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"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday 8th April, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had lobbed it into the Baltic Sea. Thought to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle, it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
0 (Adv)
"Who threw the bottle into the Baltic Sea?"
0
[ "Angela Erdmann’s grandfather", "Angela Erdmann", "A museum worker", "A fisherman" ]
[ 0, 45 ]
[ 63, 63 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday 8th April, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had lobbed it into the Baltic Sea. Thought to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle, it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
0 (Adv)
"Where is the bottle now?"
0
[ "On exhibit in Germany", "In Angela Erdmann’s possession", "In the Baltic Sea", "In a private collection of maritime items" ]
[ 56, 70 ]
[ 42, 45 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday 8th April, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had lobbed it into the Baltic Sea. Thought to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle, it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
0 (Adv)
"How did Angela Erdmann find out about the bottle?"
0
[ "A museum told her that they had it", "She coincidentally saw it at the museum where it was held", "She found it in her basement on April 28th, 2014", "A friend told her about it" ]
[ 56, 70 ]
[ 16, 34 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday April 8th, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had thrown it into the Baltic Sea. The bottle is believed to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle and it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
1 (Int)
"Who threw the bottle into the Baltic Sea?"
0
[ "Angela Erdmann’s grandfather", "Angela Erdmann", "A museum worker", "A fisherman" ]
[ 0, 45 ]
[ 67, 67 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday April 8th, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had thrown it into the Baltic Sea. The bottle is believed to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle and it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
1 (Int)
"Where is the bottle now?"
0
[ "On exhibit in Germany", "In Angela Erdmann’s possession", "In the Baltic Sea", "In a private collection of maritime items" ]
[ 60, 74 ]
[ 42, 45 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday April 8th, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had thrown it into the Baltic Sea. The bottle is believed to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle and it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
1 (Int)
"How did Angela Erdmann find out about the bottle?"
0
[ "A museum told her that they had it", "She coincidentally saw it at the museum where it was held", "She found it in her basement on April 28th, 2014", "A friend told her about it" ]
[ 60, 74 ]
[ 16, 34 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday April 28th, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he threw it into the Baltic Sea. The bottle is possibly the world’s oldest message in a bottle. It was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
2 (Ele)
"Who threw the bottle into the Baltic Sea?"
0
[ "Angela Erdmann’s grandfather", "Angela Erdmann", "A museum worker", "A fisherman" ]
[ 0, 44 ]
[ 63, 63 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday April 28th, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he threw it into the Baltic Sea. The bottle is possibly the world’s oldest message in a bottle. It was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
2 (Ele)
"Where is the bottle now?"
0
[ "On exhibit in Germany", "In Angela Erdmann’s possession", "In the Baltic Sea", "In a private collection of maritime items" ]
[ 56, 70 ]
[ 41, 44 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday April 28th, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he threw it into the Baltic Sea. The bottle is possibly the world’s oldest message in a bottle. It was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany."
2 (Ele)
"How did Angela Erdmann find out about the bottle?"
0
[ "A museum told her that they had it", "She coincidentally saw it at the museum where it was held", "She found it in her basement on April 28th, 2014", "A friend told her about it" ]
[ 56, 70 ]
[ 16, 34 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, recalling how she found out about the bottle. “A man stood at my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. He then told me that a message in a bottle had been found and that the name that was on the card was that of my grandfather.” Her visitor was a genealogical researcher who had managed to track her down in Berlin after the letter was given to the International Maritime Museum in the northern port city of Hamburg."
0 (Adv)
"What did Angela’s visitor deliver?"
1
[ "News of the discovery of the bottle", "A message from the post office", "A letter from a museum in Hamburg", "A package for Angela" ]
[ 16, 57 ]
[ 74, 89 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, recalling how she found out about the bottle. “A man stood at my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. He then told me that a message in a bottle had been found and that the name that was on the card was that of my grandfather.” Her visitor was a genealogical researcher who had managed to track her down in Berlin after the letter was given to the International Maritime Museum in the northern port city of Hamburg."
0 (Adv)
"Who was Angela’s visitor?"
1
[ "An ancestry researcher", "A museum representative from Hamburg", "A postman", "A journalist" ]
[ 58, 89 ]
[ 16, 30 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, recalling how she found out about the bottle. “A man stood at my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. He then told me that a message in a bottle had been found and that the name that was on the card was that of my grandfather.” Her visitor was a genealogical researcher who had managed to track her down in Berlin after the letter was given to the International Maritime Museum in the northern port city of Hamburg."
0 (Adv)
"How did the visitor know the message in the bottle was written by Angela’s grandfather?"
1
[ "Her grandfather’s name appeared on the message", "Her grandfather’s name was carved on the bottle", "The person who gave it to the museum said so", "The letter had unique details about her grandfather’s life" ]
[ 16, 57 ]
[ 74, 89 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, describing how she found out about the bottle. “A man stood at my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. He then told me that a message in a bottle had been found and that the name that was on the card was that of my grandfather.” Her visitor was a genealogical researcher who had managed to find her in Berlin after the letter was given to a museum in the northern port city of Hamburg."
1 (Int)
"What did Angela’s visitor deliver?"
1
[ "News of the discovery of the bottle", "A message from the post office", "A letter from a museum in Hamburg", "A package for Angela" ]
[ 16, 57 ]
[ 73, 86 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, describing how she found out about the bottle. “A man stood at my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. He then told me that a message in a bottle had been found and that the name that was on the card was that of my grandfather.” Her visitor was a genealogical researcher who had managed to find her in Berlin after the letter was given to a museum in the northern port city of Hamburg."
1 (Int)
"Who was Angela’s visitor?"
1
[ "An ancestry researcher", "A museum representative from Hamburg", "A postman", "A journalist" ]
[ 58, 86 ]
[ 16, 30 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, describing how she found out about the bottle. “A man stood at my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. He then told me that a message in a bottle had been found and that the name that was on the card was that of my grandfather.” Her visitor was a genealogical researcher who had managed to find her in Berlin after the letter was given to a museum in the northern port city of Hamburg."
1 (Int)
"How did the visitor know the message in the bottle was written by Angela’s grandfather?"
1
[ "Her grandfather’s name appeared on the message", "Her grandfather’s name was carved on the bottle", "The person who gave it to the museum said so", "The letter had unique details about her grandfather’s life" ]
[ 16, 57 ]
[ 73, 86 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, when she described how she found out about the bottle. “A man came to my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. Then, he told me that someone had found a message in a bottle and that on the card was my grandfather’s name.” Her visitor was a family-tree researcher who found her in Berlin after someone gave the letter to a museum in the northern city of Hamburg."
2 (Ele)
"What did Angela’s visitor deliver?"
1
[ "News of the discovery of the bottle", "A message from the post office", "A letter from a museum in Hamburg", "A package for Angela" ]
[ 18, 54 ]
[ 67, 79 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, when she described how she found out about the bottle. “A man came to my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. Then, he told me that someone had found a message in a bottle and that on the card was my grandfather’s name.” Her visitor was a family-tree researcher who found her in Berlin after someone gave the letter to a museum in the northern city of Hamburg."
2 (Ele)
"Who was Angela’s visitor?"
1
[ "An ancestry researcher", "A museum representative from Hamburg", "A postman", "A journalist" ]
[ 55, 79 ]
[ 18, 32 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“It was very surprising,” Angela Erdmann, 62, said, when she described how she found out about the bottle. “A man came to my door and told me he had post from my grandfather. Then, he told me that someone had found a message in a bottle and that on the card was my grandfather’s name.” Her visitor was a family-tree researcher who found her in Berlin after someone gave the letter to a museum in the northern city of Hamburg."
2 (Ele)
"How did the visitor know the message in the bottle was written by Angela’s grandfather?"
1
[ "Her grandfather’s name appeared on the message", "Her grandfather’s name was carved on the bottle", "The person who gave it to the museum said so", "The letter had unique details about her grandfather’s life" ]
[ 18, 54 ]
[ 67, 79 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle, which had been in the water for 101 years, was found in the catch of Konrad Fischer, a fisherman, who had been out in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, curator for ocean and science at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had come across. “There are documents that have been found without the bottle that are older and are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in extremely good condition.”"
0 (Adv)
"How was the bottle discovered?"
2
[ "A fisherman discovered it", "It washed up on the shore of Kiel", "Holger von Neuhoff discovered it", "A boy discovered it while playing in the sea" ]
[ 0, 22 ]
[ 37, 47 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle, which had been in the water for 101 years, was found in the catch of Konrad Fischer, a fisherman, who had been out in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, curator for ocean and science at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had come across. “There are documents that have been found without the bottle that are older and are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in extremely good condition.”"
0 (Adv)
"What does Holger von Neuhoff say about the bottled message?"
2
[ "It is the oldest message found along with the bottle he has ever encountered", "It is the oldest message in the museum", "It is a beer bottle that was in the water for 101 years", "It is the most recent addition to the museum’s collection" ]
[ 37, 99 ]
[ 0, 12 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle, which had been in the water for 101 years, was found in the catch of Konrad Fischer, a fisherman, who had been out in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, curator for ocean and science at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had come across. “There are documents that have been found without the bottle that are older and are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in extremely good condition.”"
0 (Adv)
"Does the museum have older messages than the one recently discovered?"
2
[ "Yes, but without the bottle", "No, it is the oldest message", "Yes, but not from the Baltic Sea", "No, it displays mostly personal relics" ]
[ 37, 99 ]
[ 27, 30 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle, which had been in the water for 101 years, was found by a fisherman, who had been out in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, a curator at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had come across. “There are documents that have been found without the bottle that are older and are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in extremely good condition.”"
1 (Int)
"How was the bottle discovered?"
2
[ "A fisherman discovered it", "It washed up on the shore of Kiel", "Holger von Neuhoff discovered it", "A boy discovered it while playing in the sea" ]
[ 0, 17 ]
[ 32, 39 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle, which had been in the water for 101 years, was found by a fisherman, who had been out in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, a curator at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had come across. “There are documents that have been found without the bottle that are older and are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in extremely good condition.”"
1 (Int)
"What does Holger von Neuhoff say about the bottled message?"
2
[ "It is the oldest message found along with the bottle he has ever encountered", "It is the oldest message in the museum", "It is a beer bottle that was in the water for 101 years", "It is the most recent addition to the museum’s collection" ]
[ 32, 91 ]
[ 0, 12 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle, which had been in the water for 101 years, was found by a fisherman, who had been out in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, a curator at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had come across. “There are documents that have been found without the bottle that are older and are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in extremely good condition.”"
1 (Int)
"Does the museum have older messages than the one recently discovered?"
2
[ "Yes, but without the bottle", "No, it is the oldest message", "Yes, but not from the Baltic Sea", "No, it displays mostly personal relics" ]
[ 32, 91 ]
[ 22, 25 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle was in the water for 101 years. A fisherman found it in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, a curator at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had ever seen. “There are documents without the bottle that are older and they are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in very good condition.”"
2 (Ele)
"How was the bottle discovered?"
2
[ "A fisherman discovered it", "It washed up on the shore of Kiel", "Holger von Neuhoff discovered it", "A boy discovered it while playing in the sea" ]
[ 0, 24 ]
[ 25, 32 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle was in the water for 101 years. A fisherman found it in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, a curator at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had ever seen. “There are documents without the bottle that are older and they are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in very good condition.”"
2 (Ele)
"What does Holger von Neuhoff say about the bottled message?"
2
[ "It is the oldest message found along with the bottle he has ever encountered", "It is the oldest message in the museum", "It is a beer bottle that was in the water for 101 years", "It is the most recent addition to the museum’s collection" ]
[ 25, 81 ]
[ 0, 10 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The brown beer bottle was in the water for 101 years. A fisherman found it in the Baltic Sea off the northern city of Kiel. Holger von Neuhoff, a curator at the museum, said this bottled message was the oldest he had ever seen. “There are documents without the bottle that are older and they are in the museum,” he said. “But, with the bottle and the document, this is certainly the oldest at the moment. It is in very good condition.”"
2 (Ele)
"Does the museum have older messages than the one recently discovered?"
2
[ "Yes, but without the bottle", "No, it is the oldest message", "Yes, but not from the Baltic Sea", "No, it displays mostly personal relics" ]
[ 25, 81 ]
[ 16, 18 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle in the sea while on a hike with a nature appreciation group in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. Much of the postcard was indecipherable, although the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible, as was the author’s polite request that the note be sent by the finder to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were also in the bottle, so the finder would not incur a cost,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, although she had not known her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
0 (Adv)
"According to researchers, when did Richard Platz throw the bottle into the sea?"
3
[ "At the age of 20", "Before 1913", "At the age of 54", "Before 1901" ]
[ 0, 30 ]
[ 123, 127 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle in the sea while on a hike with a nature appreciation group in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. Much of the postcard was indecipherable, although the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible, as was the author’s polite request that the note be sent by the finder to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were also in the bottle, so the finder would not incur a cost,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, although she had not known her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
0 (Adv)
"What did Richard Platz request from the person who finds the bottle?"
3
[ "To use the stamps in the bottle to send the letter to Platz", "To buy two stamps and sent the letter to Platz", "To give the bottle to Angela after his death", "To rescue him from the island he was stranded on" ]
[ 50, 91 ]
[ 102, 133 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle in the sea while on a hike with a nature appreciation group in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. Much of the postcard was indecipherable, although the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible, as was the author’s polite request that the note be sent by the finder to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were also in the bottle, so the finder would not incur a cost,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, although she had not known her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
0 (Adv)
"Where did Richard Platz want the postcard to end up?"
3
[ "His home", "In the hands of whomever found it", "Floating in the sea", "At a museum" ]
[ 50, 67 ]
[ 6, 11 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle in the sea while on a hike in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. A lot of the message on the postcard was impossible to read, although the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible. Also legible was the author’s polite request that the person finding it should send it to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were in the bottle, so the finder would not have to pay for postage,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, although she had not known her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
1 (Int)
"According to researchers, when did Richard Platz throw the bottle into the sea?"
3
[ "At the age of 20", "Before 1913", "At the age of 54", "Before 1901" ]
[ 0, 25 ]
[ 126, 130 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle in the sea while on a hike in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. A lot of the message on the postcard was impossible to read, although the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible. Also legible was the author’s polite request that the person finding it should send it to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were in the bottle, so the finder would not have to pay for postage,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, although she had not known her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
1 (Int)
"What did Richard Platz request from the person who finds the bottle?"
3
[ "To use the stamps in the bottle to send the letter to Platz", "To buy two stamps and sent the letter to Platz", "To give the bottle to Angela after his death", "To rescue him from the island he was stranded on" ]
[ 51, 94 ]
[ 105, 136 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle in the sea while on a hike in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. A lot of the message on the postcard was impossible to read, although the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible. Also legible was the author’s polite request that the person finding it should send it to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were in the bottle, so the finder would not have to pay for postage,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, although she had not known her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
1 (Int)
"Where did Richard Platz want the postcard to end up?"
3
[ "His home", "In the hands of whomever found it", "Floating in the sea", "At a museum" ]
[ 51, 69 ]
[ 6, 11 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe that Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle into the sea when he was on a hike in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. A lot of the message on the postcard was impossible to read, but the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible. Platz asked the person who found it to send the postcard to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were also in the bottle, so the finder would not have to pay for postage,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, but she did not know her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
2 (Ele)
"According to researchers, when did Richard Platz throw the bottle into the sea?"
3
[ "At the age of 20", "Before 1913", "At the age of 54", "Before 1901" ]
[ 0, 28 ]
[ 126, 130 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe that Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle into the sea when he was on a hike in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. A lot of the message on the postcard was impossible to read, but the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible. Platz asked the person who found it to send the postcard to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were also in the bottle, so the finder would not have to pay for postage,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, but she did not know her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
2 (Ele)
"What did Richard Platz request from the person who finds the bottle?"
3
[ "To use the stamps in the bottle to send the letter to Platz", "To buy two stamps and sent the letter to Platz", "To give the bottle to Angela after his death", "To rescue him from the island he was stranded on" ]
[ 54, 94 ]
[ 105, 136 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"Researchers believe that Erdmann’s grandfather, Richard Platz, threw the bottle into the sea when he was on a hike in 1913. He was 20 years old at the time. A lot of the message on the postcard was impossible to read, but the address in Berlin on the front of the card was legible. Platz asked the person who found it to send the postcard to his home address. “He also included two stamps from that time that were also in the bottle, so the finder would not have to pay for postage,” Erdmann said. “But he did not think it would take 101 years.” She said she was moved by the arrival of the message, but she did not know her grandfather because he died, at the age of 54, six years before she was born."
2 (Ele)
"Where did Richard Platz want the postcard to end up?"
3
[ "His home", "In the hands of whomever found it", "Floating in the sea", "At a museum" ]
[ 54, 68 ]
[ 7, 12 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather, but I found out that he was a writer who was very open-minded, and believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Like her grandfather, Erdmann said, she also liked culture and traveling around the world. She described herself as open-minded, too. “What he taught his two daughters, my mother taught me and I have then given to my sons,” she said. Despite her joy at receiving the bottled message, she said that she hoped others would not repeat what her grandfather had done and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of so many bottles and rubbish that more shouldn’t be thrown in there,“ she said."
0 (Adv)
"Which of the following characteristics does Angela Erdman share with her grandfather?"
4
[ "Open-mindedness", "Love for writing", "Opposition to polluting the sea", "Love for museums" ]
[ 0, 80 ]
[ 131, 151 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather, but I found out that he was a writer who was very open-minded, and believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Like her grandfather, Erdmann said, she also liked culture and traveling around the world. She described herself as open-minded, too. “What he taught his two daughters, my mother taught me and I have then given to my sons,” she said. Despite her joy at receiving the bottled message, she said that she hoped others would not repeat what her grandfather had done and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of so many bottles and rubbish that more shouldn’t be thrown in there,“ she said."
0 (Adv)
"Does Angela approve of sending bottled messages into the sea nowadays?"
4
[ "No, she thinks there is already enough objects in the sea that do not belong there", "Yes, as long as they are not thrown along with rubbish", "Yes, to her it is part of the culture of travelling around the world", "No, she thinks broken bottles in the sea can be dangerous" ]
[ 101, 151 ]
[ 64, 74 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather, but I found out that he was a writer who was very open-minded, and believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Like her grandfather, Erdmann said, she also liked culture and traveling around the world. She described herself as open-minded, too. “What he taught his two daughters, my mother taught me and I have then given to my sons,” she said. Despite her joy at receiving the bottled message, she said that she hoped others would not repeat what her grandfather had done and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of so many bottles and rubbish that more shouldn’t be thrown in there,“ she said."
0 (Adv)
"What does Angella think of the state of the sea today?"
4
[ "It is full of objects that do not belong there", "Too many people have thrown bottled messages into it", "More than ever, it symbolizes freedom", "She finds the rise in sea levels concerning" ]
[ 101, 151 ]
[ 21, 23 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather, but I found out that he was a writer who was very open-minded, and believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Erdmann said she also liked culture and traveling around the world, just like her grandfather. She described herself as open-minded, too. “What he taught his two daughters, my mother taught me and I have then given to my sons,” she said. She was very happy to receive the bottled message, she said, but she hoped other people would not do what her grandfather had done and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of so many bottles and rubbish that more shouldn’t be thrown in there,” she said."
1 (Int)
"Which of the following characteristics does Angela Erdman share with her grandfather?"
4
[ "Open-mindedness", "Love for writing", "Opposition to polluting the sea", "Love for museums" ]
[ 0, 81 ]
[ 134, 154 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather, but I found out that he was a writer who was very open-minded, and believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Erdmann said she also liked culture and traveling around the world, just like her grandfather. She described herself as open-minded, too. “What he taught his two daughters, my mother taught me and I have then given to my sons,” she said. She was very happy to receive the bottled message, she said, but she hoped other people would not do what her grandfather had done and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of so many bottles and rubbish that more shouldn’t be thrown in there,” she said."
1 (Int)
"Does Angela approve of sending bottled messages into the sea nowadays?"
4
[ "No, she thinks there is already enough objects in the sea that do not belong there", "Yes, as long as they are not thrown along with rubbish", "Yes, to her it is part of the culture of travelling around the world", "No, she thinks broken bottles in the sea can be dangerous" ]
[ 102, 154 ]
[ 61, 71 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather, but I found out that he was a writer who was very open-minded, and believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Erdmann said she also liked culture and traveling around the world, just like her grandfather. She described herself as open-minded, too. “What he taught his two daughters, my mother taught me and I have then given to my sons,” she said. She was very happy to receive the bottled message, she said, but she hoped other people would not do what her grandfather had done and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of so many bottles and rubbish that more shouldn’t be thrown in there,” she said."
1 (Int)
"What does Angella think of the state of the sea today?"
4
[ "It is full of objects that do not belong there", "Too many people have thrown bottled messages into it", "More than ever, it symbolizes freedom", "She finds the rise in sea levels concerning" ]
[ 102, 154 ]
[ 21, 23 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather. But I found out that he was a writer. He was very open-minded, and he believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Erdmann said she also liked culture and traveling around the world, just like her grandfather. She described herself as open-minded, too. She was very happy to receive the bottled message, she said, but she hoped other people would not do what her grandfather did and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of bottles and rubbish that we shouldn’t throw more in there,” she said."
2 (Ele)
"Which of the following characteristics does Angela Erdman share with her grandfather?"
4
[ "Open-mindedness", "Love for writing", "Opposition to polluting the sea", "Love for museums" ]
[ 0, 82 ]
[ 114, 132 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather. But I found out that he was a writer. He was very open-minded, and he believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Erdmann said she also liked culture and traveling around the world, just like her grandfather. She described herself as open-minded, too. She was very happy to receive the bottled message, she said, but she hoped other people would not do what her grandfather did and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of bottles and rubbish that we shouldn’t throw more in there,” she said."
2 (Ele)
"Does Angela approve of sending bottled messages into the sea nowadays?"
4
[ "No, she thinks there is already enough objects in the sea that do not belong there", "Yes, as long as they are not thrown along with rubbish", "Yes, to her it is part of the culture of travelling around the world", "No, she thinks broken bottles in the sea can be dangerous" ]
[ 83, 132 ]
[ 62, 72 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"“I knew very little about my grandfather. But I found out that he was a writer. He was very open-minded, and he believed in freedom and that everyone should respect each other,” she said. “He did a lot for the young and later traveled with his wife and two daughters. It was wonderful because I could see where my roots came from.” Erdmann said she also liked culture and traveling around the world, just like her grandfather. She described herself as open-minded, too. She was very happy to receive the bottled message, she said, but she hoped other people would not do what her grandfather did and throw bottles with messages into the sea. “Today, the sea is so full of bottles and rubbish that we shouldn’t throw more in there,” she said."
2 (Ele)
"What does Angella think of the state of the sea today?"
4
[ "It is full of objects that do not belong there", "Too many people have thrown bottled messages into it", "More than ever, it symbolizes freedom", "She finds the rise in sea levels concerning" ]
[ 83, 132 ]
[ 22, 24 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014, after which experts will attempt to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will then happen to the bottle, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to make a few photos available to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
0 (Adv)
"What will happen to the bottle after the experts finish examining the text?"
5
[ "Its fate is not known", "It will stay at the Maritime Museum", "Photos of it will be put on display", "It will be given to Erdmann" ]
[ 0, 50 ]
[ 51, 63 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014, after which experts will attempt to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will then happen to the bottle, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to make a few photos available to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
0 (Adv)
"What does Erdmann want to add to the bottle exhibit?"
5
[ "Pictures of the bottled message’s author", "A photo that depicts a young man throwing a bottle into the sea", "A deciphered copy of the text", "Excerpts from a book written by her grandfather" ]
[ 51, 84 ]
[ 21, 30 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014, after which experts will attempt to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will then happen to the bottle, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to make a few photos available to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
0 (Adv)
"What does Erdmann want to happen to the bottle after the exhibit?"
5
[ "She wants it to remain at the Hamburg Maritime Museum", "She does not make it clear what she wants to happen to the bottle", "She wants museum visitors to be able to take photos with it", "She wants to move it to her apartment and keep it for herself" ]
[ 0, 50 ]
[ 51, 63 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014, after which experts will attempt to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will then happen to the bottle, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to make a few photos available to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
1 (Int)
"What will happen to the bottle after the experts finish examining the text?"
5
[ "Its fate is not known", "It will stay at the Maritime Museum", "Photos of it will be put on display", "It will be given to Erdmann" ]
[ 0, 50 ]
[ 51, 63 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014, after which experts will attempt to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will then happen to the bottle, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to make a few photos available to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
1 (Int)
"What does Erdmann want to add to the bottle exhibit?"
5
[ "Pictures of the bottled message’s author", "A photo that depicts a young man throwing a bottle into the sea", "A deciphered copy of the text", "Excerpts from a book written by her grandfather" ]
[ 51, 84 ]
[ 21, 30 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014, after which experts will attempt to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will then happen to the bottle, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to make a few photos available to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
1 (Int)
"What does Erdmann want to happen to the bottle after the exhibit?"
5
[ "She wants it to remain at the Hamburg Maritime Museum", "She does not make it clear what she wants to happen to the bottle", "She wants museum visitors to be able to take photos with it", "She wants to move it to her apartment and keep it for herself" ]
[ 0, 50 ]
[ 51, 63 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014. Then, experts will try to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will happen to the bottle after that, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to find a few photos to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
2 (Ele)
"What will happen to the bottle after the experts finish examining the text?"
5
[ "Its fate is not known", "It will stay at the Maritime Museum", "Photos of it will be put on display", "It will be given to Erdmann" ]
[ 0, 50 ]
[ 51, 62 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014. Then, experts will try to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will happen to the bottle after that, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to find a few photos to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
2 (Ele)
"What does Erdmann want to add to the bottle exhibit?"
5
[ "Pictures of the bottled message’s author", "A photo that depicts a young man throwing a bottle into the sea", "A deciphered copy of the text", "Excerpts from a book written by her grandfather" ]
[ 51, 83 ]
[ 20, 29 ]
"101-Year-Old Bottle Message"
"The message and the bottle will be on display at Hamburg’s Maritime Museum until the beginning of May 2014. Then, experts will try to decipher the rest of the text. It is not clear what will happen to the bottle after that, but Erdmann hopes it will stay at the museum. “We want to find a few photos to put with the bottle and give it a face, so visitors can see the young man who threw the bottle into the water,” she said."
2 (Ele)
"What does Erdmann want to happen to the bottle after the exhibit?"
5
[ "She wants it to remain at the Hamburg Maritime Museum", "She does not make it clear what she wants to happen to the bottle", "She wants museum visitors to be able to take photos with it", "She wants to move it to her apartment and keep it for herself" ]
[ 0, 50 ]
[ 51, 62 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, relied on polygraphs as lie detectors to help convict criminals or unearth spies and traitors. The polygraph is beloved of the movies, with countless dramatic moments showing the guilty sweating profusely as they are hooked up. But the invention could soon be defunct. Researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have made a breakthrough, developing a method with a success rate in tests of over 70% that could be in use in police stations around the world within a decade. Rather than relying on facial tics, talking too much or waving of arms – all seen as tell-tale signs of lying – the new method involves monitoring full-body motions to provide an indicator of signs of guilty feelings."
0 (Adv)
"When is the new lie detection method expected to work with over 70% accuracy?"
0
[ "It has already achieved this accuracy level in tests", "Within ten years", "Once it is modified to monitor movements of the entire body", "It is currently not known" ]
[ 55, 90 ]
[ 113, 119 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, relied on polygraphs as lie detectors to help convict criminals or unearth spies and traitors. The polygraph is beloved of the movies, with countless dramatic moments showing the guilty sweating profusely as they are hooked up. But the invention could soon be defunct. Researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have made a breakthrough, developing a method with a success rate in tests of over 70% that could be in use in police stations around the world within a decade. Rather than relying on facial tics, talking too much or waving of arms – all seen as tell-tale signs of lying – the new method involves monitoring full-body motions to provide an indicator of signs of guilty feelings."
0 (Adv)
"What does the new method of lie detection monitor that the polygraph does not?"
0
[ "Motions in the entire body", "Talking too much and arm waving", "Body responses to statements about events within a period of ten years", "Body temperature" ]
[ 91, 128 ]
[ 78, 90 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, relied on polygraphs as lie detectors to help convict criminals or unearth spies and traitors. The polygraph is beloved of the movies, with countless dramatic moments showing the guilty sweating profusely as they are hooked up. But the invention could soon be defunct. Researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have made a breakthrough, developing a method with a success rate in tests of over 70% that could be in use in police stations around the world within a decade. Rather than relying on facial tics, talking too much or waving of arms – all seen as tell-tale signs of lying – the new method involves monitoring full-body motions to provide an indicator of signs of guilty feelings."
0 (Adv)
"When are police stations expected to start using the new lie detection method?"
0
[ "Within 10 years", "Once it reaches an accuracy of at least 70%", "Once it is able to track the movements of the entire body", "It is already in use in many police stations" ]
[ 55, 90 ]
[ 113, 119 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, used polygraphs as lie detectors to help convict criminals or find spies and traitors. But the polygraph could soon be defunct. Researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have developed a new method that has a success rate, in tests, of over 70%. This new method could be in use in police stations around the world within a decade. It doesn’t monitor facial tics, talking too much or waving of arms, which are all signs that someone is lying. The new method monitors full-body motion, which can show that the person is feeling guilty."
1 (Int)
"When is the new lie detection method expected to work with over 70% accuracy?"
0
[ "It has already achieved this accuracy level in tests", "Within ten years", "Once it is modified to monitor movements of the entire body", "It is currently not known" ]
[ 33, 69 ]
[ 90, 95 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, used polygraphs as lie detectors to help convict criminals or find spies and traitors. But the polygraph could soon be defunct. Researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have developed a new method that has a success rate, in tests, of over 70%. This new method could be in use in police stations around the world within a decade. It doesn’t monitor facial tics, talking too much or waving of arms, which are all signs that someone is lying. The new method monitors full-body motion, which can show that the person is feeling guilty."
1 (Int)
"What does the new method of lie detection monitor that the polygraph does not?"
0
[ "Motions in the entire body", "Talking too much and arm waving", "Body responses to statements about events within a period of ten years", "Body temperature" ]
[ 70, 104 ]
[ 54, 69 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, used polygraphs as lie detectors to help convict criminals or find spies and traitors. But the polygraph could soon be defunct. Researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have developed a new method that has a success rate, in tests, of over 70%. This new method could be in use in police stations around the world within a decade. It doesn’t monitor facial tics, talking too much or waving of arms, which are all signs that someone is lying. The new method monitors full-body motion, which can show that the person is feeling guilty."
1 (Int)
"When are police stations expected to start using the new lie detection method?"
0
[ "Within 10 years", "Once it reaches an accuracy of at least 70%", "Once it is able to track the movements of the entire body", "It is already in use in many police stations" ]
[ 33, 69 ]
[ 90, 95 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, used the polygraph, a lie-detector test, to help catch criminals and spies. But, now, researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have developed a new method, which is correct (in tests) over 70% of the time. Police stations around the world might begin using this new method within ten years. It doesn’t monitor movements in the face, talking too much or waving arms – all signs that someone is lying. The new method monitors movements in the whole body, which can show that the person is feeling guilty."
2 (Ele)
"When is the new lie detection method expected to work with over 70% accuracy?"
0
[ "It has already achieved this accuracy level in tests", "Within ten years", "Once it is modified to monitor movements of the entire body", "It is currently not known" ]
[ 24, 60 ]
[ 81, 89 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, used the polygraph, a lie-detector test, to help catch criminals and spies. But, now, researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have developed a new method, which is correct (in tests) over 70% of the time. Police stations around the world might begin using this new method within ten years. It doesn’t monitor movements in the face, talking too much or waving arms – all signs that someone is lying. The new method monitors movements in the whole body, which can show that the person is feeling guilty."
2 (Ele)
"What does the new method of lie detection monitor that the polygraph does not?"
0
[ "Motions in the entire body", "Talking too much and arm waving", "Body responses to statements about events within a period of ten years", "Body temperature" ]
[ 61, 98 ]
[ 47, 60 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"Police and intelligence agencies around the world have, for almost 100 years, used the polygraph, a lie-detector test, to help catch criminals and spies. But, now, researchers in Britain and the Netherlands have developed a new method, which is correct (in tests) over 70% of the time. Police stations around the world might begin using this new method within ten years. It doesn’t monitor movements in the face, talking too much or waving arms – all signs that someone is lying. The new method monitors movements in the whole body, which can show that the person is feeling guilty."
2 (Ele)
"When are police stations expected to start using the new lie detection method?"
0
[ "Within 10 years", "Once it reaches an accuracy of at least 70%", "Once it is able to track the movements of the entire body", "It is already in use in many police stations" ]
[ 24, 60 ]
[ 81, 89 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is widely used in the US in criminal and other cases and for security clearance for the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. There has been a lot of skepticism in the scientific and legal communities about its reliability. By contrast, the new method developed by the researchers has performed well in experiments. The basic premise is that liars fidget more and so the use of an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will pick this up. One of the research team, Ross Anderson, said: “Decades of deception research show that the interviewer will tell truth from lies only slightly better than random.” He said the new method, by contrast, achieved a reliability rating of over 70%. In some tests, the team has already achieved more than 80%. Anderson said: “The takeaway message is that guilty people fidget more and we can measure this robustly.”"
0 (Adv)
"What can an all-body suit be used for?"
1
[ "Create computer-generated characters", "Influence liars to fidget more", "Protect FBI and CIA agents", "Protect the body in cold weather" ]
[ 59, 90 ]
[ 19, 21, 29, 44 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is widely used in the US in criminal and other cases and for security clearance for the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. There has been a lot of skepticism in the scientific and legal communities about its reliability. By contrast, the new method developed by the researchers has performed well in experiments. The basic premise is that liars fidget more and so the use of an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will pick this up. One of the research team, Ross Anderson, said: “Decades of deception research show that the interviewer will tell truth from lies only slightly better than random.” He said the new method, by contrast, achieved a reliability rating of over 70%. In some tests, the team has already achieved more than 80%. Anderson said: “The takeaway message is that guilty people fidget more and we can measure this robustly.”"
0 (Adv)
"What does Anderson say can be measured now?"
1
[ "Body motions that show whether someone is guilty", "Whether fidgeting causes people to feel guilty", "The reliability of the polygraph in determining if someone is guilty", "Small changes in breathing rate that show if someone is guilty" ]
[ 142, 158 ]
[ 0, 44 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is widely used in the US in criminal and other cases and for security clearance for the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. There has been a lot of skepticism in the scientific and legal communities about its reliability. By contrast, the new method developed by the researchers has performed well in experiments. The basic premise is that liars fidget more and so the use of an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will pick this up. One of the research team, Ross Anderson, said: “Decades of deception research show that the interviewer will tell truth from lies only slightly better than random.” He said the new method, by contrast, achieved a reliability rating of over 70%. In some tests, the team has already achieved more than 80%. Anderson said: “The takeaway message is that guilty people fidget more and we can measure this robustly.”"
0 (Adv)
"What position does Ross Anderson hold?"
1
[ "A researcher on the team developing the new method for lie-detection", "A test participant whose lies the new method could correctly detect 80% of the time", "A special effects editor who creates computer generated characters for tests", "A director of an organization looking to refine interrogation methods" ]
[ 131, 158 ]
[ 83, 85 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is widely used in the US in criminal cases and for security clearance for the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. Many people in the scientific and legal communities do not believe that it is reliable. By contrast, the new method has performed well in experiments. The basic thought is that liars fidget more and so the use of an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will record this. One of the research team, Ross Anderson, said that years of research show that an interviewer will know whether someone is telling the truth, and not lies, in only about 55 times out of 100. He said the new method, by contrast, was reliable over 70% of the time. And he was confident they would be able to do better. In some tests, the team has already achieved more than 80%. Anderson said: “Guilty people fidget more and we can measure this.”"
1 (Int)
"What can an all-body suit be used for?"
1
[ "Create computer-generated characters", "Influence liars to fidget more", "Protect FBI and CIA agents", "Protect the body in cold weather" ]
[ 52, 82 ]
[ 17, 19, 27, 41 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is widely used in the US in criminal cases and for security clearance for the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. Many people in the scientific and legal communities do not believe that it is reliable. By contrast, the new method has performed well in experiments. The basic thought is that liars fidget more and so the use of an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will record this. One of the research team, Ross Anderson, said that years of research show that an interviewer will know whether someone is telling the truth, and not lies, in only about 55 times out of 100. He said the new method, by contrast, was reliable over 70% of the time. And he was confident they would be able to do better. In some tests, the team has already achieved more than 80%. Anderson said: “Guilty people fidget more and we can measure this.”"
1 (Int)
"What does Anderson say can be measured now?"
1
[ "Body motions that show whether someone is guilty", "Whether fidgeting causes people to feel guilty", "The reliability of the polygraph in determining if someone is guilty", "Small changes in breathing rate that show if someone is guilty" ]
[ 154, 164 ]
[ 0, 41 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is widely used in the US in criminal cases and for security clearance for the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. Many people in the scientific and legal communities do not believe that it is reliable. By contrast, the new method has performed well in experiments. The basic thought is that liars fidget more and so the use of an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will record this. One of the research team, Ross Anderson, said that years of research show that an interviewer will know whether someone is telling the truth, and not lies, in only about 55 times out of 100. He said the new method, by contrast, was reliable over 70% of the time. And he was confident they would be able to do better. In some tests, the team has already achieved more than 80%. Anderson said: “Guilty people fidget more and we can measure this.”"
1 (Int)
"What position does Ross Anderson hold?"
1
[ "A researcher on the team developing the new method for lie-detection", "A test participant whose lies the new method could correctly detect 80% of the time", "A special effects editor who creates computer generated characters for tests", "A director of an organization looking to refine interrogation methods" ]
[ 143, 164 ]
[ 76, 78 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is often used in the US in criminal cases and by the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. Many people do not believe that it is reliable. The basic idea behind the new method is that liars fidget more and that an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will record this. The new method is over 70% reliable – the polygraph is only 55% reliable. In some tests, the success rate of the new method was more than 80%. Ross Anderson, one of the research team, said: “Guilty people fidget more and we can now measure this.”"
2 (Ele)
"What can an all-body suit be used for?"
1
[ "Create computer-generated characters", "Influence liars to fidget more", "Protect FBI and CIA agents", "Protect the body in cold weather" ]
[ 33, 64 ]
[ 14, 16, 24, 32 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is often used in the US in criminal cases and by the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. Many people do not believe that it is reliable. The basic idea behind the new method is that liars fidget more and that an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will record this. The new method is over 70% reliable – the polygraph is only 55% reliable. In some tests, the success rate of the new method was more than 80%. Ross Anderson, one of the research team, said: “Guilty people fidget more and we can now measure this.”"
2 (Ele)
"What does Anderson say can be measured now?"
1
[ "Body motions that show whether someone is guilty", "Whether fidgeting causes people to feel guilty", "The reliability of the polygraph in determining if someone is guilty", "Small changes in breathing rate that show if someone is guilty" ]
[ 93, 110 ]
[ 0, 32 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph is often used in the US in criminal cases and by the FBI and CIA but is much less popular in Europe. Many people do not believe that it is reliable. The basic idea behind the new method is that liars fidget more and that an all-body motion suit – the kind used in films to create computer-generated characters – will record this. The new method is over 70% reliable – the polygraph is only 55% reliable. In some tests, the success rate of the new method was more than 80%. Ross Anderson, one of the research team, said: “Guilty people fidget more and we can now measure this.”"
2 (Ele)
"What position does Ross Anderson hold?"
1
[ "A researcher on the team developing the new method for lie-detection", "A test participant whose lies the new method could correctly detect 80% of the time", "A special effects editor who creates computer generated characters for tests", "A director of an organization looking to refine interrogation methods" ]
[ 79, 110 ]
[ 58, 60 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to ascertain whether a subject is lying. While cinema depictions suggest the device is near-infallible, the US Supreme Court ruled, in 1998, that there was no consensus that the polygraph was reliable, a finding supported by the US National Academy of Scientists in 2003."
0 (Adv)
"Who was John Larson?"
2
[ "A policeman who developed a lie-detection method", "A psychologist who created the polygraph", "A US Supreme Court judge who ruled on the reliability of the polygraph", "A 21st century researcher working on new methods of lie detection" ]
[ 0, 17 ]
[ 43, 59 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to ascertain whether a subject is lying. While cinema depictions suggest the device is near-infallible, the US Supreme Court ruled, in 1998, that there was no consensus that the polygraph was reliable, a finding supported by the US National Academy of Scientists in 2003."
0 (Adv)
"What happened in 1998?"
2
[ "The Supreme Court could not confirm that polygraphs are reliable", "The Supreme Court decided to prohibit the use of polygraphs", "The US National Academy of Scientists said it cannot confirm that polygraphs are reliable", "The European Union decided that polygraphs are not reliable" ]
[ 35, 59 ]
[ 60, 69 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to ascertain whether a subject is lying. While cinema depictions suggest the device is near-infallible, the US Supreme Court ruled, in 1998, that there was no consensus that the polygraph was reliable, a finding supported by the US National Academy of Scientists in 2003."
0 (Adv)
"Who first stated that the polygraph might not be reliable?"
2
[ "The Supreme Court of the United States", "The National Academy of Scientists", "The psychologist William Martson", "The Federal Bureau of Intelligence" ]
[ 35, 71 ]
[ 15, 17 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to find out whether someone is lying. In movies, the polygraph is always right, But, in 1998, the US Supreme Court ruled that there was no consensus that the polygraph was reliable. This conclusion was supported by the US National Academy of Scientists in 2003."
1 (Int)
"Who was John Larson?"
2
[ "A policeman who developed a lie-detection method", "A psychologist who created the polygraph", "A US Supreme Court judge who ruled on the reliability of the polygraph", "A 21st century researcher working on new methods of lie detection" ]
[ 0, 17 ]
[ 46, 59 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to find out whether someone is lying. In movies, the polygraph is always right, But, in 1998, the US Supreme Court ruled that there was no consensus that the polygraph was reliable. This conclusion was supported by the US National Academy of Scientists in 2003."
1 (Int)
"What happened in 1998?"
2
[ "The Supreme Court could not confirm that polygraphs are reliable", "The Supreme Court decided to prohibit the use of polygraphs", "The US National Academy of Scientists said it cannot confirm that polygraphs are reliable", "The European Union decided that polygraphs are not reliable" ]
[ 35, 59 ]
[ 60, 70 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to find out whether someone is lying. In movies, the polygraph is always right, But, in 1998, the US Supreme Court ruled that there was no consensus that the polygraph was reliable. This conclusion was supported by the US National Academy of Scientists in 2003."
1 (Int)
"Who first stated that the polygraph might not be reliable?"
2
[ "The Supreme Court of the United States", "The National Academy of Scientists", "The psychologist William Martson", "The Federal Bureau of Intelligence" ]
[ 35, 72 ]
[ 15, 17 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to find out if someone is lying. In movies, the polygraph is always correct but, in 1998, the US Supreme Court decided that there was no agreement that the polygraph was reliable. The US National Academy of Scientists said the same thing in 2003."
2 (Ele)
"Who was John Larson?"
2
[ "A policeman who developed a lie-detection method", "A psychologist who created the polygraph", "A US Supreme Court judge who ruled on the reliability of the polygraph", "A 21st century researcher working on new methods of lie detection" ]
[ 0, 17 ]
[ 46, 59 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to find out if someone is lying. In movies, the polygraph is always correct but, in 1998, the US Supreme Court decided that there was no agreement that the polygraph was reliable. The US National Academy of Scientists said the same thing in 2003."
2 (Ele)
"What happened in 1998?"
2
[ "The Supreme Court could not confirm that polygraphs are reliable", "The Supreme Court decided to prohibit the use of polygraphs", "The US National Academy of Scientists said it cannot confirm that polygraphs are reliable", "The European Union decided that polygraphs are not reliable" ]
[ 35, 59 ]
[ 60, 71 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The polygraph was created in 1921 by policeman John Larson, based on research by the psychologist William Marston. It records changes in pulse, blood pressure, sweating and breathing to find out if someone is lying. In movies, the polygraph is always correct but, in 1998, the US Supreme Court decided that there was no agreement that the polygraph was reliable. The US National Academy of Scientists said the same thing in 2003."
2 (Ele)
"Who first stated that the polygraph might not be reliable?"
2
[ "The Supreme Court of the United States", "The National Academy of Scientists", "The psychologist William Martson", "The Federal Bureau of Intelligence" ]
[ 35, 71 ]
[ 15, 17 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The experiment carried out by Anderson and his colleagues involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University, of which half were told to tell the truth and half to lie. They were each paid £7.50 for their participation in the 70-minute experiment, involving two tests. Some were interviewed about a computer game Never End, which they played for seven minutes, while others lied about playing it, having only been shown notes about it. The second test involved a lost wallet containing £5. Some were asked to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box while others hid it and lied about it."
0 (Adv)
"What did participants lie about in the Never End game experiment?"
3
[ "Whether they played the game", "The duration of the game", "Being paid £5 to play the game", "Their position on the game’s leaderboar" ]
[ 19, 72 ]
[ 80, 81 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The experiment carried out by Anderson and his colleagues involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University, of which half were told to tell the truth and half to lie. They were each paid £7.50 for their participation in the 70-minute experiment, involving two tests. Some were interviewed about a computer game Never End, which they played for seven minutes, while others lied about playing it, having only been shown notes about it. The second test involved a lost wallet containing £5. Some were asked to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box while others hid it and lied about it."
0 (Adv)
"What were some people supposed to do with the wallet?"
3
[ "Return it to a box of lost-and-found items", "Take out £5 and leave it where they found it", "Discuss what they would do with it in an interview", "Seek out the original owner and return it" ]
[ 73, 100 ]
[ 47, 59 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The experiment carried out by Anderson and his colleagues involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University, of which half were told to tell the truth and half to lie. They were each paid £7.50 for their participation in the 70-minute experiment, involving two tests. Some were interviewed about a computer game Never End, which they played for seven minutes, while others lied about playing it, having only been shown notes about it. The second test involved a lost wallet containing £5. Some were asked to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box while others hid it and lied about it."
0 (Adv)
"What did some participants do for seven minutes?"
3
[ "Played a computer game", "Were interviewed about Never End", "Looked for a place to hide a wallet", "Talked to a policeman" ]
[ 19, 59 ]
[ 86, 96 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The experiment carried out by Anderson and his colleagues involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University – half of the people were told to tell the truth and half to lie. They were each paid £7.50 for their participation in the 70-minute experiment, involving two tests. Some were interviewed about a computer game Never End, which they played for seven minutes. Others lied about playing the game – they had only seen notes about it. The second test involved a lost wallet containing £5. Some were asked to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box. Others hid it and lied about it."
1 (Int)
"What did participants lie about in the Never End game experiment?"
3
[ "Whether they played the game", "The duration of the game", "Being paid £5 to play the game", "Their position on the game’s leaderboar" ]
[ 18, 75 ]
[ 83, 84 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The experiment carried out by Anderson and his colleagues involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University – half of the people were told to tell the truth and half to lie. They were each paid £7.50 for their participation in the 70-minute experiment, involving two tests. Some were interviewed about a computer game Never End, which they played for seven minutes. Others lied about playing the game – they had only seen notes about it. The second test involved a lost wallet containing £5. Some were asked to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box. Others hid it and lied about it."
1 (Int)
"What were some people supposed to do with the wallet?"
3
[ "Return it to a box of lost-and-found items", "Take out £5 and leave it where they found it", "Discuss what they would do with it in an interview", "Seek out the original owner and return it" ]
[ 76, 102 ]
[ 49, 61 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The experiment carried out by Anderson and his colleagues involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University – half of the people were told to tell the truth and half to lie. They were each paid £7.50 for their participation in the 70-minute experiment, involving two tests. Some were interviewed about a computer game Never End, which they played for seven minutes. Others lied about playing the game – they had only seen notes about it. The second test involved a lost wallet containing £5. Some were asked to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box. Others hid it and lied about it."
1 (Int)
"What did some participants do for seven minutes?"
3
[ "Played a computer game", "Were interviewed about Never End", "Looked for a place to hide a wallet", "Talked to a policeman" ]
[ 18, 61 ]
[ 89, 98 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The tests Anderson and his colleagues did involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University. Half of the people were told to tell the truth and half to lie. The researchers interviewed some of the people about a computer game called Never End that they played for seven minutes. Others lied about playing it. The second test involved a lost wallet with £5 inside. Some people had to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box. Others hid it and lied about it."
2 (Ele)
"What did participants lie about in the Never End game experiment?"
3
[ "Whether they played the game", "The duration of the game", "Being paid £5 to play the game", "Their position on the game’s leaderboar" ]
[ 15, 53 ]
[ 62, 63 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The tests Anderson and his colleagues did involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University. Half of the people were told to tell the truth and half to lie. The researchers interviewed some of the people about a computer game called Never End that they played for seven minutes. Others lied about playing it. The second test involved a lost wallet with £5 inside. Some people had to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box. Others hid it and lied about it."
2 (Ele)
"What were some people supposed to do with the wallet?"
3
[ "Return it to a box of lost-and-found items", "Take out £5 and leave it where they found it", "Discuss what they would do with it in an interview", "Seek out the original owner and return it" ]
[ 54, 81 ]
[ 31, 48 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The tests Anderson and his colleagues did involved 180 students and employees at Lancaster University. Half of the people were told to tell the truth and half to lie. The researchers interviewed some of the people about a computer game called Never End that they played for seven minutes. Others lied about playing it. The second test involved a lost wallet with £5 inside. Some people had to bring the wallet to a lost-and-found box. Others hid it and lied about it."
2 (Ele)
"What did some participants do for seven minutes?"
3
[ "Played a computer game", "Were interviewed about Never End", "Looked for a place to hide a wallet", "Talked to a policeman" ]
[ 15, 48 ]
[ 68, 77 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"“Overall, we correctly classified 82.2% (truths: 88.9%; lies: 75.6%) of the interviewees as either being truthful or deceptive based on the combined movement in their individual limbs,” the report says. Anderson said: “Our first attempt looked at the extent to which different body parts and body signals indicated deception. It turned out that liars wave their arms more but, again, this is only at the 55% level that you can get from a conventional polygraph. The pay dirt was when we considered total body motion. That turns out to tell truth from lies over 70% of the time.” The use of all-body suits is expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and can be uncomfortable, and Anderson and his colleagues are now looking at low-cost alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
0 (Adv)
"What is one reason Anderson is looking for alternatives to body suits?"
4
[ "Body suits are costly", "Body suits will become expensive in the future", "The new suit is only 82.2% reliable", "Body suits take a long time to manufacture" ]
[ 98, 125 ]
[ 1, 4 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"“Overall, we correctly classified 82.2% (truths: 88.9%; lies: 75.6%) of the interviewees as either being truthful or deceptive based on the combined movement in their individual limbs,” the report says. Anderson said: “Our first attempt looked at the extent to which different body parts and body signals indicated deception. It turned out that liars wave their arms more but, again, this is only at the 55% level that you can get from a conventional polygraph. The pay dirt was when we considered total body motion. That turns out to tell truth from lies over 70% of the time.” The use of all-body suits is expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and can be uncomfortable, and Anderson and his colleagues are now looking at low-cost alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
0 (Adv)
"What is one possible alternative to the body suit?"
4
[ "Technology that senses movement remotely", "Microsoft Xbox gaming consoles", "Arm monitors", "A brain scanner" ]
[ 126, 146 ]
[ 35, 56 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"“Overall, we correctly classified 82.2% (truths: 88.9%; lies: 75.6%) of the interviewees as either being truthful or deceptive based on the combined movement in their individual limbs,” the report says. Anderson said: “Our first attempt looked at the extent to which different body parts and body signals indicated deception. It turned out that liars wave their arms more but, again, this is only at the 55% level that you can get from a conventional polygraph. The pay dirt was when we considered total body motion. That turns out to tell truth from lies over 70% of the time.” The use of all-body suits is expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and can be uncomfortable, and Anderson and his colleagues are now looking at low-cost alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
0 (Adv)
"Which of the following is true about body suits?"
4
[ "They cost a lot of money", "They are comfortable", "They were inspired by game consoles", "They are very durable" ]
[ 98, 125 ]
[ 132, 146 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"“Overall, we correctly guessed whether 82.2% (truths: 88.9%; lies: 75.6%) of the interviewees were telling the truth or lying based on the movements in their individual limbs,” the report says. Anderson said: “First, we looked at how much different body parts showed that someone was lying. We found that liars wave their arms more, but this is only at the 55% level that you can get from a polygraph. The success came when we looked at total body motion. That tells truth from lies over 70% of the time.” The use of all-body suits is expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and they can be uncomfortable, so Anderson and his colleagues are now studying low-cost alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
1 (Int)
"What is one reason Anderson is looking for alternatives to body suits?"
4
[ "Body suits are costly", "Body suits will become expensive in the future", "The new suit is only 82.2% reliable", "Body suits take a long time to manufacture" ]
[ 89, 116 ]
[ 2, 5 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"“Overall, we correctly guessed whether 82.2% (truths: 88.9%; lies: 75.6%) of the interviewees were telling the truth or lying based on the movements in their individual limbs,” the report says. Anderson said: “First, we looked at how much different body parts showed that someone was lying. We found that liars wave their arms more, but this is only at the 55% level that you can get from a polygraph. The success came when we looked at total body motion. That tells truth from lies over 70% of the time.” The use of all-body suits is expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and they can be uncomfortable, so Anderson and his colleagues are now studying low-cost alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
1 (Int)
"What is one possible alternative to the body suit?"
4
[ "Technology that senses movement remotely", "Microsoft Xbox gaming consoles", "Arm monitors", "A brain scanner" ]
[ 117, 137 ]
[ 33, 52 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"“Overall, we correctly guessed whether 82.2% (truths: 88.9%; lies: 75.6%) of the interviewees were telling the truth or lying based on the movements in their individual limbs,” the report says. Anderson said: “First, we looked at how much different body parts showed that someone was lying. We found that liars wave their arms more, but this is only at the 55% level that you can get from a polygraph. The success came when we looked at total body motion. That tells truth from lies over 70% of the time.” The use of all-body suits is expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and they can be uncomfortable, so Anderson and his colleagues are now studying low-cost alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
1 (Int)
"Which of the following is true about body suits?"
4
[ "They cost a lot of money", "They are comfortable", "They were inspired by game consoles", "They are very durable" ]
[ 89, 116 ]
[ 123, 137 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The new body-suit method was correct 82.2% of the time. Researchers monitored how much the people moved their arms and legs, to decide if they were telling the truth or lying. All-body suits are expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and they can be uncomfortable, so Anderson and his colleagues are now looking at cheaper alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
2 (Ele)
"What is one reason Anderson is looking for alternatives to body suits?"
4
[ "Body suits are costly", "Body suits will become expensive in the future", "The new suit is only 82.2% reliable", "Body suits take a long time to manufacture" ]
[ 31, 56 ]
[ 5, 9 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The new body-suit method was correct 82.2% of the time. Researchers monitored how much the people moved their arms and legs, to decide if they were telling the truth or lying. All-body suits are expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and they can be uncomfortable, so Anderson and his colleagues are now looking at cheaper alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
2 (Ele)
"What is one possible alternative to the body suit?"
4
[ "Technology that senses movement remotely", "Microsoft Xbox gaming consoles", "Arm monitors", "A brain scanner" ]
[ 57, 77 ]
[ 11, 18 ]
"A New Form of Lie Detector Test"
"The new body-suit method was correct 82.2% of the time. Researchers monitored how much the people moved their arms and legs, to decide if they were telling the truth or lying. All-body suits are expensive – they cost about £30,000 – and they can be uncomfortable, so Anderson and his colleagues are now looking at cheaper alternatives. These include using motion-sensing technology from computer games, such as the Kinect camera devices developed by Microsoft for the Xbox console."
2 (Ele)
"Which of the following is true about body suits?"
4
[ "They cost a lot of money", "They are comfortable", "They were inspired by game consoles", "They are very durable" ]
[ 31, 56 ]
[ 63, 77 ]
"Autumn-Born Children Better at Sports Says Study"
"Do you want your child to be good at sports, make the school team and, maybe one day, even compete on the world stage? Well, try to ensure that your would-be Olympian or World Cup winner is born in November or, failing that, in October. A study has found that school pupils born in those months are fitter than everyone else in their class. November- and October-born children emerged as fitter, stronger and more powerful than their peers born in the other ten months of the year, especially those whose birthdays fell in April or June. Dr. Gavin Sandercock, who is from the Center for Sports and Exercise Science at Essex University and led the study, found that autumn-born children enjoyed “a clear physical advantage” over their classmates."
0 (Adv)
"What does the study say about the fitness of children born in April or June?"
0
[ "They are weaker than children born in November and October", "They are stronger than all children, except those born in November and October", "They tend to be particularly good at sports", "They tend to perform well on math and science exams when compared to other children" ]
[ 64, 95 ]
[ 0, 23 ]
End of preview (truncated to 100 rows)

Dataset Card for OneStopQA

Dataset Summary

OneStopQA is a multiple choice reading comprehension dataset annotated according to the STARC (Structured Annotations for Reading Comprehension) scheme. The reading materials are Guardian articles taken from the OneStopEnglish corpus. Each article comes in three difficulty levels, Elementary, Intermediate and Advanced. Each paragraph is annotated with three multiple choice reading comprehension questions. The reading comprehension questions can be answered based on any of the three paragraph levels.

Supported Tasks and Leaderboards

[Needs More Information]

Languages

English (en-US).

The original Guardian articles were manually converted from British to American English.

Dataset Structure

Data Instances

An example of instance looks as follows.

{
  "title": "101-Year-Old Bottle Message",
  "paragraph": "Angela Erdmann never knew her grandfather. He died in 1946, six years before she was born. But, on Tuesday 8th April, 2014, she described the extraordinary moment when she received a message in a bottle, 101 years after he had lobbed it into the Baltic Sea. Thought to be the world’s oldest message in a bottle, it was presented to Erdmann by the museum that is now exhibiting it in Germany.",
  "paragraph_index": 1,
  "level": "Adv",
  "question": "How did Angela Erdmann find out about the bottle?", 
  "answers": ["A museum told her that they had it", 
              "She coincidentally saw it at the museum where it was held", 
              "She found it in her basement on April 28th, 2014", 
              "A friend told her about it"],
  "a_span": [56, 70], 
  "d_span": [16, 34]
}

Where,

Answer Description Textual Span
a Correct answer. Critical Span
b Incorrect answer. A miscomprehension of the critical span. Critical Span
c Incorrect answer. Refers to an additional span. Distractor Span
d Incorrect answer. Has no textual support. -

The order of the answers in the answers list corresponds to the order of the answers in the table.

Data Fields

  • title: A string feature. The article title.
  • paragraph: A string feature. The paragraph from the article.
  • paragraph_index: An int feature. Corresponds to the paragraph index in the article.
  • question: A string feature. The given question.
  • answers: A list of string feature containing the four possible answers.
  • a_span: A list of start and end indices (inclusive) of the critical span.
  • d_span: A list of start and end indices (inclusive) of the distractor span.

*Span indices are according to word positions after whitespace tokenization.

**In the rare case where a span is spread over multiple sections, the span list will contain multiple instances of start and stop indices in the format: [start_1, stop_1, start_2, stop_2,...].

Data Splits

Articles: 30
Paragraphs: 162
Questions: 486
Question-Paragraph Level pairs: 1,458

No preconfigured split is currently provided.

Dataset Creation

Curation Rationale

[Needs More Information]

Source Data

Initial Data Collection and Normalization

[Needs More Information]

Who are the source language producers?

[Needs More Information]

Annotations

Annotation process

The annotation and piloting process of the dataset is described in Appendix A in STARC: Structured Annotations for Reading Comprehension.

Who are the annotators?

[Needs More Information]

Personal and Sensitive Information

[Needs More Information]

Considerations for Using the Data

Social Impact of Dataset

[Needs More Information]

Discussion of Biases

[Needs More Information]

Other Known Limitations

[Needs More Information]

Additional Information

Dataset Curators

[Needs More Information]

Licensing Information

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Citation Information

STARC: Structured Annotations for Reading Comprehension

@inproceedings{starc2020,  
      author    = {Berzak, Yevgeni and Malmaud, Jonathan and Levy, Roger},  
      title     = {STARC: Structured Annotations for Reading Comprehension},  
      booktitle = {ACL},  
      year      = {2020},  
      publisher = {Association for Computational Linguistics} 
      }

Contributions

Thanks to @scaperex for adding this dataset.