K<n<100K
Language Creators: found
Annotations Creators: expert-generated
Source Datasets: original
Licenses: other
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example_id (string)article (string)answer (string)question (string)options (sequence)
"high19432.txt"
"The rain had continued for a week and the flood had created a big river which were running by Nancy Brown's farm. As she tried to gather her cows to a higher ground, she slipped and hit her head on a fallen tree trunk. The fall made her unconscious for a moment or two. When she came to, Lizzie, one of her oldest and favorite cows, was licking her face. At that time, the water level on the farm was still rising. Nancy gathered all her strength to get up and began walking slowly with Lizzie. The rain had become much heavier, and the water in the field was now waist high. Nancy's pace got slower and slower because she felt a great pain in her head. Finally, all she could do was to throw her arm around Lizzie's neck and try to hang on. About 20 minutes later, Lizzie managed to pull herself and Nancy out of the rising water and onto a bit of high land, which seemed like a small island in the middle of a lake of white water. Even though it was about noon, the sky was so dark and the rain and lightning was so bad that it took rescuers more than two hours to discover Nancy. A man from a helicopter lowered a rope, but Nancy couldn't catch it. A moment later, two men landed on the small island from a ladder in the helicopter. They raised her into the helicopter and took her to the school gym, where the Red Cross had set up an emergency shelter. When the flood disappeared two days later, Nancy immediately went back to the "island." Lizzie was gone. She was one of 19 cows that Nancy had lost in the flood. "I owe my life to her," said Nancy with tears."
"C"
"What did Nancy try to do before she fell over?"
[ "Measure the depth of the river", "Look for a fallen tree trunk", "Protect her cows from being drowned", "Run away from the flooded farm" ]
"high19432.txt"
"The rain had continued for a week and the flood had created a big river which were running by Nancy Brown's farm. As she tried to gather her cows to a higher ground, she slipped and hit her head on a fallen tree trunk. The fall made her unconscious for a moment or two. When she came to, Lizzie, one of her oldest and favorite cows, was licking her face. At that time, the water level on the farm was still rising. Nancy gathered all her strength to get up and began walking slowly with Lizzie. The rain had become much heavier, and the water in the field was now waist high. Nancy's pace got slower and slower because she felt a great pain in her head. Finally, all she could do was to throw her arm around Lizzie's neck and try to hang on. About 20 minutes later, Lizzie managed to pull herself and Nancy out of the rising water and onto a bit of high land, which seemed like a small island in the middle of a lake of white water. Even though it was about noon, the sky was so dark and the rain and lightning was so bad that it took rescuers more than two hours to discover Nancy. A man from a helicopter lowered a rope, but Nancy couldn't catch it. A moment later, two men landed on the small island from a ladder in the helicopter. They raised her into the helicopter and took her to the school gym, where the Red Cross had set up an emergency shelter. When the flood disappeared two days later, Nancy immediately went back to the "island." Lizzie was gone. She was one of 19 cows that Nancy had lost in the flood. "I owe my life to her," said Nancy with tears."
"D"
"The following are true according to the passage except _ ."
[ "It took Lizzie and Nancy about 20 minutes to get to safety.", "It was raining harder when Nancy managed to get up.", "The bad weather made it difficult for rescuers to find Nancy.", "Nancy took hold of the rope and climbed into the helicopter." ]
"high19432.txt"
"The rain had continued for a week and the flood had created a big river which were running by Nancy Brown's farm. As she tried to gather her cows to a higher ground, she slipped and hit her head on a fallen tree trunk. The fall made her unconscious for a moment or two. When she came to, Lizzie, one of her oldest and favorite cows, was licking her face. At that time, the water level on the farm was still rising. Nancy gathered all her strength to get up and began walking slowly with Lizzie. The rain had become much heavier, and the water in the field was now waist high. Nancy's pace got slower and slower because she felt a great pain in her head. Finally, all she could do was to throw her arm around Lizzie's neck and try to hang on. About 20 minutes later, Lizzie managed to pull herself and Nancy out of the rising water and onto a bit of high land, which seemed like a small island in the middle of a lake of white water. Even though it was about noon, the sky was so dark and the rain and lightning was so bad that it took rescuers more than two hours to discover Nancy. A man from a helicopter lowered a rope, but Nancy couldn't catch it. A moment later, two men landed on the small island from a ladder in the helicopter. They raised her into the helicopter and took her to the school gym, where the Red Cross had set up an emergency shelter. When the flood disappeared two days later, Nancy immediately went back to the "island." Lizzie was gone. She was one of 19 cows that Nancy had lost in the flood. "I owe my life to her," said Nancy with tears."
"A"
"What did the local people do to help those in the flooded area according to the passage?"
[ "They put up shelter for them in a school.", "They used helicopters to help carry cows.", "They helped farmers gather their cows.", "They set up an organization called Red Cross." ]
"high6268.txt"
"There is probably no field of human activity in which our values and lifestyles are shown more clearly and strongly than they are in the clothes that we choose to wear.The dress of an individual is a kind of "sign language" that communicates a set of information and is usually the basis on which immediate impressions are formed.Traditionally,a concern for clothes was considered to be an affair of females,while men took pride in the fact that they were completely lacking in clothes consciousness . This type of American culture is by degrees changing as man dress takes on greater variety and color.Even as early as 1955,a researcher in Michigan said that _ White collar workers in particular viewed dress as a symbol of ability,which could be used to impress or influence others,especially in the work situation.The white collar worker was described as extremely concerned about the impression his clothing made on his superiors .Although blue collar workers were less aware that they might be judged on the basis of their clothing,they recognized that any difference from the accepted pattern of dress would be made fun of by fellow workers. Since that time,of course,the patterns have changed:the typical office worker may now be wearing the blue shirt,and the laborer a white shirt;but the importance of dress has not become less.Other researchers in recent years have helped to prove its importance in the lives of individuals at various age levels and in different social and economic status groups ."
"B"
"The passage tells us that _ ."
[ "our values and lifestyles are in no field of human activity", "the clothes that we choose to wear have something to do with our values and lifestyles", "our values and lifestyles are from the sign language", "the clothes we choose to wear depend on a set of information and immediate impression" ]
"high6268.txt"
"There is probably no field of human activity in which our values and lifestyles are shown more clearly and strongly than they are in the clothes that we choose to wear.The dress of an individual is a kind of "sign language" that communicates a set of information and is usually the basis on which immediate impressions are formed.Traditionally,a concern for clothes was considered to be an affair of females,while men took pride in the fact that they were completely lacking in clothes consciousness . This type of American culture is by degrees changing as man dress takes on greater variety and color.Even as early as 1955,a researcher in Michigan said that _ White collar workers in particular viewed dress as a symbol of ability,which could be used to impress or influence others,especially in the work situation.The white collar worker was described as extremely concerned about the impression his clothing made on his superiors .Although blue collar workers were less aware that they might be judged on the basis of their clothing,they recognized that any difference from the accepted pattern of dress would be made fun of by fellow workers. Since that time,of course,the patterns have changed:the typical office worker may now be wearing the blue shirt,and the laborer a white shirt;but the importance of dress has not become less.Other researchers in recent years have helped to prove its importance in the lives of individuals at various age levels and in different social and economic status groups ."
"B"
"Traditionally,people usually thought that _ ."
[ "men cared very much for clothes", "women were concerned greatly about what they wore while men didn't", "both men and women paid great attention to their clothes", "neither men nor women showed interest in clothes" ]
"high6268.txt"
"There is probably no field of human activity in which our values and lifestyles are shown more clearly and strongly than they are in the clothes that we choose to wear.The dress of an individual is a kind of "sign language" that communicates a set of information and is usually the basis on which immediate impressions are formed.Traditionally,a concern for clothes was considered to be an affair of females,while men took pride in the fact that they were completely lacking in clothes consciousness . This type of American culture is by degrees changing as man dress takes on greater variety and color.Even as early as 1955,a researcher in Michigan said that _ White collar workers in particular viewed dress as a symbol of ability,which could be used to impress or influence others,especially in the work situation.The white collar worker was described as extremely concerned about the impression his clothing made on his superiors .Although blue collar workers were less aware that they might be judged on the basis of their clothing,they recognized that any difference from the accepted pattern of dress would be made fun of by fellow workers. Since that time,of course,the patterns have changed:the typical office worker may now be wearing the blue shirt,and the laborer a white shirt;but the importance of dress has not become less.Other researchers in recent years have helped to prove its importance in the lives of individuals at various age levels and in different social and economic status groups ."
"D"
"Blue collar workers pay attention to their clothes because _ ."
[ "they are concerned about the impression their clothes make on their superiors", "they know very clearly that people will judge them on the basis of their clothing", "they want to impress and influence others", "they don't want to be laughed at" ]
"high6268.txt"
"There is probably no field of human activity in which our values and lifestyles are shown more clearly and strongly than they are in the clothes that we choose to wear.The dress of an individual is a kind of "sign language" that communicates a set of information and is usually the basis on which immediate impressions are formed.Traditionally,a concern for clothes was considered to be an affair of females,while men took pride in the fact that they were completely lacking in clothes consciousness . This type of American culture is by degrees changing as man dress takes on greater variety and color.Even as early as 1955,a researcher in Michigan said that _ White collar workers in particular viewed dress as a symbol of ability,which could be used to impress or influence others,especially in the work situation.The white collar worker was described as extremely concerned about the impression his clothing made on his superiors .Although blue collar workers were less aware that they might be judged on the basis of their clothing,they recognized that any difference from the accepted pattern of dress would be made fun of by fellow workers. Since that time,of course,the patterns have changed:the typical office worker may now be wearing the blue shirt,and the laborer a white shirt;but the importance of dress has not become less.Other researchers in recent years have helped to prove its importance in the lives of individuals at various age levels and in different social and economic status groups ."
"C"
"The passage mainly suggests that _ ."
[ "now men pay more attention to their clothes than women do", "women always like beautiful dresses", "people have paid more and more attention to the importance of dress", "American culture is changing greatly" ]
"high24149.txt"
"Little Tommy was doing very badly in math. His parents had tried everything--tutors, cards, special learning centers--in short, everything they could think of. Finally they took Tommy to a catholic school. After the first day, little Tommy came home with a very serious look on his face. He didn't kiss his mother hello. Instead, he went straight to his room and started studying. Books and papers were spread out all over the room and little Tommy was hard at work. His mother was surprised. She called him down to dinner and as soon as he finished eating, he went back to his room, without a word. In no time he was back hitting the books as hard as before. This went on for some time, day after day while the mother tried to understand what was happening. Finally, little Tommy brought home his report card. He quietly put it on the table and went up to his room and hit the books. His mom looked at it and to her surprise, little Tommy got an A in math. She could no longer hold her curiosity. She went to his room and asked, "Son, what was it? Was it the nuns ? " Little Tommy looked at her and shook his head, "No. " "Well then," she asked again. "WHAT was it? " Little Tommy looked at her and said, "Well, on the first day of school, when I saw that man nailed to the plus sign , I knew they weren't joking. ""
"D"
"Tommy's mother felt surprised that his son _ ."
[ "was still the same as usual", "ate so much at dinner", "kissed her hello after school", "worked hard but said little" ]
"high24149.txt"
"Little Tommy was doing very badly in math. His parents had tried everything--tutors, cards, special learning centers--in short, everything they could think of. Finally they took Tommy to a catholic school. After the first day, little Tommy came home with a very serious look on his face. He didn't kiss his mother hello. Instead, he went straight to his room and started studying. Books and papers were spread out all over the room and little Tommy was hard at work. His mother was surprised. She called him down to dinner and as soon as he finished eating, he went back to his room, without a word. In no time he was back hitting the books as hard as before. This went on for some time, day after day while the mother tried to understand what was happening. Finally, little Tommy brought home his report card. He quietly put it on the table and went up to his room and hit the books. His mom looked at it and to her surprise, little Tommy got an A in math. She could no longer hold her curiosity. She went to his room and asked, "Son, what was it? Was it the nuns ? " Little Tommy looked at her and shook his head, "No. " "Well then," she asked again. "WHAT was it? " Little Tommy looked at her and said, "Well, on the first day of school, when I saw that man nailed to the plus sign , I knew they weren't joking. ""
"B"
"The last sentence in the passage shows that _ ."
[ "Tommy felt sorry for the man", "Tommy was afraid of being nailed", "Tommy didn't like the plus sign", "Tommy liked playing jokes on others" ]
"high24149.txt"
"Little Tommy was doing very badly in math. His parents had tried everything--tutors, cards, special learning centers--in short, everything they could think of. Finally they took Tommy to a catholic school. After the first day, little Tommy came home with a very serious look on his face. He didn't kiss his mother hello. Instead, he went straight to his room and started studying. Books and papers were spread out all over the room and little Tommy was hard at work. His mother was surprised. She called him down to dinner and as soon as he finished eating, he went back to his room, without a word. In no time he was back hitting the books as hard as before. This went on for some time, day after day while the mother tried to understand what was happening. Finally, little Tommy brought home his report card. He quietly put it on the table and went up to his room and hit the books. His mom looked at it and to her surprise, little Tommy got an A in math. She could no longer hold her curiosity. She went to his room and asked, "Son, what was it? Was it the nuns ? " Little Tommy looked at her and shook his head, "No. " "Well then," she asked again. "WHAT was it? " Little Tommy looked at her and said, "Well, on the first day of school, when I saw that man nailed to the plus sign , I knew they weren't joking. ""
"B"
"From the passage, we can infer that _ ."
[ "teachers should be strict with their students", "mistakes might do good sometimes", "a catholic school is much better than other ones", "nuns are good at helping children with their math" ]
"high12033.txt"
"Give it five minutes I used to be a hothead. Whenever anyone said anything, I'd think of a way to disagree. I'd push back hard if something didn't fit my world-view. It's like I had to be first with an opinion -- as if being first meant something. But what it really meant was that I wasn't thinking hard enough about the problem. The faster you react, the less you think. Not always, but often. This came to a head back in 2007. I was speaking at the Business Innovation Factory conference in Providence, RI. So was Richard Saul Wurman. After my talk Richard came up to introduce himself and compliment my talk. That was very generous of him. He certainly didn't have to do that. And what did I do? I pushed back at him about the talk he gave. While he was making his points on stage, I was taking an inventory of the things I didn't agree with. And when presented with an opportunity to speak with him, I quickly pushed back at some of his ideas. I must have seemed like such an asshole. His response changed my life. It was a simple thing. He said "Man, give it five minutes." I asked him what he meant by that? He said, it's fine to disagree, it's fine to push back, it's great to have strong opinions and beliefs, but give my ideas some time to set in before you're sure you want to argue against them. "Five minutes" represented "think", not react. He was totally right. I came into the discussion looking to prove something, not learn something. This was a big moment for me. Richard has spent his career thinking about these problems. He's given it 30 years. And I gave it just a few minutes. Now, certainly he can be wrong and I could be right, but it's better to think deeply about something first before being so certain you're right. There's also a difference between asking questions and pushing back. Pushing back means you already think you know. Asking questions means you want to know. Ask more questions. Learning to think first rather than react quick is a life-long pursuit. It's tough. I still get hot sometimes when I shouldn't. But I'm really enjoying all the benefits of getting better. If you aren't sure why this is important, think about this quote from Jonathan Ive regarding Steve Jobs' reverence(respect) for ideas: And just as Steve loved ideas, and loved making stuff, he treated the process of creativity with a rare and a wonderful reverence. You see, I think he better than anyone understood that while ideas ultimately can be so powerful, they begin as fragile, barely formed thoughts, so easily missed, so easily compromised, so easily just squished. That's deep. Ideas are fragile. They often start powerless. They're barely there, so easy to ignore or skip or miss. There are two things in this world that take no skill: 1. Spending other people's money and 2. Dismissing an idea. Dismissing an idea is so easy because it doesn't involve any work. You can scoff at it. You can ignore it. You can puff some smoke at it. That's easy. The hard thing to do is protect it, think about it, let it marinate, explore it, riff on it, and try it. The right idea could start out life as the wrong idea. So next time you hear something, or someone, talk about an idea, pitch an idea, or suggest an idea, give it five minutes. Think about it a little bit before pushing back, before saying it's too hard or it's too much work. Those things may be true, but there may be another truth in there too: It may be worth it."
"A"
"What did the author do while Richard was talking in the business conference?"
[ "He kept notes for things that he did not agree with.", "He pushed Richard and beat him.", "He was preparing for his own speech.", "He was getting ready to compliment him." ]
"high12033.txt"
"Give it five minutes I used to be a hothead. Whenever anyone said anything, I'd think of a way to disagree. I'd push back hard if something didn't fit my world-view. It's like I had to be first with an opinion -- as if being first meant something. But what it really meant was that I wasn't thinking hard enough about the problem. The faster you react, the less you think. Not always, but often. This came to a head back in 2007. I was speaking at the Business Innovation Factory conference in Providence, RI. So was Richard Saul Wurman. After my talk Richard came up to introduce himself and compliment my talk. That was very generous of him. He certainly didn't have to do that. And what did I do? I pushed back at him about the talk he gave. While he was making his points on stage, I was taking an inventory of the things I didn't agree with. And when presented with an opportunity to speak with him, I quickly pushed back at some of his ideas. I must have seemed like such an asshole. His response changed my life. It was a simple thing. He said "Man, give it five minutes." I asked him what he meant by that? He said, it's fine to disagree, it's fine to push back, it's great to have strong opinions and beliefs, but give my ideas some time to set in before you're sure you want to argue against them. "Five minutes" represented "think", not react. He was totally right. I came into the discussion looking to prove something, not learn something. This was a big moment for me. Richard has spent his career thinking about these problems. He's given it 30 years. And I gave it just a few minutes. Now, certainly he can be wrong and I could be right, but it's better to think deeply about something first before being so certain you're right. There's also a difference between asking questions and pushing back. Pushing back means you already think you know. Asking questions means you want to know. Ask more questions. Learning to think first rather than react quick is a life-long pursuit. It's tough. I still get hot sometimes when I shouldn't. But I'm really enjoying all the benefits of getting better. If you aren't sure why this is important, think about this quote from Jonathan Ive regarding Steve Jobs' reverence(respect) for ideas: And just as Steve loved ideas, and loved making stuff, he treated the process of creativity with a rare and a wonderful reverence. You see, I think he better than anyone understood that while ideas ultimately can be so powerful, they begin as fragile, barely formed thoughts, so easily missed, so easily compromised, so easily just squished. That's deep. Ideas are fragile. They often start powerless. They're barely there, so easy to ignore or skip or miss. There are two things in this world that take no skill: 1. Spending other people's money and 2. Dismissing an idea. Dismissing an idea is so easy because it doesn't involve any work. You can scoff at it. You can ignore it. You can puff some smoke at it. That's easy. The hard thing to do is protect it, think about it, let it marinate, explore it, riff on it, and try it. The right idea could start out life as the wrong idea. So next time you hear something, or someone, talk about an idea, pitch an idea, or suggest an idea, give it five minutes. Think about it a little bit before pushing back, before saying it's too hard or it's too much work. Those things may be true, but there may be another truth in there too: It may be worth it."
"B"
"Which of the following is the reason for quoting Jonathan Ive?"
[ "The author thinks Steve Job is the best when it comes to creativity.", "The author is inspired by Steve Job's attitude towards new ideas.", "The author respects Steve Job because he is creative and he likes ideas.", "The author thinks Steve Job has ideas that are strong and powerful and are hard to miss." ]
"high12033.txt"
"Give it five minutes I used to be a hothead. Whenever anyone said anything, I'd think of a way to disagree. I'd push back hard if something didn't fit my world-view. It's like I had to be first with an opinion -- as if being first meant something. But what it really meant was that I wasn't thinking hard enough about the problem. The faster you react, the less you think. Not always, but often. This came to a head back in 2007. I was speaking at the Business Innovation Factory conference in Providence, RI. So was Richard Saul Wurman. After my talk Richard came up to introduce himself and compliment my talk. That was very generous of him. He certainly didn't have to do that. And what did I do? I pushed back at him about the talk he gave. While he was making his points on stage, I was taking an inventory of the things I didn't agree with. And when presented with an opportunity to speak with him, I quickly pushed back at some of his ideas. I must have seemed like such an asshole. His response changed my life. It was a simple thing. He said "Man, give it five minutes." I asked him what he meant by that? He said, it's fine to disagree, it's fine to push back, it's great to have strong opinions and beliefs, but give my ideas some time to set in before you're sure you want to argue against them. "Five minutes" represented "think", not react. He was totally right. I came into the discussion looking to prove something, not learn something. This was a big moment for me. Richard has spent his career thinking about these problems. He's given it 30 years. And I gave it just a few minutes. Now, certainly he can be wrong and I could be right, but it's better to think deeply about something first before being so certain you're right. There's also a difference between asking questions and pushing back. Pushing back means you already think you know. Asking questions means you want to know. Ask more questions. Learning to think first rather than react quick is a life-long pursuit. It's tough. I still get hot sometimes when I shouldn't. But I'm really enjoying all the benefits of getting better. If you aren't sure why this is important, think about this quote from Jonathan Ive regarding Steve Jobs' reverence(respect) for ideas: And just as Steve loved ideas, and loved making stuff, he treated the process of creativity with a rare and a wonderful reverence. You see, I think he better than anyone understood that while ideas ultimately can be so powerful, they begin as fragile, barely formed thoughts, so easily missed, so easily compromised, so easily just squished. That's deep. Ideas are fragile. They often start powerless. They're barely there, so easy to ignore or skip or miss. There are two things in this world that take no skill: 1. Spending other people's money and 2. Dismissing an idea. Dismissing an idea is so easy because it doesn't involve any work. You can scoff at it. You can ignore it. You can puff some smoke at it. That's easy. The hard thing to do is protect it, think about it, let it marinate, explore it, riff on it, and try it. The right idea could start out life as the wrong idea. So next time you hear something, or someone, talk about an idea, pitch an idea, or suggest an idea, give it five minutes. Think about it a little bit before pushing back, before saying it's too hard or it's too much work. Those things may be true, but there may be another truth in there too: It may be worth it."
"C"
"What is the core argument that the author put forward?"
[ "Dismissing ideas is an effortless thing to do so you should always protect ideas carefully.", "The right idea always starts from a wrong idea and you need to protect it from being dismissed.", "One should be careful when it comes to judge a new idea.", "Every idea, whether powerful or fragile deserves five minutes" ]
"high2633.txt"
"Bungee jumping is an activity about jumping from a tall structure while connected to a large elastic cord . The tall structure is usually a fixed object, such as a building, bridge or crane; but it is also possible to jump from a movable object, such as a hot-air balloon or helicopter, that has the ability to stay over one place on the ground; fixed-wing aircraft are unsuitable because they only stay high when moving quickly forward. When the person jumps, the cord stretches to absorb the energy of the fall, then the jumper flies upwards again as the cord jumps back. The jumper oscillates up and down until all the energy is used up. The word bungee first appeared around 1930 and was the name for a rubber eraser. The first modern bungee jumps were made on 1 April 1979 from the 250-foot Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol, by David Kirk, Chris Baker and Alan Weston of the Dangerous Sports Club. The jumpers continued with jumps in the US from the Golden Gate and Royal Gorge bridges, spreading the concept worldwide. By 1982 they were jumping from mobile cranes and hot-air balloons. Later they put on commercial shows, which began in 1986. As with any sport, injuries can still happen, and there have been deaths. A relatively common mistake in the cases that may cause death is to use a cord that is too long. The cord should be fully shorter than the height of the jumping place to allow it room to jumper either starts to slow down or keeps speeding up depending upon the speed of falling."
"A"
"Which of the following is NOT suitable for bungee jumping?"
[ "The fixed-wing aircraft", "The helicopter", "The hot-air balloon", "The mobile crane" ]
"high2633.txt"
"Bungee jumping is an activity about jumping from a tall structure while connected to a large elastic cord . The tall structure is usually a fixed object, such as a building, bridge or crane; but it is also possible to jump from a movable object, such as a hot-air balloon or helicopter, that has the ability to stay over one place on the ground; fixed-wing aircraft are unsuitable because they only stay high when moving quickly forward. When the person jumps, the cord stretches to absorb the energy of the fall, then the jumper flies upwards again as the cord jumps back. The jumper oscillates up and down until all the energy is used up. The word bungee first appeared around 1930 and was the name for a rubber eraser. The first modern bungee jumps were made on 1 April 1979 from the 250-foot Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol, by David Kirk, Chris Baker and Alan Weston of the Dangerous Sports Club. The jumpers continued with jumps in the US from the Golden Gate and Royal Gorge bridges, spreading the concept worldwide. By 1982 they were jumping from mobile cranes and hot-air balloons. Later they put on commercial shows, which began in 1986. As with any sport, injuries can still happen, and there have been deaths. A relatively common mistake in the cases that may cause death is to use a cord that is too long. The cord should be fully shorter than the height of the jumping place to allow it room to jumper either starts to slow down or keeps speeding up depending upon the speed of falling."
"D"
"The purpose of writing this passage is to _ ."
[ "teach people how to carry out a bungee jumping", "remind people of the danger of bungee jumping", "advise people not to take the risk of bungee jumping", "introduce some knowledge about bungee jumping" ]
"high16066.txt"
"A girl with blue eyes is a blue-eyed girl. A man with long legs is a long-legged man. A woman with white hair is a white-haired woman. Children who have good looks are good-looking children. What do you do when you want to buy clothes? You go to a shop. If you can find clothes that are the right size for you, and if they are ready to wear, you will probably buy them. They are called ready-made clothes. If you can not find clothes that are the right size, you will go to a tailor's shop. A tailor is a man who makes clothes. He will measure you carefully and will then make clothes for you. Such clothes are called tailor-made clothes. What do we call a man who is dressed badly? We call him a badly-dressed man. A woman who is dressed well is called a well-dressed woman. What do you wear when it rains heavily? You wear a coat that will keep the rain out. Such a coat is called a raincoat. It is made of waterproof cloth--cloth that does not let water pass through. We have a lot of rain in England. If you come to England, bring a raincoat and an umbrella. You will find them useful. If the floor, walls and ceiling of a room are made so that sound cannot pass through the wall, we say that the room is sound-proof. There are sound-proof rooms in all broadcasting stations."
"B"
"55. The clothes which you buy from the supermarket are called _ clothes."
[ "tailor-made", "ready-made", "hand-made", "mass production" ]
"high16066.txt"
"A girl with blue eyes is a blue-eyed girl. A man with long legs is a long-legged man. A woman with white hair is a white-haired woman. Children who have good looks are good-looking children. What do you do when you want to buy clothes? You go to a shop. If you can find clothes that are the right size for you, and if they are ready to wear, you will probably buy them. They are called ready-made clothes. If you can not find clothes that are the right size, you will go to a tailor's shop. A tailor is a man who makes clothes. He will measure you carefully and will then make clothes for you. Such clothes are called tailor-made clothes. What do we call a man who is dressed badly? We call him a badly-dressed man. A woman who is dressed well is called a well-dressed woman. What do you wear when it rains heavily? You wear a coat that will keep the rain out. Such a coat is called a raincoat. It is made of waterproof cloth--cloth that does not let water pass through. We have a lot of rain in England. If you come to England, bring a raincoat and an umbrella. You will find them useful. If the floor, walls and ceiling of a room are made so that sound cannot pass through the wall, we say that the room is sound-proof. There are sound-proof rooms in all broadcasting stations."
"A"
"56. If you come to England, bring both a raincoat and an umbrella because _ ."
[ "there is a lot of rain in England", "there are few umbrellas in the country", "gentlemen usually carry umbrellas with them in England", "walking with an umbrella in hand is popular in England" ]
"high16066.txt"
"A girl with blue eyes is a blue-eyed girl. A man with long legs is a long-legged man. A woman with white hair is a white-haired woman. Children who have good looks are good-looking children. What do you do when you want to buy clothes? You go to a shop. If you can find clothes that are the right size for you, and if they are ready to wear, you will probably buy them. They are called ready-made clothes. If you can not find clothes that are the right size, you will go to a tailor's shop. A tailor is a man who makes clothes. He will measure you carefully and will then make clothes for you. Such clothes are called tailor-made clothes. What do we call a man who is dressed badly? We call him a badly-dressed man. A woman who is dressed well is called a well-dressed woman. What do you wear when it rains heavily? You wear a coat that will keep the rain out. Such a coat is called a raincoat. It is made of waterproof cloth--cloth that does not let water pass through. We have a lot of rain in England. If you come to England, bring a raincoat and an umbrella. You will find them useful. If the floor, walls and ceiling of a room are made so that sound cannot pass through the wall, we say that the room is sound-proof. There are sound-proof rooms in all broadcasting stations."
"A"
"57. On back of a watch we can often see the word "water-proof". The word means_."
[ "water won't get into the watch", "you can put water into the watch", "not putting the watch into water", "you can see the watch clearly in water" ]
"high16066.txt"
"A girl with blue eyes is a blue-eyed girl. A man with long legs is a long-legged man. A woman with white hair is a white-haired woman. Children who have good looks are good-looking children. What do you do when you want to buy clothes? You go to a shop. If you can find clothes that are the right size for you, and if they are ready to wear, you will probably buy them. They are called ready-made clothes. If you can not find clothes that are the right size, you will go to a tailor's shop. A tailor is a man who makes clothes. He will measure you carefully and will then make clothes for you. Such clothes are called tailor-made clothes. What do we call a man who is dressed badly? We call him a badly-dressed man. A woman who is dressed well is called a well-dressed woman. What do you wear when it rains heavily? You wear a coat that will keep the rain out. Such a coat is called a raincoat. It is made of waterproof cloth--cloth that does not let water pass through. We have a lot of rain in England. If you come to England, bring a raincoat and an umbrella. You will find them useful. If the floor, walls and ceiling of a room are made so that sound cannot pass through the wall, we say that the room is sound-proof. There are sound-proof rooms in all broadcasting stations."
"B"
"58. What do you think is the best title for the article?"
[ "The Forms of Compound Words.", "Compound Words in Everyday Life", "How to Use Compound Words.", "Water-proof Cloth in the Best." ]
"high11311.txt"
"My legs don't do much because I have a serious disease. _ just sit there and look pretty. When people look at me, they only see the chair -- my wheelchair. I've been in one since I was 3 years old. And it doesn't matter if I graduate at the top of my class and go to law school. To some, I'll always be the girl in the chair. But I don't think of myself as the kid who can't walk. Most of my friends don't even notice the chair anymore. I'm just the girl they've been friends with. My friends are good at lifting me in and out of my small car when we go to the movies. We even took the car to the dance. One of the boys helped me out of the car and all the girls helped me to fix my dress. Even in the crowded school elevator, there's always someone around to carry me. There are a lot of things I can't do for myself, such as lifting my arms, dressing myself, and feeding myself. Even so, I do very well at school and I always tell myself that I'm just like any other kid in my school. The truth is that my parents raised me to be proud of my disability . There are plenty of things I wish I could do differently. I wanted to be a doctor. But that's not going to work out. So I'll be a lawyer instead. I also wanted to dance and play soccer. My parents taught me that I'm like this for a reason -- to educate people and show them that this disease affects my bones -- not my brain. My friends Erica once said to me, "Kennedy, you're not disabled. You just can't walk.""
"B"
"Kennedy's story mainly tells us that we should _ ."
[ "work hard", "smile at life", "have dreams", "thank our parents" ]
"high1338.txt"
"Today, whether or not you follow the latest trends, one's fashion and choice of dress is a reflection of one's individual style and tastes. Can you still remember how you dressed at the start of China's opening-up? Today's program is one of a special series commemorating the 30th anniversary of reform and opening-up in China. In these two episodes we focused on fashion and style and were honored to invite two special guests to join us in studio--Ms. Zhang Ling from Raffles-BICT Inter-national College and Alex from Esquire magazine. When we talk about fashion, color is absolutely crucial. A color can reflect the mood of an individual person or the spiritual temperament of entire society or age. Mrs. Zhang and Alex talked about the colors which have left the greatest impression on them. In the 1960s and 70s, blue and grey were the dominant colors at the time and people had limited choices to dress up. But fast forward to the present, you will find no difficulty in choosing from array of vivid colors in the market. We also gave our guests a list of keywords--traditional brands, jeans, DIY, international brands, personal dress for them to choose from in order to represent the fashion of their generation. We find out that for every keyword our guest chose, there was a special story behind it. Some of the stories brought us back to old times--we even brought some vintage clothing from the 60s and 70s up on stage and invited some audience members to try them on. When we mention fashion, we must mention brand. With increasing disposable income and purchasing power of the Chinese, many luxury brands have flocked into China. However, you could imagine in 1980s, when the first inter-national brand came to China, it unveiled a fashion storm among the Chinese."
"B"
"China's opening-up dates back to _ ."
[ "the 1960s", "the 1970s", "the 1980s", "the 1990s" ]
"high1338.txt"
"Today, whether or not you follow the latest trends, one's fashion and choice of dress is a reflection of one's individual style and tastes. Can you still remember how you dressed at the start of China's opening-up? Today's program is one of a special series commemorating the 30th anniversary of reform and opening-up in China. In these two episodes we focused on fashion and style and were honored to invite two special guests to join us in studio--Ms. Zhang Ling from Raffles-BICT Inter-national College and Alex from Esquire magazine. When we talk about fashion, color is absolutely crucial. A color can reflect the mood of an individual person or the spiritual temperament of entire society or age. Mrs. Zhang and Alex talked about the colors which have left the greatest impression on them. In the 1960s and 70s, blue and grey were the dominant colors at the time and people had limited choices to dress up. But fast forward to the present, you will find no difficulty in choosing from array of vivid colors in the market. We also gave our guests a list of keywords--traditional brands, jeans, DIY, international brands, personal dress for them to choose from in order to represent the fashion of their generation. We find out that for every keyword our guest chose, there was a special story behind it. Some of the stories brought us back to old times--we even brought some vintage clothing from the 60s and 70s up on stage and invited some audience members to try them on. When we mention fashion, we must mention brand. With increasing disposable income and purchasing power of the Chinese, many luxury brands have flocked into China. However, you could imagine in 1980s, when the first inter-national brand came to China, it unveiled a fashion storm among the Chinese."
"D"
"All of the following EXCEPT _ are keywords in representing the fashion of our generation."
[ "traditional brands", "international brands", "personal dress", "special stories" ]
"high1338.txt"
"Today, whether or not you follow the latest trends, one's fashion and choice of dress is a reflection of one's individual style and tastes. Can you still remember how you dressed at the start of China's opening-up? Today's program is one of a special series commemorating the 30th anniversary of reform and opening-up in China. In these two episodes we focused on fashion and style and were honored to invite two special guests to join us in studio--Ms. Zhang Ling from Raffles-BICT Inter-national College and Alex from Esquire magazine. When we talk about fashion, color is absolutely crucial. A color can reflect the mood of an individual person or the spiritual temperament of entire society or age. Mrs. Zhang and Alex talked about the colors which have left the greatest impression on them. In the 1960s and 70s, blue and grey were the dominant colors at the time and people had limited choices to dress up. But fast forward to the present, you will find no difficulty in choosing from array of vivid colors in the market. We also gave our guests a list of keywords--traditional brands, jeans, DIY, international brands, personal dress for them to choose from in order to represent the fashion of their generation. We find out that for every keyword our guest chose, there was a special story behind it. Some of the stories brought us back to old times--we even brought some vintage clothing from the 60s and 70s up on stage and invited some audience members to try them on. When we mention fashion, we must mention brand. With increasing disposable income and purchasing power of the Chinese, many luxury brands have flocked into China. However, you could imagine in 1980s, when the first inter-national brand came to China, it unveiled a fashion storm among the Chinese."
"C"
"The fact that many luxury brands have flocked into China shows that _ ."
[ "China has given up its own culture", "Chinese have been tired of array of vivid colors in the markets", "Chinese have increased their disposable income and purchasing power", "China has grown tired of its traditional brands" ]
"high9049.txt"
"A couple who held hands at breakfast every morning even after 70 years of marriage have died 15 hours apart. Helen Felumlee, died at 92 on April 12. Her husband, 91-year-old Kenneth Felumlee, died the next morning. The couple's eight children say the two had been inseparable since meeting as teenagers, once sharing the bottom of a bunk bed on a ferry rather than sleeping on night apart. They remained deeply in love until the very end, even eating breakfast together while holding hands, said their daughter, Linda Cody. "We knew when one went, the other was going to go," she said. According to Cody, about 12 hours after Helen died, Kenneth looked at his children and said, "Mon's dead." He quickly began to fade, surrounded by 24 of his closest family members and friends when he died the next morning. "He was ready," Cody said, "He just didn't want to leave her here by herself." Son Dick said his parents died of old age, surrounded by family. The pair had known each other for several years when they eloped in Newport across the Ohio River from Cincinnati, on Feb. 20, 1994. At two days shy of his 21stbirthday, Kenneth-who went by Kenny-was too young to marry in Ohio. "He couldn't wait.' son Jim said. Kenneth worked as a railroad car inspector and mechanic before becoming a mail carrier for the Post Office. He was active in the church as a Sunday teacher. Helen stayed at home, not only cooking and cleaning for her own family but also for other families in need in the area. She taught Sunday school, too, but was known more for her greeting card ministry, sending cards for birthdays, sympathy and the holidays to everyone in her community, each with a personal note inside. "She kept Hallmark in business," daughter-in-law Debbie joked. When Kenneth retired in 1983 and the children began to leave the house, the Felumlees began to explore their love of travel, visiting almost all 50 states by bus. "He didn't want to fly anywhere because you couldn't see anything as you were going," Jim said. Although both experienced declining health in recent years, Cody said, each tried to stay strong for the other. "That's what kept them going," she said."
"C"
"From what Cody said, we can learn the children _ ."
[ "were not in front of their father", "don't look after their father", "foresaw their father would go", "surrounded their father" ]
"high9049.txt"
"A couple who held hands at breakfast every morning even after 70 years of marriage have died 15 hours apart. Helen Felumlee, died at 92 on April 12. Her husband, 91-year-old Kenneth Felumlee, died the next morning. The couple's eight children say the two had been inseparable since meeting as teenagers, once sharing the bottom of a bunk bed on a ferry rather than sleeping on night apart. They remained deeply in love until the very end, even eating breakfast together while holding hands, said their daughter, Linda Cody. "We knew when one went, the other was going to go," she said. According to Cody, about 12 hours after Helen died, Kenneth looked at his children and said, "Mon's dead." He quickly began to fade, surrounded by 24 of his closest family members and friends when he died the next morning. "He was ready," Cody said, "He just didn't want to leave her here by herself." Son Dick said his parents died of old age, surrounded by family. The pair had known each other for several years when they eloped in Newport across the Ohio River from Cincinnati, on Feb. 20, 1994. At two days shy of his 21stbirthday, Kenneth-who went by Kenny-was too young to marry in Ohio. "He couldn't wait.' son Jim said. Kenneth worked as a railroad car inspector and mechanic before becoming a mail carrier for the Post Office. He was active in the church as a Sunday teacher. Helen stayed at home, not only cooking and cleaning for her own family but also for other families in need in the area. She taught Sunday school, too, but was known more for her greeting card ministry, sending cards for birthdays, sympathy and the holidays to everyone in her community, each with a personal note inside. "She kept Hallmark in business," daughter-in-law Debbie joked. When Kenneth retired in 1983 and the children began to leave the house, the Felumlees began to explore their love of travel, visiting almost all 50 states by bus. "He didn't want to fly anywhere because you couldn't see anything as you were going," Jim said. Although both experienced declining health in recent years, Cody said, each tried to stay strong for the other. "That's what kept them going," she said."
"A"
"How many jobs did Kenneth get?"
[ "Four.", "Three.", "Two.", "One." ]
"high9374.txt"
"Very soon the Rabbit noticed Alice, as she went hunting about, and called out to her, "What are you doing out here? Run home this moment, and fetch me a pair of gloves and a fan! Quick, now!" Alice was so much frightened that she ran off at once in the direction it pointed to. She saw a little house, on the door of which was a plate with the name "W. RABBIT". She went in and hurried upstairs. By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room with a table in the window, and on it a fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves: she took up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time with the words' DRINK ME,' but she opened it and put it to her lips ."I know something interesting is sure to happen," she said to herself. Before she had drunk half the bottle, she found her head touching the ceiling. She went on growing and very soon had to get down on her knees on the floor. Still she went on growing, and as a last _ , she put one arm out of the window, and one foot up the chimney , and said to herself, "Now I can do no more, whatever happens. What will happen to me?" Luckily for Alice, she grew no longer: still it was very uncomfortable, and as there seemed to be no sort of chance of her ever getting out of the room again, no wonder she felt unhappy."
"B"
"According to the passage, we can know that Alice _ ."
[ "felt comfortable when she grew no longer", "was afraid when the Rabbit called out to her", "knew what would happen to her if she continued to grow", "saw a label \"DRINK ME\" on the bottle and drank half of it" ]
"high9374.txt"
"Very soon the Rabbit noticed Alice, as she went hunting about, and called out to her, "What are you doing out here? Run home this moment, and fetch me a pair of gloves and a fan! Quick, now!" Alice was so much frightened that she ran off at once in the direction it pointed to. She saw a little house, on the door of which was a plate with the name "W. RABBIT". She went in and hurried upstairs. By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room with a table in the window, and on it a fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves: she took up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time with the words' DRINK ME,' but she opened it and put it to her lips ."I know something interesting is sure to happen," she said to herself. Before she had drunk half the bottle, she found her head touching the ceiling. She went on growing and very soon had to get down on her knees on the floor. Still she went on growing, and as a last _ , she put one arm out of the window, and one foot up the chimney , and said to herself, "Now I can do no more, whatever happens. What will happen to me?" Luckily for Alice, she grew no longer: still it was very uncomfortable, and as there seemed to be no sort of chance of her ever getting out of the room again, no wonder she felt unhappy."
"C"
"Alice grew so big because she _ ."
[ "had special magical power", "wore the Rabbit's gloves.", "drank something in the bottle", "wanted to frighten the Rabbit" ]
"high9374.txt"
"Very soon the Rabbit noticed Alice, as she went hunting about, and called out to her, "What are you doing out here? Run home this moment, and fetch me a pair of gloves and a fan! Quick, now!" Alice was so much frightened that she ran off at once in the direction it pointed to. She saw a little house, on the door of which was a plate with the name "W. RABBIT". She went in and hurried upstairs. By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room with a table in the window, and on it a fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves: she took up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time with the words' DRINK ME,' but she opened it and put it to her lips ."I know something interesting is sure to happen," she said to herself. Before she had drunk half the bottle, she found her head touching the ceiling. She went on growing and very soon had to get down on her knees on the floor. Still she went on growing, and as a last _ , she put one arm out of the window, and one foot up the chimney , and said to herself, "Now I can do no more, whatever happens. What will happen to me?" Luckily for Alice, she grew no longer: still it was very uncomfortable, and as there seemed to be no sort of chance of her ever getting out of the room again, no wonder she felt unhappy."
"D"
"The passage may come from a(an) _ ."
[ "science book", "wildlife magazine", "guide book", "English novel" ]
"high6885.txt"
"My favourite book is The Adventure of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.Tom lives with his aunt Polly in a quiet street of St. Petersburg, Missouri.He's a lively and clever young boy,and he finds himself in many exciting adventures.He runs away with his two friends,Huck Finn and Joe,to an island in the middle of the Mississippi River for several days.With Huck he goes looking for treasure, with Becky he gets lost in a cave.and finally,they find a box of gold. My favourite scene in the book is when everyone thinks Tom is dead.He decides to go to his own funeral.He hides and watches for a time and then suddenly he appears. Everyone is astonished to see him but they're also pleased to see him alive. Tom is the hero of the story,but there are other important characters.Huck is an outsider and everyone is afraid of him.Becky is pretty with fair hair,Joe is Tom's best friend.and Injun Joe is the bad man of the story. The theme of the story is about children growing up.It describes how strangers are seen in small towns of America. Finally, it talks about freedom,social rules and how people are punished for bad behaviour. Why do I think The Adventure of Tom Sawyer is a great book? Mark Twain wrote the story in 1876,but it's still read and loved by people all over the world today. And although it's only a story, Twain wrote it in the everyday English of the southern states of America in the 19th century,so it sounds very real. Today it's thought to be one of the greatest books in American literature. Go on--- read it! I know you'll enjoy it,too."
"A"
".How did people feel when Tom appeared at his own funeral ?"
[ "They were surprised and happy.", "They were surprised and sad", "They were worried and excited.", "They were frightened and happy." ]
"high6885.txt"
"My favourite book is The Adventure of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.Tom lives with his aunt Polly in a quiet street of St. Petersburg, Missouri.He's a lively and clever young boy,and he finds himself in many exciting adventures.He runs away with his two friends,Huck Finn and Joe,to an island in the middle of the Mississippi River for several days.With Huck he goes looking for treasure, with Becky he gets lost in a cave.and finally,they find a box of gold. My favourite scene in the book is when everyone thinks Tom is dead.He decides to go to his own funeral.He hides and watches for a time and then suddenly he appears. Everyone is astonished to see him but they're also pleased to see him alive. Tom is the hero of the story,but there are other important characters.Huck is an outsider and everyone is afraid of him.Becky is pretty with fair hair,Joe is Tom's best friend.and Injun Joe is the bad man of the story. The theme of the story is about children growing up.It describes how strangers are seen in small towns of America. Finally, it talks about freedom,social rules and how people are punished for bad behaviour. Why do I think The Adventure of Tom Sawyer is a great book? Mark Twain wrote the story in 1876,but it's still read and loved by people all over the world today. And although it's only a story, Twain wrote it in the everyday English of the southern states of America in the 19th century,so it sounds very real. Today it's thought to be one of the greatest books in American literature. Go on--- read it! I know you'll enjoy it,too."
"C"
".The whole book is mainly about _ ."
[ "freedom and social rules", "children's bad behaviour", "the growth of young children", "strangers in American small towns" ]
"high6885.txt"
"My favourite book is The Adventure of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.Tom lives with his aunt Polly in a quiet street of St. Petersburg, Missouri.He's a lively and clever young boy,and he finds himself in many exciting adventures.He runs away with his two friends,Huck Finn and Joe,to an island in the middle of the Mississippi River for several days.With Huck he goes looking for treasure, with Becky he gets lost in a cave.and finally,they find a box of gold. My favourite scene in the book is when everyone thinks Tom is dead.He decides to go to his own funeral.He hides and watches for a time and then suddenly he appears. Everyone is astonished to see him but they're also pleased to see him alive. Tom is the hero of the story,but there are other important characters.Huck is an outsider and everyone is afraid of him.Becky is pretty with fair hair,Joe is Tom's best friend.and Injun Joe is the bad man of the story. The theme of the story is about children growing up.It describes how strangers are seen in small towns of America. Finally, it talks about freedom,social rules and how people are punished for bad behaviour. Why do I think The Adventure of Tom Sawyer is a great book? Mark Twain wrote the story in 1876,but it's still read and loved by people all over the world today. And although it's only a story, Twain wrote it in the everyday English of the southern states of America in the 19th century,so it sounds very real. Today it's thought to be one of the greatest books in American literature. Go on--- read it! I know you'll enjoy it,too."
"A"
".The writer writes the article to _ ."
[ "ask us to read the book", "tell us how popular the book is today", "tell us when Mark Twain wrote the story", "tell us why the story sounds very real" ]
"high11664.txt"
"What does it mean to say that we live in a world of persuasion? It means that we live among competing interests. Your roommate's need to study for an exam may take priority over pizza. Your instructor may have good reasons not to change your grade. In such a world, persuasion is the art of getting others to give fair and favorable consideration to our points of view. When we persuade, we want to influence how others believe and behave. We may not always _ -- other points of view may be more persuasive, depending on the listener, the situation, and the merit of the case. But when we practice the art of persuasion, we try to ensure that our position receives the attention it deserves. Some people, however, object to the very idea of persuasion. They may regard it as an unwelcome interruption into their lives. Just the opposite, we believe that persuasion is unavoidable -- to live is to persuade. Persuasion may be ethical or unethical, selfless or selfish, inspiring or degrading. Persuaders may enlighten our minds or get our vulnerability . Ethical persuasion, however, calls on sound reasoning and is sensitive to the feelings and needs of listeners. Such persuasion can help us apply the wisdom of the past to the decisions we now must make. Therefore, the most basic part of education is learning to resist the one kind of persuasion and to encourage and practice the other. Beyond its personal importance to us, persuasion is necessary to society. The right to persuade and be persuaded is the bedrock of the American political system, guaranteed by the First Amendment to the Constitution ."
"C"
"According to the passage, persuasion means _ ."
[ "changing others' points of view", "exercising power over other people", "getting other people to consider your point of view", "getting people to agree with you and do what you want" ]
"high11664.txt"
"What does it mean to say that we live in a world of persuasion? It means that we live among competing interests. Your roommate's need to study for an exam may take priority over pizza. Your instructor may have good reasons not to change your grade. In such a world, persuasion is the art of getting others to give fair and favorable consideration to our points of view. When we persuade, we want to influence how others believe and behave. We may not always _ -- other points of view may be more persuasive, depending on the listener, the situation, and the merit of the case. But when we practice the art of persuasion, we try to ensure that our position receives the attention it deserves. Some people, however, object to the very idea of persuasion. They may regard it as an unwelcome interruption into their lives. Just the opposite, we believe that persuasion is unavoidable -- to live is to persuade. Persuasion may be ethical or unethical, selfless or selfish, inspiring or degrading. Persuaders may enlighten our minds or get our vulnerability . Ethical persuasion, however, calls on sound reasoning and is sensitive to the feelings and needs of listeners. Such persuasion can help us apply the wisdom of the past to the decisions we now must make. Therefore, the most basic part of education is learning to resist the one kind of persuasion and to encourage and practice the other. Beyond its personal importance to us, persuasion is necessary to society. The right to persuade and be persuaded is the bedrock of the American political system, guaranteed by the First Amendment to the Constitution ."
"C"
"The passage states that some people object to persuasion because they think it is _ ."
[ "a danger to society", "difficult to do well", "unwelcome behavior", "never successful" ]
"high11664.txt"
"What does it mean to say that we live in a world of persuasion? It means that we live among competing interests. Your roommate's need to study for an exam may take priority over pizza. Your instructor may have good reasons not to change your grade. In such a world, persuasion is the art of getting others to give fair and favorable consideration to our points of view. When we persuade, we want to influence how others believe and behave. We may not always _ -- other points of view may be more persuasive, depending on the listener, the situation, and the merit of the case. But when we practice the art of persuasion, we try to ensure that our position receives the attention it deserves. Some people, however, object to the very idea of persuasion. They may regard it as an unwelcome interruption into their lives. Just the opposite, we believe that persuasion is unavoidable -- to live is to persuade. Persuasion may be ethical or unethical, selfless or selfish, inspiring or degrading. Persuaders may enlighten our minds or get our vulnerability . Ethical persuasion, however, calls on sound reasoning and is sensitive to the feelings and needs of listeners. Such persuasion can help us apply the wisdom of the past to the decisions we now must make. Therefore, the most basic part of education is learning to resist the one kind of persuasion and to encourage and practice the other. Beyond its personal importance to us, persuasion is necessary to society. The right to persuade and be persuaded is the bedrock of the American political system, guaranteed by the First Amendment to the Constitution ."
"D"
"The passage mainly discusses _ ."
[ "that people persuade to get what they want", "that people persuade in different ways", "that persuasion is widely accepted and appreciated", "that persuasion is important and it is all around us" ]
"high10134.txt"
"Hi, everybody! Welcome to our newly-opened Richards Cinema Bookstore! Now let me introduce to you some of the new film books in our store. Are you Chinese film fans? OK, here comes the latest 25 New Takes about Chinese films. It is a collection of 25 fresh readings of different Chinese films from the 1930s to the present. In recent years, Chinese films are very popular in the States, such as Crouching Tiger and Hidden Dragon, Hero, and Flowers of Shanghai. Do you like French films? Well, here is The French Cinema Book. It covers French films from the 1890s to the beginning of the 21st century. It is written for all lovers of French cinema: students and teachers, specialists and fans, and so on. Maybe you are Indian film fans and star-chasers. Then here is Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema. The book is complete introduction to all the best Indian films. It also offers a full list of names of the famous and successful film stars in the past ten years. You know, the Indian film industry is the largest in the world after our Hollywood. If you like British films, we have The British Cinema Book. It is a good review of British cinema. This book contains a good many nice pictures. In our bookstore, you can also find books about Mexican, Japanese, Australian, German and Italian films. Well, please help yourselves to some coffee or tea, and have a good time here!"
"C"
"The speaker of the passage is most probably _ ."
[ "the author of 25 New Takes", "a tourist in the cinema bookstore", "the manager of the cinema bookstore", "a reader of Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema" ]
"high10134.txt"
"Hi, everybody! Welcome to our newly-opened Richards Cinema Bookstore! Now let me introduce to you some of the new film books in our store. Are you Chinese film fans? OK, here comes the latest 25 New Takes about Chinese films. It is a collection of 25 fresh readings of different Chinese films from the 1930s to the present. In recent years, Chinese films are very popular in the States, such as Crouching Tiger and Hidden Dragon, Hero, and Flowers of Shanghai. Do you like French films? Well, here is The French Cinema Book. It covers French films from the 1890s to the beginning of the 21st century. It is written for all lovers of French cinema: students and teachers, specialists and fans, and so on. Maybe you are Indian film fans and star-chasers. Then here is Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema. The book is complete introduction to all the best Indian films. It also offers a full list of names of the famous and successful film stars in the past ten years. You know, the Indian film industry is the largest in the world after our Hollywood. If you like British films, we have The British Cinema Book. It is a good review of British cinema. This book contains a good many nice pictures. In our bookstore, you can also find books about Mexican, Japanese, Australian, German and Italian films. Well, please help yourselves to some coffee or tea, and have a good time here!"
"A"
"The purpose of the speaker is _ ."
[ "to satisfy the customers' various tastes", "to keep the authors in the cinema bookstore", "to offer the tourists chances to meet the film stars", "to turn the readers into film producers" ]
"high19192.txt"
"A rare butterfly has been discovered in Britain for the first time in 60 years,having moved from Eastern Europe.The only previous record of a wild yellow-legged Tortoiseshell in Britain was in 1953,when it was seen just once in Sevenoaks,Kent.Several weeks ago,there were already four confirmed sightings,along the East coast in Norfolk,Suffolk and Kent,and six further reports of the butterfly in coastal areas. Conservationists are very excited about the sightings,which are rare in the butterfly world. The butterflies are thought to have flown on easterly winds across Europe in the last few weeks.The large and colourful insect mainly lives in Eastern Europe.In recent years,it has spread into Scandinavia and its number increases rapidly during warm weather.Also known as the Scarce Tortoiseshell,it has an orange and blue colour and is about one third bigger than our own Small Tortoiseshell. Butterfly Conservation was starting its annual Big Butterfly Count,a yearly survey of the butterflies across the nation.Sir David Attenborough,President of the charity,said,"The UK is a nation of amateur naturalists and we have a proud tradition of celebrating and studying our wildlife.By taking part in the Big Butterfly Count this summer,you can contribute to discovering the fantastic butterflies and other wildlife that share your garden,parks and countryside."He added,"Butterflies fought back last year after a terrible 2012 but despite this,butterfly numbers were still below average.Three quarters of the UK's butterflies are in decline and one third are in danger of dying out.This is bad news for the UK's birds,bees,bats and other wildlife."
"A"
"These rare butterflies usually live in _ ."
[ "Eastern Europe", "Norfolk,Suffolk and Kent", "coastal areas", "Sevenoaks,Kent" ]
"high19192.txt"
"A rare butterfly has been discovered in Britain for the first time in 60 years,having moved from Eastern Europe.The only previous record of a wild yellow-legged Tortoiseshell in Britain was in 1953,when it was seen just once in Sevenoaks,Kent.Several weeks ago,there were already four confirmed sightings,along the East coast in Norfolk,Suffolk and Kent,and six further reports of the butterfly in coastal areas. Conservationists are very excited about the sightings,which are rare in the butterfly world. The butterflies are thought to have flown on easterly winds across Europe in the last few weeks.The large and colourful insect mainly lives in Eastern Europe.In recent years,it has spread into Scandinavia and its number increases rapidly during warm weather.Also known as the Scarce Tortoiseshell,it has an orange and blue colour and is about one third bigger than our own Small Tortoiseshell. Butterfly Conservation was starting its annual Big Butterfly Count,a yearly survey of the butterflies across the nation.Sir David Attenborough,President of the charity,said,"The UK is a nation of amateur naturalists and we have a proud tradition of celebrating and studying our wildlife.By taking part in the Big Butterfly Count this summer,you can contribute to discovering the fantastic butterflies and other wildlife that share your garden,parks and countryside."He added,"Butterflies fought back last year after a terrible 2012 but despite this,butterfly numbers were still below average.Three quarters of the UK's butterflies are in decline and one third are in danger of dying out.This is bad news for the UK's birds,bees,bats and other wildlife."
"C"
"The annual Big Butterfly Count is Intended to _ ."
[ "inspire amateurs'studying interest", "teach people to do good gardening", "study butterflies across Britain", "celebrate naturalists'contributions" ]
"high19192.txt"
"A rare butterfly has been discovered in Britain for the first time in 60 years,having moved from Eastern Europe.The only previous record of a wild yellow-legged Tortoiseshell in Britain was in 1953,when it was seen just once in Sevenoaks,Kent.Several weeks ago,there were already four confirmed sightings,along the East coast in Norfolk,Suffolk and Kent,and six further reports of the butterfly in coastal areas. Conservationists are very excited about the sightings,which are rare in the butterfly world. The butterflies are thought to have flown on easterly winds across Europe in the last few weeks.The large and colourful insect mainly lives in Eastern Europe.In recent years,it has spread into Scandinavia and its number increases rapidly during warm weather.Also known as the Scarce Tortoiseshell,it has an orange and blue colour and is about one third bigger than our own Small Tortoiseshell. Butterfly Conservation was starting its annual Big Butterfly Count,a yearly survey of the butterflies across the nation.Sir David Attenborough,President of the charity,said,"The UK is a nation of amateur naturalists and we have a proud tradition of celebrating and studying our wildlife.By taking part in the Big Butterfly Count this summer,you can contribute to discovering the fantastic butterflies and other wildlife that share your garden,parks and countryside."He added,"Butterflies fought back last year after a terrible 2012 but despite this,butterfly numbers were still below average.Three quarters of the UK's butterflies are in decline and one third are in danger of dying out.This is bad news for the UK's birds,bees,bats and other wildlife."
"C"
"What's the main idea of the text?"
[ "Butterflies are quite rare in Britain.", "Butterflies like travelling frequently.", "A rare butterfly appeared in Britain.", "The butterfly world changed a lot." ]
"high11886.txt"
"The first time Luca heard the Island of Inventions, he was very young, but the wonders he heard about sounded so unbelievable to him that they were forever kept in his memory. Since then, he never stopped searching clues which might lead him to that place of wonder. He read widely to collect information. Taking a little from here and there, he got quite a clear idea of what the Island was really like. It was a secret place, where all the great men learn and invent together. To be able to join that select club, you had to have created great inventions. Only then could you receive the invitation. To get a chance, Luca spend the years studying and inventing. Every new idea he got, he made it into an invention, and if there were anything he didn't understand, he would seek help. Soon he met other brilliant inventors too, and he told them of the secrets of the Island. These young inventors would likewise dream of being sent "the letter". As time passed, the disappointment of not being sent the letter gave rise to even greater cooperation and help between them. Their inventions soon became known throughout the world. But no invention came. They didn't lose heart. They continued learning and inventing, trying to come up with better ideas. Fresh talent was added to their group. One day, Luca, already very old, was speaking with a brilliant young man who had written to join their group. Luca told the young man the secrets of the Island, and of how he was sure that they would receive an invitation. Surprised, the young inventor said: "What? You mean this isn't really the Island of Inventions?" It inspired Luca and he realized that his dream had become true."
"C"
"Luca read widely to _ ."
[ "get information about the great inventions", "get clear ideas about the island for vacations", "seek massages about the secret club of inventions", "get more knowledge for the benefit of his inventions" ]
"high11886.txt"
"The first time Luca heard the Island of Inventions, he was very young, but the wonders he heard about sounded so unbelievable to him that they were forever kept in his memory. Since then, he never stopped searching clues which might lead him to that place of wonder. He read widely to collect information. Taking a little from here and there, he got quite a clear idea of what the Island was really like. It was a secret place, where all the great men learn and invent together. To be able to join that select club, you had to have created great inventions. Only then could you receive the invitation. To get a chance, Luca spend the years studying and inventing. Every new idea he got, he made it into an invention, and if there were anything he didn't understand, he would seek help. Soon he met other brilliant inventors too, and he told them of the secrets of the Island. These young inventors would likewise dream of being sent "the letter". As time passed, the disappointment of not being sent the letter gave rise to even greater cooperation and help between them. Their inventions soon became known throughout the world. But no invention came. They didn't lose heart. They continued learning and inventing, trying to come up with better ideas. Fresh talent was added to their group. One day, Luca, already very old, was speaking with a brilliant young man who had written to join their group. Luca told the young man the secrets of the Island, and of how he was sure that they would receive an invitation. Surprised, the young inventor said: "What? You mean this isn't really the Island of Inventions?" It inspired Luca and he realized that his dream had become true."
"B"
"Luca and other brilliant inventors around him shared a dream of _ ."
[ "being great inventors of worldwide fame", "being accepted as members of the Island of Inventions", "being inventors envied by members of the Island of Inventions", "being remembered for the contribution to scientific development" ]
"high11886.txt"
"The first time Luca heard the Island of Inventions, he was very young, but the wonders he heard about sounded so unbelievable to him that they were forever kept in his memory. Since then, he never stopped searching clues which might lead him to that place of wonder. He read widely to collect information. Taking a little from here and there, he got quite a clear idea of what the Island was really like. It was a secret place, where all the great men learn and invent together. To be able to join that select club, you had to have created great inventions. Only then could you receive the invitation. To get a chance, Luca spend the years studying and inventing. Every new idea he got, he made it into an invention, and if there were anything he didn't understand, he would seek help. Soon he met other brilliant inventors too, and he told them of the secrets of the Island. These young inventors would likewise dream of being sent "the letter". As time passed, the disappointment of not being sent the letter gave rise to even greater cooperation and help between them. Their inventions soon became known throughout the world. But no invention came. They didn't lose heart. They continued learning and inventing, trying to come up with better ideas. Fresh talent was added to their group. One day, Luca, already very old, was speaking with a brilliant young man who had written to join their group. Luca told the young man the secrets of the Island, and of how he was sure that they would receive an invitation. Surprised, the young inventor said: "What? You mean this isn't really the Island of Inventions?" It inspired Luca and he realized that his dream had become true."
"A"
"What is the effect of their not being given "the letter"?"
[ "They were disappointed, while it encouraged them to work harder.", "They became desperate and decided to have another way of living.", "They changed their strategy and promote their inventions publicly.", "They gave up their dream while continued their inventions together." ]
"high8556.txt"
"One of the traditions which is now a necessary part of Christmas is a that of Father Christmas, or Santa Claus. According to the modern legend, he is a magical figure who visits all the children of the world during the night before Christmas Day, leaving presents which they find the next morning. He flies through the night sky in a sledge pulled by reindeer, and enters houses by climbing down chimneys. This strange legend is based on the life of a man called Nicholas, but in fact we know very little about him. Historians think he was a Christian bishop in Turkey in about 285--350 A.D. One of the stories about him is that he helped three poor girls. No one would marry them because they were so poor. To provide them with money for their weddings, Nicholas secretly dropped some gold coins down the chimney of their house. After Nicholas died, he was made a saint by the church.(The name Santa Claus thus comes from St Nicholas.) His feast day was celebrated in December, and parents started giving their children secret presents from St Nicholas. Over the years, this custom became part of our Christmas traditions. Recently, a psychologist has claimed that Father Christmas is "the perfect fantasy" for children. According to Professor Anthony Clare, children love the character of Father Christmas because he is like an ideal father: he loves children and gives them presents, but he never criticizes them, is never angry, and children do not even need to thank him for the presents. Other writers, however, point out that Father Christmas can be a frightening character to some children. Jane Bidder says that some children are terrified of this fat, bearded old man. It can certainly confuse many children. As parents, we warn our children to be careful of strangers and never to let them into the house, and yet we tell children that a strange man will come into their bedroom at night! Some children can become very worried about this idea and fear that he is a kind of burglar. Most children, however, understand from their parents and from the media that Father Christmas is basically a _ character, and look forward to his annual visit with joy and excitement."
"D"
"The writer mentions details such as Father Christmas's sledge, the reindeer and the way he climbs down chimneys because he/she _"
[ "wants to make it clear that these things are impossible", "is describing the history of St Nicholas", "wants everyone to believe that Father Christmas is real", "is explaining the modern legend of Father Christmas" ]
"high8556.txt"
"One of the traditions which is now a necessary part of Christmas is a that of Father Christmas, or Santa Claus. According to the modern legend, he is a magical figure who visits all the children of the world during the night before Christmas Day, leaving presents which they find the next morning. He flies through the night sky in a sledge pulled by reindeer, and enters houses by climbing down chimneys. This strange legend is based on the life of a man called Nicholas, but in fact we know very little about him. Historians think he was a Christian bishop in Turkey in about 285--350 A.D. One of the stories about him is that he helped three poor girls. No one would marry them because they were so poor. To provide them with money for their weddings, Nicholas secretly dropped some gold coins down the chimney of their house. After Nicholas died, he was made a saint by the church.(The name Santa Claus thus comes from St Nicholas.) His feast day was celebrated in December, and parents started giving their children secret presents from St Nicholas. Over the years, this custom became part of our Christmas traditions. Recently, a psychologist has claimed that Father Christmas is "the perfect fantasy" for children. According to Professor Anthony Clare, children love the character of Father Christmas because he is like an ideal father: he loves children and gives them presents, but he never criticizes them, is never angry, and children do not even need to thank him for the presents. Other writers, however, point out that Father Christmas can be a frightening character to some children. Jane Bidder says that some children are terrified of this fat, bearded old man. It can certainly confuse many children. As parents, we warn our children to be careful of strangers and never to let them into the house, and yet we tell children that a strange man will come into their bedroom at night! Some children can become very worried about this idea and fear that he is a kind of burglar. Most children, however, understand from their parents and from the media that Father Christmas is basically a _ character, and look forward to his annual visit with joy and excitement."
"B"
"Why does the writer mention the story about St Nicholas helping three poor girls?"
[ "It shows us that historians know very little about him.", "This story explains why parents give secret presents to children.", "It supports the writer's main point that Father Christmas is based on an untrue story.", "This story explains why we celebrate Christmas in December." ]
"high8556.txt"
"One of the traditions which is now a necessary part of Christmas is a that of Father Christmas, or Santa Claus. According to the modern legend, he is a magical figure who visits all the children of the world during the night before Christmas Day, leaving presents which they find the next morning. He flies through the night sky in a sledge pulled by reindeer, and enters houses by climbing down chimneys. This strange legend is based on the life of a man called Nicholas, but in fact we know very little about him. Historians think he was a Christian bishop in Turkey in about 285--350 A.D. One of the stories about him is that he helped three poor girls. No one would marry them because they were so poor. To provide them with money for their weddings, Nicholas secretly dropped some gold coins down the chimney of their house. After Nicholas died, he was made a saint by the church.(The name Santa Claus thus comes from St Nicholas.) His feast day was celebrated in December, and parents started giving their children secret presents from St Nicholas. Over the years, this custom became part of our Christmas traditions. Recently, a psychologist has claimed that Father Christmas is "the perfect fantasy" for children. According to Professor Anthony Clare, children love the character of Father Christmas because he is like an ideal father: he loves children and gives them presents, but he never criticizes them, is never angry, and children do not even need to thank him for the presents. Other writers, however, point out that Father Christmas can be a frightening character to some children. Jane Bidder says that some children are terrified of this fat, bearded old man. It can certainly confuse many children. As parents, we warn our children to be careful of strangers and never to let them into the house, and yet we tell children that a strange man will come into their bedroom at night! Some children can become very worried about this idea and fear that he is a kind of burglar. Most children, however, understand from their parents and from the media that Father Christmas is basically a _ character, and look forward to his annual visit with joy and excitement."
"C"
"The best title for this passage would be _ ."
[ "Is Father Christmas Dangerous?", "The True History of St Nicholas", "The Legend of Santa Claus", "The Traditions of Christmas" ]
"high18377.txt"
"A new law helps people with disabilities. The law says that people with disabilities must be able to get into and out of all public buildings. It also says that business must offer special services to people who have special needs. Companies can not refuse to hire disabled workers. Many businesses may have to change their buildings and services. --Ramps must be built so people can get into buildings. --Movie theatres must have space for people in wheelchairs and seats for their friends to sit near them. --Elevators must have floor number in _ . This law will help millions of people. One woman who has been in a wheelchair for many years said, "It is like a dream.""
"D"
"According to the passage we can see that_."
[ "it will be difficult for the normal persons to get into the public buildings", "the buildings of all the businesses will have to be changed", "Most businesses used to offer special services to people who have special needs", "it was difficult for the disabled workers to find jobs in the past" ]
"high18377.txt"
"A new law helps people with disabilities. The law says that people with disabilities must be able to get into and out of all public buildings. It also says that business must offer special services to people who have special needs. Companies can not refuse to hire disabled workers. Many businesses may have to change their buildings and services. --Ramps must be built so people can get into buildings. --Movie theatres must have space for people in wheelchairs and seats for their friends to sit near them. --Elevators must have floor number in _ . This law will help millions of people. One woman who has been in a wheelchair for many years said, "It is like a dream.""
"C"
"Ramps can help people_."
[ "with hearing problems", "who have difficulty in using their hands", "who have difficulty in using their legs or feet", "who don't like stairs" ]
"high18377.txt"
"A new law helps people with disabilities. The law says that people with disabilities must be able to get into and out of all public buildings. It also says that business must offer special services to people who have special needs. Companies can not refuse to hire disabled workers. Many businesses may have to change their buildings and services. --Ramps must be built so people can get into buildings. --Movie theatres must have space for people in wheelchairs and seats for their friends to sit near them. --Elevators must have floor number in _ . This law will help millions of people. One woman who has been in a wheelchair for many years said, "It is like a dream.""
"D"
"The word "Braille" means_."
[ "words known by foreigners", "words known by common people", "words on walls", "words known by the blind" ]
"high18377.txt"
"A new law helps people with disabilities. The law says that people with disabilities must be able to get into and out of all public buildings. It also says that business must offer special services to people who have special needs. Companies can not refuse to hire disabled workers. Many businesses may have to change their buildings and services. --Ramps must be built so people can get into buildings. --Movie theatres must have space for people in wheelchairs and seats for their friends to sit near them. --Elevators must have floor number in _ . This law will help millions of people. One woman who has been in a wheelchair for many years said, "It is like a dream.""
"C"
"What do you think the disabled would feel about the new law?"
[ "They may think the new law reasonable.", "Some of them are sure to be for the new law.", "They must feel very excited and happy.", "They feel it is like a dream." ]
"high18377.txt"
"A new law helps people with disabilities. The law says that people with disabilities must be able to get into and out of all public buildings. It also says that business must offer special services to people who have special needs. Companies can not refuse to hire disabled workers. Many businesses may have to change their buildings and services. --Ramps must be built so people can get into buildings. --Movie theatres must have space for people in wheelchairs and seats for their friends to sit near them. --Elevators must have floor number in _ . This law will help millions of people. One woman who has been in a wheelchair for many years said, "It is like a dream.""
"B"
"The fact that the new law has been passed shows that _ ."
[ "the government has paid no attention to the disabilities", "the government wants to help these disabilities", "normal people show mercy to the disabilities", "companies will hire millions of disabled people" ]
"high15438.txt"
""What is the most important thing you've done in your life?" The question was put to me during a presentation I gave to a group of lawyers. The answer came to me in an instant. It's not the one I gave, because the situation was not right. As a lawyer in the entertainment industry, I knew the audience wanted to hear some amusing stories about my work with well-known people, but here's the true answer: The most important thing I've ever done occurred on October 8,1990. I began the day playing tennis with an old friend I hadn't seen for a while. Between points we talked about what had been happening in each other's lives. He and his wife had just had a baby boy, who was keeping them up at night. While we were playing, a car came screaming up the road toward the courts. It was my friend's father, who shouted to my friend that his baby had stopped breathing and was being rushed to the hospital. In a flash my friend was in the car and gone, disappearing in a cloud of dust. For a moment I just stood there, paralyzed . Then I tried to figure out what I should do. Follow my friend to the hospital? There was nothing I could accomplish there, I convinced myself. My friend's son was in the care of doctors and nurses, and nothing I could do or say would affect the outcome. Be there for moral support? Well, maybe. But my friend and his wife both had large families, and I knew they'd be surrounded by relatives who would provide more than enough comfort and support, whatever happened. All I could do at the hospital, I decided, was to get in the way. Also, I had planned a full day with my family, who were waiting for me to get home. So I decided to head back to my house and check in my friend later. As I started my car, I realized that my friend had left his truck and keys at the courts. I now faced another problem. I couldn't leave the keys in the truck. So I decided to go to the hospital and give him the keys. When I arrived, I was directed to a room where my friend and his wife were waiting. As I had thought, the room was filled with family members silently watching my friend comfort his wife. I went in and stood by the door, trying to decide what to do next. Soon a doctor appeared. He approached my friend and his wife, and in a quiet voice told them that their son had died. For a long time the two held each other and cried, unaware of the rest of us standing around in pained silence. After they had calmed themselves, the doctor suggested they spend a few moments with their son. My friend and his wife stood up and walked past their families. When they reached the door, my friend saw me standing in the corner. He came over and hugged me and started to cry. My friend's wife hugged me, too, and said , "Thanks for being here." For the rest of that morning, I sat in the emergency room of that hospital and watched my friend and his wife hold the body of their infant son, and say goodbye. It's the most important thing I have ever done. The experience taught me two lessons. First: The most important thing I've ever done happened when I was completely helpless. None of the things I had learned in university, in three years of law school or in six years of legal practice were of any use in that situation. Something terrible was happening to people I cared about, and I was powerless to change the outcome. All I could do was standing by and watching it happen. And yet it was critical that I do just that--- just be there when someone needed me. Second: The most important thing I've done almost didn't happen because of things I had learned in classroom and professional life. Law school taught me how to take a set of facts, break them down and organized them. These skills are critical for lawyers. When people come to us for help, they're often stressed out and depend on a lawyer to think logically. But while learning to think, I almost forget how to feel. Today I have no doubt that I should have leapt into my car without hesitation and followed my friend to the hospital. From that one experience I learned that the most important thing in life isn't the money you make, the status you attain or the honors you achieve."
"D"
"When he was asked about the most important thing he had done in life at a presentation, the author _ ."
[ "felt it was not an interesting question", "thought for a while and spoke his mind", "gave an answer from a lawyer's point of view", "didn't give the real answer" ]
"high15438.txt"
""What is the most important thing you've done in your life?" The question was put to me during a presentation I gave to a group of lawyers. The answer came to me in an instant. It's not the one I gave, because the situation was not right. As a lawyer in the entertainment industry, I knew the audience wanted to hear some amusing stories about my work with well-known people, but here's the true answer: The most important thing I've ever done occurred on October 8,1990. I began the day playing tennis with an old friend I hadn't seen for a while. Between points we talked about what had been happening in each other's lives. He and his wife had just had a baby boy, who was keeping them up at night. While we were playing, a car came screaming up the road toward the courts. It was my friend's father, who shouted to my friend that his baby had stopped breathing and was being rushed to the hospital. In a flash my friend was in the car and gone, disappearing in a cloud of dust. For a moment I just stood there, paralyzed . Then I tried to figure out what I should do. Follow my friend to the hospital? There was nothing I could accomplish there, I convinced myself. My friend's son was in the care of doctors and nurses, and nothing I could do or say would affect the outcome. Be there for moral support? Well, maybe. But my friend and his wife both had large families, and I knew they'd be surrounded by relatives who would provide more than enough comfort and support, whatever happened. All I could do at the hospital, I decided, was to get in the way. Also, I had planned a full day with my family, who were waiting for me to get home. So I decided to head back to my house and check in my friend later. As I started my car, I realized that my friend had left his truck and keys at the courts. I now faced another problem. I couldn't leave the keys in the truck. So I decided to go to the hospital and give him the keys. When I arrived, I was directed to a room where my friend and his wife were waiting. As I had thought, the room was filled with family members silently watching my friend comfort his wife. I went in and stood by the door, trying to decide what to do next. Soon a doctor appeared. He approached my friend and his wife, and in a quiet voice told them that their son had died. For a long time the two held each other and cried, unaware of the rest of us standing around in pained silence. After they had calmed themselves, the doctor suggested they spend a few moments with their son. My friend and his wife stood up and walked past their families. When they reached the door, my friend saw me standing in the corner. He came over and hugged me and started to cry. My friend's wife hugged me, too, and said , "Thanks for being here." For the rest of that morning, I sat in the emergency room of that hospital and watched my friend and his wife hold the body of their infant son, and say goodbye. It's the most important thing I have ever done. The experience taught me two lessons. First: The most important thing I've ever done happened when I was completely helpless. None of the things I had learned in university, in three years of law school or in six years of legal practice were of any use in that situation. Something terrible was happening to people I cared about, and I was powerless to change the outcome. All I could do was standing by and watching it happen. And yet it was critical that I do just that--- just be there when someone needed me. Second: The most important thing I've done almost didn't happen because of things I had learned in classroom and professional life. Law school taught me how to take a set of facts, break them down and organized them. These skills are critical for lawyers. When people come to us for help, they're often stressed out and depend on a lawyer to think logically. But while learning to think, I almost forget how to feel. Today I have no doubt that I should have leapt into my car without hesitation and followed my friend to the hospital. From that one experience I learned that the most important thing in life isn't the money you make, the status you attain or the honors you achieve."
"C"
"When he saw his friend rush to the hospital, the author could not decide whether to follow mainly because he thought _ ."
[ "he had to stay with his family", "his friend did not need his help.", "he would not be of much help", "the baby would be in the doctor's care" ]
"high15438.txt"
""What is the most important thing you've done in your life?" The question was put to me during a presentation I gave to a group of lawyers. The answer came to me in an instant. It's not the one I gave, because the situation was not right. As a lawyer in the entertainment industry, I knew the audience wanted to hear some amusing stories about my work with well-known people, but here's the true answer: The most important thing I've ever done occurred on October 8,1990. I began the day playing tennis with an old friend I hadn't seen for a while. Between points we talked about what had been happening in each other's lives. He and his wife had just had a baby boy, who was keeping them up at night. While we were playing, a car came screaming up the road toward the courts. It was my friend's father, who shouted to my friend that his baby had stopped breathing and was being rushed to the hospital. In a flash my friend was in the car and gone, disappearing in a cloud of dust. For a moment I just stood there, paralyzed . Then I tried to figure out what I should do. Follow my friend to the hospital? There was nothing I could accomplish there, I convinced myself. My friend's son was in the care of doctors and nurses, and nothing I could do or say would affect the outcome. Be there for moral support? Well, maybe. But my friend and his wife both had large families, and I knew they'd be surrounded by relatives who would provide more than enough comfort and support, whatever happened. All I could do at the hospital, I decided, was to get in the way. Also, I had planned a full day with my family, who were waiting for me to get home. So I decided to head back to my house and check in my friend later. As I started my car, I realized that my friend had left his truck and keys at the courts. I now faced another problem. I couldn't leave the keys in the truck. So I decided to go to the hospital and give him the keys. When I arrived, I was directed to a room where my friend and his wife were waiting. As I had thought, the room was filled with family members silently watching my friend comfort his wife. I went in and stood by the door, trying to decide what to do next. Soon a doctor appeared. He approached my friend and his wife, and in a quiet voice told them that their son had died. For a long time the two held each other and cried, unaware of the rest of us standing around in pained silence. After they had calmed themselves, the doctor suggested they spend a few moments with their son. My friend and his wife stood up and walked past their families. When they reached the door, my friend saw me standing in the corner. He came over and hugged me and started to cry. My friend's wife hugged me, too, and said , "Thanks for being here." For the rest of that morning, I sat in the emergency room of that hospital and watched my friend and his wife hold the body of their infant son, and say goodbye. It's the most important thing I have ever done. The experience taught me two lessons. First: The most important thing I've ever done happened when I was completely helpless. None of the things I had learned in university, in three years of law school or in six years of legal practice were of any use in that situation. Something terrible was happening to people I cared about, and I was powerless to change the outcome. All I could do was standing by and watching it happen. And yet it was critical that I do just that--- just be there when someone needed me. Second: The most important thing I've done almost didn't happen because of things I had learned in classroom and professional life. Law school taught me how to take a set of facts, break them down and organized them. These skills are critical for lawyers. When people come to us for help, they're often stressed out and depend on a lawyer to think logically. But while learning to think, I almost forget how to feel. Today I have no doubt that I should have leapt into my car without hesitation and followed my friend to the hospital. From that one experience I learned that the most important thing in life isn't the money you make, the status you attain or the honors you achieve."
"B"
"What can we infer from the author's description of the scene at the hospital?"
[ "He found out that he was in the way.", "He would have felt guilty if he had not been there.", "He regretted that he went too late.", "His friend would have felt better if he had not been there." ]
"high15438.txt"
""What is the most important thing you've done in your life?" The question was put to me during a presentation I gave to a group of lawyers. The answer came to me in an instant. It's not the one I gave, because the situation was not right. As a lawyer in the entertainment industry, I knew the audience wanted to hear some amusing stories about my work with well-known people, but here's the true answer: The most important thing I've ever done occurred on October 8,1990. I began the day playing tennis with an old friend I hadn't seen for a while. Between points we talked about what had been happening in each other's lives. He and his wife had just had a baby boy, who was keeping them up at night. While we were playing, a car came screaming up the road toward the courts. It was my friend's father, who shouted to my friend that his baby had stopped breathing and was being rushed to the hospital. In a flash my friend was in the car and gone, disappearing in a cloud of dust. For a moment I just stood there, paralyzed . Then I tried to figure out what I should do. Follow my friend to the hospital? There was nothing I could accomplish there, I convinced myself. My friend's son was in the care of doctors and nurses, and nothing I could do or say would affect the outcome. Be there for moral support? Well, maybe. But my friend and his wife both had large families, and I knew they'd be surrounded by relatives who would provide more than enough comfort and support, whatever happened. All I could do at the hospital, I decided, was to get in the way. Also, I had planned a full day with my family, who were waiting for me to get home. So I decided to head back to my house and check in my friend later. As I started my car, I realized that my friend had left his truck and keys at the courts. I now faced another problem. I couldn't leave the keys in the truck. So I decided to go to the hospital and give him the keys. When I arrived, I was directed to a room where my friend and his wife were waiting. As I had thought, the room was filled with family members silently watching my friend comfort his wife. I went in and stood by the door, trying to decide what to do next. Soon a doctor appeared. He approached my friend and his wife, and in a quiet voice told them that their son had died. For a long time the two held each other and cried, unaware of the rest of us standing around in pained silence. After they had calmed themselves, the doctor suggested they spend a few moments with their son. My friend and his wife stood up and walked past their families. When they reached the door, my friend saw me standing in the corner. He came over and hugged me and started to cry. My friend's wife hugged me, too, and said , "Thanks for being here." For the rest of that morning, I sat in the emergency room of that hospital and watched my friend and his wife hold the body of their infant son, and say goodbye. It's the most important thing I have ever done. The experience taught me two lessons. First: The most important thing I've ever done happened when I was completely helpless. None of the things I had learned in university, in three years of law school or in six years of legal practice were of any use in that situation. Something terrible was happening to people I cared about, and I was powerless to change the outcome. All I could do was standing by and watching it happen. And yet it was critical that I do just that--- just be there when someone needed me. Second: The most important thing I've done almost didn't happen because of things I had learned in classroom and professional life. Law school taught me how to take a set of facts, break them down and organized them. These skills are critical for lawyers. When people come to us for help, they're often stressed out and depend on a lawyer to think logically. But while learning to think, I almost forget how to feel. Today I have no doubt that I should have leapt into my car without hesitation and followed my friend to the hospital. From that one experience I learned that the most important thing in life isn't the money you make, the status you attain or the honors you achieve."
"C"
"Which of the following is conveyed in this story?"
[ "Family and relatives can not take the place of friends.", "More people are a great comfort when one is in trouble.", "It is best to be here when someone needs you.", "You can certainly help a friend if you want to." ]
"high15438.txt"
""What is the most important thing you've done in your life?" The question was put to me during a presentation I gave to a group of lawyers. The answer came to me in an instant. It's not the one I gave, because the situation was not right. As a lawyer in the entertainment industry, I knew the audience wanted to hear some amusing stories about my work with well-known people, but here's the true answer: The most important thing I've ever done occurred on October 8,1990. I began the day playing tennis with an old friend I hadn't seen for a while. Between points we talked about what had been happening in each other's lives. He and his wife had just had a baby boy, who was keeping them up at night. While we were playing, a car came screaming up the road toward the courts. It was my friend's father, who shouted to my friend that his baby had stopped breathing and was being rushed to the hospital. In a flash my friend was in the car and gone, disappearing in a cloud of dust. For a moment I just stood there, paralyzed . Then I tried to figure out what I should do. Follow my friend to the hospital? There was nothing I could accomplish there, I convinced myself. My friend's son was in the care of doctors and nurses, and nothing I could do or say would affect the outcome. Be there for moral support? Well, maybe. But my friend and his wife both had large families, and I knew they'd be surrounded by relatives who would provide more than enough comfort and support, whatever happened. All I could do at the hospital, I decided, was to get in the way. Also, I had planned a full day with my family, who were waiting for me to get home. So I decided to head back to my house and check in my friend later. As I started my car, I realized that my friend had left his truck and keys at the courts. I now faced another problem. I couldn't leave the keys in the truck. So I decided to go to the hospital and give him the keys. When I arrived, I was directed to a room where my friend and his wife were waiting. As I had thought, the room was filled with family members silently watching my friend comfort his wife. I went in and stood by the door, trying to decide what to do next. Soon a doctor appeared. He approached my friend and his wife, and in a quiet voice told them that their son had died. For a long time the two held each other and cried, unaware of the rest of us standing around in pained silence. After they had calmed themselves, the doctor suggested they spend a few moments with their son. My friend and his wife stood up and walked past their families. When they reached the door, my friend saw me standing in the corner. He came over and hugged me and started to cry. My friend's wife hugged me, too, and said , "Thanks for being here." For the rest of that morning, I sat in the emergency room of that hospital and watched my friend and his wife hold the body of their infant son, and say goodbye. It's the most important thing I have ever done. The experience taught me two lessons. First: The most important thing I've ever done happened when I was completely helpless. None of the things I had learned in university, in three years of law school or in six years of legal practice were of any use in that situation. Something terrible was happening to people I cared about, and I was powerless to change the outcome. All I could do was standing by and watching it happen. And yet it was critical that I do just that--- just be there when someone needed me. Second: The most important thing I've done almost didn't happen because of things I had learned in classroom and professional life. Law school taught me how to take a set of facts, break them down and organized them. These skills are critical for lawyers. When people come to us for help, they're often stressed out and depend on a lawyer to think logically. But while learning to think, I almost forget how to feel. Today I have no doubt that I should have leapt into my car without hesitation and followed my friend to the hospital. From that one experience I learned that the most important thing in life isn't the money you make, the status you attain or the honors you achieve."
"D"
"The author learned from his own experience that _ ."
[ "what is taught in school is usually of no use.", "a lawyer cannot learn much in classrooms", "a lawyer should know people's feeling first", "he needs to be able to feel as well as think logically" ]
"high7560.txt"
"A desert is a beautiful land of silence and space. The sun shines, the wind blows, and time and space seem endless. Nothing is soft. The sand and rocks are hard, and many of the plants even have hard needles instead of leaves. The size and location of the world's deserts are always changing. Over millions of years, as climates change and mountains rise, new dry and wet areas develop. But within the last 100 yeas, deserts have been growing at a frightening speed. This is partly because of natural changes, but the greatest makers are humans. Humans can make deserts, but humans can also prevent their growth. Algeria Mauritania is planting a similar wall around Nouakchott, the capital. Iran puts a thin covering of petroleum on sandy areas and plants trees. The oil keeps the water and small trees in the land, and men on motorcycles keep the sheep and goats away. The USSR and India are building long canals to bring water to desert areas."
"C"
"In this passage, "needles" refers to _ ."
[ "small, thin pieces of steel.", "long, thin pieces of branches.", "small pointed growth on the stem of a plant.", "small, thin pieces of sticks." ]
"high7560.txt"
"A desert is a beautiful land of silence and space. The sun shines, the wind blows, and time and space seem endless. Nothing is soft. The sand and rocks are hard, and many of the plants even have hard needles instead of leaves. The size and location of the world's deserts are always changing. Over millions of years, as climates change and mountains rise, new dry and wet areas develop. But within the last 100 yeas, deserts have been growing at a frightening speed. This is partly because of natural changes, but the greatest makers are humans. Humans can make deserts, but humans can also prevent their growth. Algeria Mauritania is planting a similar wall around Nouakchott, the capital. Iran puts a thin covering of petroleum on sandy areas and plants trees. The oil keeps the water and small trees in the land, and men on motorcycles keep the sheep and goats away. The USSR and India are building long canals to bring water to desert areas."
"B"
"Which of the following is NOT true?"
[ "The greatest desert makers are humans.", "There aren't any living things in the deserts.", "Deserts have been growing quickly.", "The size of the deserts is always changing." ]
"high7560.txt"
"A desert is a beautiful land of silence and space. The sun shines, the wind blows, and time and space seem endless. Nothing is soft. The sand and rocks are hard, and many of the plants even have hard needles instead of leaves. The size and location of the world's deserts are always changing. Over millions of years, as climates change and mountains rise, new dry and wet areas develop. But within the last 100 yeas, deserts have been growing at a frightening speed. This is partly because of natural changes, but the greatest makers are humans. Humans can make deserts, but humans can also prevent their growth. Algeria Mauritania is planting a similar wall around Nouakchott, the capital. Iran puts a thin covering of petroleum on sandy areas and plants trees. The oil keeps the water and small trees in the land, and men on motorcycles keep the sheep and goats away. The USSR and India are building long canals to bring water to desert areas."
"A"
"People in some countries are fighting a battle against _ ."
[ "the growth of deserts", "the disappearance of desert plants", "natural changes", "congenital climate" ]
"high7560.txt"
"A desert is a beautiful land of silence and space. The sun shines, the wind blows, and time and space seem endless. Nothing is soft. The sand and rocks are hard, and many of the plants even have hard needles instead of leaves. The size and location of the world's deserts are always changing. Over millions of years, as climates change and mountains rise, new dry and wet areas develop. But within the last 100 yeas, deserts have been growing at a frightening speed. This is partly because of natural changes, but the greatest makers are humans. Humans can make deserts, but humans can also prevent their growth. Algeria Mauritania is planting a similar wall around Nouakchott, the capital. Iran puts a thin covering of petroleum on sandy areas and plants trees. The oil keeps the water and small trees in the land, and men on motorcycles keep the sheep and goats away. The USSR and India are building long canals to bring water to desert areas."
"D"
"We can guess that Mauritania and Algeria belong to _ ."
[ "Asian countries", "American countries", "European counties", "African countries" ]
"high7560.txt"
"A desert is a beautiful land of silence and space. The sun shines, the wind blows, and time and space seem endless. Nothing is soft. The sand and rocks are hard, and many of the plants even have hard needles instead of leaves. The size and location of the world's deserts are always changing. Over millions of years, as climates change and mountains rise, new dry and wet areas develop. But within the last 100 yeas, deserts have been growing at a frightening speed. This is partly because of natural changes, but the greatest makers are humans. Humans can make deserts, but humans can also prevent their growth. Algeria Mauritania is planting a similar wall around Nouakchott, the capital. Iran puts a thin covering of petroleum on sandy areas and plants trees. The oil keeps the water and small trees in the land, and men on motorcycles keep the sheep and goats away. The USSR and India are building long canals to bring water to desert areas."
"B"
"Choose the sentence which best gives the main idea of the passage."
[ "The deserts of the world are always changing.", "Man is to take measures to control the growth of the world's deserts.", "Deserts are lands of silence and space.", "Deserts have grown at a fast pace in the past 10 years." ]
"high5745.txt"
"Nelson Mandela was a figure of international fame, and many details of his life and career were public knowledge. But here are four things you may not have known about the late South African leader. 1. He was a boxing fan. In his youth, Nelson Mandela enjoyed boxing and long-distance running. Even during the 27 years he spent in prison, he would exercise every morning. "I did not enjoy the violence of boxing so much as the science of it. I was curious by how one moved one's body to protect oneself, how one used a strategy both to attack and retreat, how one paced oneself over a match," he wrote in his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom. 2. His original name was not Nelson. Rolihlahla Mandela was nine years old when a teacher at the primary Methodist school where he was studying in Qunu, South Africa, gave him an English name "Nelson" in accordance with the custom to give all school children Christian names. 3. He forgot his glasses when he was released from prison. Mr. Mandela's release on 11 February 1990 followed years of political pressure against apartheid . Mr. Mandela's reading glasses stayed behind in prison Mr. Mandela and his then-wife Winnie were taken to the centre of Cape Town to address a huge and exciting crowd. But when he pulled out the text of his speech, he realized he had forgotten his glasses and had to borrow Winnie's. 4. He had his own law firm, but it took him years to get a law degree. Mr. Mandela studied law on and off for 50 years from 1939, failing about half the courses he took. A two-year diploma in law on top of his university degree allowed him to practice, and in August 1952, he and Oliver Tambo set up South Africa's first black law firm, Mandela and Tambo, in Johannesburg. He kept on studying hard to finally secure a law degree while in prison in 1989."
"D"
"What is the main idea of the passage?"
[ "Nelson Mandela's life in the prison.", "The achievements of Nelson Mandela.", "Nelson Mandela's hobbies and career.", "Unknown things about Nelson Mandela." ]
"high5745.txt"
"Nelson Mandela was a figure of international fame, and many details of his life and career were public knowledge. But here are four things you may not have known about the late South African leader. 1. He was a boxing fan. In his youth, Nelson Mandela enjoyed boxing and long-distance running. Even during the 27 years he spent in prison, he would exercise every morning. "I did not enjoy the violence of boxing so much as the science of it. I was curious by how one moved one's body to protect oneself, how one used a strategy both to attack and retreat, how one paced oneself over a match," he wrote in his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom. 2. His original name was not Nelson. Rolihlahla Mandela was nine years old when a teacher at the primary Methodist school where he was studying in Qunu, South Africa, gave him an English name "Nelson" in accordance with the custom to give all school children Christian names. 3. He forgot his glasses when he was released from prison. Mr. Mandela's release on 11 February 1990 followed years of political pressure against apartheid . Mr. Mandela's reading glasses stayed behind in prison Mr. Mandela and his then-wife Winnie were taken to the centre of Cape Town to address a huge and exciting crowd. But when he pulled out the text of his speech, he realized he had forgotten his glasses and had to borrow Winnie's. 4. He had his own law firm, but it took him years to get a law degree. Mr. Mandela studied law on and off for 50 years from 1939, failing about half the courses he took. A two-year diploma in law on top of his university degree allowed him to practice, and in August 1952, he and Oliver Tambo set up South Africa's first black law firm, Mandela and Tambo, in Johannesburg. He kept on studying hard to finally secure a law degree while in prison in 1989."
"C"
"Why did Nelson Mandela love boxing?"
[ "Because he wanted to be a boxer.", "Because he enjoyed the violence of boxing.", "Because he appreciated the strategy in boxing.", "Because he had nothing else to do in the prison." ]
"high5745.txt"
"Nelson Mandela was a figure of international fame, and many details of his life and career were public knowledge. But here are four things you may not have known about the late South African leader. 1. He was a boxing fan. In his youth, Nelson Mandela enjoyed boxing and long-distance running. Even during the 27 years he spent in prison, he would exercise every morning. "I did not enjoy the violence of boxing so much as the science of it. I was curious by how one moved one's body to protect oneself, how one used a strategy both to attack and retreat, how one paced oneself over a match," he wrote in his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom. 2. His original name was not Nelson. Rolihlahla Mandela was nine years old when a teacher at the primary Methodist school where he was studying in Qunu, South Africa, gave him an English name "Nelson" in accordance with the custom to give all school children Christian names. 3. He forgot his glasses when he was released from prison. Mr. Mandela's release on 11 February 1990 followed years of political pressure against apartheid . Mr. Mandela's reading glasses stayed behind in prison Mr. Mandela and his then-wife Winnie were taken to the centre of Cape Town to address a huge and exciting crowd. But when he pulled out the text of his speech, he realized he had forgotten his glasses and had to borrow Winnie's. 4. He had his own law firm, but it took him years to get a law degree. Mr. Mandela studied law on and off for 50 years from 1939, failing about half the courses he took. A two-year diploma in law on top of his university degree allowed him to practice, and in August 1952, he and Oliver Tambo set up South Africa's first black law firm, Mandela and Tambo, in Johannesburg. He kept on studying hard to finally secure a law degree while in prison in 1989."
"B"
"What happened to Mandela when he was about to give the speech?"
[ "He broke his glasses into pieces.", "He had to use his wife's glasses.", "He left his own glasses at home.", "His wife wanted to borrow his glasses." ]
"high5745.txt"
"Nelson Mandela was a figure of international fame, and many details of his life and career were public knowledge. But here are four things you may not have known about the late South African leader. 1. He was a boxing fan. In his youth, Nelson Mandela enjoyed boxing and long-distance running. Even during the 27 years he spent in prison, he would exercise every morning. "I did not enjoy the violence of boxing so much as the science of it. I was curious by how one moved one's body to protect oneself, how one used a strategy both to attack and retreat, how one paced oneself over a match," he wrote in his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom. 2. His original name was not Nelson. Rolihlahla Mandela was nine years old when a teacher at the primary Methodist school where he was studying in Qunu, South Africa, gave him an English name "Nelson" in accordance with the custom to give all school children Christian names. 3. He forgot his glasses when he was released from prison. Mr. Mandela's release on 11 February 1990 followed years of political pressure against apartheid . Mr. Mandela's reading glasses stayed behind in prison Mr. Mandela and his then-wife Winnie were taken to the centre of Cape Town to address a huge and exciting crowd. But when he pulled out the text of his speech, he realized he had forgotten his glasses and had to borrow Winnie's. 4. He had his own law firm, but it took him years to get a law degree. Mr. Mandela studied law on and off for 50 years from 1939, failing about half the courses he took. A two-year diploma in law on top of his university degree allowed him to practice, and in August 1952, he and Oliver Tambo set up South Africa's first black law firm, Mandela and Tambo, in Johannesburg. He kept on studying hard to finally secure a law degree while in prison in 1989."
"C"
"Which of the following is NOT true according to the passage?"
[ "Nelson Mandela was not his original name.", "Nelson Mandela was the name given by his teacher.", "Nelson Mandela had been studying the law nonstop for 50 years.", "Nelson Mandela had started his own law firm before he got a law degree." ]
"high17984.txt"
"New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health. Cavazos-Rehg, an assistant professor of psychiatry, found that quitting or significantly cutting back on cigarette smoking was linked to improved mental health outcomes. Quitting altogether or reducing by half the number of cigarettes smoked daily was associated with lower risk for mood disorders like depression, as well as a lower likelihood of alcohol and drug problems. "We don't know if their mental health improves first and then they are more motivated to quit smoking or if quitting smoking leads to an improvement in mental health," Cavazos-Rehg said. "But either way, our findings show a strong link between quitting and a better psychiatric outlook." In addition, she believes the serious health risks associated with smoking make it important for doctors to work with their patients to quit, regardless of other psychiatric problems. "About half of all smokers die from related to smoking, so we need to remember that as complicated as it can be to treat mental health issues, smoking cigarettes also causes very serious illnesses that can lead to death," she explained. Cavazos-Rehg and her team analyzed questionnaires gathered as part of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions. In the early 2000s, just under 35,000 people were surveyed. As part of the study, they answered questions about drinking, smoking and mental health in two interviews conducted three years apart. The researchers focused on data from 4,800 daily smokers. Those who had addiction or other psychiatric problems at the time of the first survey were less likely to have those same problems three years later if they had quit smoking. And those who hadn't had psychiatric problems at the initial survey were less likely to develop those problems later if they already had quit. "We really need to spread the word and encourage doctors and patients to tackle these problems," Cavazos-Rehg said. "When a patient is ready to focus on other mental health issues, it may be an ideal time to address smoking cessation, too.""
"B"
"What is the main idea of the passage?"
[ "Smoking was associated with alcohol and drug problems.", "Quitting smoking may help to improve mental health.", "Smoking can lead to cancer or other deadly problems.", "Those who had mental problem are more motivated to quit smoking." ]
"high17984.txt"
"New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health. Cavazos-Rehg, an assistant professor of psychiatry, found that quitting or significantly cutting back on cigarette smoking was linked to improved mental health outcomes. Quitting altogether or reducing by half the number of cigarettes smoked daily was associated with lower risk for mood disorders like depression, as well as a lower likelihood of alcohol and drug problems. "We don't know if their mental health improves first and then they are more motivated to quit smoking or if quitting smoking leads to an improvement in mental health," Cavazos-Rehg said. "But either way, our findings show a strong link between quitting and a better psychiatric outlook." In addition, she believes the serious health risks associated with smoking make it important for doctors to work with their patients to quit, regardless of other psychiatric problems. "About half of all smokers die from related to smoking, so we need to remember that as complicated as it can be to treat mental health issues, smoking cigarettes also causes very serious illnesses that can lead to death," she explained. Cavazos-Rehg and her team analyzed questionnaires gathered as part of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions. In the early 2000s, just under 35,000 people were surveyed. As part of the study, they answered questions about drinking, smoking and mental health in two interviews conducted three years apart. The researchers focused on data from 4,800 daily smokers. Those who had addiction or other psychiatric problems at the time of the first survey were less likely to have those same problems three years later if they had quit smoking. And those who hadn't had psychiatric problems at the initial survey were less likely to develop those problems later if they already had quit. "We really need to spread the word and encourage doctors and patients to tackle these problems," Cavazos-Rehg said. "When a patient is ready to focus on other mental health issues, it may be an ideal time to address smoking cessation, too.""
"D"
"It can be inferred from this passage that _ ."
[ "Having quit smoking, tobacco addicts won't have the same problems again.", "About half of the daily smokers die from deadly mental diseases.", "More than 35,000 people were surveyed, 4,800 of whom were daily smokers.", "Quitting smoking may help avoid alcohol and drug problems." ]
"high17984.txt"
"New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health. Cavazos-Rehg, an assistant professor of psychiatry, found that quitting or significantly cutting back on cigarette smoking was linked to improved mental health outcomes. Quitting altogether or reducing by half the number of cigarettes smoked daily was associated with lower risk for mood disorders like depression, as well as a lower likelihood of alcohol and drug problems. "We don't know if their mental health improves first and then they are more motivated to quit smoking or if quitting smoking leads to an improvement in mental health," Cavazos-Rehg said. "But either way, our findings show a strong link between quitting and a better psychiatric outlook." In addition, she believes the serious health risks associated with smoking make it important for doctors to work with their patients to quit, regardless of other psychiatric problems. "About half of all smokers die from related to smoking, so we need to remember that as complicated as it can be to treat mental health issues, smoking cigarettes also causes very serious illnesses that can lead to death," she explained. Cavazos-Rehg and her team analyzed questionnaires gathered as part of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions. In the early 2000s, just under 35,000 people were surveyed. As part of the study, they answered questions about drinking, smoking and mental health in two interviews conducted three years apart. The researchers focused on data from 4,800 daily smokers. Those who had addiction or other psychiatric problems at the time of the first survey were less likely to have those same problems three years later if they had quit smoking. And those who hadn't had psychiatric problems at the initial survey were less likely to develop those problems later if they already had quit. "We really need to spread the word and encourage doctors and patients to tackle these problems," Cavazos-Rehg said. "When a patient is ready to focus on other mental health issues, it may be an ideal time to address smoking cessation, too.""
"C"
"Which of the following does professor Cavazos-Rehg agree?"
[ "Quitting smoking leads to a better psychiatric outlook.", "If you want to quit smoking, you have to improve your mood problems first.", "There is a strong link between mental health and quitting smoking.", "There is no need to stop smoking when patients center on mental health." ]
"high17984.txt"
"New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health. Cavazos-Rehg, an assistant professor of psychiatry, found that quitting or significantly cutting back on cigarette smoking was linked to improved mental health outcomes. Quitting altogether or reducing by half the number of cigarettes smoked daily was associated with lower risk for mood disorders like depression, as well as a lower likelihood of alcohol and drug problems. "We don't know if their mental health improves first and then they are more motivated to quit smoking or if quitting smoking leads to an improvement in mental health," Cavazos-Rehg said. "But either way, our findings show a strong link between quitting and a better psychiatric outlook." In addition, she believes the serious health risks associated with smoking make it important for doctors to work with their patients to quit, regardless of other psychiatric problems. "About half of all smokers die from related to smoking, so we need to remember that as complicated as it can be to treat mental health issues, smoking cigarettes also causes very serious illnesses that can lead to death," she explained. Cavazos-Rehg and her team analyzed questionnaires gathered as part of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions. In the early 2000s, just under 35,000 people were surveyed. As part of the study, they answered questions about drinking, smoking and mental health in two interviews conducted three years apart. The researchers focused on data from 4,800 daily smokers. Those who had addiction or other psychiatric problems at the time of the first survey were less likely to have those same problems three years later if they had quit smoking. And those who hadn't had psychiatric problems at the initial survey were less likely to develop those problems later if they already had quit. "We really need to spread the word and encourage doctors and patients to tackle these problems," Cavazos-Rehg said. "When a patient is ready to focus on other mental health issues, it may be an ideal time to address smoking cessation, too.""
"B"
"Which type of writing is the article likely to be?"
[ "Science fiction", "A health report", "An education report", "A news report" ]
"high24133.txt"
"School is out for the summer in some areas, and for many children, that means weeks of sleeping in late, trips to the swimming pool or hours spent in front of the TV. These months of inactivity--- away from the daily tiring things of school--- are something that young people look forward to, but it can have a detrimental influence on the knowledge they have. Studies have shown that children lose a lot in math skills during the summer months. Children who spend little time learning experience a much greater amount of learning loss than those who often take part in summer programs. So when school starts again in the fall, teachers often have to spend several weeks reteaching children material that they have forgotten. Experts suggest that parents make sure the summer months are a time of continued learning. For example, they suggest that lunch time is good time to improve a child's spoken skills, simply through conversation. A trip to the supermarket can be an opportunity to improve a child's math skills by having him or her add up the cost of food. And there is no better way to prevent learning loss than by having a child read every day. Fortunately, there are many programs that can help parents. The best place to start is at your local library. Most libraries have summer reading programs that are filled with fun activities. A. strong musical education also improves learning. Find out summer music camps in your area. We think that children should have fun during the summer break, but it should not be a vacation from learning. We strongly suggest parents should take advantage of the many educational opportunities available for their children during the coming weeks."
"D"
"Children lose a lot in learning in the summer break because they_."
[ "do homework before the TV", "stay up late at night", "visit the swimming pool", "spend little time learning" ]
"high24133.txt"
"School is out for the summer in some areas, and for many children, that means weeks of sleeping in late, trips to the swimming pool or hours spent in front of the TV. These months of inactivity--- away from the daily tiring things of school--- are something that young people look forward to, but it can have a detrimental influence on the knowledge they have. Studies have shown that children lose a lot in math skills during the summer months. Children who spend little time learning experience a much greater amount of learning loss than those who often take part in summer programs. So when school starts again in the fall, teachers often have to spend several weeks reteaching children material that they have forgotten. Experts suggest that parents make sure the summer months are a time of continued learning. For example, they suggest that lunch time is good time to improve a child's spoken skills, simply through conversation. A trip to the supermarket can be an opportunity to improve a child's math skills by having him or her add up the cost of food. And there is no better way to prevent learning loss than by having a child read every day. Fortunately, there are many programs that can help parents. The best place to start is at your local library. Most libraries have summer reading programs that are filled with fun activities. A. strong musical education also improves learning. Find out summer music camps in your area. We think that children should have fun during the summer break, but it should not be a vacation from learning. We strongly suggest parents should take advantage of the many educational opportunities available for their children during the coming weeks."
"C"
"Which of the following is true?"
[ "It isn't good for children to have fun in summer.", "Children will get bored with reading programs", "Summer programs can be helpful for children.", "Teachers needn't help children review lessons." ]
"high24133.txt"
"School is out for the summer in some areas, and for many children, that means weeks of sleeping in late, trips to the swimming pool or hours spent in front of the TV. These months of inactivity--- away from the daily tiring things of school--- are something that young people look forward to, but it can have a detrimental influence on the knowledge they have. Studies have shown that children lose a lot in math skills during the summer months. Children who spend little time learning experience a much greater amount of learning loss than those who often take part in summer programs. So when school starts again in the fall, teachers often have to spend several weeks reteaching children material that they have forgotten. Experts suggest that parents make sure the summer months are a time of continued learning. For example, they suggest that lunch time is good time to improve a child's spoken skills, simply through conversation. A trip to the supermarket can be an opportunity to improve a child's math skills by having him or her add up the cost of food. And there is no better way to prevent learning loss than by having a child read every day. Fortunately, there are many programs that can help parents. The best place to start is at your local library. Most libraries have summer reading programs that are filled with fun activities. A. strong musical education also improves learning. Find out summer music camps in your area. We think that children should have fun during the summer break, but it should not be a vacation from learning. We strongly suggest parents should take advantage of the many educational opportunities available for their children during the coming weeks."
"C"
"might be most interested in this passage."
[ "Students", "Teachers", "Parents", "Reporters" ]
"high20162.txt"
"A new study has been carried to test the role of story telling in lowering blood pressure. Dr. Thomas Houston, a professor of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, led a group of scientists that investigated how pre-recorded videos of hypertension patients' talking about their medical histories helped another group of patients with high blood pressure to control their condition over several months. Houston was surprised by their studies that suggested that communication can be a powerful tool in medicine. They showed that those who had had similar experiences, when talking to someone with a similar background, could help change their behavior to become healthier. Hypertension is difficult to control, since it is dependent on diet, exercise and mental state. Medical treatments with drugs, and lifestyle therapies have been ly ineffective because people find it hard to follow those medical requirements. In the test, his team carefully chose their story-tellers from 230 members of a patients' community with whom they could most easily relate. Next, they divided their study population into two groups. One received three interactive DVDs containing the tellers' stories of their experiences in living with and treating their hypertension. The other were given educational discs on an unrelated health topic. The study volunteers reported that they had listened to the DVDs, and after three months, those who heard the stories of the hypertensive patients lowered their blood pressure. While the study did not _ how the story-telling influenced the patients' behavior, Houston suspects that watching patients of similar backgrounds who had a similar medical experience helped to motivate them to seek medical help to their hypertension. They found that after six months the difference in blood pressure between those who watched the story-tellers and those who observed the unrelated videos remained, suggesting that the story-telling continued to have an effect."
"A"
"We can learn from the text that the pre-recorded videos _ ."
[ "tell medical histories of hypertension patients", "introduce some medical treatments of hypertension", "introduce a good lifestyle for hypertensive patients", "tell scientific discoveries of the scientist group" ]
"high20162.txt"
"A new study has been carried to test the role of story telling in lowering blood pressure. Dr. Thomas Houston, a professor of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, led a group of scientists that investigated how pre-recorded videos of hypertension patients' talking about their medical histories helped another group of patients with high blood pressure to control their condition over several months. Houston was surprised by their studies that suggested that communication can be a powerful tool in medicine. They showed that those who had had similar experiences, when talking to someone with a similar background, could help change their behavior to become healthier. Hypertension is difficult to control, since it is dependent on diet, exercise and mental state. Medical treatments with drugs, and lifestyle therapies have been ly ineffective because people find it hard to follow those medical requirements. In the test, his team carefully chose their story-tellers from 230 members of a patients' community with whom they could most easily relate. Next, they divided their study population into two groups. One received three interactive DVDs containing the tellers' stories of their experiences in living with and treating their hypertension. The other were given educational discs on an unrelated health topic. The study volunteers reported that they had listened to the DVDs, and after three months, those who heard the stories of the hypertensive patients lowered their blood pressure. While the study did not _ how the story-telling influenced the patients' behavior, Houston suspects that watching patients of similar backgrounds who had a similar medical experience helped to motivate them to seek medical help to their hypertension. They found that after six months the difference in blood pressure between those who watched the story-tellers and those who observed the unrelated videos remained, suggesting that the story-telling continued to have an effect."
"B"
"Houston was surprised to find that _ ."
[ "hypertension is really difficult to control", "communication has some medical effects", "medical treatments have no effect at all", "people don't follow the medical requirements" ]
"high20162.txt"
"A new study has been carried to test the role of story telling in lowering blood pressure. Dr. Thomas Houston, a professor of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, led a group of scientists that investigated how pre-recorded videos of hypertension patients' talking about their medical histories helped another group of patients with high blood pressure to control their condition over several months. Houston was surprised by their studies that suggested that communication can be a powerful tool in medicine. They showed that those who had had similar experiences, when talking to someone with a similar background, could help change their behavior to become healthier. Hypertension is difficult to control, since it is dependent on diet, exercise and mental state. Medical treatments with drugs, and lifestyle therapies have been ly ineffective because people find it hard to follow those medical requirements. In the test, his team carefully chose their story-tellers from 230 members of a patients' community with whom they could most easily relate. Next, they divided their study population into two groups. One received three interactive DVDs containing the tellers' stories of their experiences in living with and treating their hypertension. The other were given educational discs on an unrelated health topic. The study volunteers reported that they had listened to the DVDs, and after three months, those who heard the stories of the hypertensive patients lowered their blood pressure. While the study did not _ how the story-telling influenced the patients' behavior, Houston suspects that watching patients of similar backgrounds who had a similar medical experience helped to motivate them to seek medical help to their hypertension. They found that after six months the difference in blood pressure between those who watched the story-tellers and those who observed the unrelated videos remained, suggesting that the story-telling continued to have an effect."
"B"
"Which of the following could be the best title of the text?"
[ "The stories of some hypertension patients.", "Medical treatments of blood pressure.", "Storytelling may help lower blood pressure.", "Suggestions about how to lower blood pressure." ]
"high11148.txt"
"Some people collect stamps. Other people collect works of art or musical instruments. But a man in the American state of Maryland collects secrets. For the past 10 years, people have been sending Frank Warren postcards and other objects with secrets written on them. He now has a million secrets. "It's a drawing of a lift. And the secret says: 'I feel guilty when I take lifts for one floor, so I limp when I get out.'" Frank said. Ten years ago, Mr. Warren created an art project called PostSecret. People then began to send him postcards, other objects and emails telling their secrets. Every Sunday, he chooses 10 secrets and puts them on the website. Mr. Warren says he created PostSecret so people could share their secrets in a safe place. "I was struggling with secrets in my own life. And it was by creating this safe place where others could share their secrets with me, I think that space was something I needed just as much as they did." He has published six books full of the secrets people have shared with him. One secret in each book is his. Eric Perry delivers mail for the U.S. Postal Service. He has brought thousands of secrets to Frank's home over the past three years. "I have a couple of the books that Frank's given me and I've read them all and my family has read them all and it's wild!" The project itself was once one of Frank's secrets. His wife Jan didn't know exactly what he was doing until the first book was published. The publisher told him that the address was going to be on the book, and he refused. However, the address was there just because of the contract between them. Actually Warren wasn't very happy about that. Some people tell Frank of their secret desire to kill themselves. So he and the PostSecret community have raised more than $1 million to help prevent suicides ."
"C"
"Mr. Warren created PostSecret in order to _ ."
[ "satisfy his curiosity about others' secrets", "collect more materials for his series of books", "offer a safe place for people to share their secrets", "earn a lot of money by sharing others' secrets online" ]
"high11148.txt"
"Some people collect stamps. Other people collect works of art or musical instruments. But a man in the American state of Maryland collects secrets. For the past 10 years, people have been sending Frank Warren postcards and other objects with secrets written on them. He now has a million secrets. "It's a drawing of a lift. And the secret says: 'I feel guilty when I take lifts for one floor, so I limp when I get out.'" Frank said. Ten years ago, Mr. Warren created an art project called PostSecret. People then began to send him postcards, other objects and emails telling their secrets. Every Sunday, he chooses 10 secrets and puts them on the website. Mr. Warren says he created PostSecret so people could share their secrets in a safe place. "I was struggling with secrets in my own life. And it was by creating this safe place where others could share their secrets with me, I think that space was something I needed just as much as they did." He has published six books full of the secrets people have shared with him. One secret in each book is his. Eric Perry delivers mail for the U.S. Postal Service. He has brought thousands of secrets to Frank's home over the past three years. "I have a couple of the books that Frank's given me and I've read them all and my family has read them all and it's wild!" The project itself was once one of Frank's secrets. His wife Jan didn't know exactly what he was doing until the first book was published. The publisher told him that the address was going to be on the book, and he refused. However, the address was there just because of the contract between them. Actually Warren wasn't very happy about that. Some people tell Frank of their secret desire to kill themselves. So he and the PostSecret community have raised more than $1 million to help prevent suicides ."
"D"
"What do we know about Eric Perry from the passage?"
[ "His family are eager to collect the books written by Frank.", "His main job is to deliver mails and postcards for Frank.", "He has been a postman who has a great many secrets.", "He has developed a good relationship with Frank." ]
"high11148.txt"
"Some people collect stamps. Other people collect works of art or musical instruments. But a man in the American state of Maryland collects secrets. For the past 10 years, people have been sending Frank Warren postcards and other objects with secrets written on them. He now has a million secrets. "It's a drawing of a lift. And the secret says: 'I feel guilty when I take lifts for one floor, so I limp when I get out.'" Frank said. Ten years ago, Mr. Warren created an art project called PostSecret. People then began to send him postcards, other objects and emails telling their secrets. Every Sunday, he chooses 10 secrets and puts them on the website. Mr. Warren says he created PostSecret so people could share their secrets in a safe place. "I was struggling with secrets in my own life. And it was by creating this safe place where others could share their secrets with me, I think that space was something I needed just as much as they did." He has published six books full of the secrets people have shared with him. One secret in each book is his. Eric Perry delivers mail for the U.S. Postal Service. He has brought thousands of secrets to Frank's home over the past three years. "I have a couple of the books that Frank's given me and I've read them all and my family has read them all and it's wild!" The project itself was once one of Frank's secrets. His wife Jan didn't know exactly what he was doing until the first book was published. The publisher told him that the address was going to be on the book, and he refused. However, the address was there just because of the contract between them. Actually Warren wasn't very happy about that. Some people tell Frank of their secret desire to kill themselves. So he and the PostSecret community have raised more than $1 million to help prevent suicides ."
"C"
"What was Mr. Warren's secret according to the passage?"
[ "He once took the lift only for one floor.", "He is interested in collecting others' secrets.", "He created an art project without telling his wife.", "He helped prevent others from committing suicides." ]
"high122.txt"
"What's your idea of a good time? What about dancing in a rainy field with one hundred and fifty thousand other people while a famous rock band plays on a stage so far away that the performers look like ants? It may sound strange but that is what many hundreds of thousands of young people in the UK do every summer.Why? Because summer is the time for outdoor music festivals. Held on a farm, the Glastonbury Festival is the most well-known and popular festival in the UK.It began in 1970 and the first festival was attended by one thousand five hundred people each paying an admission price of PS1 -- the ticket included free milk from the farm. Since then the Glastonbury Festival has gone from strength to strength -- in 2004 one hundred and fifty thousand fans attended, paying PS112 each for a ticket to the three-day event.Tickets for the event sold out within three hours.Performers included superstars, such as Paul McCartney and James Brown, as well as new talent, like Franz Ferdinand and Joss Stone. Although many summer festivals are run on a profit-making basis, Glastonbury is a charity event, donating millions of pounds to local and international charities. Glastonbury is not unique in using live music to raise money to fight global poverty.In July of this year, the Live 8 concerts were held simultaneously in London, Paris, Rome and Berlin.Superstars such as Madonna, Sir Elton John and Stevie Wonder performed in order to highlight international poverty and debt."
"A"
"What does the author mean by saying "the Glastonbury Festival has gone from strength to strength"?"
[ "The festival has achieved growing success.", "Great efforts have been made to hold the festival.", "The festival has brought in a large amount of money.", "There have been thousands of fans attending the festival." ]
"high122.txt"
"What's your idea of a good time? What about dancing in a rainy field with one hundred and fifty thousand other people while a famous rock band plays on a stage so far away that the performers look like ants? It may sound strange but that is what many hundreds of thousands of young people in the UK do every summer.Why? Because summer is the time for outdoor music festivals. Held on a farm, the Glastonbury Festival is the most well-known and popular festival in the UK.It began in 1970 and the first festival was attended by one thousand five hundred people each paying an admission price of PS1 -- the ticket included free milk from the farm. Since then the Glastonbury Festival has gone from strength to strength -- in 2004 one hundred and fifty thousand fans attended, paying PS112 each for a ticket to the three-day event.Tickets for the event sold out within three hours.Performers included superstars, such as Paul McCartney and James Brown, as well as new talent, like Franz Ferdinand and Joss Stone. Although many summer festivals are run on a profit-making basis, Glastonbury is a charity event, donating millions of pounds to local and international charities. Glastonbury is not unique in using live music to raise money to fight global poverty.In July of this year, the Live 8 concerts were held simultaneously in London, Paris, Rome and Berlin.Superstars such as Madonna, Sir Elton John and Stevie Wonder performed in order to highlight international poverty and debt."
"B"
"Which of the following is TRUE according to the passage?"
[ "The Glastonbury Festival is run on a profit-making basis.", "Tickets for the 2004 Glastonbury Festival were in great demand despite the high price.", "Both James Brown and Joss Stone were born in poor families.", "In the 1970 Glastonbury Festival, one could have lunch on the farm for free." ]
"high122.txt"
"What's your idea of a good time? What about dancing in a rainy field with one hundred and fifty thousand other people while a famous rock band plays on a stage so far away that the performers look like ants? It may sound strange but that is what many hundreds of thousands of young people in the UK do every summer.Why? Because summer is the time for outdoor music festivals. Held on a farm, the Glastonbury Festival is the most well-known and popular festival in the UK.It began in 1970 and the first festival was attended by one thousand five hundred people each paying an admission price of PS1 -- the ticket included free milk from the farm. Since then the Glastonbury Festival has gone from strength to strength -- in 2004 one hundred and fifty thousand fans attended, paying PS112 each for a ticket to the three-day event.Tickets for the event sold out within three hours.Performers included superstars, such as Paul McCartney and James Brown, as well as new talent, like Franz Ferdinand and Joss Stone. Although many summer festivals are run on a profit-making basis, Glastonbury is a charity event, donating millions of pounds to local and international charities. Glastonbury is not unique in using live music to raise money to fight global poverty.In July of this year, the Live 8 concerts were held simultaneously in London, Paris, Rome and Berlin.Superstars such as Madonna, Sir Elton John and Stevie Wonder performed in order to highlight international poverty and debt."
"C"
"What is the best title for the passage?"
[ "How to have a good time", "Charity events around the world", "The Glastonbury Festival", "Superstars' performances in charity events" ]
"high9184.txt"
"The best selling children's book, Pipilu Sending You 100 Lives, has been adapted into a homonymous play that will be put on for the first time next March and tour around 50 cities in China. The book was adapted by the Hangzhou based Star Dream Factory. "We don't want to descend to the average children's dramas that are overly eager to please the kids," said Huang Qin, director of Star Dream Factory. "We want to provide something practically useful and mystically entertaining." The original book by Chinese children's book writer Zheng Yuanjie focuses on safety tips for kids. With Zheng's usual _ and simplicity, the book avoids sugar-coating reality. Instead, it illustrates the potential dangers in everyday life and provides possible solutions. Zheng recalled that when he saw his new-born baby in the hospital, the first thought that hit him was to do his utmost to guarantee his son's safety. "Safety is of the greatest importance to a human being," said Zheng. "If the person is gone, nothing else will matter." According to Zheng, there is no preaching or soapboxing in his book. He said that he just wanted to talk and tell the plain truth to the children in an easily understandable way. This line of thought will be echoed in the theatrical reproduction, said director Guo Yan. She also said that the play will place emphasis on multimedia effects and the interaction with the families. "Theatre may not ensure the children a path to professional esteem and better jobs in society, but it does have the power to give them strength (at heart)," said Huang Qin. Huang also calls for consistent attention to child safety, pointing out the lack of universal education and effective legal channels. The show is expecting an estimated audience of more than 100,000 people during its domestic tour in the upcoming year."
"D"
"Pipilu Sending You 100 Lives has been adapted into a play by _ ."
[ "Huang Qin .", "Zheng Yuanjie.", "Guo Yan.", "Star Dream Factory" ]
"high9184.txt"
"The best selling children's book, Pipilu Sending You 100 Lives, has been adapted into a homonymous play that will be put on for the first time next March and tour around 50 cities in China. The book was adapted by the Hangzhou based Star Dream Factory. "We don't want to descend to the average children's dramas that are overly eager to please the kids," said Huang Qin, director of Star Dream Factory. "We want to provide something practically useful and mystically entertaining." The original book by Chinese children's book writer Zheng Yuanjie focuses on safety tips for kids. With Zheng's usual _ and simplicity, the book avoids sugar-coating reality. Instead, it illustrates the potential dangers in everyday life and provides possible solutions. Zheng recalled that when he saw his new-born baby in the hospital, the first thought that hit him was to do his utmost to guarantee his son's safety. "Safety is of the greatest importance to a human being," said Zheng. "If the person is gone, nothing else will matter." According to Zheng, there is no preaching or soapboxing in his book. He said that he just wanted to talk and tell the plain truth to the children in an easily understandable way. This line of thought will be echoed in the theatrical reproduction, said director Guo Yan. She also said that the play will place emphasis on multimedia effects and the interaction with the families. "Theatre may not ensure the children a path to professional esteem and better jobs in society, but it does have the power to give them strength (at heart)," said Huang Qin. Huang also calls for consistent attention to child safety, pointing out the lack of universal education and effective legal channels. The show is expecting an estimated audience of more than 100,000 people during its domestic tour in the upcoming year."
"C"
"The book Pipilu Sending You 100 Lives is trying to tell the readers _ ."
[ "how Pipilu give you 100 lives in a clear way", "how Pipilu can live a more interesting life in a simple way", "how we can live a safer life in an understandable way", "how we can have 100 lives in a pleasing way" ]
"high9184.txt"
"The best selling children's book, Pipilu Sending You 100 Lives, has been adapted into a homonymous play that will be put on for the first time next March and tour around 50 cities in China. The book was adapted by the Hangzhou based Star Dream Factory. "We don't want to descend to the average children's dramas that are overly eager to please the kids," said Huang Qin, director of Star Dream Factory. "We want to provide something practically useful and mystically entertaining." The original book by Chinese children's book writer Zheng Yuanjie focuses on safety tips for kids. With Zheng's usual _ and simplicity, the book avoids sugar-coating reality. Instead, it illustrates the potential dangers in everyday life and provides possible solutions. Zheng recalled that when he saw his new-born baby in the hospital, the first thought that hit him was to do his utmost to guarantee his son's safety. "Safety is of the greatest importance to a human being," said Zheng. "If the person is gone, nothing else will matter." According to Zheng, there is no preaching or soapboxing in his book. He said that he just wanted to talk and tell the plain truth to the children in an easily understandable way. This line of thought will be echoed in the theatrical reproduction, said director Guo Yan. She also said that the play will place emphasis on multimedia effects and the interaction with the families. "Theatre may not ensure the children a path to professional esteem and better jobs in society, but it does have the power to give them strength (at heart)," said Huang Qin. Huang also calls for consistent attention to child safety, pointing out the lack of universal education and effective legal channels. The show is expecting an estimated audience of more than 100,000 people during its domestic tour in the upcoming year."
"A"
"According to Zheng,safety _ ."
[ "is more important to people than any other things", "is an essential part only to all the children", "is more important to the old than the young", "is more important to the young than the old" ]
"high9184.txt"
"The best selling children's book, Pipilu Sending You 100 Lives, has been adapted into a homonymous play that will be put on for the first time next March and tour around 50 cities in China. The book was adapted by the Hangzhou based Star Dream Factory. "We don't want to descend to the average children's dramas that are overly eager to please the kids," said Huang Qin, director of Star Dream Factory. "We want to provide something practically useful and mystically entertaining." The original book by Chinese children's book writer Zheng Yuanjie focuses on safety tips for kids. With Zheng's usual _ and simplicity, the book avoids sugar-coating reality. Instead, it illustrates the potential dangers in everyday life and provides possible solutions. Zheng recalled that when he saw his new-born baby in the hospital, the first thought that hit him was to do his utmost to guarantee his son's safety. "Safety is of the greatest importance to a human being," said Zheng. "If the person is gone, nothing else will matter." According to Zheng, there is no preaching or soapboxing in his book. He said that he just wanted to talk and tell the plain truth to the children in an easily understandable way. This line of thought will be echoed in the theatrical reproduction, said director Guo Yan. She also said that the play will place emphasis on multimedia effects and the interaction with the families. "Theatre may not ensure the children a path to professional esteem and better jobs in society, but it does have the power to give them strength (at heart)," said Huang Qin. Huang also calls for consistent attention to child safety, pointing out the lack of universal education and effective legal channels. The show is expecting an estimated audience of more than 100,000 people during its domestic tour in the upcoming year."
"B"
"The purpose of the passage is to _ ?"
[ "introduce a play to remind children of the importance of safety", "introduce a book and its homonymous play to the readers", "tell the readers how to keep safe", "tell the readers how important safety is" ]
"high19643.txt"
"Many people hate wet, sticky August, but to some, it's an especially bitter time. A new working paper finds that, March and August are the months in which divorce filings peak. For the paper, the University of Washington's Brian Serafini and Julie Brines analyzed the most recent years of divorce filings in Washington and drew their conclusion: divorce rises sharply in March and August. The result is supported by some nation-wide, anecdotal evidence. Online searches for "divorce" and "child custody" dramatically grow early in the year, peaking in March, they point out. The authors guess that unhappily married couples schedule their divorce filings around both the winter holidays and Valentine's Day, as well as summer vacations. (More Americans vacation m July than any other month.) There are a few explanations why people might time their marital dissolutions this way, It might just be too difficult to announce a divorce around family-oriented Christmas time, especially if there are kids involved, so many couples weigh the decision to divorce around the new year and progress from there. February is a period in which couples tend to look around for representation on legal sites. And by March, they're prepared to file for divorce. But the authors think the more likely reason is that people decide their differences are irreconcilable right after a big trip. It could be that people don't want to ruin a family getaway, or that vacations are so stressful that they drive the already-dissatisfied to divorce. ("I told you to pack your suitcase last night; now we've missed the train!") Then there's the "broken promise" theory. "6People are discontent with their marriages, they look at vacation as an opportunity to give it one last shot, and what they were hoping would happen didn't occur," explained Brines, an associate professor of sociology. It's not you; in other words, it's your failure to print the boarding passes."
"C"
"Which of the following can support Brian and Julie's conclusion?"
[ "The divorce rate rises sharply in March and August.", "They carried out online surveys and analyzed the results.", "More people search for key words about divorce early in the year.", "Conflicts in marriage tend to get more serious during Christmas." ]
"high19643.txt"
"Many people hate wet, sticky August, but to some, it's an especially bitter time. A new working paper finds that, March and August are the months in which divorce filings peak. For the paper, the University of Washington's Brian Serafini and Julie Brines analyzed the most recent years of divorce filings in Washington and drew their conclusion: divorce rises sharply in March and August. The result is supported by some nation-wide, anecdotal evidence. Online searches for "divorce" and "child custody" dramatically grow early in the year, peaking in March, they point out. The authors guess that unhappily married couples schedule their divorce filings around both the winter holidays and Valentine's Day, as well as summer vacations. (More Americans vacation m July than any other month.) There are a few explanations why people might time their marital dissolutions this way, It might just be too difficult to announce a divorce around family-oriented Christmas time, especially if there are kids involved, so many couples weigh the decision to divorce around the new year and progress from there. February is a period in which couples tend to look around for representation on legal sites. And by March, they're prepared to file for divorce. But the authors think the more likely reason is that people decide their differences are irreconcilable right after a big trip. It could be that people don't want to ruin a family getaway, or that vacations are so stressful that they drive the already-dissatisfied to divorce. ("I told you to pack your suitcase last night; now we've missed the train!") Then there's the "broken promise" theory. "6People are discontent with their marriages, they look at vacation as an opportunity to give it one last shot, and what they were hoping would happen didn't occur," explained Brines, an associate professor of sociology. It's not you; in other words, it's your failure to print the boarding passes."
"D"
"According to Brian and Julie, why does divorce rise in March and August?"
[ "People need time to decide and prepare before they divorce.", "Many couples want to have a new beginning in a new year.", "Kids are less involved in winter and summer vacations.", "Couples see more marital problems in their vacation trips." ]
"high19140.txt"
"When was the last time someone did something unexpectedly nice for you? Not someone you knew, but a total stranger? It's happened to me a few times, but two instances really stand out. A few years ago, I was dining out with a person who kept going on and on about himself, completely unaware of the fact that I was sitting there in misery . It wasn't his company that disappointed me. I was recovering from a bad grade in my study. I could have collapsed in tears right there at the table. When we picked up the check, the waitress said, "Your meal was already paid for." My friend and I didn't have a clue how it happened. Then I remembered a man coming in out of the corner of my eye. He was dressed in mostly white, sat down at the bar, had a glass of wine, stayed for maybe ten minutes and then left. The waitress said, "Yes, the gentleman who was in here a while ago paid for you." Just last year, I was running a half-marathon. With just 0.1 miles to go, I was out of gas. Runners call it "hitting the wall"; I thought I couldn't move another muscle. Out of nowhere, a teenager jogged up next to me and said, "What's your name sweetie? Jennifer? Okay, Jennifer, let's go! Come on! It's just around the corner! You can do it!". And he ran with me until I picked up my pace. I found him at the finish line to thank him for the encouragement only to learn he wasn't even supposed to be in the race that day. He was running in place of someone else. I still shake my head when I think of these momentary angels that came to me at my point of need. Do you have any experiences like this?"
"D"
"Why did the author say she was in misery?"
[ "Because she got into trouble with her friend.", "Because she couldn't enjoy her meal quietly.", "Because her friend complained so much.", "Because she was doing poorly in her study." ]
"high19140.txt"
"When was the last time someone did something unexpectedly nice for you? Not someone you knew, but a total stranger? It's happened to me a few times, but two instances really stand out. A few years ago, I was dining out with a person who kept going on and on about himself, completely unaware of the fact that I was sitting there in misery . It wasn't his company that disappointed me. I was recovering from a bad grade in my study. I could have collapsed in tears right there at the table. When we picked up the check, the waitress said, "Your meal was already paid for." My friend and I didn't have a clue how it happened. Then I remembered a man coming in out of the corner of my eye. He was dressed in mostly white, sat down at the bar, had a glass of wine, stayed for maybe ten minutes and then left. The waitress said, "Yes, the gentleman who was in here a while ago paid for you." Just last year, I was running a half-marathon. With just 0.1 miles to go, I was out of gas. Runners call it "hitting the wall"; I thought I couldn't move another muscle. Out of nowhere, a teenager jogged up next to me and said, "What's your name sweetie? Jennifer? Okay, Jennifer, let's go! Come on! It's just around the corner! You can do it!". And he ran with me until I picked up my pace. I found him at the finish line to thank him for the encouragement only to learn he wasn't even supposed to be in the race that day. He was running in place of someone else. I still shake my head when I think of these momentary angels that came to me at my point of need. Do you have any experiences like this?"
"A"
"What do you think of the man who paid for the meal?"
[ "He was generous and warm-hearted.", "He knew the author well and always helped her.", "He showed his kindness to his girlfriend.", "He liked making fun of others." ]
"high19140.txt"
"When was the last time someone did something unexpectedly nice for you? Not someone you knew, but a total stranger? It's happened to me a few times, but two instances really stand out. A few years ago, I was dining out with a person who kept going on and on about himself, completely unaware of the fact that I was sitting there in misery . It wasn't his company that disappointed me. I was recovering from a bad grade in my study. I could have collapsed in tears right there at the table. When we picked up the check, the waitress said, "Your meal was already paid for." My friend and I didn't have a clue how it happened. Then I remembered a man coming in out of the corner of my eye. He was dressed in mostly white, sat down at the bar, had a glass of wine, stayed for maybe ten minutes and then left. The waitress said, "Yes, the gentleman who was in here a while ago paid for you." Just last year, I was running a half-marathon. With just 0.1 miles to go, I was out of gas. Runners call it "hitting the wall"; I thought I couldn't move another muscle. Out of nowhere, a teenager jogged up next to me and said, "What's your name sweetie? Jennifer? Okay, Jennifer, let's go! Come on! It's just around the corner! You can do it!". And he ran with me until I picked up my pace. I found him at the finish line to thank him for the encouragement only to learn he wasn't even supposed to be in the race that day. He was running in place of someone else. I still shake my head when I think of these momentary angels that came to me at my point of need. Do you have any experiences like this?"
"A"
"Which of the following is the best title for the passage?"
[ "The Kindness of Strangers", "An Unpleasant Friend", "Two Unbelievable Experiences", "Hitting the Wall" ]
"high13207.txt"
"If there is a building which symbolizes a country--such as the Eiffel Tower for France and Sydney Opera House for Australia--then it has to be the Taj Mahal for India. It was set up by Emperor Shah Jahan in 1653 in memory of his wife, Mumtaz Mahal. From the time they got married, they wouldn't be separated. She followed him to wars, advised him on affairs of state, and was loved by his people for her good work. But she died in 1631 during childbirth. The emperor was heart-broken and had the Taj Mahal built as a sign of his love. It took more than 20 years for the Taj Mahal to be built. Workers were brought in, not only from all over India, but from Central Asia too. A total of 20,000 people worked on the building. In 1657, Shah Jahan fell ill, and in 1658 his son Aurangzeb, imprisoned his father and seized power. Shah Jahan stayed in prison until his death in 1666. He was finally buried there with his wife he could never forget. The Taj Mahal is definitely worth more than a single visit. As it is built with white marble stones, its character changes in different lights. It looks more beautiful at sunrise and sunset. At sunset, for example, the colour of the Taj changes from white to yellow, then to pink. As the moon rises, it turns a silvery white. To show respect to the Taj, tourists are asked to take off their shoes during their visit."
"B"
"Emperor Shah Jahan built the Taj Mahal to _ ."
[ "make it symbolize India", "memorise his wife", "show his great power", "give his wife a present" ]
"high13207.txt"
"If there is a building which symbolizes a country--such as the Eiffel Tower for France and Sydney Opera House for Australia--then it has to be the Taj Mahal for India. It was set up by Emperor Shah Jahan in 1653 in memory of his wife, Mumtaz Mahal. From the time they got married, they wouldn't be separated. She followed him to wars, advised him on affairs of state, and was loved by his people for her good work. But she died in 1631 during childbirth. The emperor was heart-broken and had the Taj Mahal built as a sign of his love. It took more than 20 years for the Taj Mahal to be built. Workers were brought in, not only from all over India, but from Central Asia too. A total of 20,000 people worked on the building. In 1657, Shah Jahan fell ill, and in 1658 his son Aurangzeb, imprisoned his father and seized power. Shah Jahan stayed in prison until his death in 1666. He was finally buried there with his wife he could never forget. The Taj Mahal is definitely worth more than a single visit. As it is built with white marble stones, its character changes in different lights. It looks more beautiful at sunrise and sunset. At sunset, for example, the colour of the Taj changes from white to yellow, then to pink. As the moon rises, it turns a silvery white. To show respect to the Taj, tourists are asked to take off their shoes during their visit."
"C"
"Which of the following about the Taj Mahal is NOT true?"
[ "It is a symbol of India.", "It took over 20 years to build the Taj Mahal.", "All workers building the Taj Mahal came from Central Asia.", "The Taj Mahal was built with white marble stones." ]
"high13207.txt"
"If there is a building which symbolizes a country--such as the Eiffel Tower for France and Sydney Opera House for Australia--then it has to be the Taj Mahal for India. It was set up by Emperor Shah Jahan in 1653 in memory of his wife, Mumtaz Mahal. From the time they got married, they wouldn't be separated. She followed him to wars, advised him on affairs of state, and was loved by his people for her good work. But she died in 1631 during childbirth. The emperor was heart-broken and had the Taj Mahal built as a sign of his love. It took more than 20 years for the Taj Mahal to be built. Workers were brought in, not only from all over India, but from Central Asia too. A total of 20,000 people worked on the building. In 1657, Shah Jahan fell ill, and in 1658 his son Aurangzeb, imprisoned his father and seized power. Shah Jahan stayed in prison until his death in 1666. He was finally buried there with his wife he could never forget. The Taj Mahal is definitely worth more than a single visit. As it is built with white marble stones, its character changes in different lights. It looks more beautiful at sunrise and sunset. At sunset, for example, the colour of the Taj changes from white to yellow, then to pink. As the moon rises, it turns a silvery white. To show respect to the Taj, tourists are asked to take off their shoes during their visit."
"A"
"According to the passage, we know that Shah Jahan _ ."
[ "lived a hard life in his last few years", "lost his life just because of his old age", "was not popular with his people at that time", "treated his son badly when he was young" ]
"high15079.txt"
"According to Andrew, it never would have happened if he had not had a flat tire on Highway 10 last night at about 7:30. He was on his way to attend a three-day sales meeting when he had the flat. tyre. Unfortunately, he did not have a spare, so he pushed the car off the road, locked it up, and managed to thumb a ride back to Pine Grove. It was after eleven o'clock when he finally got home, and it was then that his real problems started. When Andrew left home at about 5:30, he had told his wife not to expect him back until Thursday or Friday. Knowing that his wife was nervous about staying in the house alone at night, Andrew took the precaution of checking all the windows in the house to be sure they were locked, so that he could report to his wife that the house was secure. He convinced his wife that the house was burglar-proof, and that she would be perfectly safe, providing she bolted the front door as soon as he drove away. Andrew's only thought as he made his way in the dark to his front door was how surprised his wife was going to be to see him, since he was not supposed to be back until Thursday or Friday. He had forgotten about the bolt on the front door. When he turned his key in the lock and the door wouldn't _ he remembered the bolt. And he remembered that he had carefully locked all of the windows. Although Andrew didn't know it at the time, a next-door neighbor had seen him approaching the house and had watched him go up the steps to the front door. In the dark, it was impossible for the neighbor to recognize Andrew, and, besides, the neighbor knew that Andrew had gone out-of-town for a three-day meeting. As a matter of fact, Andrew had asked the neighbor to keep an eye on the house while he was gone. Finding that he couldn't get in, Andrew began pounding on the front door to get his wife to open the door. According to Andrew, however, his wife is a very sound sleeper, and he knew it was going to be hard to wake her up. In the meantime, because of all the noise he had been making, the neighbor was convinced that somebody was trying to break into the house; so she called the police. When we talked to Andrew at the country jail this morning, he said that he still didn't understand how the police managed to circle the house without his seeing them. He stated that he had decided the only way to get in was to break one of the dining room windows, and that he was about, to hurl his briefcase into the window to break it when two of the officers grabbed him from behind. Andrew could not make the officers believe that he lived there; so they took him off to jail. Apparently, he did succeed in convincing them that they ought to wake up the woman in the house to check his story. But there was no answer when they knocked at the door. He tried to explain to them that his wife was a very sound sleeper, but they concluded there was nobody in the house."
"C"
"As Andrew had a flat tyre on the way, he _ ."
[ "had to take another car to attend the meeting", "rode on a bike to attend the meating", "asked for a lift to go back home", "borrowed a car to go back home" ]
"high15079.txt"
"According to Andrew, it never would have happened if he had not had a flat tire on Highway 10 last night at about 7:30. He was on his way to attend a three-day sales meeting when he had the flat. tyre. Unfortunately, he did not have a spare, so he pushed the car off the road, locked it up, and managed to thumb a ride back to Pine Grove. It was after eleven o'clock when he finally got home, and it was then that his real problems started. When Andrew left home at about 5:30, he had told his wife not to expect him back until Thursday or Friday. Knowing that his wife was nervous about staying in the house alone at night, Andrew took the precaution of checking all the windows in the house to be sure they were locked, so that he could report to his wife that the house was secure. He convinced his wife that the house was burglar-proof, and that she would be perfectly safe, providing she bolted the front door as soon as he drove away. Andrew's only thought as he made his way in the dark to his front door was how surprised his wife was going to be to see him, since he was not supposed to be back until Thursday or Friday. He had forgotten about the bolt on the front door. When he turned his key in the lock and the door wouldn't _ he remembered the bolt. And he remembered that he had carefully locked all of the windows. Although Andrew didn't know it at the time, a next-door neighbor had seen him approaching the house and had watched him go up the steps to the front door. In the dark, it was impossible for the neighbor to recognize Andrew, and, besides, the neighbor knew that Andrew had gone out-of-town for a three-day meeting. As a matter of fact, Andrew had asked the neighbor to keep an eye on the house while he was gone. Finding that he couldn't get in, Andrew began pounding on the front door to get his wife to open the door. According to Andrew, however, his wife is a very sound sleeper, and he knew it was going to be hard to wake her up. In the meantime, because of all the noise he had been making, the neighbor was convinced that somebody was trying to break into the house; so she called the police. When we talked to Andrew at the country jail this morning, he said that he still didn't understand how the police managed to circle the house without his seeing them. He stated that he had decided the only way to get in was to break one of the dining room windows, and that he was about, to hurl his briefcase into the window to break it when two of the officers grabbed him from behind. Andrew could not make the officers believe that he lived there; so they took him off to jail. Apparently, he did succeed in convincing them that they ought to wake up the woman in the house to check his story. But there was no answer when they knocked at the door. He tried to explain to them that his wife was a very sound sleeper, but they concluded there was nobody in the house."
"A"
"When Andrew was approaching the house _ ."
[ "he was sure he would pleasently surprise his wife", "he was deep in thought", "he was sure that his neighbor would help him", "he was worried about how to wake his wife up" ]
"high15079.txt"
"According to Andrew, it never would have happened if he had not had a flat tire on Highway 10 last night at about 7:30. He was on his way to attend a three-day sales meeting when he had the flat. tyre. Unfortunately, he did not have a spare, so he pushed the car off the road, locked it up, and managed to thumb a ride back to Pine Grove. It was after eleven o'clock when he finally got home, and it was then that his real problems started. When Andrew left home at about 5:30, he had told his wife not to expect him back until Thursday or Friday. Knowing that his wife was nervous about staying in the house alone at night, Andrew took the precaution of checking all the windows in the house to be sure they were locked, so that he could report to his wife that the house was secure. He convinced his wife that the house was burglar-proof, and that she would be perfectly safe, providing she bolted the front door as soon as he drove away. Andrew's only thought as he made his way in the dark to his front door was how surprised his wife was going to be to see him, since he was not supposed to be back until Thursday or Friday. He had forgotten about the bolt on the front door. When he turned his key in the lock and the door wouldn't _ he remembered the bolt. And he remembered that he had carefully locked all of the windows. Although Andrew didn't know it at the time, a next-door neighbor had seen him approaching the house and had watched him go up the steps to the front door. In the dark, it was impossible for the neighbor to recognize Andrew, and, besides, the neighbor knew that Andrew had gone out-of-town for a three-day meeting. As a matter of fact, Andrew had asked the neighbor to keep an eye on the house while he was gone. Finding that he couldn't get in, Andrew began pounding on the front door to get his wife to open the door. According to Andrew, however, his wife is a very sound sleeper, and he knew it was going to be hard to wake her up. In the meantime, because of all the noise he had been making, the neighbor was convinced that somebody was trying to break into the house; so she called the police. When we talked to Andrew at the country jail this morning, he said that he still didn't understand how the police managed to circle the house without his seeing them. He stated that he had decided the only way to get in was to break one of the dining room windows, and that he was about, to hurl his briefcase into the window to break it when two of the officers grabbed him from behind. Andrew could not make the officers believe that he lived there; so they took him off to jail. Apparently, he did succeed in convincing them that they ought to wake up the woman in the house to check his story. But there was no answer when they knocked at the door. He tried to explain to them that his wife was a very sound sleeper, but they concluded there was nobody in the house."
"D"
"Why did the police officers take Andrew off to jail?"
[ "It was too late for them to contact Andrew's wife.", "Andrew did not explain clearly why he broke into the house.", "They thought it unnecessary to check Andrew's story.", "they concluded that Andrew's story was a complete invention." ]
"high11185.txt"
"Owning a smartphone may not be as smart as you think.They may let you surf the Internet,listen to music and snap photos wherever you are...but they also turn you into a workaholic,it seems.A study suggests that,by giving you access to emails at all times.the all-singing.all-dancing mobile phone adds as much as two hours to your working day. Researchers found that Britons work an additional 460hours a year on average as they are able to respond to emails on their mobiles.The study by technology retailer Pixmania,reveals the average UK working day is between nine and ten hours,but a further two hours is spent responding to or sending work emails,or making work calls.Almost one in ten admits spending up to three hours outside their normal working day checking work emails.Some workers confess they are on call almost 24 hours a day,with nine out of ten saying they take work emails and calls outside their normal working hours.Nearly two-thirds say they often check work emails just before they go to bed and as soon as they wake up,while over a third have replied to one in the middle of the night. Ghadi Hobeika,marketing director of Pixmania,said:"The ability to access literally millions of apps,keep in contact via social networks and take photos and video as well as text and call has made smartphones valuable for many people.However,there are _ .Many companies expect their employees to be on call 24 hours a day,seven days a week,and smartphones mean that people literally cannot get away from work.The more constantly in contact we become. The more is expected of us in a work capacity.""
"C"
"The text is probably taken from _ ."
[ "a scientific report", "a financial report", "a newspaper", "a literary journal" ]
"high11185.txt"
"Owning a smartphone may not be as smart as you think.They may let you surf the Internet,listen to music and snap photos wherever you are...but they also turn you into a workaholic,it seems.A study suggests that,by giving you access to emails at all times.the all-singing.all-dancing mobile phone adds as much as two hours to your working day. Researchers found that Britons work an additional 460hours a year on average as they are able to respond to emails on their mobiles.The study by technology retailer Pixmania,reveals the average UK working day is between nine and ten hours,but a further two hours is spent responding to or sending work emails,or making work calls.Almost one in ten admits spending up to three hours outside their normal working day checking work emails.Some workers confess they are on call almost 24 hours a day,with nine out of ten saying they take work emails and calls outside their normal working hours.Nearly two-thirds say they often check work emails just before they go to bed and as soon as they wake up,while over a third have replied to one in the middle of the night. Ghadi Hobeika,marketing director of Pixmania,said:"The ability to access literally millions of apps,keep in contact via social networks and take photos and video as well as text and call has made smartphones valuable for many people.However,there are _ .Many companies expect their employees to be on call 24 hours a day,seven days a week,and smartphones mean that people literally cannot get away from work.The more constantly in contact we become. The more is expected of us in a work capacity.""
"C"
"Ghadi may agree that _ ."
[ "employees are supposed to be on call 24 hours a day", "the ability to access many apps made smartphones worthless", "smartphones might turn a person into a workaholic", "people literally cannot get away from work without smartphones" ]
"high11185.txt"
"Owning a smartphone may not be as smart as you think.They may let you surf the Internet,listen to music and snap photos wherever you are...but they also turn you into a workaholic,it seems.A study suggests that,by giving you access to emails at all times.the all-singing.all-dancing mobile phone adds as much as two hours to your working day. Researchers found that Britons work an additional 460hours a year on average as they are able to respond to emails on their mobiles.The study by technology retailer Pixmania,reveals the average UK working day is between nine and ten hours,but a further two hours is spent responding to or sending work emails,or making work calls.Almost one in ten admits spending up to three hours outside their normal working day checking work emails.Some workers confess they are on call almost 24 hours a day,with nine out of ten saying they take work emails and calls outside their normal working hours.Nearly two-thirds say they often check work emails just before they go to bed and as soon as they wake up,while over a third have replied to one in the middle of the night. Ghadi Hobeika,marketing director of Pixmania,said:"The ability to access literally millions of apps,keep in contact via social networks and take photos and video as well as text and call has made smartphones valuable for many people.However,there are _ .Many companies expect their employees to be on call 24 hours a day,seven days a week,and smartphones mean that people literally cannot get away from work.The more constantly in contact we become. The more is expected of us in a work capacity.""
"A"
"What is the main idea of this passage?"
[ "Smartphones are lengthening working hours.", "Smartphones are becoming valuable for many people.", "Britons work art additional 460 hours a year on average.", "Smartphones are more beneficial to our life than we think." ]
"high22994.txt"
"I've done many things that would make any parent proud. I've taken part in sports, community work and school events, but I am most proud to be a good big brother. I have to watch over four sisters and a brother, plus myself. That's quitea task, but one I feel I have gotten good at. My brother needs more attention than most siblings. When he was nine, he was hit by a pick-up truck on the way to the bus stop and lost use of the lower two-thirds of his body. He's been in a wheelchair for six years. My brother does many things, but sometimes he tries to do things he used to do but can't now. I' m always there with words of encouragement. I now watch my brother struggle to do as many things as he can within and beyond his limits. Should he fall, I will be the person to pick him up. I also watch as my younger sisters grow up into intelligent, beautiful young women. Whenever my brother or sisters need a helping hand or words of encouragement, I'm on the job. That's what I, the big brother, am for."
"D"
"How many people are probably there in the author's family? _ ."
[ "5", "6", "7", "8" ]
"high22994.txt"
"I've done many things that would make any parent proud. I've taken part in sports, community work and school events, but I am most proud to be a good big brother. I have to watch over four sisters and a brother, plus myself. That's quitea task, but one I feel I have gotten good at. My brother needs more attention than most siblings. When he was nine, he was hit by a pick-up truck on the way to the bus stop and lost use of the lower two-thirds of his body. He's been in a wheelchair for six years. My brother does many things, but sometimes he tries to do things he used to do but can't now. I' m always there with words of encouragement. I now watch my brother struggle to do as many things as he can within and beyond his limits. Should he fall, I will be the person to pick him up. I also watch as my younger sisters grow up into intelligent, beautiful young women. Whenever my brother or sisters need a helping hand or words of encouragement, I'm on the job. That's what I, the big brother, am for."
"B"
"The author's brother needs more attention because _ ."
[ "he is the youngest child of the family", "he lost the functions of his lower body", "he was disabled by a careless bus driver", "he needs the words of encouragement" ]
End of preview (truncated to 100 rows)

Dataset Card for "race"

Dataset Summary

RACE is a large-scale reading comprehension dataset with more than 28,000 passages and nearly 100,000 questions. The dataset is collected from English examinations in China, which are designed for middle school and high school students. The dataset can be served as the training and test sets for machine comprehension.

Supported Tasks and Leaderboards

More Information Needed

Languages

More Information Needed

Dataset Structure

Data Instances

all

  • Size of downloaded dataset files: 24.26 MB
  • Size of the generated dataset: 166.64 MB
  • Total amount of disk used: 190.90 MB

An example of 'train' looks as follows.

This example was too long and was cropped:

{
    "answer": "A",
    "article": "\"Schoolgirls have been wearing such short skirts at Paget High School in Branston that they've been ordered to wear trousers ins...",
    "example_id": "high132.txt",
    "options": ["short skirts give people the impression of sexualisation", "short skirts are too expensive for parents to afford", "the headmaster doesn't like girls wearing short skirts", "the girls wearing short skirts will be at the risk of being laughed at"],
    "question": "The girls at Paget High School are not allowed to wear skirts in that    _  ."
}

high

  • Size of downloaded dataset files: 24.26 MB
  • Size of the generated dataset: 133.63 MB
  • Total amount of disk used: 157.89 MB

An example of 'train' looks as follows.

This example was too long and was cropped:

{
    "answer": "A",
    "article": "\"Schoolgirls have been wearing such short skirts at Paget High School in Branston that they've been ordered to wear trousers ins...",
    "example_id": "high132.txt",
    "options": ["short skirts give people the impression of sexualisation", "short skirts are too expensive for parents to afford", "the headmaster doesn't like girls wearing short skirts", "the girls wearing short skirts will be at the risk of being laughed at"],
    "question": "The girls at Paget High School are not allowed to wear skirts in that    _  ."
}

middle

  • Size of downloaded dataset files: 24.26 MB
  • Size of the generated dataset: 33.01 MB
  • Total amount of disk used: 57.27 MB

An example of 'train' looks as follows.

This example was too long and was cropped:

{
    "answer": "B",
    "article": "\"There is not enough oil in the world now. As time goes by, it becomes less and less, so what are we going to do when it runs ou...",
    "example_id": "middle3.txt",
    "options": ["There is more petroleum than we can use now.", "Trees are needed for some other things besides making gas.", "We got electricity from ocean tides in the old days.", "Gas wasn't used to run cars in the Second World War."],
    "question": "According to the passage, which of the following statements is TRUE?"
}

Data Fields

The data fields are the same among all splits.

all

  • example_id: a string feature.
  • article: a string feature.
  • answer: a string feature.
  • question: a string feature.
  • options: a list of string features.

high

  • example_id: a string feature.
  • article: a string feature.
  • answer: a string feature.
  • question: a string feature.
  • options: a list of string features.

middle

  • example_id: a string feature.
  • article: a string feature.
  • answer: a string feature.
  • question: a string feature.
  • options: a list of string features.

Data Splits

name train validation test
all 87866 4887 4934
high 62445 3451 3498
middle 25421 1436 1436

Dataset Creation

Curation Rationale

More Information Needed

Source Data

Initial Data Collection and Normalization

More Information Needed

Who are the source language producers?

More Information Needed

Annotations

Annotation process

More Information Needed

Who are the annotators?

More Information Needed

Personal and Sensitive Information

More Information Needed

Considerations for Using the Data

Social Impact of Dataset

More Information Needed

Discussion of Biases

More Information Needed

Other Known Limitations

More Information Needed

Additional Information

Dataset Curators

More Information Needed

Licensing Information

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~glai1/data/race/

  1. RACE dataset is available for non-commercial research purpose only.

  2. All passages are obtained from the Internet which is not property of Carnegie Mellon University. We are not responsible for the content nor the meaning of these passages.

  3. You agree not to reproduce, duplicate, copy, sell, trade, resell or exploit for any commercial purpose, any portion of the contexts and any portion of derived data.

  4. We reserve the right to terminate your access to the RACE dataset at any time.

Citation Information

@inproceedings{lai-etal-2017-race,
    title = "{RACE}: Large-scale {R}e{A}ding Comprehension Dataset From Examinations",
    author = "Lai, Guokun  and
      Xie, Qizhe  and
      Liu, Hanxiao  and
      Yang, Yiming  and
      Hovy, Eduard",
    booktitle = "Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing",
    month = sep,
    year = "2017",
    address = "Copenhagen, Denmark",
    publisher = "Association for Computational Linguistics",
    url = "https://aclanthology.org/D17-1082",
    doi = "10.18653/v1/D17-1082",
    pages = "785--794",
}

Contributions

Thanks to @abarbosa94, @patrickvonplaten, @lewtun, @thomwolf, @mariamabarham for adding this dataset.

Models trained or fine-tuned on race