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vcu , 0OUGLAS CVVY AND TRKADWKLL, ALASKA. NOVEMBER 23, 1898. NO. 1. Jl III HI III III >11 III III III Ml Ml Ml r . . ... ? ^ Boo^s, Shoe.% Rubber (.loods Ladles and (lcntiemcn s 5 and OH Clothing Furnishing (ioods. Frank Bach, I ; , , Dealer in j GEHEBHL KBMIKE MINERS' SUPPLIES, ETC. v\\\w LIES' CLOAKS IB MPS LIES' IS : FRONT STREET, - DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. F. M. JAMES, GENERAL MERCHANDISE. WWW DOUGLAS C ITY, is the place to buy your Dry Goods and Groceries that is, if you are in the market for u j?oo?l article. -W I am not selling below cost, but selling as low as any one can and make an honest living. rimers' Outfits a Specialty. DOUGLAS CITY, .... ALASKA. #P. H. FOX, DEALER IX REHEBAL MERCHANDISE x. STAPLt and FANCY GROCERIES. Boots, Shoes, Clothing, Hardware. Complete Yukon Outfits. ' First-class Bakery in connection with the store. 1 DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. L A ALASKA MEAT MARKET I D. SVlcKAY, Proprietor A full line of Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats constantly on W* hand. / \ r\ Poultry and Game Huuter Jfloc^c, Douglas City, Alaska, in Season. /TELEPHONE NO. 8. '?s \ ( c \ -i V I \ Ill 1 BILL MINES.! I A News Man Spends a Few Hours Sight Seeing. Going Down the Shaft. The Tunnel. ???? FOREMAN HUNTER AS GUIDE. Who lias not hoard of the wonderful; Trcadwell mines? The greatest, mine? the largest stamp mill in the world. Ono pf the first things the News man j thought of after locating at Douglas j City was a trip to Treadwell, not to go and look at the buildings and see the ! stamps pound the ore so fine that it j looks like buckwheat flour, but to go down into the bowols of old mother j earth and follow the ore until it passes through the various stages and becomes; a thing of real value. Our wishes were made known to Foreman Hunter and in part our desire was realized 011 last Saturduy; leaving ; a portion of our sight seeing for some future time. Wo met Mr. Qonter at. the shaft about ten oclock in the fore- | . ii 1 _r ii.? 1 i noon ana me engineer ui rue uui?ui j engines stopped one of the skips and : wo climbed on. We stood on the edge ! of the box and were let down so easily I ! and gently that it remiudcd us of a I ; beautiful dream. Wo made our land ! ing on the first level, which is down i 110 feet below the surface. We were j ; each provided with a candle, for the' electric light is not in all parts of the j many tunnels through which we | passed. At tho place where we landed are tiu- j 1 merous iron tracks on which the ore is conveyed on cars to a bin some fifty j feet in depth and. which holds 200 tons ! of ore. We started out toward tho l end of the tunnel, which has a high! ceiling and is wide enough for a team and wagon to travel on. Along either 1 j side are numerous chutes that are! ; filled with ore, and Manager Hunter, iuformed us that if tho blasting were J | stopped, the ore constantly on hand j would be sufficient to run the mill for at least three months. Wo soon reach ed two men who were running a drill with compressed air. They had a wall | pretty well peforated. but were still j i drilling in more holes. Two feet was j the depth of the holes they made. .. J "How much ore will you blow our of i that place?" asked the scribe, j "About thirty tons," was the reply, j "And how far do you go away when ; the discharge takes place?" asked the j News man. "Oh, around the corner a little ways," was the reply. Our judgment was that we would j prefer to be away a half a mile and we haven't changed our mind yet on the | subject. We followed that tunnel some four i hundred feet until wo came to a hole j that Manager Hunter told us was 100 I feet deep. It extended clear across the tunnel and we had no desire to go any ; further, and Mr. Hunter no doubt ; viewed the situation in the same light: 1 we did, for we turned and cut across \ into another tunnel that is still longer and where the cross sections are as nu- i merous. We traveled over 1100 feet j through the tunnel, and think of it, from the surface down hundreds ot feet through solid ore. This vein is more than 400 feet wide, but just how far it extends in downward course, no | one knows, bnt for more than 500 feet: is known to a certainty. Six or seven little cars are constantly I running from the chutes down to where the ore is hauled up to the crusher, which we will see later on. The load- j ing of these cars is done by a man who raises tho trap door to the mouth of I tho chute. The cars are at present run by hand to the place where the ore is ; dumped into the big bin before men-; tioned, but the company is arranging to run these cars by electricity. Here : the man oowor stops short. From ; there the ore is all handled by ma- i chinery, and how much do you think | the stamps will use in a day? 250 tons, i i Just think of it, 250 tons of ore is; I 1 J mined, crushed and ground as fine as : Hour every twenty-four hours. i We wandered around the caverns for j some time and returned to the shaft: i I : and soon we were up in the hoisting; engine rooms and from there we climbed > up flights of stairs until we reached j the room in which two crushers get in their awful work. We expected to find a mill, a great big strong iron mill! built on the same principle of those , i i little domestic machines we grind, or used to grind coffee in, and we thought the teeth would be even larg er than a Tacoma girl's foot, but the crusher is a most harmless looking ma chine, and just the opposite of what we expected to see. In the center of the room are two concave disks or hoppers we should probably cell them. The ore comos down an incline chute from the hoisting boxes where thoy are automatically emptied. In the center of the disk is a round opening some three feet wide, and in the center of this opening, a little lower down is a round cylinder two or three feet long that revolves and moves laterally at the same time. The ore falls between this disk and the basin iu which it is set and tho disk just crushes it into small pieces, and when broken to a cer tain size it drops down into a bin below. Two men are in tho crusher room to keep tho large pieces of ore from clog ging the hopper. The ore as it comes down the chute is sometimes in large pieces and those employed at the crusher are constantly on the watch to keep out of the course of the heavy We next go down several flights of 6tairs into the room whero the stamps are running. Have you ever been in a stamp mill ? If you haven't, you never beard any noise. You may think you havo but my friend you are mistaken. This mill has 240 stamps, all going at the same time. Talking in there is never thought of. Stampmill language is by means of signs. We were only too glad when Fore man Hunter conducted us into a side room, whero we could think and talk. It proved to be the office of Mr. Win. M.Hale, foreman of the stamp mill, who is a genial, pleasant geutloman. Wo were also pleased to moet Mr. Nick King who is employed in the amalga mating department. Here wo bade Foreman Hunter goodbye for the duy. There is much to be seen and a great deal to be said as we follow the course of the precious metal at the Tread well and a future issue will contain more upon this subject. Saturday was a cold dreary day and our stay at the mines was limited. The new stamp mill which is neariug completion is larger than the one we visited and will contain 300stamps, but we did not go into the building. We also made no mention of the tunnels one hundred feet below the one we wore in, the "glory hole" and the many other places of interest. When ono considers the magnitude of the Treadwell mines, ono naturally wonders what master mind is superin tendent of this groat plant and others, as well as the writer, will be surprised to know that a young man, less than forty years of age, has charge of these works and successfully conducts them ?an enterprise that employs some 700 men?included in which is also ono of the greatest general stores in Alaska, and equal to those on the Pacific coast. The name of this man is J. P. Corbus. piCWUO UL U1U. From the crusher room we go just below, where we see a train of small cars backing up under the chute that holds the crushed ore. Thore are five or six of the cars to which is attached the cutest little engine you ever saw. It is a little bit of a thing, not over three or four feet high, and is minus a cab and tender. One man runs this little locomotive. The diminutive size of the machine makes the man that runs it look several sizes larger than the ordinary man, in fact we thought he must bo betwoon sevou and ten feot tall. We didn't get the best kind of a look at him, but we thought he rode the engine liko the girls did the old gray mare, when the writer was a boy, ?a-straddlo, but we might have been mistaken. When the cars are loaded the litilo engine pulls them into the mill where they empty into bins far above the stamps,into which it is fed automati cally. A Good Chicken Story. A story is going the rounds of the papers about a man who tried the ex periment of mixing sawdust with his chicken feed. The results were so sat isfactory that he discontinued the uso of meal altogether and fed his chickens entirely on sawdust. Soon after adopt ing the scheme he set a hen with fif teen eggs. She brought off thirteen chicks. Twelve of them had wooden legs and the thirteenth was e wood pecker. Subscribe for the News. / m 11 NEI GOLD FIELDS. ? ? ? A Trip into the Atlin and Pine Creek Country, by a Douglas City Man ? f MR. P. H. McGUIRE TALKS, Mr. P. H. McGuire, of Douglas City, accompanied by a man named G. W. Mathews, left this city sometimo du ring the latter part of last February on a prospecting tour, into the Lake Teslin country. Before returning, the party went down the lakes and wore within thirty miles of Pino Creek which has since that time become fa mous as a new mining region. A trail into these new gold fields has been I found and improved, by way of Doug las City and Juneau, and from the fact that the McGuire party passed over a greater portion of this new inlet, the i News man concluded that a few items 1 of interest concerning the trail nnd country could be gained for our read | ers by looking up the prospector and . interviewing him. "I understand you have once been, very near the Pine Creek placer miues," ! said the News mau, "and we would bo j 1 pleased to have you give the readers of the News some information concerning it." "Yes, Mr. G. W. Mathews and myself | left this place the latter part of Fobru , ary of this year. Of course we knew ; nothing concerning the strike at Pine : Creek and wore simply out prospecting. We first headed for Lake Teslin, and the first forty miles is made in a boat, going down the Gastrinoaux channel to Bishop's point, thence up the Taku inlet 28 miles, which lauds us at the mouth of the Tuku rivor on the ice. The mouth of this river is about three | miles wide. We wont up the river to ; tho head waters of the Taku. a distance of about fifty miles, to the confluence ; of the Inkliu and Knacunaw rivers : where the Tuku river boffins. We then ; followed up the Knacunaw to the Sil ! ver Salmon which was about twenty-six 1 miles. From the Silver Salmon to Lake Tesliu is a distance of about 8ix ty miles and is a low and practically level country. We each had a four I dog team and carried in all twenty eight hundred pounds to tho lake. Tho i most difficult part of the trail we en countered thus far was in going around the Sinwauklin mountains, which took | two or three days of our time. From Lake Teslin we returned to the Silver , Salmon over the samo route wo had previously traveled. Wo went up tho Silver Salmon river into the Atliu lake j country where we were within about ' thirty miles of Pino Creek." "What can you say as to tho practi ? cability of this routo you traveled over as a summer routo to Pino Creek ?" was asked. "Well, 1 think the route to be practi cable. The packing part of the routo ? in the summer would bo about fifty miles. There is plenty of good feed along tho way and horses aud cattle could 1x3 used. Tho soil is principally I of a gravelly nature and very firm. A survey has recently been made which j confirms my judgment. For winter travel it is good, all one could reason ably ask for." "How did your prospocting tour pau out?" j "Wo found colors on three of the riv era wo were on and also aovoral crooks, but did not go to bed rock. I shall re i turn, however, after tho holidays and more thoroughly prospect tho stream*, i I Know the gold is there and expect to find it. Wo were probably the first per sons who over prospected on the rivers I have mentioned." Mr. McGuire further said that he thought small river steamers could go up the Taku river as far as the Inklin , during tho high water season, and pack ing can be easily done from there into the Atlin lake country. Mr. McGuire has been in Alaska for tho last two years and at presont is em ployed at tho Troadwell mines, lie u a man of intelligence and education, j a close obsorver and posessed of a good memory, a good talker and wo boliovo his description of the route over which I he traveled is truthful. His appear - j ance denotes a man of abundance of | nerve and wo sincerely trust that hie | second trip up the Taku may prove ' more than successful, yes that he will Hud more gold t han he and his four dog team may be able to pull out into civilization. * \ ?' -
sn84021930
1898-11-23
1
2
sn84021930/1898/11/23/ed-1/seq-2/ocr.txt
3,305
/ ? THE DOUGLAS ISLAND NEWS. A. O. IcBRlOE. - - - CHA5. A. HOPP Editors and Publishers. PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY ? I TERiYlS:?In Advance. One Year - - ~ - - - $3.00, Six Months 1.50 Three Months .... 1.00 i Single Copies - - - .10 Foreign Postage must be Prepaid. Wednesday, November 23,1898. To Exchanges. Our exchauges will please note the removal of the News from Fort Wran-1 gel to Douglas City and Treadwell and } govern themselves accordingly. I SALUTATORY. We take pleasure iu herewith pre senting to the people of Douglas City and Treadwoll tho initial number of! the Douglas Island News, which we j earnestly trust will meet with your ex pectations as an ideal local newspaper ! and merit a liberal support. The live and prosperous towns of Douglas City and Treadwell are cer | tainly entitled to one good, wide-awake | newspaper, and it will be our desire to ! supply this adjunct, that is so neces- j sary to tho upbuilding of cities, and \ whether, or not, wo succeed in our ef-1 forts, we leave for you to judge. The columus of this paper, with only I slight exceptions, will be devoted to I the publication of local events and \ Alaska news, and there being no mu-j nicipal organizations or elections, its 1 pages will be for the present non-par tisan. Read our paper, observe its style and make-up, aud, if it pleases you, give it such support as it is entitled to, and we will be satisfied. Very respectfully, A. G. McBride and On as. A. Hopp, tklitors and Publishers. I Where Is It? Douglas City is located on Douglas j island and joins the town of Treadwell, 1 where the greatest stamp mill in the j world is operated. The towns of Doug- i las City and Treadwell have all thej branches of trade represented within ' their limits aud every dealer is doing a prosperous business. The population j is between 2500 and .'1000 people, and the pay roll at the mines reaches close to 800 men, whiih, however will be in- j creased to 1500 or 2000 within the next j six months. There is one wharf at; Douglas City and one at Treadwell. These towns are two and one half i miles from Juneau and a ferry boat plies between the towns making five trips a day, but which will soou be in-J creased. New buildings are going up 1 in every direction and there is not an empty store room or dwelling in town. Rents are reasonable. The supply of carpenters seems to be inadequate to ! the demand. The business men are all' live, prosperous men and here to stay. Money for any public enterprise is lib erally supplied. A new 6J500 church; is now in course of construction. If you want to come to Alaska, come to the future great town of the district, Douglas City and Treadwell. Always Solemn. ?very race of beings has its peeul- j iarities and the most striking of the Alaska Indian, is solemnity. Wher-1 ever you find the Indian you will ob- j serve that same grave expression on his i countenance. We have seen him at the ; dance where "joy was uncontined," j with the feathers flying in every direc tion and the dancers jumping, kicking and puffing in such a manner as to sat isfy the desire of the most enthusiastic and ardent spectator, but not a smile was visible. We have seen him by the side of a coffin that held that which is supposed to be ueareet and dearest to ' humanity, civilized or uncivilized, and yet the same pensive look was upon his face that we observed at the dance. We have seen him at the grave, and as the ! dull, heavy thud of the clods of earth covered the remains of a wife or child, his solemnity seemed no more appar- ( ent than when he was roaming through the forest in search of game. We saw a young Indian and his wife , coming towards us on the sidwealk the : other day. Just ahead of them was their little two and a half year old babe < which was slowly toddling along. They | ] were both intently watching the child. 11 It was their first-born.' They were well 1 dressed and among the brightest of < ! / their race. Did they smile as they looked at the little tot as it wabbled along 011 the sidewalk? No, indeed, their faces were as expressionless as j the outside of an imported Swiss cheese. Love the little thing? Why yes, as much as any mother and father love their olfspring. They are a sorrowful appearing race and if you ever obsorve an expression of mirthfuluess on their countenances it is the exception and not the rule. McGINTY IN SIGHT. Narrow Escape of the Utopia on Her last Up Trip. Tied Up at the Wharf. Did She Violate the Law. _ The little Sound steamer Utopia came near, awful near, going to see Mc- ' Ginty at the bottom of the sea ou her ! last trip up and that she escaped the ' misfortune, borders closely on the mi-1 raculous. She made the trip up with- i out mishap until she reached a place ! about twelve miles this side of Capo Faushaw, at which place, where the' channel is very wide, a lamp upsot in ; the captain's cabin, which set the bed! clothes on fira, which spread very rap-; idly and soon burned the ropes of the j steering gear. There being no other' provision on the boat for steering, sho rolled helplessly in the sea. The confusion was intense among the ; passengers, but the officers finally launched the life raft which was at j once pounded to pieces by the waves.; A boat was next lowered aud a passen- 1 ger jumped into it, but the waves dash-1 ed it to pieces and there was one less ! of the passengers. By this time the | crew got the hose coupled on aud tho j pumps into action aud the tire was j speedily extinguished aud order was restored. Tho steering ropes were re-1 paired and tho plucky little boat made j another start for this place, but luck was still against her, and when she j reached Taku inlet, alxnit fiftoeu miles from this city and while in a place of shelter, her wheel struck something and off went two of her propeller blades, J and within a few minutes off went the third blade and then she was in a fix;! she commenced drifting towards the rocky beach, but as good fortune would ! have it, the Farallon happened to- lie coming along aud she took the disa-J bled boat in tow and safely brought her to Juueau, where she now lies help-; less aud forlorn. If our understanding of the United States laws is correct, every boat, and especially that class which carry pas- j sengers, is required to be provided with relieving tackle, that is tackle ! which can be attached to the rudder, lever so that in case the ropes are part ed or destroyed, tho boat may still be steered by this extra gear. Wo under-1 stand the Utopia is running without! this relieving tackle and if so, why? Perhaps the Seattle inspectors, who frequently do some very careless work, can explain the matter. If, as we are informed, the Utopia has been violat- j ing the law, in the manner indicated, the cause for being allowed to do so should be made known. Steward Sanders, While at Juneau laat Monday evening the News man boarded the Topeka to take a look at the "wild Irishman" who has held the position of steward on that boat since tho year 1. "If you don't quit calling me an Irish man we will have trouble," said Stew- ' ard Sanders to tho scribe, the moment j he caught sight of the writer. " And if you don't quit lying about your nationality tho office paralyzer will be turned loose on you," was the reply. Sanders is a pretty good fellow, but he will insist on calling himself a Johnny Bull. It Blew. A severe wind storm has prevailed in ; these parts for the past week, and it made things hcwl. The News office opened for business in a new building with an uncompleted chimney, and for two days and a half we were smoked 1 out of house and home. A galvanized | extension was put up by contractor ; Boyce last Sunday afternoon but at about 11 o'clock that night it blew down and scared three hours of sleep and seven brilliant ideas out of the senior editor. A coal famine has also I prevailed in the city and the wood we ; were able to get was too wet to burn. J But this did not end our trouble: our I foreman spent an hour trying to find j a clean spot on our office towel and ! we lost that time also. Considering the difficulties encountered, we feel ' thankful that we have been able to is sue this number before the holidays. The Al-Ki was in port last week and brought up a full cargo of freight. She lid not go any further north than this : place. She had her whistle with her and bellowed and bawled around the four wharves nearby for three or four lays and then slid out for Seattle. FROM UP THE COAST. Deputy Collector Thomas Back. HIb Talk with the News Man. Mr. W. G. Thomas, a resident of Alaska for the past twenty years, and his most estimable wife, returned to this part of Alaska recently. Mrs. Thomas had pone from Fort VVrangel to Juneau to meet her husband. Mr. Thomas is direct from Kodiak where he was deputy collector, having also served in the same capacity in other | portions of Alaska. Mr. Thomas was j seon at his residence at VVrangel by a News man, and when asked concerning some of his Alaska experiences said: j "I went to the Sand Point custom j house 011 Popofi' island, in May, 1804,1 and remained there until May, 1800, at j which time the custom house wns j changed to Unga, on Unga island. In j ** io/u> r ? 1 4.? I lUUy, louu, l was nuuoionuu i.u ivuuiuk island, the distance between the two being about 3(X) miles." "That must be a great country up there," suggested the writer. "Yes, Unga and Popoff islands are treeless. The country is low and there are no impediments to chock the wind. Codfish are in abundance and two cur ing stutions have boon there for years. The Appollo mine is located about four miles from Unga with forty stamps aud a good output." "That must be a great place for thought and reflection. Iiow terribly lonesome you must have been up there," said the News man. "No, not near so much as one would imagiuo. One becomes accustomed to it and the time flies as rapidly as any where. Wo had quite a little town at Kodiak and, strange to say, there never has been a saloon there. The people supported mo in keeping the liquor business out of tlie town. At Kodiak, the climate is about the same as it is J in Fort Wrangel. I wish to toll you I also about some tree culture up in Un- j alaska. Twenty years ago some one | planted three treos at that place and ! they are all alive, but have not grown a ' particle. The place where the trees! are planted is called The grove.' " Mr. and Mrs. Thomas showed the i writer a beautiful collection of photo graphic views taken in that part of Alaska. Mr Thomas has kindly con- i sented to give the News another inter- J view concerning that country which wo ! know will interest our readers. Her Troubles Ended. Somo months ugo the little steamer ! Diana was libeled at Fort Wrangel at J the instauco of a party named Barclay. | Artwick Dahl is master of the vessel! and he contested the action for all he I is worth. The facts of the case were that the boat was chartered for prospecting purposes and in this enterprise Bar- j clay the plaintiff was interested as a j partner. Judge Suudtnaeher, of Fort Wrangel, was appoiuted by Judge! Johuson to take the evidence and sub-1 mit findings, which was done, resulting j in a recommendation that the action j be dismissed, which was confirmed by j Judge Johnson, last Monday. Capt. Dahl, when seen by a News1 man was very jubilant over the result j of the action, and is especially pleased with the work in getting this ground- j less, though vexatious suit, dismissed. I DOUGLAS CITY. The future great city of Alaska is located on Doug= | !as island, across the bay from Ju= neau. Douglas island is sixteen : miles long and nine miles at its j widest place, and ! is practically a mass of solid ore. 700 stamps will I be in operation om this island within the next 5 months The mines will employ about 2000 men who are paid good wages every month. I ! OFFICIAL DIRECTORY OF ALASKA. FOR THE DISTRICT OF ALASKA. Governor?John G. Brady; private I secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Knapp. U. S. Judge?C. S. Johnson. U. S. Attorney?Robert A.T?Yiedrick. Assistant District Attorney?Alfred J. Daly. District Clerk?Albert D. Elliott. Deputy Clerk?Joseph J. Rogers. U. S. Marshal?J. M. Shoup. Surveyor General?W. L. Distin. Register?John W. Dudley. Receiver?Roswell Shelly. Court Interpreter?Goorge Kostro-1 metinoff. Commissioners?C. W. Tuttle, Sitka; John Y.Ostrander, Juneau; Fred P.Tus tin, Fort Wrangel; L. R. Woodward, Unalaska; Phillip Gallagher, Kodiak; 1 John U. Smith, Dyea; W. J. Jones, Cir- 1 cle City; Chas. H. Isham, Unga. Deputy Marshals?W. A. McNair, Sitka; Edward S. Staley, Juneau; W. D. Grant, Fort Wrangel; R. Y. Street ; Douglas; Edward C. Hasey, Kadiak; i Lewis L. Bowers, Unga; J. C. Blaine, , Unalaska; F. M. Canton, Circle City; , Josias M. Tanner, Dyea. Deputy Internal Revenue Collector? W. C. Pedlar. Educational Agont?Sheldon Jackson Assistant Agont?William Hamilton. Supt. of Schools?W. A. Kelly. CUSTOMS OFFICERS. .? ii ? i. t iir i uoiiecwr?tj. w. ivc,v. Special Deputy?W. P. McBride. Deputy and Inspector?Win. Mill rnore and C. L. Andrews. Deputy Collectors?Joseph Arment, i Fort Wrangel; E. M. VanSlyck, Mary Island; W. G. Thomas, Kodiak; G. W. Caton, Cook's Inlet; T. E. Holmes, Ka riuk; J. F. Sinnot., Unga; J. P. Word, Unalaska; E. T. Hatch, St. Michaels; Chas. Smith, Circle City; John C. Ten ny, Juneau. Inspectors at Juneau?Loring K. Ad ams, Harry Minto and John R. Auldin. ; Inspectors at Fort Wrangel, Edward ! j Hofstad, S. L. Adams, Geo. J. Smith, E.! L. Hunter, Win. Denny. Inspectors Afloat?J. S. Slater, S. F. !, Hodges, L. H. Love joy, Edgar Grim. Skaguay's Fire. h On the evening of the 19th inst., a ! most disastrous fire occurred at Skag ' uay, which burned tho railroad offices i which were located between tho Pacific Coast wharf and Henry's dock. A liv ery stablo with four horses and 1 some vehicles was also consumed in the flames, besides one dwelling house. The loss is estimated at $2b0,000. Some of the railroad employees were j, sleoping in tho office and they wore so ! badly burned that they are not expect- j ed to survive. * " An industry mat urcw. The manufacture of tiu plate in this j country calls for 1,000,000 tons of iron i ore, .'100,(XX) tons of limestone, 2,(XX),000 tons of coal and coke, 400,(XX) tons of pig iron, f>,(XX),(XX) pounds of lead, 13, 000,0(H) pounds of tallow and oil, 40,000 0(X) pounds of sulphuric acid, 12,000,000 feet of lumber. It gives employment to .'IT),(XX) persons. Vet a few years ago the Democratic press laughed at the American tin industry as a joke and an imposture. La Motte's Mince and Pumpkin Pies ? for Thanksgiving Day. Leave your or-; ders early. DR. W. L. HARRISON, | DENTIST Hunter Block, bet. Front und 2nd Sts. Douglas City.. A. G. McBRIDE, ATTORNEY AT LAW. NOTARY PUBLIC. Office with News. Douglas City, Alaska, j 'I ! THE i ? STAR BREWERY, DOUGLAS CITY. nun < JOHN EGAN, Proprietor. WWW w THE NEW BREWERY BUILD- ? |, ING IS COMPLETED AND OCCUPIED 0UR FACILlTIES^^OR^BREW~ ' ING FIRST-CLASS BEER ARE NOT EXCELLED IN ALASKA / THE STAR BREWERY I English Boats, Keep Off. The Queen City, a small ateai ?r that hails from Vancouver, and is on led by an English company and marine by a Canadian or English crew, mat her initial trip to this country last week. She had a small passenger list, a d, we understand, can only accommoate a few. Whether the passengers wre fed on rotten tisli and second class Igrub, which is the usual fare </n Hglish boats, we don't know, but we will mger a good hat that Americans will fa 3 ten times as well on a straight Amrican ship. A few months ago, an Eiflish vessel landed at Fort Wraugel o her way down and the passengers won to the town restaurants and paid : >r a square meal. We forget the nam of the boat. She was a lino looking ves sel and that is what fools so many peo ple. If you are going to the Sound ake a Pacific Coast Steamship Co. steaner, or that of some other American Ine, and you will get good quarters knd first class meals. It should not be forgotten that at McKay's butcher shop, you can get either a fine Turkey, Goose, Chicken or Duck for your Thanksgiving diuter. Prices reasonable. & t it 4 ? ? * Notice to creditors. Before K. M. Jackson, Unites States Commissioner for the District of Al aska, holding court at Fort Wraa gcl, Alaska. In the matter of the estate of Shci stack, an Indian, formerly ctlled Hish-ta-day, deceased. Notice is hereby givon by the under signed, administrator of the estate of Shustack, an Indian, formerly called Hish-ta-day, deceased to the creditor# of, and all persons having claim# against the said deceased, to present and exhibit them together with thenec essary vouchers within six months after the fourth publication of this notice, to the undersigned administrator at the office of Henry Drum Co., in the town of Fort Wrangel, in the District of Alaska, the same boing the place for the transaction of the business of the said estate in said town of Fort Wran gel. First publication Oct. 12th 1808. Dated at Fort Wrangel, Alaska, this 12th day of October, 1808. C. 11. SlJNlXMACHER, Administrator of the estate of Shu stack, an Indian, formerly called Hish ta-day, deceased. Prescriptions Filled Day and Night at... ? Douglas Pharmacy. ! A Full Line of Toilet Articles, i Perfumes, ^ Soaps, </L Brashes, Etc., Etc. Hunter Bld'o Ud St., Douglas City. THIS SPACE IS RESERVED FO R THE ALASK A PHOTO CO Ol-" DOUGLAS** CITY WATCH I T GROW * * * * G. ROENE, Dealer in and Manufacturer of ^STOVES? TIN- AND HARDWARE. W?PLUMBING?W ^ ^ Doucrlas City. ? - ? Alaska. 3AM GLOVER Wm. HICKS WWWW WWWWWW I Seattle Billiard $ 5 ...Hall... | iHICKS & GLOVER, Props* JwwwwwwwwwJ LMie Only Billiard Tables in the City. rront Street, - - Douglas City, Alaska. The KLONDIKE of douglas city. Is a Gentlemen's Resort j ' * - v j S. GIUS, Proprietor. Choicf Wines, Liquors, and Cigars. /
sn84021930
1898-11-23
1
3
sn84021930/1898/11/23/ed-1/seq-3/ocr.txt
3,133
The Koehler-James Mercantile Co. S. BLUM, Manager. 'JUNEAU, = - = ALASKA. GROCERIES GLASSWARE LAMPS CROCKERY CUTLERY TINWARE COOKING UTENSILS CURTAINS PORTIERS TRUNKS VALISES LARGEST AND MOST COM PLETE STOCK OF \ t# . General Merchandise IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA. ' "Honest Goods and Values" Our Motto. Examine Our Stock and be Convinced, FREE DELIVERY TO THE FERRY. DRY GOODS FANCY GOODS NOTIONS SHOES BOOTS HATS CAPS CLOTHING FURNISHING GOODS CARPETS LINOLEUM OIL CLOTH MAT TING WALL PA PER SHADES I While in Juneau Look for the Big Sign ?? ? BR0WNV1LLE 111 WOOLEN MILLS ....JUNEAU ALASKA i ssssr All Wool Suits Made to Order Deposit Required Li0aiS L. Bl2fe!fflENTHRL I The Douglas Island News. THE LOCAL FIELD. Item* of Interest Dished Up In Brief for the Ben efit of Our Readers. Thanks to Merchant Bach for the use of a copy of the Dawson City Midnight Sun. Mr. J. 13. Caro, who represents J. 1). Myer A Co., of Portland was iu the city Tuesday. Sam Gowan of Wrangle, a friend of the editor, is a witness before the court and rooms in this city. La Motto has the best Coffee in town, try it?drink it. 'Tis a nectar for the Gods. Ex-deputy Collector Thomas and his charming wife are in Juneau. He is a member of the grand jury. Your Thanksgiving Dinner will not be complete without one of La Motto's Mince or Pumpkin Pies. The wind of last Saturday input Diew alxDut 300 panes of glass out of the new stamp mill windows facing the bay. The Masons and Odd Fellows hold regular meetings in Douglas City, but Masons are not working under a charter. Special Dinner at the Delmonico, Thanksgiviug day. La Motte will have Turkey and Mince Pie for all the boys. We were pleased to meet Deputy Marshal Grant, of Fort Wrangel, who is attending court at Juneau. He is one of the best and cleanest officers in Alaska. Marshal Shoup got the right man when he sent Grant to that city. Don't complain of dyspepsia or a bad stomach if you are out of whack, for in nine times out of ten the trouble is that your teeth need attention. Go to Dr. Harrison, in the new Hunter building, Douglas City, and get first-class work at reasonable prices. . Dr. Harrison moved into his new dental parlors, between Front and Sec ond streets, last Monday. Unquestion ably they are the finest and most com plete and convenient dental rooms in Alaska, and we are pleased to know that the Doctor has the business to maintain such elegant quarters. Mr. Fox seemingly enjoys a joke as much as any one, and his latest is well worth repeating. The Juneau Record i reached his store last Saturday and ? Mr. "SVeesner was sitting by the stove; ^ . enjoying a good Are when Mr. Fox J asked his caller if he had seen the new ' Douglas City paper. Mr. Weesner said % he had not and Mr. Fox handed him a ^3?lopy of the Record, and he read nearly all of it before he discovered the joke. Mr. P. H. Fox, the merchant, is agent for fhe Royal Tailors of Chicago. He t has just received 1000 samples of jcloth and will take measures for men's clothing which will be delivered to you in this city, tailor made, at from $10.00 to $40.00. The book in which the sam-; pies are kept, is a work of art; it is ; about two feet square and five inches thick; and opposite each page of sam- j pies is a page of pictures of interest. | Go and see it and get prices. The Topeka, Thompson captain j reached this place Monday morning, but owing to the rough sea, did not try to land until late in the evening which was effected at the wharf at Juneau. A News man met the captain, who was in the best of humor. He has entirely recovered from the shock that was pro "*? duced by the rickety old wharf at Kil lisnoo running against his boat. The The vessel sustained no injury, but they have built a new wharf since the collision. ?V-i., '118 81 IN THE QUIET. j A Few Gentle Hints Given to the News Representative that are not Generally Known. f That foot racer Ed. Hayward can j beat any man on earth in a fifty mile , race, "go off you please." I That Dick Tatum will go to the Sound on the Cottage City and will not return alone. j That Chas. Workman's English is I very "taking" with the ladios. .... That the boys want to know who will ; be cook in the new house Pat Milan is building. That Howell don't like sandwiches no how. That Dan McKay has a very fatherly j appearance and says grace at the table three times a day. That Plunk is authority on long in telects. That John Egan is not with the boys two nights in the week. That the boys are fixing up a job ou j Frank Copp. That a fifteen inch woman's garter was recently found in Geo. Shatter's j . overcoat pocket. That Wilmot Kenny is a groat favor ite among the ladies. .... That Muth lost his bachelor's skillet j i during the excitement of the lire up in i his end of the town last Saturday night. That Douglas City has a host of handsome women. .... That big feet are not characteristic ! of Douglas City women. .... j That Fox will be annihilated off the j I face of the earth if he don't quit perpe-! j trating jokes on his friends. I The Miller Cornet Band of this city will give a grand ball to-morrow night,1 at Oilman's hall. The music will bo first class and a general good time is j expected. A complimentary ticket was ^ received at this office and the editor is ; having his shoe heels securely fastened to-day for the occasion. Our old friend Louis L. Blunienthal' has an advertisement on the local page I under the heading of the Brownville I Woolen Mills. It. is one of the neatest, j cleanest and best stores in Alaska, and i buying there simply means that you are buying of the manufacturer. His line of gent's furnishing goods is the finest in Alaska. One branch of his store is a blessing, yes a real blessing, to Alas kans. You can go there and have your ; measure taken, select your goods from 1300 samples and get a suit of clothes made to order that will cost you only 815, and he don't ask any deposit either. Go and see the store and get acquaint ed with Mr. Blumenthal, ask him to see his samples and you will go back again sure. Mr. Keetcn, chief clerk at McKay's, his wife and boy, will leave for Seattle on the Cottage City, where they will spend the holidays. The News wishes them a most pleasant visit and a safe and speedy return. But what will Mc Kay do without him ? Fefl 1500 Feet. Robert Davis, a Welchman, about ' twenty seven years of ago, who was em i ployed at Sheop Creek, met with an ac cident last Saturday that cost him his ! life. He was up at the (ilacier mines j and while returning to the mill, he lost 1 the trail, which at best is a dangerous one, and while crossing a canyon he ; slipped and fell down the mountain a distance of 1500 feet. His ribs, arms and legs were broken and his head was 1 crushed. An employe at the mines saw | him fall and he was speedily rescued, j : A physician was called but 110 human j power could save him with the injuries : he sustained, and yet it was two hours I after the accident before life was ex j tinct. Mr. Davis had many friends at j the mines and all who knew him spoke I of his many virtues in tho highest j praise. I. O. O. F. I Alaska Lodge No. 1 meets at Odd Fellows Hall, Douglas, on Wednesday ? evenings at 8 o'clock, j Visiting Brothers are Cordially in vited to attend. Geo. W. Stephexsen. N. (*., W. R. Dorr, M. D., Sec. I Have you tried La Motte's Sunday Dinners, at the Delinonico? If not you have missed a good thing. Wanted I 50 men to board at the Dolmonico Restaurant. Best meals in town. Have Found It! Steamer Detroit left Juneau last Sat-! urday with thirty passengers bound j for somewhere, but wo don't know just where, except that it is 011 the Dalton trail, where a new rich placer strike has beeu made. If you want to enjoy a good dinner, go to the Delmonico. ??????????????? Be Patient. I The nearer we get to locking up the I forms of this issue, the more we be come convinced that the lirst number, of the News will not be entirely satis-1 factory in make-up and appearance.! We were smoked out of our office for : several days this week, which threw us behind with our work. When you go to Juneau to do your; trading, always go to the Kohler-James store. There are many reasons why you should do this. In tho first place you will save money, for you can get tho same goods cheaper thpre than any place in town. Then the manager and his clerks are so pleasant and accomo dating. You can't find a "Smart Alex" among them. Another reason is you can get just what you want, for they run the largest stock in Alaska. By all means go to the store anyhow, even if you don't trade there that trip; no tice how nice and pleasant customers are waited on, and if you give them a trial you will do your trading there. We were so fortunate as to secure the services of Mr. W. O. Graham to as sist us in the News office. All around newspaper men are hard to find in Alaska, but luck favored us with assis tance that is so satisfactoay that we would ask for no better. Mr. Graham formerly run a big job office in Kansas City, but his thirst for goici orougnt him here. He intends to go to Atlin in the spring at which time the office will put on a dress of deep mourning. We regret that we could not attend the mask ball recently held in this city. It was a swell affair. The costumes were elegant, unique and comical, as the wearer preferred. One gentleman wore a pair of trousers with holes in the seat. His underwear was whole, however. The music was good and the dancers all reported a pleasant time. J. G. Quinn, of the Juneau Electric Construction Co., was in the city yes terday. He has lots of friends in this city and is deserving of them. ALASKA CLIMATE. I Erroneous Impressions Concerning nn Alaska Winter. Not Near So Cold as the Western States. Ex-Chief Jack .McDonald on Wind. Alaska weather is peculiar. It is a climate of spells and moods. There is j only orio thing connected with it that is a real sure, dead certainty?it is cer tain to rain. Sometimes it rains hard i and sometimes it is so gentle and soft you scarce can hear, but rain it will. I Douglas Island climate is new to us, but we are seeking for knowledge con I cerning it and in our search for infor mation we dropped onto the fact that 1 once in a while the air gets itself into a motion that is liable to surprise a new-comer. Old settlers call it a Ta ' ku wind, but, from what we can learn, the name is too mild to correctly de j scribe it. i "Go and sec Jack McDonald ir you ! want to know .anything about wind," said a Douglas City man to the "wind" ! reporter of the News, "he can tell you I all about it, but dont try to find him ! until in the afternoon, for he sleeps until noon." The News man found Jack, the same irrepressible Jack, who is ex-chief of the Seattle flro department and was deputy sheriff for more than four years in the Queen City. His power of speech, good humor, and good looks has not yet deserted him?no, he is the same Jack McDonald and always will bo un til the pearly gates swing open for him. After the usual afternoon salutations the News man addressed the ex-chief as follows^ "Mr. McDonald, it nas come to tne knowledge of the News office that you are the beet posted man on wind there is on Douglas island, and our readers abroad, if not at this place, will be pleased to gain some knowledge upon the peculiar "symptoms" of this coun try in that line. Can you impart some of your most valuable information for the benefit of the readers of the News. Mr. McDonald drew a long sigh and said: "I can tell you a few things on the subject of wind and especially the j peculiar species that prevails at this j season of the year on Douglas Island j nnd the surrounding country. In the ! first place, to correctly understand what I may say on this subject it must be understood that the word Taku, which gives its name to the 'high flyer' of this country, is of Indian origin, and means hell, the place spoken of in the Bible and so much dreaded by saint and sinner, so that when you hear a man say that a Taku wind is coming, he means it will be a h?lof a wind, or, in other words, a wind that is nearly h?1. "Yes, we have some wind up this way, you bet! I have known of winds in | Seattle that blew cars off the railroad track into the bay, have seen trees go down by the hundreds, known of winds that blew all the water out of a 28 foot well, why sir, I have attended a Pop convention when Bob Bridges had the " r ^ 4- ?MmufAfl Kn f oil 11001* inr imrby-tJIgilU uiuim<cn, uuu an these winds are nothing as compared to a certain class of very rare winds that swoop down on us once in a gr^at while from the direction of Juneau and engage in sundry and divers flirtations with the stockings of the dusky beau ties, who mako their homes on the beach of Douglas Island. "You have heard of Hank Osborn's , dog, haven't you?" Jack asked the News man. > We explained how recently we had come to town and our inability to hear of Douglas City's famous dogs. " Well anyhow, Hank has a dog, a j ! boar dog, and ho got him to hunt bear | with oil Admiralty island. That dog is, and always was, so thin he scarcely made a shadow. Well, last fall Hank ' and that thin dog started out on the Douglas City dock while one of those winds was blowing and it blew that dog from one side of the approach to the other and into tho bay. "You would hardly believe itT but about the same time, the same day I think, Asbury Johnson started out to the wharf with a pack of blankets on his back, and one of these winds we call a 'woolly' struck him. Asbury wound his legs around one of the posts, and his arms around the railing and in that way saved himself, but the blan kets were blown off of his back into the bay, breaking two pood inch straps beforojthey "flew." Wind! Why, I should say .we do have some winds. Well the blankets floated ashore and he borrowed a sled, strappedtb? blank ets onto it and pulled the outfit onto the dock, where he dumped them off I to let some of the water run out of I them. He took the sled back to its. owner and returned to the wharf, for he was going to Dyea. liy this time j the steamer arrived and when he went i to load his bundle of wet blanket* j they were frozen solidly to the wharf : floor. Tho steamer waited until he J could get an ax and chop them loose. Why man, you talk about wind, wait until a'woolly' strikes you. You will j never be 'in it' until then. Why I could fill your paper with anecdotes j about our wind, but I will give you | just one more. I "One of the 'seven virgins' who lives i down on the water front went into | Bach's store one morning and bought a i pair of rubbers, that high kind called i storm rubbers. She put them on and i started for the wharf, to go to Juneau. Before she got to the dock the wind blew both of her rubbers off into the bay. "You may know how to try a luw suit or run a newspaper, but my friend you don't know anything about wind," and unless Jack is the biggest liar that ever lived, we are free to confess that we can yet gain much information con cerning Taku and Woolly winds. Thank.* Awfully. The baud boys desire to return their most sincere thanks to Mr. J. P. Smith for the liberal donation that he made to them a short time ago. Mr. Smith is one of the wide-awake business men of the city and can always be depend ed on when liberality and enterprise are at stake. \ Eat, Drink, and Bo Merry. Go to Dan McKay's butcher shop and get a nice turkey for your Thanks giving dinner. They are as choice as can bo found in the market anywhere on oarth, and at a reasonable price. Chickens, ducks and geese also on hand. Don't Be Careless About Fire. , We wish to sound a note of warning concerning the carelessness that causes fires this time of year. A firo in Doug las City means the wiping out of the greater portion of the town. Don't be careless. Keep your lamps full and clean, see that your ashes have no live coals in them when thrown out?bo careful?you may save your home or the town by avoiding carelessness. Go to Dr Harrisou's new dental par lors, Douglas City, and have your teeth examined free of charge. ' ^ V1 v ?- ? vVu
sn84021930
1898-11-23
1
4
sn84021930/1898/11/23/ed-1/seq-4/ocr.txt
1,985
I Estimates on Eire- Special Attention ! trie Machines ami Given to Kepuir "Wiring furnished Work. JUNEAU Electric Construction Works T. G. QUINN, PROP. 1 Oenler In all Kinds of ? Electrical Supplies... * # * Cor. Third and Seward Sts. JUNEAU. j, f. Mcdonald, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars. GOODS SOLD AT SEATTLE PRICES****** *** SNUFF*** Doiiglai City, - Alaska. I ...THE... Charles Coffee House, j DOUGLAS CITY. CHARLES YOBTMAN, Proprietor. Best Lancli in the City ^ST3 IJF" At Reasonable Rates A laryrr atock of choice Confoctionery ulwuys j on hand. . i THE DOUGLAS CITY ooooeo-ooo?*>oooo$ t MUSIC HALL O o AND BAR S o *? FIKST Cf.ASS LIQUORS AND CIGARS. | ? ? Douglas and Juneau Beer always on tap X. CASPERSOX, Prop. Front Street. - Douglas City. | ' ~ I Douglas City Barber Shop. Hair Cutting Shampooing Shaving ^ Baths FRANK VESTAL, Prop. - I i LINDSTROM BROS. inm Dealeri in iDry Goods, jg. Clothing, E ; Furnishing!^ Goods, |E | Boots and t Shoes, E , Hats and E Caps, Etc. E Douglas City, Alaska. I | I DELMONICO HOTEL j1 AND RESTAURANT. ALEX. LA MOTTE, Proprietor. Board by the Day, bk Week, or Month * * Rates Reasonable ,mrn% %% MEALS AT ALL HOURS, w ?0" The table First-class and will satisfy the most fastidious. W Our Coffee cannot be excelled. ' ^ Douglas City, Alaska. : \ j 8 i, C*t*?ic?'s tu Family Trade. J. P. SMITH & CO., Groceries r Meats Vegetables Fruits Krcsh Meat Supplies received on evory in coming; Pueiile Coust Steamer. Sutler and Kgrjrs of iirat-class grade always on hand. Douglas City, ? - Alusku. ERNST BEIHL DEALER IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE. Bakery ;u connection where the Best Fresh Bread may Ih? had. A Fresh Lino of Cakes and Cookies always on lland^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Douglas City, - - Alaska. | NORTHERN PACIFIC j RUNS: PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS ELEGANT DINING CARS TOURIST SLEEPING CARS I TO ? ' ST. PAUL MINNEAPOLIS ! DULUTH FARGO GRAND FORKS CROOKSTON WINNIPEG ' HELENA BUTTE CHICAGO P HI LA D ELPIIIA WASHINGTON NEW YORK BOSTON AND ALL POINTS EAST AND SOUTH TIME SCHEDULE. In Effect February 13th, 1808. TRAINS LEAVE SEATTLE. For SiMjkane, Roxslaml, St. Paul and the East 4;00 p. m. j For Portland 5:00 a. iu. and 4:00 p. in. 1 ?For Olympia 7:80 a. m.; ?For Abenleen 5:00 a. in. For Toco ma 5:00, 7:80 and 11:00 a. m: 4:00 and 7:00 p. m. TKAINS ARRIVE AT SEATTLE. From Spokane, Rossland, St. Paul and the East 7:00 a. m. From Portland .. .. 6:20 and 11:00 11. in. ?From Olympia 6:20 p. m. 'From Abenleen 6:20 p. m. From Tacoma ? 7:00 and 8:00 a. m.: 12:15,6:20 and 11:30 p. m. ?Daily except Sunday. All others daily. This eard subject to change without notice Through tickets to Japan antf China via Northern Pacific Steamship Company. For rates, routes and other information :all on or address I. A. NADEAU. Gen'l Apent, Seattle. Citv Ticket Office, corner Yesler Way and ; First Avenue. Depot Ticket Office, corner Western Ave-1 ine and Columbia Street. A. D. CHARLTON, Assistant General Passenper Apent, No. 255 Morrison St., cor. Third, Portland,Or. ( j NORTHERN RAILWAY I > TICKET OFFICE )12 First Avenue, Seattle. Japan America Line. ?FOR? JAPAN, CHINA, ?AND ALL? Asiatic Ports SAIL REGULARLY. j I I < ] ,eave Seattle. Arrive i . :00 p.m. Overland Express 7:00 p.m. , :15 a. tu Pacific Coast Lines '*?;!?"> p. in. j ' - ? \ DOW in NEWS. Additional Locals and Items of Interest. 1 CharlesWortman. of Charles Coffee I House, the busiest man in town, took , 1 . time to call on us last week. Mr. N. Casperson was a caller Satur day. He joins the mighty throng in Douglas City wishing the News abun ! (lanco of success. Mr. P. H. McGliiretook a look around i our office last week and is of course j anxious to see the first issue of the I News. Well, here we are. Mr. Frank Kane was one of our first! J callers last week. When it comes to j good, live citizenship, push and energy, he is right "in it." Come again. Dan McKay, our next door neighbor who has rendered the News much of his time in getting started occupied I j a chair in our sanctum Saturday, j Mr. West of the firm of West Bros.,; j of Port Wraugol, dropped in on us the ' ! first of last week. He is one of the en- ? ! terprising business men of that nice! j littlo city. The Lone Fisherman, Tibpetts, cap j tain, missed one or two trips between : ! Douglas City and Juneau last Friday. ; The Taku wind that prevailed on that | day kicked up an awful muss and made crossing the channel rather dangerous.! Dr. W. B. Dorr and Mr. Ceo. W. J I i Stepheusen favored the News with a , call last week. As a matter of history, ; wo wish to mention the fact that the j Doctor favored the News job depart- j ment with its first order for job work, j Mr. Weesner, of the steam laundry i of this city, was a caller at the News of- j lice last week. He expressed himself I as being highly pleased over the loca- j tiou of a newspaper in this city, and | [ his firm, Johnson &, Weesner, will bo ( heard from in our columns. I Mr. (tus. B. Leach, of the Alaska Mining Record, made us a pleasant ; call a few days ago. Mr. Leach is a; jolly good follow and expects to see j the News a financial success. He is built on the wide gage idea, and though a competitor in the business, he still ! wishes us to succeed. I Doctor Harrison, through whose in-; fluence the people of Douglas City J have cause to rejoice for, or regret, the 1 removal of tho News plant to Douglas j Island, dropped in on us last Saturday and talked science and religion with ? the editor. After a flfteeu minute sit- ! ting he left very much refreshed. Mr. D. J. Milan, of this city, but for- j merly of tho police force of Seattle, \ was a welcome caller at the News otilce ! a few days ago. He is a rattling good fellow and we regret to hear that ho is ! going to winter 011 the Sound; but he I will return iu the spring. Mr. Milan , was our first subscri!>er to the News ; and the great weekly will follow him to i Seattle. Our thanks are due Mr. J. F. McDon ald for kindly assistance iu getting our heavy machinery from the wharf to our office on Paradise street. Jack's kindness wiljftong be remembered. He j always was a sympathetic cuss and he| has a heart in him that compares only j with the liver of a skate, which hangs . in four sections and reaches from the I thorax to the appendix. Mr. M. J. O'Connor, the popular mer- ! chant, was a caller last Friday at our . office. Our good judgment prevented j trouble between Mr. O'Connor and the ; News force, and all grow out of our cal- ! ler's peculiar conduct of insisting on j paying a month's advertising in ad- j vance. We finally concluded to accept the money and Mr. O'Connor left,! peace and harmony prevailing. Mr. S. A. Boynton, the contractor and builder who is building the Con- I gregational church in this city called i Saturday and talked over old times ! with the editor. Our first acquaintance with him dates back to 1870 when we first met him in Ottawa county Kan sas. He was then a number one man, and wo doubt not, as much will l>e said of him wherovor he may go. As a me- ' chanic there are no better, and the church trustees made a wise choice in giving him tho contract to construct the church. A PJea.sant Surprise. The Douglas City correspondent of , the Alaska Mining Record gave us the following notico in the issue of that pa per: "The new paper to be known as the ( News has come to stay. Editor Mc Bride is rapidly getting things in shape ' and will probably put out his first is sue next Wednesday. The permanent home of the new enterprise is in the Hunter building, between Front and Second streets. Mr. MoBride has made scores of firm friends since his j arrival in town, and the new journal is bound to be a success from the start. , We extend the right hand of fraternal fellowship." i \ ALASKA TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO., STORE DEPARTMENT, - DOUGLAS ISLAND, ALASKA. OUTFITS FOR THE GOLD FIELDS. * . ir OUTFITS?, I1. ESTIMATESl~~T:"T ; We nre prepared to furnish outfit# uf Let us figure with you on anr Prices tnut ure right mid with jfO{Mls proposition to Sell Goods forcash thnt are guaranteed to he iirnt-clusH in any Quantity ... in every particular Mine and Mill Fittings, Dynamite, Fuse, Caps. Steamers sailing for Skaguay and Dyea will call at our wharf for Outfits. NO WHARFAGE Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining Co., * Douglas island, Alaska, M. J. O'CONNOR, DEALER IN fimALpfERCHA^DISE DOUGLAS CITY. If You Want _ at'the rS I ry 0 Connor Prices J j j subscriptions v -3 ? sonc ycar ? ? $3.ooj> 9 0 0 0 v > isix months ? i.so^ c \ ^three months i.ooi / 3 ? advertising rates i read 1 he ( s 5 on application ? f > i... t t?e ? ...nfws < v 5 yks | advertising medium ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ? ? <s> 3 / | /|y i u< of *< 7 r j jl""southeast alaska and get the . .v ? $ j^wwwvw ? s 5 rinst class j s ( 5 "job work., ? ??rsif?\a/5i \ J ? a specialty ? 1 1 4 v v 4lzjp?* i ? / satisfaction ? \ > ^guaranteed j ? 0 o 0 c ( vmv^^vwvv^ ? H ??? r 1 C? 1.* r This company's New, Larse, Fast und Ble I 3ClllC Coast Steamship Co. Kaut gtenmory ie*ovo and arrive as follows : Leave [ San Francisco Oct. 3 8, 23' 28' Nov. 2 - 7, Leave I Paget ! Sound Ort. 7 :: i2i 17 22 27: Nov. 1' a M jJ Arrivo i W range] Oct. ll} 15j 20! 261 3l)j Nov. 41 lOi 171 IiCUVO Dycu A Skujjun.v Oct. 14 IS 2:1 c 20 Nov. 2! 7,S 12 17 Duo Sitka < )ct. 25 [ov. J) Leave ! Sitka | )ct, 10< \ I 2.V I l! tov. 9j I Leavo i Wranjjel! l_ Oct. 121 Itij H 27: " . 81 ?Jov. Si 11 IS ?20\ Due Puffet Sound I )ot. IS ( 19 241 ?)'? >ov. 3| 8 14| 18 2?! l_ Duo San 'rancivoo )ct. 19 "* " .24 29 <iov. 3 8 13 18 23 28 The above dates are only approximate. For further information obtain folder. The Company reserves the right to change, without previous not fee. Steamer's Hailing dates, and hour of sailing. AGENTS?McKINNON WHARF A FORWARDING CO f WRANGKL; Sitku, Ed. Db Ghofp ; Sknguay, F. A. Twitchbll; Snpt. for Alaska, H. F. Robinson, Juneau ; N. Fostkn, Portland, Oro.; D. F. Tkowhkidub, P. S. Supt. Seattle. Wash. QOODALL, PERKINS & CO., r THE STANDARD MUSIC HALL JOHNSON S COTTRELL, PROPRIETORS. Douglas City, - Alaska. 3S?$0PEN ALL NIGHT.$***f Hot and Mixed Drinks a Specialty. ffjET" The Finest Brands of Liquors and Cigars al jway.-; on hand. i :: -M A
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DOUGLAS ISLAND NEWS. t * ?. ? VOL. 1. DOUGLAS OITV AND TREADWELL, ALASKA, NOVEMBER 30, 1898. ? NO. 2, ? ? OFFICIAL DIRECTORY OF ALASKA. FOR THE DISTRICT OF ALASKA. Governor?John G. Brady; private secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Knapp. U. S. Judge?C. S. Johnson. U. S. Attorney?Robert A. Friedrich. Assistant District Attorney?Alfred J. Daly. District Clerk?Albert D. Elliott. Deputy Clerk?Joseph J. Rogers. U. S. Marshal?J. M. Shoup. Surveyor General?W. L. Distin. Register?.John W. Dudley. Receiver?Roswell Shelly. Court. Interpreter?George Kostro-! metinoff. Commissioners?C. W. Tuttle, Sitka; | John Y.Ostrandcr, Juneau; Fred P.Tus tin, Fort Wrangel; L. R, Woodward, Unalaska; Phillip Gallagher, Kodiak;, John U. Smith, Dyea; W. J. Jones, Cir- j ele City; Chas. H. Isham, Unga. Deputy Marshals?W. A. McNair,; Sitka; Edward S. Staley, Juneau; W. j D.Grant, Fort Wrangel; K Y. Street; Douglas; Edward C. Hasey, Kadiak; I Lewis L. Bowers, Unga; J. C. Blaine, Unalaska; F. M. Canton, Circle City; Josias M. Tanner, Dyea; John McEl heny. Douglas City. rx 1? l-.i. P/\llA/itAr I deputy iilitfriuu ivuvfuuu ? W. C. Pedlar. Educational Agent?Sheldon Jackson Assistant Agent?William Hamilton, j Supt. of Schools?W. A. Kelly. CUSTOMS OFFICERS. Collector?J. W. Ivey. Special Deputy?W. P. McBride. Deputy and Inspector?Wm. Mill-: more and C. L. Andrews. Deputy Collectors?Joseph Arment, Fort Wrangel; E. M. VanSlyck, Mary | Island; W. (J. Thomas, Kodiak; G. W., Caton, Cook's Inlet; T. E. Holmes, Ka riuk; J. F. Sinnot, Unga; J. P. Word, Unalaska; E. T. Hatch, St. Michaels; Chas. Smith, Circle City; John C. Ten- j ny, Juneau. Inspectors at Jnneau?Loring K. Ad- i ams, Harry Minto and John K. Auldin. \ Inspectors at Fort Wraugel, Edward Hofstad, S. L. Adams. Geo. J. Smith, E.' L. Huuter, Wm. Denny. Inspectors Afloat?J. S. Slater, S. F.; llodges, L. H. Lovejoy, Edgar Grim. DR. W. L. HARRISON, DENTIST Hunter Block, bet. Front and 2nd Sts. Douglas City. A. G. McBRIDE, ATTORNEY AT LAW. NOTARY PUBLIC. Office with News. Douglas City, Alaska.' Prescriptions Filled Day and Night at... ^ Douglas Pharmacy. A Full Line of Toilet Articles, j j Perfumes, Soaps, '/<m Brushes, Etc., Etc. Hunter Bld'g 3d St., Douglas City. G. ROENE, Dealer in and Manufacturer of ^STOVES^ TIN- AND HARDWARE.! W?PLUMBING?W Douglas City, ... Alaska. ' ? - | LINDSTROM BROS. Dealers in I Dry Goods, & Clothing, E Furnlshlngt Goods, E Boots and & Shoes, E fiats and Caps, Etc. |?. Douglas City, Alaska. DELMONICO HOTEL AND RESTAURANT. ALEX. LA MOTTE, Proprietor. Board by the Day, A A Week, or Month * * Rates 'V-i r**'? in W MEALS AT ALL HOURS. W ?XST The table First-class and will satisfy the most fastidious. w Our Cotl'ee cannot l>o excelled. Doucrlas City, Alaska. THE | STAR BREWERY, DOUGLAS CITY. WWW JOHN EGAN, Proprietor. twwv W T1IE NEW BREWERY BUILD ING IS COMPLETED AND OCCUPIED OUR FACILITIES FOR BREW ING FIRST-CLASS BEER ARE NOT EXCELLED IN ALASKA ktt THE STAR BREWERY The KLONDIKE of douglas city. 4. - Is a Gentlemen's Resort ? S. GIUS, Proprietor. Choice Wines, Liquors, and Cigars. ! I THIS SPACE IS RESERVED EO R THE ALASK A PHOTO CO OF DOUGLAS** CITY WATCH I T GROW * * * * : SAM GLOVER Wm. HICKS VWWVVWWWWWiW I Seattle Billiard $ | ...Hall... 5 CHICKS & GLOVER, Props* I The Only Billiajrd Tables in tho City. ? ? Front Street, - - Douglas City, Alaska. ...THE... Charles Coffee House, DOUGLAS CITY. CHARLES WORTMAN, Proprietor. | fJtF Best Lunch in the City a? ! ?30r At Reasonable Rates A large stock of choice Confectionery always * (j on hand. I LIMING BALL. Fairly Good Attendance. A Tre menduous Spread and Those Who Served It. TO JOIN THE: GIDDY WHIRL. Our last issue contained a notice that i a grand ball would be given iu Oilman's ! Hall 011 Thanksgiving night under the j supervision of tho band boys of this | city. The ball had also been advertised I by tho posting and distribution of post- j ers, but the fact is that here, as in most j places, a party needs but little advor-1 tising to insure a good attendance. ' ^ ? i _ -i? -vt ,i ' A HOI! I U O ClOOK a i\tJwa xuuii iuuuu ; the hall, which is a largo spacious room ! with a raised platform in one end, a J stove in the other, well lighted by elec* ; trie lamps and beautifully decorated with flags and bunting. It was rather j cold outside and some snow was fall ing and so, on entering, our first move | was towards the stove, which was sur rounded with girls and women. There ! was but little lire and huddled up in 0110 corner of tho alcove in which tho ' stove was located was a young lady | with a pure white dress on. One glance ! at that white dress was sufficient to ! cause the chills to commence running up and down our back, and our teeth chattered to the tune of "Home, sweet Home." A boy soon appeared 011 the scene with a beer bottle filled with oil and commenced encouraging the fire with it, but not until the girl, with the i white dress on, left tho place where the j stove was, did the coal and oil perform | their usual functions. The youthful! janitor would take the bottle of oil and pour it in on the llaraos and whenever the bottle came in sight in the hands of the boy, there was a grand rush to get away from iu front of the stove, j When we observed this carelessness,: we regretted that we had taken the j trouble to write and publish an article about fires in this city and the danger that was resulting t hrough carelessness. About half past 9 o'clock the orches tra commenced playing a beautiful waltz and with great haste the couples ; soon comfortably filled the floor. Here ! as elsewhere, the waltz is the favorite j dance. There is something about it that dancers much admire. It really j is a beautiful sight to see a floor full j of waltzers whirling around the room with a perfect stop, and our opinion is that the Douglas City and Treadwell , dancers have got it down to perfection, j There seemed to be a total absence of J jumping that some waltzers get into ! the habit of doing. We felt sorry for one fellow, however. He held his part | nor at arms length. She was a beauti ful waltzer and to us it seemed that she several times tried to make a sneak on him and get up a little closer?to huddle up in the vicinity of his bo som as it were?but ho wouldn't have it that way. Poor fellow, he missed all the fun, according to our way of think ing, and overy effort she made to "close in" on him was mildly repulsed. The next time we go to report a dance in this city, we will take a sand club along to be used on the cold hearted gentleman. Quadrille and the other round dan cos were announced in their turn ac cording to their order in tho program. In the former, nine sets were on the floor at a time. We should judge the square dancos are not very popular for when tho caller gavo them a change, something out of tho old worn out "first four right and left" etc., the dan cers got mixed up so that it took thorn a long time to get straightened out again and into their proper places. Tho caller oxplained the matter and tried it again, but only to result in a second mix-up in which arms and limbs seem ed to bo more thoroughly ontanglod than before. Tho caller smiled, but finally succeeded in getting them through the various changes in good shano. Among the dancers, Mrs. Howe, Mrs. Dr. Harrison, Mrs. James and the Miss es Falconer and McCormick deserve special notice for grace and ease in the waltz, while if a cake were offerod as a prize, Mr. Herbert Wilson would take a whole bakory. AT THE SUPPER TABLE. About 12 o'clock the floor manager announced that supper was ready and that thereafter tho grand march would occur. The supper was given by the Guild of the Episcopal church of this J. city in Odd Fellows' Hall on third street. It -was a regular genuine Thanksgiving dinner. The supply of turkey and cranberry sauco was inex haustible and liberally provided. The preparation of the food was perfection itself. A better dinner could not bo desired. It was for the benefit of the church. It was not necessary to say that the supper wAs all right, in fact could havo been no better, for the way those who sat at the table ate, furnish ed all tho evidence necessary. No prizes wero given to those who ate tho most, but if there had been, honors wore easy between Mr. Taylor, Mr. M. 0. Howe and Dr. Harrison. On a toc nical investigation the Dr. would prob ably get tho prize. The supper was pro pared by Mrs. R. Bently, Mrs. L. A. J Anderson and Mrs. Falconer and the . waiters wore tho Misses H. Johnson, j Florenco Crofts, Maggie Shotter aud Mrs. J. C.Roso. AFTER SUPPER. The grand march took place after supper, as announced, after which dancing was renewed and continued i until a late hour. The party was a pleasant one, but wo are informed that the attendance was not as large as us ual. Among those who attended wore ! some of the best people of the town | and really wo were agreeably surprised j to see such a turnout of lino looking j people. We of course expected to see i an average collection, but this one was I far superior to the average turnout of an Alaska city. The music was excellent, could have j been no better, and was provided by i Prof. Clark Miller, Herbert Fullmer I and Charles Fremont. The Boys Give Thanks. Douglas City has a lively lot of boys. When wo say boys we don't exactly mean young boys, but we include the older fellows too. Few towns indeed can claim so many generous wide-awake men. Environment no doubt contrib- j utes to make thorn so, for Douglas City j is certainly a place where man may be I happy. All those who want employ- j mont can get it and none need ever complain of want. This is a cash busi ness town and everybody has money.! Whether those so fortunately situa ted are as appreciative of the fact as ; they should be, we really do not know, I but we believe they are. For the pur pose of informing our readers on this j subject a News man was ordered to i take a stroll around town. Wo sent a ! mind reader on this mission and we give his report. Frank Bacli is thankful that trade is good and that he has plenty of fuel on hand. Fox gave thanks that the victims of his jokes still permit him to live. Jack McDonald is thankful for his superior knowledge of the winds. Dr. Harrison gave thanks that all his | signs are right side up. M. C. Howe wa9 thankful that his I appetite stayed with him over Thauks | giving. | Smith was and ought to bo thankful j for having a big trade. O'Connor was thankful that his 200 | pound Swiss Cheese was not quite all i gone. John Egan was more than thankful that his new brewery is just what ho wants. Taylor gave thanks for a good din ner and general prosperity. . James "thanked awfully" because ho had as good a dinner as anyone. Hunter gavo thanks because Douglas I has a newspapor McKay gave thanks because he sold all his stock of fine turkeys and that his new baby is all right. LaMotte was thankful for a good pat ronage at his excellent dinner. Caspersen gavo thanks for hoalth and comfort. Sam Gius was thankful that he was I still alive. Johnson & Oottrell gave thanks be | eause they are satisfied to still remain j on earth. Boynton was exceedingly thankful that the storm was over and he could resume work on the new church. Corbus (the News man thought) was thankful for having the best job in Alaska. Hale should be thankful for being the best looking man at Treadwell. Joe Edwards was thankful because "not a wave of trouble rolls, across his peaceful breast". / Subscribe for the New6. i RECEPTION OF TIE NEWS. Our First Issue Cordially I^e* ceived by the Douglas Is land People. ? WHAT THE NEWS HAN SAW, TEie first issue of the News was gra ciously received by tho readers of Douglas City and Treadwell, and the publishers feel very thankful for the cordial reception that has been given our first publication. A News man strolled around town for a short time as soon as the paper was being, delivered. Tho writer handed our neighbor, Mr. G. Roeno a paper. Two - i- 1 ? 1 handsome women were standing oy, "What! the new paper, aro you going to slight us," said one. Of course they were each supplied with a copy. We went up to see our friend in the Douglas Pharmacy. Just before we got to the door wo heard some one making an awful noise. A man was running toward us and when ho saw that we were looking at him, he com menced to wave his hands and shout at the top of his voice. We went to meet him and with tears running out of his eyes he begged for a copy of the News. To see women and children cry for our paper is not an uncommon: thing, but for able bodied men to so lose control of their feelings is a new one oil us. "Have you come to stay?'r said another lady, as she glanced at the local page and wiped away a tear from her left eye. Ileing assured that the News would always remain here to ' ? ttr. ji *i 1 i greet ner every vvecinesuay sue ueouiue composed and we bade her good bye and strolled on. On Front street we met John Egan; it was dusk by this time. Ho was shoving a wheel barrow.. "The now paper out!" said John.. "There's your paralyzer, the only re ligious paper in Alaska", said the News man. John dropped the wheelbarrow handles and looked the sheet over^ Then ho commenced to read. He kept 011 reading and wo commenced to get cold. We had an overcoat on, but John was in his shirt sleeves. The wind was blowing and getting colder every minute. Wo could see his trous er legs flap in the mild Taku wind aa it engaged in sundry and divers flirta tions, but John read right on. Pres ently his hat blew off and went whirl ing toward the Standard Hall door, but John paid no attention to his hat and kept on reading the great newspaper of I Alaska. Just how long John stood there without coat or hat reading the News we don't know for we got so aw ful cold that wo left to find some good hot stove. He may have stayod there all night for all wo know. Of course these incidents are gratify ing to tho publishers. We are publish ing a paper for the people and to please them will bo our constant aim. nirrf. Little Myrtle McWilliama, the seven year old dauglitor of Mr. and Mrs. McWilliams of this city, died last Fri day morning. Little Myrtle had been sick for some time with scarlatina but was supposed to be getting better un til Thursday night, when a physician was summoned from Juneau, the ferry boat making an extra trip to carry him to this city; but no power could save. The immediate cause of death was hemorrhage of the lungs. Tlio funeral took place last Saturday and the inter ment was mude at Juneau, the re mains, mourners, and friends being conveyed to that city on the ferryboat on the 1 o'clock trip. The parents have the sympathy of all in the losa of a lovely child. "He who gave haa taken away." Christmas Tree Ornaments. A largo and beautiful stock of Christ mas tree ornaments, etc. has been re ceived on the last boat for the Charles Coffoe House on Front street. These goods should bo seen by everybody. Come early and get your choice. The Lamp was Loaded. A miner's lamp carried by Thomas Madden exploded at Troadwell last Thursday forenoon, from the effects of which he received severe injuries by j being burned on the neck and other portions of the body. He was immedi ' ately removed to the hospital, where, ! under the excellent care and treatment | of Dr. Dorr he is rapidly recovering. I
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THE DOUQLAS ISLAND NEWS. a. a. ncBRioe anj charles a. hopp Editors and Publishers. PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY TERMS:?In Advancer. One Year - - $3.00 Six Months ------- 1.50 Three Month* ------ 1.00 Single Copies ------ JO Foreign Postage most l>e prepaid. Wednesday, November 30,1896. To Exchanges. Our exchanges will please note the removal of the News from Fort Wran gel to Douglas City aud Treadwell and govern themselves accordingly. JAKE OLSENVS THANKSGIVING, A Sea biscuit and on Ortorf his repast on the great Holiday of last year. Three days on a Barge?A Flag of Distress. Jake Olsen is the first mate on the steamer Alaska which is owned by Willson & Sylvester of Fort Wrangel. The Alaska is a staunch little craft and is used by its owners in towing the ; Garnet,'a lumber barge to this and oth-1 er Alaska ports, loaded with lumber, the product of the Fort Wrangel saw-1 mill, of which they are also the owners. I Mr. Willson, the senior member of the firm, and one of the best men in aJI Alaska, is also an old sea captain, and is generally known as Capt. Willson. Sometimes the Captain commands the Alaska and at other times a master is employed. Just before Thanksgiving, one year ago, the Alaska left Fort Wrangel for Juneau with the Garnet well loaded with lumber, in tow. Capt. Willson bad the boat in charge and Jake then, as now, was first mate. The trip was made without iucident until Taku bay was reached, which was the day before Thanksgiving. There vras a heavy sea running aud the Captain thought it advisable not to attempt to pull into Juneau during the storm. Th? stock of provisions was running low. There were some passengers on the boat and Capt. Willson concluded to bring his passengers on up to Juneau, get some supplies and return and bring up She Garnet when the storm subsided. "Now Jake," said the captain, "you fulra oaro 11 f tKa horf?o !i n ri T g Ml J OlAVi kOUV V V*. WfcAV. A will run up to-Juneau and return in the morning." "All right," said Jake, and the Alaska was soon in Jnneau with her passen gers safely landed and the boat tied up at the wharf. Jake is an awful good fellow, bat once in a great while forgets something aud when the Alaska had pulled a good distance away, Jake discovered that he had forgotten to take anything to eat off the boat, but, thought Jake, she will be back to-morrow and I can stand it that long. Now, Capt. Willson has hosts of friends all over Alaska and he ' struck one of his best, while at Ju neau, who took theCapt. to his home, gave him a Thanksgiving dinner, and wouldn't let him go for three days. But, you will ask, "how about Jake?" | Well, he waited until the next day, and when the time came for the Captain to return he became anxious. He waited a while and commenced hunting for something to eat for a Thanksgiving dinner. In his search for grub he found one sea biscuit and an onion. He ate the biscuit that day, and the next day he ate the onion. Jake was in hard lines. He was on the barge, with no small boat, nothing to eat, and even water was not pfentiful. Jake stood it until the third day and then he took some lumber, made a raft and paddled to the shore where he put up a flag of distress that could be seen by a passing steamer, and while putting up the sig nal, the Alaska pulled up to the barge. Jake paddled over to the boat, and lost no time in finding the good things the genial Captain had on board, and satis fying his hunger. Jake's experience with the sea biscuit and onion would probably never have been told, had it not been that last Wednesday the Alas ka pulled up to the Taku. Jake was at the wheel. The sea was rough, and the Captain of the boat, we forget his name, gave orders to pull into Taku bay for the purpose of waiting until the storm was over. Jake positively refus ed to obey. He would not let the Cap tain get to the wheel, and consequently pulled through and reached Juneau in safety. Jake was asked to explain his conduct and he told the story of the sea biscuit and onion. "I am not going to eat my Thanksgiving dinner in Taku bay," said Jake, and he didn't. Mr. J. C. Mcuonaia ana Mr. u. n. Stevens were most welcome callers at the News office last Monday evening. They are both prominent members of the Odd Fellows' lodge of this city. Did you eat Dinner at the Delmoni co Thanksgiving day? If not yon missed the best meal for 50c. ever given in Douglas City. THANK50IYING. The Congregational Church People Hold their Service on Sunday night. Rev. Loyal L. Wlit on Heaven. | The Congregationalists of Douglas J City and Treadwell held their Thanks-! giving services in Obman's hall last \ Sunday night and the room was com-1 fortably filled which is quite a compli ment to the pastor, Rev. Loynl L, Wirt, j who is building up a fine organization \ ! in this city. The church people are 1 putting up a $3500 church on Third ; street and all are looking forward to I its completion which will be iu about I six weeks. The service consisted of singing by j ! the congregation, responsive reading | and a short sermon by the pastor. Mrs. j Ross presided at the organ and Mr. j Courson led the singing and the music was one of the most enjoyable parts of the service. Much of the ev ening be ing takon up with the regular Thanks giving service, the sermon was neces- ; i sarily shortened, some. The pastor read the ilrst twelve ver- j see of the fifth chapter of St. Matthew and drew a picture between the con-' j ditiou of man at tho time wbon Christ ! ottered the words and the present time; I also referred to the old Mosaic law and I compared the lj?w of "an eye for an eye" j 1 with that of love, forbearance and for- j j givness, which Christ so freely taught, j He spoke of heaven, and illustrated ; j where the place was by telling of a man I who was inquiring where heaven was. I ! The seeker after knowledge was told to , | take a fifty dollar bill and an abundant j ' supply of provisions to a certain widow ! and pray with her and her children and ' j he would find heaven right there. [ "Heaven is a condition, not a place," i ) said the able divine, with much erapha I sis. If you expect to find a heaven,1 othev than on this earth you will be disappointed,"' he said The pastor's illustration of the love j ; of the Assyrian girl was l>eautiful and the point he inade was that in following i and finding her lover she found ber heaven on earth. From the estimate we have placed on I : the Rev. Mr. Wirt, we believe his edu | cation and liberality will not permit : him to object to a fair criticism of the | doctrine he preaches, and we wish to ; take exception to nis statement tnat: "heaven is a condition and not a place." i When Elijah cast his mantle aside and bodily ascended into heaven, where did he go ? In the II chapter of the ' second book of Kings and the eleventh | verse we find the following: "And it camo to pass, as they still | went on and talked that behold, there appeared a chariot of fire, and horses ! of fire, and parted them asunder; and ! Elijah went np by a whirlwind into heaven." When Christ was crucified, buried ! and arose from the dead, where did he | go i Where does the Bible teach us ! ' Christ camo from? Where is the "right' hand of God" ? When Christ said, "I : go to prepare a place for you ; what did he refer to ? According to the Jewish heaven, it was divided into three parts, j the third being the place where God , and his angels dwell. Where did the J angels go that are referred to in the | ' 15th verse of the 2nd chapter of Luke? \ Where did Christ go when he was j spoken of as being carried into heaven j in the 51 verse of the 24 chapter of the | same writer ? How will the 11th verse of the 1st, chapter of the Acts be explained with the idea that heaven is a condition, not j j a place. The same may be said of the j ' 6th verse of the 10th chapter of Ro-j I j mans. The word heaven appears in the Bi- j : ble hundreds of times?and how Chris-1 ! tian people will believe the sacred old ' book and deny the existence of a heav . en?a place where the angels hover around a throne and minister to the wants of those who have "washed | themselves white in the blood of the Lamb," is a mystery to us. We are are aware of the fact that the beliefs of men, concerning the scrip tures are being liberalized and brought more in harmony with human thought than inspired declarations. You sel dom meet a bright, well educated di j vine who at the present time really I believes the Bible and its teachings. ; One will wander away on one point and a second on something else and be tween them, the good, old book is mis represented and its true meaning and teachings are explained away until you have left, in the new Testament, a good code of ethics, but nothing more. Ask a modern preacner concerning tne on i gin and creation of man and he goes off on evolution. Ask another one of them concerning the miraculous star of Bethlehem and he will try to explain its appearance on natural causes. Ask another concerning the miraculous conception of Christ and he will shake his head and close his left eye. Com plaint was made to Christ that two (men, Hymenius and Philetus were teaching false doctrine concerning th e rosurection. If we remember correct ly, Christ replied that false teachers would always be found. Is the teach ing of the Bible under the liberalized rules, a fulfillment of what he said? As a believer in the existence of a God, the Bible and its Christian teach-, ings, in all kindness we wish to ask the ministry a few questions. If there is a God, if he made man, the heavens and the earth, the sun, moon and stars, the fowls of the air, the beasts of the field and the fishes of the sea, yes if he made everytihng, as all teachers of the scripture claim, was it impossible for Him to make a real, genuine, Bible heaven where the spirits I of the just may enjoy the fruits of a j well spent Christian life on this earth ? Does it seem unreasonable that he should do so? If God is ail powerful, as yon confess in every prayer you offer, what is or was impossible for him to do ? Why say there is no heaven?no real heaven?no place where God reigns and where the angels are?that there is no place where the "Son was with the Father" from the beginning? Was it impossible for such a place to be pro pared by God? It is true there are many things taught in the Bible whose foundations rest upon other than natural laws. The biblical account of the conception of Christ is an illustration, but if God made the laws of nature, is he powor le9S to set them aside? What minister will say he could not annul any fixed law that he made? If the course of the ministry of the day is continued, the thought and hope of christianizing the world must lie abandoned. There is but little left of the good old cbristain teaching, that which brought comfort to our fathers and mothers during life and joy and hope in a happy future at death. What! say to a true and faithful worshipper of God that there is no heaven to gain? Why what is there left to strive for? What reward has the christian in store for him? What did Christ come onto earth for? You say to save sinners? save them from what, from where? They need no saving if there is no place to save them from. Thoy need no fu ture happiness if there is no place for 11 - ? A. - jl ^ mem 10 go to. We hope our Bro. Wirt will consider our views in the light in which we in tend them to be received. The criti cisms we offer arc not particularly di rected to hisserman, they are more es pecially directed towards the tendency of the ministry of the age to become, as we think, too liberal in construing the Bible. That Bro. Wirt is a chris tian gentleman, conscientious iu his work and accomplishing good, we doubt not, but that much more good would be the resul if old fashioned preaching were done, we are equally certain. If the tendency of the future is to contin ue as iu the recent past, seekers after the truth will one and all be led to en quire in the language of Solemon, "Oh, where can truth be found, and where is the place of understanding?" It is not necessary to befog the minds of the people. The plain teachings of Christ are simple and easily understood by all. Mr. and Mrs. Truedale and family, of this city, left for the south and east on the Cottage City last Friday. They will be gone some months, probably until spring. A1 ex. Small wood, BEACH TRADER. g0 Carries at all times a complete ^rstock of Groceries, Provisions, Vegetables, Fruit, Candies, Etc. ' Proprietor of Miners' and Mechanics' [ I ^?Beach Boarding Douse?$ ; Rooms and Bunk House in coi:noction with I Table Board. 1 1 A First=class Boot and Shoe Shop I U maintained, Repair Work" promptly, i neatly and substantially done. Years of ex* i perience in Miner's repair work enables us j to proi>erly do your work. Give us a call. I On the Beach, - Bet. Treadwe'l & Dougrlos Comet.... SAMPLE ROOM Headquarters for Tourists and Yukoners "There's nothing too good for The Boys." ED. CASEBALL, Proprietor. Opp. Occidental Hotel, JUNEAU, ALASKA Boots, Shoes, Rubber Goods Ladies and Gentlemen's ^and Oil Clothing Furnishing Goods. Frank Bach, Dealer in GEHE1L JRlflSE MINERS' SUPPLIES, ETC. VWWtr litS' CLOAKS AND CAPES LADIES' DAIS FRONT STREET, .... DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. F. M. JAMES, GENERAL MERCHANDISE. DOUGLAS CITY, i8 the place to buy your Dry Goods and Groceries that is, If you are in the market for a good article. <*.m. I am not selling below cost, bnt selling as low as any one can and make an honest living. www riiners' Outfits a Specialty. DOUGLAS CITY, .... ALASKA. H. FOXj DEALER IN 1 RENER*L MERCHANDISE; STAPLE and li FANCY GROCERIES. | Boots, Shoes, Clothing, Hardware.^ Complete Yukon Outfits. | First-class Bakery in connection with the store.Jj DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. % ALASKA MEAT MARKET ^ ? D. McKAY, Proprietor. A full line of Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats constantly on hand. Poultry and Game Hunter Block, Douglas City, Alaska, in Season. TELEPHONE NO. 8. Subscribe for the News. !
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The Koehler-James Mercantile Co. S. BLUM, Manager. JUNEAU, - - - ALASKA. GROCERIES GLASSWARE LAMPS CROCKERY CUTLERY TINWARE COOKING | UTENSILS ? CURTAINS PORTIERS TRUNKS VALISES I LARGEST AND MOST COM PLETE STOCK OF t* . General Merchandise IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA. "Honest Goods and Values" Our Motto. Examine Our Stock and be Convinced, FREE DELIVERY TO THE FERRY. DRY GOODS FANCY GOODS NOTIONS SHOES BOOTS HATS CAPS FURNISHING GOODS CLOTHING CARPETS LINOLEUM OIL CLOTH WALL PAPER MATTING 1 WINDOW SHADES While in Juneau ? 5 Look for the Big Sign ?nn?aBk * 1 BROWNVILLE | WOOLEN i MILLS \ ....JUNEAU ALASKA i I BLANKETS and hII \1/AA| l UNDERWEAR All WOOii j Suits Made to Order j! Deposit Required ![ L20aiS L. BbtiffiENTHRL * * The Douglas Island News. THE LOCAL FIELD. Items of Interest Dished Up In Brief for the Ben efit of Our Reader5. Mr. L. A. Sla.no was a caller Monday. Merchant Bach called the first of the week. Jas. Schell makes all kinds of Jewel ry to order. Mrs. J. B. Gale, experienced Nurse; inquire at Fox's store. Fine Watch Repairing. All work warranted by Jas. Schell. LaMotte's meals at the Delmonico are becoming very popular. A tine assortment of clothing at Bach's. See them and get prices. Michael Kelley was arrested last j evening for selling liquor to the In dians. A boat load of Christmas goods just received at Bach's store. The finest, stock that can be purchased. The best stock of fancy Crockery i aud Glassware ever brought to Alaska is now on sale at Frank Bach's store. Prices to suit. John W. Link, special agent of the ! Treasury department, was in the city yesterday. He is making a tour of all the Alaska cities. Mr. Johnson, of Weesner & Johnson, j of the Steam Laundry, returned on the Al-ki Monday, from a month's trip to the Sound country. C. A. Lindstrom, of the firm of Lind-, strom Bros, of this city, will return on the Topeka from Portland. His trip to ; that city was to purchase goods. Look at LaMotte's display window I on the 1st. Steaks, Chops, Ham and | Eggs, Fish, Game, etc., etc. Go in i boys, LaMotte is the "Chef and will, cook you anything you want. The Odd Fellows did some work in ! the first degree last Wednesday night.' The lodge is in a flourishing condition and composed of as good men as are to be found on the earth. LaMotte offers an apology to those who did not get one of his Mince or Pumpkin pies on Thanksgiving day; the demand was greater than the sup ply?next time leave your orders early. Y Jas. Schell. the Jeweler will move to J morrow the first, next door to P. H. J Fox. Give him a cail. New line of I goods just received. All kinds of Jew elry made to order. Full line of Nug gets always on hand. Free mending at the Douglas Steam Laundry. Laundrying in all its branches. Flannels a specialty. Work called for and delivered. Rates guar anteed satisfactory. Patronize your home laundry. Weesner & Johnson. A man named J. D. Ross was arrested in this city last Saturday by Jack Mc Donald and Dan McKay on the charge of selling liquor to Indians. He was sent to Juneau and now languishes in < hastile. Ross is the man who was : IUV mm ? sent to the pen Ave or six years ago j for attempting to burn the buildings j at the Treadwell mines, and we under stand he also tried to burn Bach's store. The pen is probably the best place for him. We were more than pleased to receive a call from Rev. Loyal L. Wirt, pas tor of the Congregational church of this city and Juneau. In the Rev. Mr. Wirt the church has a live, wide-awake man and an excellent pastor and min uter. He is doing a good work in i Alaska. aH I ^ ' THANKSGIVING IN DOUdLAS. Snow and Wind Combine to Make the Day A Quiet one. Fowls In Grout Demand. Last Wednesday night about four ; inches of snow fell on Douglas Island and on Thursday morning a light wind was blowing which continued during the day. Some snow fell on Thanks ; giving day, just enough so that it I would be called a stormy day. Prepa rations had been pretty generally made for the usual observance of this day of thanks. On account of the disagreo able weather, there were but few peo ple on the streets. The stock of tnr kej*s in market was exhausted early in the week, but a new supply was obtain ed at Juneau. Services were held at the Penial mission building in which the Friends' mission joined and were led by C. X. Replogle of the latter. The Catholics had a special service which was well attended. The Thanksgiving services of the Congregational church were postponed until Sunday evening, special mention of which is made elsewhere. If you want Nuggets, call on Jas. Schell, the Jeweler. ANOTHER BOAT GONE. Steamer Detroit went on the Rock5 and 15 A To tal Loss. Prompt Action by Collector Ivey That stanch little steamer Detroit passed in her checks last week and is now numbered among those that were. The Detroit left Juneau severak weeks ago and just ahead of the recent storm with a full passenger list bound for some place, the exact location not being known. In our last issue we stated that a new strike had been made on the Dalton trail aud the De troit was making for it, when the storm came on; some fears were expressed for the safety of the boat and her passen gers, but word was received since the wind subsided that the Detroit was seen between Seward City and Skaguay and that she was heading for the latter port. On Thanksgiving day, about noon, the Detroit ran onto the rocks on the lower end of Shelton Island about forty miles from this place. The passengers were safely landed on the island. The purser, Mr. Bush, and four members of the crew immediately put off in a small boat for Juneau. They got with in fifteen miles of that city when they abandoned the small boat and walked to Juneau, arriving there Friday night. Collector lvey was at once informed of j the wreck of the boat and at 2 o'clock Friday morning dispatched the little steamer Alert to the scene of the dis aster, and she returned to J uneau with the twenty-three passengers the same day. Why Do It. Why buy ready made clothing when you can go to P. H. Fox and got tailor made for less money. Mr. Danforth, engineer oil the Alas ka and his estimable wife were in the city last Friday, visiting Dr. and Mrs. Harrison. Mrs. Danforth and Mrs. Harrison are sisters and formerly came from Seattle. Mr. Danforth will re turn to this city in a few weeks and re main for the winter. The boys and girls are enjoying our alley for coasting purposes. The steam laundry of this city start ed up again today. They have just re ceived new and improved machinery which will insure good work. Kind Words from Our Former Home. ] Stikcen River Journal. We regret to announce the loss of j Mr. aud Mrs. McBride, and Mr. and J ! Mrs. Hopp, as citizens of Wrangel, who ! j went north on the I) irigo, to Douglas ? ! City, where they will set up the plant I of the Wrangel News, and publish it as , a Douglas City paper. The fact that | , McBride & Hopp are at the head of the enterprise is a sufficient guarantee that i it will be a success. LaMotte has 100 Turkeys ordered for j Christmas. kook out boys, stay at I home and eat at the Delmonico. No j need to go to Juneau for a squaro1 meal, you can get it at the Delmonico. j Now Open. The Bath Rooms at the City Barber ! Shop are in running order for the ac- j | commodation of the public. I. O. O. F. Alaska Lodge No. 1 meets at Odd j : Fellows Hall, Douglas, oil Wednesday i 1 evenings at 8 o'clock. Visiting Brothers are Cordially in j vited to attend. Geo. W. Stephensen. N. G., W. R. Dorr, M. D.t Sec. Wanted. 100 men at once to Board at the Del- j | monico Restaurant. I Mr. and Mrs. Dickenson, of Juneau, I i took Thanksgiving dinner with Mr. and ' Mrs LaMotte of this city at the Del ; monico. : Mr. James, the merchant, is making preparations to withstand the Taku j | wind by a reenforcement of his front ! door. i The Corbett-Sharkey prize fight was called off by the referee in the ninth round, because of the interference of Corbett's second. The fight was giv i en to Sharkey on points, but all bets were declared off. Thomas Madden, who was injured by the explosion of a miners' lamp at Treadwell, last Thursday, died last night. Mr. C. N. Replogle and family return ed to this city last week after an ex tended trip through the East. Mr. Replogle is the superintendent of the Friends' mission of this city. He re ports a very pleasant trip, but glad to get back to his homo in this city. Mr. E. D. Stralford, editor of the Plaindealer of Ros oburg, Oregon, made this office a pleasant call last Friday He is connected with the Interior De partment and is now looking after townsite matters in Alaska. Belli & Shaker commenced the erec tion of a new brewery building on 3d street, between Ohmen's Hall and the Bon Ton bakery in this city last Tues day. The main building will be 26x56 feet, and the new plant is to be first class in every particular. Murray & White are the builders. A Pleasant (lathering. A nice little entertainment took place in Odd Fellow's Hall last Saturday. A A literary program was one of the pleasing foaiures of the evening. The program was as follows: < Recitation - Miss Annie McCormick Song _ Mr. Courson Recitation - Gertrude Landsburg Reading - ? - Mrs. Patten Recitation - Frankie Landsburg Song - Mr. Courson Impromptu Speeches were made by Messrs. Boynton, Courson and C. H. Stevens. i The evening's entertainment closed < with a dance which was much enjoyed. | A NARROW ESCAPE. Matt Hartcr and a Hon.stcr Whole Narrowly Escape a Collision. Matt Harter, the chief clerk at Smith's butcher shop, will long remember last Sunday night. He was over at Juneau and in company with John Hoffman and another party, they left the city for the island about half past nine in the evening, in a row boat. When about two-thirds of the way across a monster whale came to the surface of the water within twenty-five feet of them. A number of other whales were sporting in the water near by. If that boat had touched the monster there would have been a "tail movement" in that vicinity that would no doubt speedily have left the earth with three less of its population. The escape from the fury of the huge leviathan was one of the many things that Matt will always be thankful for. Indian Pay Day. There are a number of Indians em ployed at the Treadwell mines, and to them the company issues a check at the end of each day's work. White em ployees are paid once a month, but the Indians will not work unless they re ceive a check at the close of each day's work. Their long association with the j whites has not changed their ideas of correct financial transactions. There may be a dozen articles, but each one is paid for before the deal for the sec ond is made. Not long ago an Indian woman at Wrangel purchased thirteen sugar bowls, and paid for each one be fore another one was taken. The mer chant was short of change and before he got through with his sugar bowl customer he was completely tired out i hunting up change. In the Courts. The United States District Court is in session at Juneau now. A tempora ry court room and jail have been provi ded and things are running along nice ly. Judge Johnson presides with his usual dignity, Clerk Elliot keeps his de partment in first-class shape and Mar shal Shoup opens court and rounds up the hobos in a charming manner. The stock of lawyers is ample. M. J. Cochran, formerly of Wrangel, but now of Juneau, is on hand with plenty of business. Judge Winn, as genial and pleasant as ever, is "in evidence." Our old friend, Judge Louis K. Pratt, now of Skaguay is also down. He has been in the district but a short time, but the boys will find him a powerful ad versary. Undoubtedly he is one of the best lawyers in Alaska. Bro. Donahue one of the nicest boys in Alaska seems to have plenty to do. Martha Heard From. Dear Editors: Will you kindly give notice in this week's paper that the Ladies' League, of the Congregational church is to re ceive a consignment of fine, fresh oys ters on the Topeka, and desire to share the same with all good Douglas Islanders next Tuesday evening, Dec. 6th, in Ohman's Hall. From 8 to 10 the talent of the two towns, assisted by friends from Juneau, will entertain the audience with a fine dramatic and musical program, for which there will be no charge whatso ever. This will be followed by a boun tiful supper in which oysters will be served in any style. Games and amusements of varied character will complete an evening of rare enjoy ment. Martha. \ THE PRISONERS. Safely Conveyed from Sitka to Juneau on the Cottage City?Deputies Hanlin and Snook In Charge. The Cottage City returned from her ! trip to Sitka last week and brought j seventeen prisoners and four detained : witnesses to Juneau who will receive I some attention by the juries that are j in attendance at court. The expedi tion was in charge of United States j deputy marshals Hanlin and Snook, two of the most trusted deputies on tho force. Mr. J. Hanlin has been a i deputy marshal in this district for the I past seventeen years, and is a most I competent official. "Did you have any ' trouble with tho boys?" he was asked I by a News man. "None whatever," was the reply. The | deputy is probably too wary to give | them a chance to make any trouble. We have never heard of any prisoner ! getting away from him. Just received at Bach's, a new lot of Clothing, which was bought at the low est price, is made in the latest style and will be sold cheap. Fire Fund. The chief of the Douglas City Fire { Department, J. F. McDonald, took a trip around town last Saturday to col lect funds to be used in employing a watchman during the storms. This is certainly a move in the right direction. The business men subscribed amounts as follows: P. H. Fox 3.00 F. M. James 3.00 F. Bach 3.00 F.Kane 3.00 Yukon Hotel 2.00 Seattle Billiard Hall 1.00 Michigan Headquarters 1.00 Lindstrom Bros 1.00 Douglas City Hotel 2.00 Sam Gius 2.00 Charles Wakman 1.50 Dr. W. L. Harrison 1.00 This subscription list will remain open and those desiring to do so can leave their names and the amount they will subscribe at the News offico or with the Chief, and their names will appear each week. J. F. McDonald, Chief Fire Department. LaMotto's Coffee is the best in town. Shophard says its better than ho gets at homo, and you J^uow that Shep is a good judge of coffee^ A NEW DEPUTY. Mr. John ncElheny Appointed Deputy Mar shal for this City and Trcadweli. The United States Marshal for this district has appointed Mr. John McEl heny deputy U. S. marshal for Douglas City and Treadwell. This place has been in need of a deputy marshal for some time, the former one, Mr. Robert Street, having resigned quite a while ago. Mr. McElheny is an old-time cit izen, an upright and honest man, and has the esteem and confidence of every man on Douglas Island. We wish him every success in his new office. Ladies don't forget that Bach has just received a stock of trimmed hats. They are in the latest styles and will suit you as well as the price. Married. Rev. Loyal L. Wirt gets in his work on two pair. Married, in Sumdum, Alaska, Nov. 24,1898, by Rev. JLoyal L. Wirt, W. S. Benninghoff and Stella Thompson; Henry C. Boerhie and Viola Thomp son.
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_ Estimates on Elec- Special Attention trie Machines and Given to Repair Wiring furnished Work JUNEAU Electric Construction Works I T. G. QUINN, Prof. Dealer In all Kinds of ? Electrical Supplies... * ? * Cor. Third and Seward Sts. JUNEAU. ? j, f. Mcdonald, WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars. GOODS SOLD AT SEATTLE PRICES****** *** SNUFF *** Douglas City. .... Alaska. I .. THE DOUGLAS CITY ft 0 O ft 0 ft 0 ftO <??$$$ ft MUSIC HALL ft 2 AND BAR ft & a ft ftftft ftft ftftft ftOft^ftftft FIRST CLASS LIQUORS AND CICxARS. ? % Douglas and Juneau Beer always on tap ! X. CASPERSOX, Prop. Front Street, - Douglas City. I Douglas City Barber Shop. Hair Cutting Shampooing j Shaving ^ Baths FRAXK VESTAL, Prop. Notice to Creditors. Before K. M. Jackson, Unites States ; Commissioner for the District of Al- j aska. holding court at Fort Wrau- j gel, Alaska. In the matter of the estate of Shu- j stack, an Indian, formerly called ; Hish-ta-day, deceased. Notice is hereby given by the under signed, administrator of the estate of i Shustaek, an Indian, formerly called; Hish-ta-day, deceased to the creditors ; of, and all persons having claims J against the said deceased, to present j and exhibit them together with thenec-1 essary vouchers within six months after | the fourth publication of this notice, i to the undersigned administrator at | the office of Henry Drum & Co., in the I town of Fort Wrangel, in the District of Alaska, the same being the place for the transaction of the business of the | said estate in said town of Fort Wran- \ gel. First publication Oct. 12th 189S. Dated at Fort Wrangel, Alaska, this 12th day of October, 1S98. C. H. SUNDMACIIER, Administrator of the estate of Shu stack, an Indian, formerly called Hish ta-day, deceased. DOUGLAS CITY. t j The future great city of Alaska is located on Doug= las island, across the bay from Ju= neau. Douglas island is sixteen miles long and nine miles at its widest place, and is practically a mass of solid ore. 860 stamps will be in operation on this island within the next .5 months The miines will employ about 2000 men who are paid good wages every month. Caterers to Family Trade J. P. SMITH & CO., Groceries ' Meats Vegetables Fruits Fresh Meat Supplies received on every in coming Pacific Coast Stoamer. Butter and Eggs of first-class grade always on hand. Douglas City, ? ? Alaska. ERNST BEIHL DEALER IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE. Bakery in connection where the Best Fresh Bread may be had. A Fresh Lino of Cakes and Cookies always on Haud^"^ ^ ^ . Douglas City, - - Alaska. NORTHERN PACIFIC RUNS PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS ELEGANT DINING CARS TOURIST SLEEPING CARS to ST. PAUL MINNEAPOLIS DULtJTH FARGO GRAND FORKS CROOKSTON WINNIPEG HELENA BUTTE CHICAGO PHILADELPHIA WASHINGTON NEW YORK BOSTON AND ALL POINTS EAST AND SOUTH TIME SCHEDULE. In Effect February 13th, 1898. TRAINS LEAVE SEATTLE. For Spokane, Rosslaml, St. Paul and the East 4:00 p. m. For Portland 5:00 a. m. and 4:00 p. m. ?For Olymuia 7:30 a.m. ?For Aberdeen 5:00 a. in. Por Tacoma 5:00, 7:30 and 11:00 a. ni; 4:00 and 7:00 p. m. TRAINS ARRIVE AT SEATTLE. From Spokane. Rossland, St. Paul and the East 7:00 a. m. From Portland .. .. 6:20 and 11:00 p. m. ?From Olymuia 6:20 p. m. ?From Aberdeen .. ... .. .. 6:20 p.m. From Taeoma ? 7:00 and 8:00 a. m.: 12:15, 6:20 and 11:30 p. m. ?Daily except Sunday. All others daily. This card subject to change without notice Through tickets to Japan and China via Northern Pacific Steamship Company. For rates, routes and other information call on or address 1. A. NADEAU, Gen'l Agent, Seattle. Citv Ticket Office, corner Yesler Way and First Avenue. Depot Ticket Office, corner Western Ave nue and Columbia Street. A. D. CHARLTON, I Assistant General Passenger Agent, No. 255 Morrison St., cor. Third, Portland,Or. ! I TICKET OFFICE 612 First Avenue, Seattle. Japan America Line. ?FOR? JAPAN, CHINA, ?AND ALL? Asiatic Ports SAIL REGULARLY. Leave Seattle. Arrive 4:00 p.m. Overland Express 7:00 p. m 8:15 a.m. Pacific Coast Lines 6; 15 p. m IDOM ISLAND ?. Additional Locals and Items of Interest. Subscribe for the News. { Wm. S. Tadduck called Wednesday. Kobenstein, the popular cigar mauu facturor of Wrangel, was in town last week. Mr. E. WTWeesner was a caller last week and of course ordered tho Newo delivered to him. Dr. Steiner, of Wrangel, is attending court in Juneau. He has a case of his own in tho courts. Only four panos of glass were left intact on the side of the mill build ing facing tho bay abovo Treadwell when tho storm subsided last week. Mr. J. W. Kerry was a caller at the News headquarters on our last publi cation day Mr. Kerry's name is classed among the "rustlers." Look out for the ad of his company which will appear later on. Our friend Capt. Adams, customs ; inspector at Fort Wrangel is attending j court at Juneau. The Capt. is one of i the best men in Alaska and you can ! count on his never bringing reproach i nnrtn Hio fnllnp.tnr's ofHfie. We were pleased to make the ac quaintance ol' Mr. C. G. Milne, of | Treadwell. He is employed at the j mines and runs one of the drills. I Many of the employees at the Tread j well mines are very bright, intelligent i men?in fact to find the opposite is the exception and not the rule. AT THE TREADWELL. A Few Corrections for Our Last Week's Wrlteup. j It don't surprise us that many mis i takes were made in our last issue. It ! was our number one and besides being i smoked out of our office for three ? days, we encountered so many little annoying conditions that we now won der that its columns were as near I correct as they are. We stated that 250 tons of ore were crushed and went through the stamp ! mill every day. It should have been i 750 tons. Not a very great mistake of i course, only a difference of 500 tons. Then we said the holes for blasting were drilled two feet deep, but in fact j they are put in seven, and the holes in the pit are drilled eleven feet deep. ! If the boys at Treadwell will permit us to live after makiug these err<5rs, ! we will try and not have such mistakes ; occur again. Colonel Lewis. The brilliant young congressman, j Cel. James Hamilton Lewis, of the state of Washington, has suffered defeat at the polls in the election held 011 theGth ! of this month, by a majority of about 3,000 votes. Two years ago he was elec i ted by a majority of some 13,000 and I those who are not acquainted with the politics of that state will wonder why this great change of friendship to that j of apparent hostility in the short space ; of two years. The cause briefly stated ! is, that Col. Lewis severely attacked President McKinley and his adminis tration when patriotism and good judg ment should have led him to the ardent support of the president during a timo that the nation was not at peace. Tho News, whiio published at Fort Wrangel, advised the Col. to let Mc Kinley alone and make his campaign speeches on other lines; the people were with the president and an attack on him would surely bring and merit his defeat, but the Congressman had never before experienced a Waterloo and knowing that for years he was the most popular man in his state, he could not be made to believe that the voters of Washington would refuse to support him. As an orator, Col. .Lewis has no equai in the state in which he lives, probably not on the Pacific coast. As a lawyer his oquals are few, and while the pres ent defeat may be painful, it will prove to be a great benefit to him in the fu ture. Col. Lowis will survive this defeat. It will only result in bringing out tho better metal that is within his body, and tho republicans of that stato will find in him a more troublesome adver sary in the future than he has been in the past. The Seattle papers that wer? opposed to him are glorying in his do feat. It is natural that they should do so. They rejoice th at ho is politically dead, but when two years roll around they will find him, like the Philistines did Sampson?his strength restored and more powerful than ever. No Col. Lewis cannot be "downed," his ability will still keep him before the people of that state as tho leader of his ' party, and a foe that republicans will | always fear. S - # . ALASKA TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.,. . STORE DEPARTMENT, - DOUGLAS ISLAND, ALASKA. Wholesale and |\ /I 1 S * Retan ? ? ? Mercnandise OUTFITS FOR THE GOLD FIELDS. OUTFITS-! ~ ESTIMATES We ure prepared to furnish outfits at Lot us figure with you on an* Prices that uro right and with {foods proposition to Sell Goods for ca?b that are guaranteed to be first-class in any Quantity in every particular Mine and Mill Fittings, Dynamite, Fuse, Caps. Steamers sailing for Skaguay and Dyoa will call at our wharf for Outfits. NO WHARFAGE Alaska Trcadwell Gold Mining Co., ? Douglas Island, Alaska, I I sg Good Goods. T* ~ o n . You go to that throe corner store, ^ That's where I get tho best, r?3 The Price isn't a darned cent more, O Than I've paid all over tho West. (ft rv (D The name isn't over the door m* But you'll find the place just the same ?5^ The people flock there by tho score, While the rest of the city is tame. I ? : 3 o Low Prices. ^ THE STANDARD MUSIC HALL JOHNSON & COTTRELL, PROPRIETORS. ? Douglas City, -- Alaska. **?$0PEN ALL NIGHT.?**? fitF" Hot and Mixed Drinks a Specialty. MT The finest Brands of Liquors and Cigars al ways on hand. 1 ^wwwwvww i j subscriptions j Sone Year ? ? $3.ooJ> I i Six Months * 1.so^ ! ^Three Months i.ooi , > Advertising Rates > ( % or. application ^ > /vwwvwww (' r advertising medium j! /j\ > ^ of ** x?* southeast alaska ?-wwvwwvw | 5 first class j S "JOB WORK.. ? > ? A SPECIALTY ? ? SATISFACTION ? > J GUARANTEED J | wvw^ww^wv ? ? ? ? ? READ THE -NEWS... AND GET THE "NEWS.. 0 ? e ? ' I* *i? r J. CJ. k* r company's Now, Largo, Fast and Elo FaCiiiC Loast MCaniSnip Uh gant steamers leave and arrive as follows : Leave San Francisco Oct. 3 8 13 18 23 " 28 r Nov. 2 7 i Leave Puj?et Sound Oct. 7 12 17 22 27 Nov. 1 6 11 Arrive Wranprel Oct. 11 15 " 20 26 20 Nov. i 10 17 Leave Dyea & Skaguay Oct. 14 18 23 C " 29 Nov. 2 " 7 J 18 u 17 Duo Sitka 0 )ct. 25 ,ov- 9n Leave Sitka 1 ct, 10 (. 25 N ov. 9 Leave N rangel )ct. 12 ( 16 21 27 311 ov. 5 11 15 20 Due Puget Sound )ct. 10 < 19 24 u so: *ov. 3 8 14 18 23 Due San Francisco Oct. 19 24 ?? 29 Nov. | ?* 8 " II v 18 A 21 " 23 [ The abovo dates are only approximate. For further information obtain fold** ' The Company reserves the right to change, without previous notice,Steamer's sail!" dates, and hour of sailing. AGENTS?McKINNON WHARF & FORWARDING CO-t ? WRANGEL; Sitka, Ed. De Groff ; Skaguay, F. A. Twitchell: Supt. for Alaska, H. f j Robinson, Juneau; N.Postbn, Portland, Ore.; D. F. Tbowbbidge, P. S. 6upt. Seattle Wash. GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., f 1 i?r
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1898-12-07
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3,016
VOL. 1. DOUGLAS CITY AND TREADWELL, ALASKA, DECEMBER 7, 1898. NO. 3. OFFICIAL DIRECTORY OF ALASKA. I FOR THE DISTRICT OF ALASKA. I Governor?John G. Brady; private secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Knapp. U. S. Judge?C. S. Johnson. U. S. Attorney?Robert A. Fried rich.; Assistant District Attorney?Alfred ! J Dalv. District Clerk?Albert 1). Elliott. Deputy Clerk?Joseph J. Rogers. U. S. Marshal?J. M. Shoup. Surveyor General?W. L. Distill. Register?John W. Dudley. I teceiver?Roswel 1 Shel ly. Court Interpreter?George Kostro-: metinotf. Commissioners?C. W. Tuttle, Sitka; John V.Ostninder, Juneau; Fred P.Tus tin. Fort Wrangel; L. R. Woodward, Unalaska; Phillip Gallagher, Kodiak; John U. Smith, Dyea; W. J. Jones, Cir cle City; Chas. II. lsham, Unga. Deputy Marshals?W. II. McNair, Sitka; Edward S. Staley, Juneau; W. 1). Grant, Fort Wrangel; Edward C. Ilasey, Kadiak; i Lewis L. Rowers, Unga; J. C. Rlaine, j Unalaska; F. M. Canton, Circle City;1 Josias M. Tanner, Dyea; John McEl-1 heny. Douglas City; Neil C. Vawter, St. i Michaels. Deputy Internal Revenue Collector? W. C. Pedlar. Educational Agent?Sheldon Jackson Assistant Agent?William Hamilton.: Supt. of Schools?W. A. Kelly. CUSTOMS OFFICERS. Collector?J. W. Ivey. Special Deputy?W. P. McBride. Deputy and Inspector?Wm. Mill-! more and C. L. Andrews. Deputy Collectors?Joseph Arment, j Fort Wrangel; E. M. VanSlyck, Mary, Island; W. G. Thomas, Kodiak; G. W.I Caton, Cook's Inlet; T. E. Holmes, Ka- j rink; J. F. Sinnot, Unga; J. P. Word, Unalaska; E. T. Hatch, St. Michaels;} Chas. Smith, Circle City; John C. Ten- ; ny. Juneau. Inspectors at Jnneau?Loring K. Ad-1 arns, Harry Minto and John R. Auldin. Inspectors at Fort Wrangel, Edward ! Hofstad, S. L. Adams, Geo. J. Smith, E. i L. Hunter, Wm. Denny. Inspectors Afloat?J. S. Slater, S. F.} Hodges, L. II. Lovejoy, Edgar Grim. CHURCH DIRECTORY. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH-Kev. Loyal S. Wirt, pastor. Until the new church buihl- \ in?r is complete*!, evening services will be i held every Sunday in Chimin's Hall at 7:45 p. : m. Sunday School meets in Odd Fellow's ; Hall at 11 a.m. Society of Christian Endeav-i or in the same place, Thursday evenings a 7:3U. Ladies League every alternate Thurs-' day afternoon. Juneau Ferry aad Navigation Co. j TIME CARD. Steamer. LONE FISHEItMAM; TIBBETS. j Captain. leaves juneau: leaves treadwell: ! 9:00 a. m. 9:50 a. m. ! 11 DO a. m. 12:50 p. m. 2DO p. hl 2:50 p. m. 4:30 p. m. 0:50 p. m. 9:00 p. in. 9:25 p. m. SHEEP CREEK TRIPS. leaves juneau! leaves sheep creek*. , 11 a. m., 4:30 p. m. J 12:15 and G:15 p. in. I DR. W. L. HARRISON, DENTIST Hunter Block. l>et. Front and 2nd Sts. Douglas City, j A. G. McBRIDE, ATTORNEY AT LAW. NOTARY PUBLIC. Ottice w ith News. Douglas City, Alaska, j Prescriptions Filled Day and Night at... Douglas Pharmacy.; A Full Line of ToHet Articles,! Perfumes, ?#7 Soaps, '< ? Brushes, Etc^ Etc. Hunter Bld'g 3d St., Donglas City. | | Alex. Smalbvood, BEACH TRADER. j?j^"Carries at all times a complete jfj^^Stock of Groceries, Provisions, | Vegetables, Fruit, Candies, Etc. Pij)priotor of Miners' and Mechanics' i ^?Beach Boarding House?$ Rooms and Hunk House in connection with Table Board. A First=class Boot and Shoe Shop Is maintained. Repair Work promptly, [ neatly and substantially done. Years of ex- \ perience in Miner's repair work enables us to properly do your work. Give us a call. On the Beach. ? Bet. Trcadwel! Dougrlas. \ DELJI0N1C0 HOTEL AND RESTAURANT. ALEX. LA MOTTE, Proprietor. Board by the Day, &) & Week, or Month ^ ^ Rates Reasonable ti w MEALS AT ALL HOURS. - tJF The table First-class and will satisfy the most fastidious. w Our Coffee eannot he excelled. Douglas City, Alnskn. i THE I STAR BREWERY,! DOUGLAS CITY, www JOHN EOAN, Proprietor. ! www I I I w i THE NEW BREWERY BUILD ING IS COMPLETED AND OCCUPIED OUR FACILITIES FOR BREW ING FIRST-CLASS BEER ARE NOT EXCELLED IN ALASKA | 1 THE STAR BREWERY j THE KLONDIKE OF DOUGLAS CITY. Is a Gentlemen's Resort ? V S. G1US, Proprietor. Choice Wines, Liquors, and Cigars. THIS SPACE IS RESERVED EO R THE ALASK A PHOTO CO OK DOUGLAS** CITY WATCH I T GROW **** SAM GLOVER Wjl HICKS VWWtVW/WVWVVlV^ $ Seattle Billiard t ? ...Hall... 5 JjHICKS & GLOVER, Props* ^v^wwwvwvwwvvj | The Only Billiard Tables in the City. [ Front Street, - - Douglas City, Alaska. i 1 * -.THE... Charles Coffee House, DOUGLAS CITY. CHARLES WORTMAN, Proprietor. gjSF' Best Lunch in the City _J&TI glST At Reasonable Rates ...iSlTl ? A larpre stock of choice Confectionery a In'ay on hand. Ill THE III MIL. nr. Wm. McDougal, Just Back From Atlin Lake, Interviewed by a News Reporter. FROM ATLIN TO THE SEA. i Mr. William McDougal, formerly of Montreal, Canada, returned a few da3rs ago from the Atlin Lake country, and, knowing that anything and everything connected with that country and the way in and out of it is of interest to the most of our readers, tho News man sought an interview, with tho following result: j "I understand," said the reporter, j "that you have just come out from At lin lake. What route did you come over ?" "By what is willed the Taku trail," said Mr. McDougal. "What was the actual time consumed in travel on your way out ?" "Well, we wero four days coming from Atlin to the Coclohene river?tho head of the Taku river?and twelve hours from there to tho Taku inlet." "Are there many claims being re corded in the Atlin district ?" "No, claims win only be recorded in tho recording season, which extends j from June 1st to September 15th, but applications for location can be filed , at any time." "What does a miner's license cost?" ! "1 got one at Pine Creek and it cost | me five dollars." "What alniut the water supply. Is it sufficient for all purposes?" "Yes, I think there will always be plenty of water for sluicing, and what is called Pine Creek, is quite a river." "What do you think of tho claims; are they as rich as reported?" "Well, no, that is not a Klondiko and there are no million dollar claims, but still some of them are very rich. It is fi.ut fimr-o sit-o ftvnn hot.t<?r claims I oaiu 1/11(11/ V? UVI V ?.?? v> x/? v? ? _ than the discovery, which are variously J estimated at from $10,000 to $20,000 per 100 foot claim-" "Hew many people aro there in At-! J in ?" "I can't say exactly, there aro a num- j ber coming out and going in continu- ' ally. Tiie population of the district is j said to be about 1200, but there are probably not over two hundred there j now." | "Where are Atlin City and Pine City j I located ?" "Atlin City is on Atlin lake and Pine I City is on Pino creek, seven miles from the lake. Discovery is also on Pine ? Iviuuu. "IIow large a place is Atlin City, how | i many stores, etc.? "There are three stores and one sa- j loon. The saloon had, when I was in j | there, only two bottles of gin as stock ; ; inTrade. A number of men have their | I wives and children with them thero." j "What about the bench or hill | j claims?" "Well, that is something that has sur- j j prised all old miners. Some tenderfeet | I or greenhorns, who had no experience ! I in mining, and who failed to secure j j claims on the creek, went up above on j J the sidehills and located claims and I went to digging, and to the surprise j 1 of everybody, some of them proved to ! bo very rich. There is but little soil or I gravel, but simply little hills full of j nuggets." "Are you going back again Mr. Mc-} Dougal?" "Oh yes, I shall return to Atlin some time during the winter, on tho snow." j RECEPTION OF THE NEWS. j What a News Man Saw and Heard at Juneau. I The News a Dead Winner in Both Cities. "Nothing succeeds like success," aud j our readers will pardon us for again j calling attention to the most hearty re ! ception the News is receiving at the ' hands of the reading public. In our last issue we gave a brief account of a few incidents that greatly pleased us because thoy indicated the beat of the public pulse as to the place this paper should occupy in Alaska journalism j and which was certainly, as we viewed it, a deserving compliment. Last week a representative spent a day in Juneau attending court and visiting friends j and business men and much to our j surprise the Douglas City and Tread | well fame of the News had preceeded I us. / As wo passed the Brownvillo Woolen Mills' storo wo stopped to say "how" to our friond L. Blumenthal. "Your pa per is all right, bright and newsy," said the merchant. Wo could hardly say yes, and to say no would not have been the truth, so wo just thanked him for the compliment and headed for the ofiicc of Mr. II. F. Kobiuson, the Alas ka superintendent of the Pacific Coast Steamship Co. Business called us thoro, but not finding him in, we wait njm 'P)ia rtncViinr* wiin hllflrfi UVA 1171 111U1. X ilW VtAUllAVA If MW WMW?-j however, and {is busy as over. A nice young man with auburn hair and a goodnatured look on his face was sit ting at his desk apparently in deep thought. As is our custom, we laid two copies of the paper on the desk and hold down a chair until Mr. Robinson arrived. "Wo are much interested in your pa per and enjoy it very much at this of fice," said the cashier. Immediately ] the young man with the auburn hair picked up a copy of the News. He didn't even take time to return to his : chair, but jumped onto the table from j which he had taken the paper and com menced to read. He read all of the first page and turned on to the editori-! al. We think he must be religiously; inclined for we observed him perusing our criticism on the Rev. Loyal L.! Wirt's sermon. He finished that page and turned on to the local, stored all j the good things there was in that and j then read the article on CoL Lewis and j when he commenced to read the adver tisements, why, Mr. Robinson came in J and we could observe him no longer. Mr. Robinson is a peculiarly made j man. Somehow, the cares of active business don't seem to tell on him. j Ho is always the same. Always busy,) there must be much to worry him, but j if he has uny cares you never lind it' out. Good natured and full of humor,1 the nice and responsible position he ? holds has never enlarged his head.; Just below the waist he measures up; well, but that is not because he ever gets "swelled up" 011 account of a good job. Wo took one more look at the young ' man who was still reading the News' and headed for the corner of Seward : street and that big mountain. "My wife has heard of your paper i and wants to see it," said a stranger to ! us as we were turning into Seward street. "You will find the great relig ious weekly at the postofiice," was our reply and away we went. We received a number of compliments on the way up the street for tlio great Alaska pa per and as we were forgetting some we stopped to tako notes. Presently we saw coming up the walk our friend Rev. Loyal L. Wirt. As he walked along ho was reading the first page of the News, and he seemed very much inter ested. We greeted him when close by, but ho seemingly did not hear us. Then we yelled and began waving our hands ' and "shooing," and attracted his atten- J tion from the paper to us. Tho usual i salutations occurred, and as our criti-1 cism of his sermon was on the fourth ! page we thought he had not yet seen it so wo made for other parts of town. We dropped iuto Young's and there too we heard kind words for the News, i One of tho Kaufman Bros, expressed admiration for the paper. Somehow we were more than pleased to hear his complimentary reference to the News for he must bo a good judge of a good neat paper, for he has one of the hand -, somest stores wo over saw. The goods and arrangement of his rooms would be a credit to any city on earth. But we must follow this subject no further and yet the sixteenth part has not been told. Wo hurried to tho forry boat and for tho first time saw Captain Tibbets look pale, weary and distress ed. Wo hardly knew him. Wo edged I around to his side for the purpose of consoling him. Surely wo thought ho was in trouble. In low and subdued tones he told us that it was now Fri day and he had not yet seen a copy of the this week's News. Our time card told us ho would return at 7 o'clock, and believe mo, at that time we were there with a copy of the paper for tho Captain. That women and children cry for it, tho men must have it and tho church people hoed it, there can be no doubt. Watch it grow. The bark Richard III, now being used as a coal barge, was towed into this port last week, and unloaded about 150 tons of coal upon the dock. The coal is from Nanaimo, B. C., and a number of our citizens are ! laying in their winter's supply. v BESI lOiJ urn. What Douglas City is Doing in the Building Line. Not a Boom Town. ALL SUBSTANTIAL BUILDINGS Tho history of most of the cities and towns in Alaska, as in every new and undeveloped country, has been one of continued uncertainty as to the ulti mate outcome. We find a very apt il lustration of this in the see-saw of the relative positions of Skaguay and Dyea. First one is up and the other is down, or vice versa. There are many reasons for this, but perhaps the most potent is that a city to stand and grow and thrive must have a foundation of re sources that is permanent and lasting. The fact that these conditions prevail in so few young cities is a prime reason for a lack of confidence in the stability of them. Douglas City stands as a notable ex ception to the rule applied, having for its financial support an enterprise that is no longer an experiment or a venture, but a paying gold mine, the annual output of which is only limited by the number of men and stamps employed. It is not the purpose of this article to enlarge on the greatness or grandeur or magnitude of the Treadwell or oth er mines, located an Douglas Island, but we simply wish to call the atten tion of our readers to the certainty of the fact that Douglas city in not des tined to meet, in its career, any of the reverses or backsets that have been and are being so fatal to the average Alaskan town. Douglas City has nev er had a boom, in fact it has never yet quite come up to its opportunities and even now a scarcity of dwelling houses keeps away many would-be residents. And this brings us to the subject in hand. A reporter for the News started out the other afternoon tx?look up the new buildings in the city that had just becu completed or were in course of con struction and in a very few minutes returned with the following very re markable list, which, wo are told is very far from a complete ono yet is still a grand index of the spirit of thrifty growth that pervades our city: Congregationalchurch building, nearing completion. J. A. Boy ni ton, contractor. Cost 3,500 A. Hunter, buildings between Front and Second streets occu pied by D. McKay's meat market, j Dr. Harrison's dental parlors and i the NcwsofUce. Just completed Cost 2^500 Boihl & Shaker, New Brewery on 3rd street, just begun. Mur ray & Hoyt, contractors. To cost 2,000 Mrs. Clias. Martin, a four room cottage on Second street, nearing completion. Cost 1,000 Pat Malin, a dwelling on Sec ond street. Murray & Hoyt con ! tractors. Cost 900 Chas. Hoofer, throe fine cot tages on 4th & P streets. O. N. Boyes, contractor. To cost 2,000 P. M. Jarnos, cottage on Third street, just begun. Cost 250 Frank Back, just completed a fine largo residence, corner 4th &, E streets. Cost 2,000 Frank Back, two cottages on E street. Murray & Hoyt con tractors. Cost 1,500 Also a dwelling on Third street. 850 J. H. Raymond, five room cot tage on E street. Cost 750 P. II. Fox, addition to cottage on Third street. Cost 150 F. M. James, addition to cot tage on Third street. Cost 150 Chas. Bevans, cottage on Front street. Cha3. Fenster, builder.. 500 Martin Oloson, threo cabins on Front street. Cost 300 Frank Kane, business house on Front street. Steve Falkner, builder. Cost 800 John Egan, brewery building on Front street, just completed Cost. 2,000 ? i-1 *? 4-U.x .. wnenwo rememuur does not include the very extensive improvements at Treadwell, of which wo will speak later, wo have reason to congratulate the citizens of Douglas. Another Citizen. Born to Mr.'and Mrs. W. Ainsworth, last Friday morning, u ten pound boy.
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2,327
' 1 ??????? !??? ???I.I - THE DOUGLAS ISLAND NEWS. A. a. .IcBRIDB and CHARLES A. HOPP Editors and Publishers. PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY TEfcMS:?In Advance. One Year - - fSJ.00 Six Months ------- 1.50 Three Months ------ 1.00 Single Copies ------ JO Foreign Postage must he prepai d. Wednesday, December 7# 1898. To Ex change a. Oilr exchanges will please note the removal of the News from Fort Wran gel to Douglas City and Treadwell and govern themselves accordingly. Commissioner's Decision. I'he local Land Office at Sitka haa re-1 ceived the following decision of the j Commissioner of the General Land ' Office holdiug that entry cannot be made nor filings received by the local 1 land offices In general homestead cases . though they may be made with soldier's j additional homestead scrip. Register and Receiver, Sitka, Alaska. Gentlemeu:? I am in receipt of your letter of Oct. i 5, 1808, transmitting the papers in the j case of homestead entry No. 1, made i October 4, 1898, by Adolph Ellefson, j on a tract of unsurveyed land contain ug 5 acres, It appears that you have also allow-1 ed the party a leave of absence from ' the land for a period of nine months j from October 5, 1S98. You state that you desire a ruling by { this office as to the future acceptance of such filings; that you have inter preted the circular issued June 8,1898,! under the Act of Congress approved j May 14,1898, (30 Stat., 409), "to mean ; that, while entry may not be perfected ; and patent issued until the system of ! public surveys is extended to this Dis-1 trict, yet, in order that the bona fide ! settler may have the advantage of a ! record of his date of settlement and ; ???_ ?? -i . - ni ?_ 1 occupancy 01 nis iana ne may me in; this (your) office his application and j the usual accompanying affidavit." i On page 4 of the circular of June 8, : 1898, relating to section 1 of the Act of May 16,1898, it is stated in rule three that existing homestead laws, while rec-! ognizing settlements on unsurveyed public lands, do not authorize the en try or the patenting thereof until the public surveys have been regularly ex-; tended over them; that section one of this act (May 14, 1898), however in terms authorizes the entry of unsur- j veyed lands in Alaska through the ex- 1 ercise of soldiers additional homestead rights; but this does not apply to the general homestead right. Your action allowing said entry and leave of absence wa s, therefore, erro neous, and Ellefsen's entry is accord ingly held for cancellation. x x x x Very respectfully, Binger Herman, ? Commissioner. : Prof. Graves of Wyoming has been made president of the Washington' State University, which by the way is! becoming ono of the best institutions of learning in the country. The Seat-1 tie papers have contained an alleged picture of the professor. We are slow to believe that the cut in the paper ; will give any one an idea of how the | man looks, except that he parts his j hair in the middle, a practice that ought to be prohibited by law. __________ I Kindly Remembrance. Stikeen River Journal. We have received No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Douglas Island News. Our old friends 1 A. G. McBride and C. A. Hopp are at; the helm. It is a neat, clean sheet and i the advertising columns look healthy. A. G. is a good fellow and we hope the Douglas Island people will show their 1 appreciation by subscribing for and j advertising in the Douglas Island News. ? Very Rev. J. B. Rene, S. J., Prefect j Apostolic of the Catholic church in ! Alaska, paid Douglas a visit last week.; Father Rene has been traveling exten- j aively and had been absent from this district for a year and a half. He vis- j ited the Yukon twice, the States, Cana- j da, and Europe, etc. Here his friends j, were delighted to see him home again ! and so well. He had a very welcome , reception at the Sisters School where i a large crowd of children sang to him 1 words of welcome. Rev. Father Rene < was impressed by the growth of Doug las City. The Catholic church close ; < by the hospital has become too small < for the ever increasing population, and i permission is given to build a good, < substantial church structure as soon 1 as the necessary funds have been j rained. j 1 r; --' *& ? ? A THE CHURCHES, ! Rev. Loyal L. Wirt ift Oilman's Hall, The Friends Mission. People Need Not Com* plain of Poor Preaching. Kev. Loyal L. Wirt delivered a ser mou at Oilman's hall last Sunday evening. The Congregational church people hold their services there for the present, but the pastor announced that Christmas services would be held in : the new church; from which statement | people will know that the building is I nearlng completion. The Rev. Mr. Wirt was at his best on j Sunday night. He chose for his sub ! ject the fifth to the eighth Versos inolu j sive of the fifth chapter of John, which j relates to the healing by Christ of a ' certain man who had an infirmity for thirty-eight years. Without copious notes it would be im possible to give a description of the sermon, and this we did not take; but we can truly say that the sermon was worthy of a bishop. The eloquent di vine has a wonderful flow of language, is a profound thinker and pleasing in delivery, and such preaching cer tainly will accomplish much good. Our attention was also especially di rected to the opening prayer. It cov ered'a wide range, as it properly should. With deep fervency he prayed for the salvation of souls by the divine Healer and a final gathering of the peoples of the earth into heaven. It was so ear nest, so pure that it seemed to us that ? * i - v j. 1 iu musr sureiy reacn mat nwiveu iu which we believe, but which we feared onr brother was skeptical concerning. It is wonderful what a good effect such a sermon, such a prayer has upon an audience. You could see in the faces of those present the pleasure and satisfaction that it produced. We are one of the number who do not believe that Christianity is advancing, but we do believe that if every church mem bership could hear such sermons, it would not be long until the world would be christianized. The people will go to hear preaching of the right kind. The life and teachings of Christ ? * 1-1-1 41 4^ nave Deeu onen i,oiu, uut tuey gu iu hear them again and again when they are narrated by a truly good man. Mr. C. N. Replogle, at the Friends' Mission, chose for the theme of his dis course the words found in the second verse of the fourth chapter of Malachi: "But unto you that fear my name shall the Sun of righteousness arise with healing in his wings; and ye shall go forth, as calves of the stall." He dwelt at some length on the fear of the ad verse criticism of the world; and said that we should fear God and not man. He spoke feelingly of the hearts that needed the application of the healing power of "the Sun of righteousness," of the greet efficacy of that power, and eloquently alluded to the perfected state when "ye shall go forth as calves of the stall." A portion of the time was spent in a talk to the natives through an inter preter, after which a general invitation was extendad to all to speak in testi mony. The attendance was good; the inter est deep and sincere. Manager Gorbus. Mr. Corbus, the manager of the huge mercantile establishment at Treadwell, has changed his ad this week and the people will read and profit by it. We I were pleased to know that Manager j Corbus carefully reads the News each week and that its contents and makeup are agreeable to his taste. Whether he i appreciates it because it is the only "re-! ligious paper" in Alaska we do not j know, but that he should is not ques- J tioned in our mind. Mr. Corbus is a young man, but he is all business and | the manner in which he manages that | branch of the great mining company's j interests shows that he is a valuable man. The first time we saw him we sized him up as one of those far away men, but socially he is a rattling good fellow, when you know him. He is not as tall as his brother, the superintend-1 ent, but resembles him in many re-! spects. Whether he ever has any trou-1 ble, like Hebson, in keeping the girls from kissing him we don't know, but he is certainly one of the best looking men in Alaska. He Is All Right. M. Manson, former agent at Wran gel for R. Dunsmuir and Sons, is now in charge of the shipping department at Union Wharf. In a letter to G. A. McCulloch he wishes to be remembered to his Wrangel friends.?Stikeen River Journal. Mr. Manson was at Juneau for sev eral weeks and we were in hopes his employers would permit him to remain in Alaska. Mr. Manson is certainly ene of the best men that ever came to bhis district. We need more Masons in Alaska. There is nothing the mat :er with Manson. V A YOUNG HAN AND HIS GIRL. A Suit Water Bath with Ml* Sunday Clothes ; on. Hard Luck (or one of the flexlcan Mine Boys. There is a young man who works at the Mexican stamp mill a little ways below Treadwell. He is not the only one, for they are many. He is unmar ried, but how old he is, the color of his hair und eyes, whether he parts his hair in the middle or not are all mat ters we know nothing about for we are unacquainted with him. This young | man, as we are informed, has a girl I somewhere across the bay, some place | near or at Sheep Creek, and last Sat | urday he left on the II o'clock boat to I make her a visit. He reached the cor i rect place, but the next we hoar o f i | him he is making his way toward the I wharf to take the evening ferry for j home. Just how it happened we don't | know, and he will probably never tell, j but anyway the young man fell off the | wharf into the bay with all his clothes j j on, and his Sunday clothes at that, j | He was pretty badly scared, no doubt, j j for he yelled and bellowed so that you j J could hear him a distance of three j : miles. Some teamsters heard his voice ! I and took a rope and fished him out of j the water. We did not try to interview the; ! young man and of course cannot give ! all the particulars, but these are the | main facts. Me Never Sleeps. Economy, tact and close attention to business never fail to bring a man a good trade. Smith, the fruit, confec tionery and meat man, started in one ! room in this city. His business grew ' and now he is in two rooms and thero j | is always someone waiting to do their ; i trading. The secret of his success is | I that he buys the best, sells cheap and ! t is always there. He is first to open, j I last to close. He never sleeps. ! ggjttOGo ft ft ft We have Just Received ft II LARGEST HOLIDAY I \% AND HAND- rnnnc I SOMEST GOODS*?*?? t % LINE OF UUUUJ $ S EVER SHOWN IN ALASKA. ft! I ft * * ft ft * ft 'ft ft ' ?? Come and See them. ?i ft 'ft J Our Prices are Rijrht, too ^ i ft THE ALASKA DRUG CO., t ft ft ft PRESCRIP- Front A Seward St8., ft i ft TIONS A ft .ft SPECIALTY. JUNEAU, ft. i ft ftft ft ft ftftft ft ft ft ftftftft ft ft ft 6 ftftftft ft.ftft I | G. ROENE, .... Dealer in and Manufacturer of ?STOVES? TIN- AND HARDWARE. W?PLUMBING?V* l Douglas City, ? - - Alaska. LINDSTROM BROS. I 1 I Dealers in Dry Goods, Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Etc. Douglas City, Alaska. Comet.... | SAMPLE ROOM I Headquarters for Tourists and Yukoners "There's nothing too good for The Boys." ED. CASE^VLL, Proprietor. Opp. Occidental Hotel, JUNEAU, ALASKA ALASKA TREAD WELL GOLD MINING CO Mercantile Department DOUGLAS ISLAND, - - ALASKA. WHOLELALE MERCiiANDISEZr^E I Full Line jfc Hardware of Christmas # Iron & Steel VoYelties ^ Pipe Fittings Just Received I OUTFITS FOR THE GOLD FIELDS. Gel our Prices before Purchasing elsewhere. We will do Ihe rigid Ihing. F. M. JAMES, GENERAL MERCHANDISE. WWW Watch for this space Next Week DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. P. H. POX, I DEALER IN J RENEBAL MERCHANDISE; : STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES. | Boots, Shoes, Clothing, Hardware.*# Complete Yukon Outfits. M First-class Bakery in connection with the store.?} DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. Mi ALASKA MEAT MARKET D. McKAY, Proprietor. A full line of Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats constantly on hand. Poultry and Game Hunter Block, Douglas City, Alaska, in Season. TELEPHONE NO. 8.
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The Koehler-James Mercantile Co. [ S. BLUM, Manager. ii JUNEAU, - = = ALASKA. !! _ _ J I GROCERJES GLASSWARE LAMPS CROCKERY CUTLERY TINWARE COOKING UTENSILS 1 CURTAINS PORTIERS TRUNKS VALISES ; LARGEST AND MOST COM ? PLETE STOCK OF ^ General Merchandise IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA. "Honest floods and Values" Our Motto. Examine Our Stock and be Convinced, ?TREE DELIVERY TO THE FERRY. < I ! DRY GOODS FANCY GOODS NOTIONS | | SHOES BOOTS ! > < i HATS CAPS ] | FURNISHING GOODS J | CLOTHING !! CARPETS LINOLEUM 11 I OIL CLOTH j! WALL PAPER . MATTING J[ I ! WINDOW SHADES !! 1 j; While in Juneau !> Look for the Big Sign_ BROWNVILLE WOOLEN MILLS ....JUNEAU ALASKA BLANKETS and ? II \i/^^I UNDERWEAR All WOO I Suits Made to Order Deposit Required Leais L BLamENTHRL The Douglas Island News. THE LOCAL FAELD. I'tetns of Interest Dished Up In Brief for "the Ben- | ; cfIt of Our Readers. ? \ | Those Oraiiberries at McKay's. W. II. McBI&in of Tread we LI .was h j ferry passenger today. Joe Patterson of -the Mexican ?mines ! was oxer a? Juneau today. Full line of "vegetables at McKay's,! fresh and at reasonable prices. * Keep your eye on McKay for Christ- J mas Turkeys and meats of all kinds.: Fox's store still continues to be the' "talk of the town. The stock includes ?everything and prices are.all right. I The finest assortineut of crockery i 'ever brought to Alaska is now in the . sale room of Frank Bach's store. If you want anything in the line of i nice candy, fruit and nuts g? to Smith" s where vou get the best possible prices. Those Christmas .goods at the Alaska Treadwell store are just what you wairt. ?Call for aqy thing you want and you get it. Born, Thursday, Dec. 1st, li&8, to Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Angel, of Tread well, a boy. Mother and child doing well. Dr. Geo.vii. Bean in attendance. Dr. Geo. II. Boan made this office a pleasant call last Tuesday evening, and expressed his pleasure aver the loca- i tion of the News at Douglas City. The Alaska with lumber barge Garnet j uu tow arrived in port yesterday. She brought up lum.her'for Tread well, also IS,000 feet for .the new wharf .in the Narrows. Your Christmas Turkey or other meat can. just as well be tender .and of ithe beat quality, and by buying of Mc Kay you will have it that way. William McMilleu, watchman at the Xiclia mill, is in the city and attended ?the entertainment at Ohman's hall last ?evening. He is visiting Mr. Early and family of Douglas. John Morrow, son-in lawof engineer, Anderson and his charming wife, of this city, spent his 'Thanksgiving in | Dougias. He is foreman at the mill at i tComet City, on Berner's Bay. Go to Fosl, leave your measure, and get a tailor made suit of clothes at the ?same price you would pay tor ready made, and then you will conclude that you have made a good strike. That immense store at Treadwell I means a great deal to Douglas Island. : It is the largest in Alaska and full of | goods. Did you ever get prices there? ! You will be surprised to know that I they sell as low as the Seattle prices. j An Indian woman came very neari being injured on Second street last j Monday. She was making for Fox's J store to see the Christmas and other ! goods. In her haste she overtaxed her ! strength. The goods and prices the j people get at that store arc always the \ irarrr ? VI J Dr. C. M. Droste and Mr. \V. J. Williams of the steamer Grand Rapids j -were in the city Monday. The Grand i Rapids is used for prospecting purpos es during that season and her owners are from Grand Rapids, Michigan. For I the present the boat and her crew are at Juneau and will probably remain for ! the winter. Every trade and profes sion is represented in the crew and the business is conducted on the co-opera tive plan. We will have more to say i concerning this boat in the near fu ture which will be of interest. A FIGHT FOR LIFE. The Stanch Little Lucy's Battle for Exis tance. Caught in Two Storms. A Close Call for Capt. Martin and Engineer Anderson. The Lucy is a small steamboat owned by the Alaska Treadwell Compauy of this island. She is a nice little craft thirty-five to forty feet long and can run in about seven feet of water. Cap tain Martin is her master and A. L. An derson, engineer. She has no fixed oc cupation and just hangs around Tread well, Douglas City and Juneau. When Supt. Corbus wants to go to Juneau, or take a spin 011 the bay, the Lucy is al ways ready and at his command. Sometimes the little boat wanders off to other parts of Alaska on business for the Superintendent aud is heard from iu places where the water is much deeper thau iu the channel. A few days before the first storm of ?this season the Lucy started out on a busiuess trip. She was over at Pyra mid harbor, and in getting there was in a storm for severai days. Hearing of the time the little boat had, a News nian boarded tho Lucy at Treadwell a few days ago aud asked for some par ticulars. Neither one of the officers wanted to or would consent to be in terviewed; but we knew considerable about the matter and a few well direct ed questions gave us more light on the subject, and after assuring them that tho interview would be interesting to our eastern readers, even if not to those in Alaska, the Captain and En gineer gave us some particulars. "In going over to Pyramid harbor," said Capt. Martin, "we were in the storm several days but reached there all right without any disfigurement to speak of. We waited there awhile but not long enough for we started out too soon. We faced the storm going and in starting out we thought the wind was on our back, or rather a fair wind, ^hat would do us no harm. We run into James' bay while on our way from there up to tho Chilkat and laid up four days." ?'Well what did the storm do to you?" we asked. "We had a small boat tied onto the deck on the bow. It was right side up. It filled full of water and commenced pounding around, but it finally broke loose and we lost it. The loss of that boat no doubt saved the Lucy. It was an awful storm and at times one could .hardly see how the boat could go through it." "And what was you doing during this time?" was the question asked of Engineer Anderson. "I was standing in from eighteen to twenty-four inches of water in the en gine room. I kept the wheel running and the syphons at work. Sometimes the water would gain on me and at other times 1 would get it out faster than it would come in. 1 never expect ed to get onto dry land again. The wa ter at times seemed to pour in although the doors were closed." "How does a fellow feel after such a narrow escape?" the News man enquir ed.' "Oh, we forget all about it after its over," said the engineer, and the cap tain said that he wouldn't shift off un til his time come and it wasn't his +nT-n fimo A Question and an Answer. The boys at the Hospital got into a dispute and we are asked to decide the matter in question, which is, whether we are living iu the eighteenth or the nineteenth century. Our answer is the nineteenth. The Topeka. The Topeka came in last Sunday, stayed a few days and left for Skag ! nay. She had 10 first and 3 second ; class passengers for Juneau and 14 ! first and 57 second class for Skaguuy. ] ! She was two days in getting to Skag | nay from here and returned to this J; j city yesterday. The Topeka is proba-p i bly the favorite boat of Alaska. For j i | years she was the mail boat, an honor J ! that is now conferred on the Cottage ' 1 City. Her master, Capt. Thompson is , 1 one of the most trusted of the Pacific ( ! Coast line. He is a most genial, pleas-1; ' ant man either on shore or on l>oard his vessel. He is not a growler and ;s j often seen mingling with the passen-i; gers. The steward, Mr. Sanders is an artist ; in his hue and we don't believe has an I; | equal in Alaskan waters. Tho tables I < , are always so nice, neat and clean and ' | the cooking first-class. We were pleas- i i ed to know that Mr. Williams is again back at his former place, that of second i I steward. lh> was transferred for a j time. Everybody that ever meets: < ? Williams, likes him. Mr. Balentine, formerly of the Clot-! j tage City, is now purser on the Topeka.?, j Mr. Curtis and he have exchanged ! ? j boats. He is a splendid good fellow. J ! So is Curtis, only one is longer in find- ; ( ! ing out his social qualities. j < The lirst officer is Charles McCarthy, i , We don't know him very well, but if he i were not all right however, ho wouldn't j be holding down his job. Fred Jordou and Wm. E. Edwards j are the pilots and are tried men and i have never been found wanting. i Mrs. Swayze, the former stewardess, ] I is not on the Topeka any more. She has ] gone to SanFrancisco. She left in not 11 the best of health. She is Euglish, and j j a matronly good natured, kind hearted j i ! woman, and there are none bettor. She ( ! was with the Topeka for yoars. That \ | reminds us of caking lunch with Stew- ( I ard Sanders one time not long ago on ? | the Topeka at Juneau. Around the ta- j : ble wore only officers and crew, except ] i the writer. Sanders said something that raised a discussion about liars. Mrs. Swayze, while showing no temper, in a most good natured manner inform-! ed Sanders and those present, of the j ? kind of a liar he was. Now we don't say j I Sanders is the biggest liar that ever ' lived, Oh no! But Mrs. Swayze thinks j it, and she has associated with him for j j years. David said, "I said in mine haste j | all men are liars." Well, it don't mat ; ter if David was hasty in saying it or ! not, he told the truth anyway, and I when Mrs. Swayze got through with i the steward, the laugh was on him, and i all his Irish wit couldn't save him. We , are informed that the steward has re j formed since then, of which wo doubt i not the former stewardess will be glad ( j to hear. ! x lit; wribvi uu v> u nuuuu ouuu ! and when he does, it will be on the To I peka or he will walk. A thorough business inan soon learns the true value of a newspaper. That prince of merchants, Mr. Behrends, whose store would be a credit to Seat tle or Portland reserves his spaco this week, but in our next issue it will con- * tain words of truth and wisdom. Look < out for Behrends' ad. ' The Rev. Father Bougis, pastor of ( the Catholic church of this city, was a 1 most welcome caller at this office to day. We have placed Father Bougis' < name on our complimentary list, and we will be pleased to extend the same courtesy to all the ministers of Doug- 1 las City and surrounding cities. < MYSTERIOUSLY DISAPPEARED. Stephen H. Falconer of this City Drops Out of; Sight. Stephen H. Falconer of this city, who with his wife and children has lived on Second street for a long time,left Doug- j las City on the 3 p. m. ferry boat last | Saturday for Juneau. He arrived there j safely and was in commissioner's court i that afternoon where he obtained a! judgment against some parties. From ' the most reliable information wo could obtain, Mr. Falconer was with his attor ney at about half-past six o'clock on I Saturday evening, at which time he j said he was going to the wharf to go | home. At that time however, he did j not go to the ferry wharf as he said he j would and that is the last trace that is had of him. Mr. Falconer had some fifteen or twenty dollars with him out j of which ho paid some court costs, i Voluntary leaving on his part is not believed by any one. Mr. V. Haggerty, who lives at Juneau i and has known Mr. Falconer for ten j years has been untiring in his search to j ascertain the whereabouts of the miss ing man ever since Sunday noon. He j reached the Falconer residence between ! eleven and twelve o'clock today, but was unable to report anything new. A News man visited the Falconer res deuce to-day. Mrs. Falconer is much distressed over the condition of affairs. | When asked concerning her opinion of ! the matter, she said: UT fear some accident must have be fallen him. He is most always at homo nights, very seldom is he away, and then only when work or business de mands his absence. He took but little money with him. Ho has not left on his own accord. My worst fears are that he has fallen into the bay." The sixt een year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Falconer was in Juneau all day Monday, but gained no informa tion except that a man named Falcon or had bought a boat ticket and after wards changed it for another one. The initials, however, were not those of the missing man. Possibly Mr. Falconer might have left on the boat. From 3uch investigation as we have made, we are inclined to the belief that he will 3how up soon. Charley Milne is high authority on drills at Treadwell. TERRIBLE SUFFERING. The Han Supposed to Have Been lost From the Utopia Turns Up. Died From Exposure Last week we reported the loss of a passenger on the Utopia. Since his supposed death, it was learned that he got to the shore and for eight days, with no clothing bat his underwear, he kept himself alive. At the end of that time he was found by some Indians who took him to their home and cared for him, bat for several days he did not seem to improve. The Indians put him in a boat and started for Fort Wrangel, but he died on the way and the friendly rescuers buried the body as best they could. He told the Indi ans of the misfortrme that befell the Utopia and sard to them that he thought he was the only person saved from the boat. Poor fellow, if he had remained oil the Utopia as the balance of the passen gers did he would now be alive. His suffering for eight days, was re ported by him to have been terrible and the only covering he had nights was some moss. , He Gets There. A News man dropped into the Beach Boarding House between this city and Treadwell the other day. The proprie tor, Alex. Smallwood, was in of course. He is there day and night and busy? well we should say he was. In the first place he has a fine large store room well stocked with everything. On tho side of this is his largo and commodi ous dining room with tho kitchen back, and hundreds are fed there every day. Tho upper floors are used for sleeping rooms. In one corner of tho storo a room is partitioned off and in this is his boot and shoe manufacturing and repairing department. lie has a good trade in his store and it keeps him mov ing pretty lively looking after things. Just how many employees he has, wo don't know, but quite a number. Mr. Smallwood fully demonstrates what a man can do if determined and a good systematic worker. If you want to see a busy place, see Smallwood's. If you are going to buy Christmas goods, and you surely will, go to Bach's The finest assortmend in all Alaska. Prices low down. THIS SPACE IS RESERVED FOR B. H. BEHRENDS * THE Banker and Herchant OF JUNEAU See what it says uext week. 0
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Estimates on Klec- Special Attention Trie Machines and Given to Repair Wiring furnished Work JUNEAU Electric Construction Works j T. G. QUINN, Prop. -w ? Dealer In all Kinds of ? Electrical Supplies... # ? # Cor. Third and Seward Sts. JUNEAU, j j, f. Mcdonald, i WHOLESALE AND RETAIL j Dealer in ] Tobacco and Cigars. | uoons sold * AT SEATTLE PRICES ****** *** SNUFF*** Douglas City, .... Alaska. * THE DOUGLAS CITY ?OO 0?K' C # MUSIC HALL * o o <v AND BAR V <> Oi ?HHOS o O o 6 <J>;O & FIRST CLASS LIQUORS AND CIGARS. Douglas and Juneau Beer always on tap ! N. CASPERSON, Prop. Front Street, ? Douglas City. I I Douglas City Barber Shop. Hair Cutting Shampooing Shaving 'A Baths FRANK VESTAL, Prop. ? Notice to Creditors. ? ; Before K. M. Jackson, Unites States j Commissioner for the District of Al-j aska, holding court at Fort Wran gel, Alaska. In the matter of the estate of Shu i stack, an Indian, formerly called j ilish-ta-day, deceased. Notice is hereby given by the under- j signed, administrator of the estate of j Shustack, an Indian, formerly called j Hish-ta-day, deceased to the creditors ; of, and all persons having claims: against the said deceased, to present j and exhibit them together with the nec essary vouchers within six months after j the fourth publication of this notice, I to the undersigned administrator at j the office of Henry Drum & Co., in the i town of Fort Wrangel, in the District j of Alaska, the same being the place for | the transaction of the business of the said estate in said town of Fort Wran gel. First publication Oct. 12th 1898. Dated at Fort Wrangel, Alaska, this i 12th day of October, 1898. C. H. SCNDMACHER, Administrator of the estate of Shu- J stack, an Indian, formerly called Hish- I ta-day, deceased. i DOUGLAS CITY J The future great city of Alaska is j located on Doug= ; las island, across ; the bay from Ju=| neau. Douglas island is sixteen miles long and nine miles at its widest place, and is practically a mass of solid ore. j 860stamps will; f ? j ? ue ni ujjci ciiiuji uu this island within the next 5 months The mines will employ about 2000 men who are paid good wages every month. j I Caterers to Family Trade J. P. SMITH & CO., i I Groceries ir Meats \ Vegetables Fruits | Fresh Meat Supplies received on every in-1 corning Pacific Coast Steamer. Butter and liggs of first-class grade always on hand. I i Douglas City. - - Alaska. | EKNi>l fcSLIHL IDE^ERJN GENERAL MERCHANDISE, j Bakery in connection where tho Best Fresh Bread may lie had. A Fresh Line of Cakes and Cookies always oil Hand^-^ Douglas City, - - Alaska. NORTHERN PACIFIC RUNS PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS ELEGANT DINING CARS TOURIST SLEEPING CARS 1 ' to St. PAUL MINNEAPOLIS DULUTH FARGO GRAND FORKS CROOKSTON WINNIPEG HELENA BUTTE CHICAGO PI 11 LA DELPI11A W A SHINGTON NEW YORK BOSTON AND ALL POINTS EAST wnummi I ????? TIME SCHEDULE. I In Effect February 13th i8q8. TRAINS LEAVE SEATTLE. For Spokane, Russia nd, St. Paul and the East 4:00 p. m. i For Portland 5:00 a. m. and 4:00 p. in.; ?For Olymnia 7:50 a. m. j ?For Aberdeen. 5:00 a. in.; For Tacoma... .5:00. 7:30 and 11:00 a. m: 4:00 and 1 7:00 p.m. THAIN^AKHIVE AT SKATTI.E. From Spokane. Kossland, St. | Paul and the East 7:00 a. m. J From Portland .. .. 6:20 and 11:00 p. in. ?From Olympta 6:20 p. m. ? ?From Aberdeen 6:20 p. in. 1 From Tacoma 7:00 and 8:00 a. m.: 12:15, 6:20 and 11:30 p. in.: ?Daily except Sunday. All others daily. This card subject to change without notice | Through tickets to Japan anil China vin Northern Pacific Steamship Company. For rates, routes and other information call on or address I. A. NADEAU, Gen'I Agent, Seattle. ! Citv Ticket Office, corner Yexler Way and 1 First Avenue. Depot Ticket Office, corner Western Ave- ! nueaud Columbia Street. A. L>. CHARLTON, | Assistant General Passenger Agent, No. 255 Morrison St., cor. Third, Port land,Or. 1 ? GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY TICKET OFFICE 612 First Avenue, Seattle.' Japan America Line. ?FOR? JAPAN, CHINA, | ?AND ALL? Asiatic Ports SAIL REGULARLY. Leave Seattle. Arrive 4:00 p.m. Overland Express 7:00 p.m. S:l/> a. in. Pacific Coast Lines tf;15 p. in. I i , DOUGLAS ISLAND NEWS. Additional Locals and Items of Interest. Bon Crockett of Skaguay, formerly of Seattle, is at Juneau attending court. C. S. Blackett is probably the best looking lawyer in Juneau. It is pretty near neck and neck with two others. ! i We hear it whispered by patrons of ! the ferry that a warm waiting room ; would bo a great accommodation to ! the llouglas City people. I Mr. J. G. Hoid, 0110 of the best law- I yers in Alaska, said, V\w>1 News." Lawyers generally know a | good thing when they see it. Geo. Vantier of Treadwell will go south 011 tho Topeka to spend the holi days. lie will of course return. What com is one of the places he will visit. A whale sported around in the waters close to tho wharf last Friday after noon. The matter was immediatly re-! ported to Matt Ilarter Gus B. Leach editor of tho Record went down to tho Sound country last1 week. Ho will also visit Whatcom. Mr. i Leach has not licon away from Alaska for four years and is certainly deserv- j ing of the vacation he is taking. The Washington newspaper men will find Leach one of the best fellows 011 earth. Last Monday morning as the Richard 111 was discharging coal at the Tread well dock, a rope broke letting one of the heavy buckets fall back. Ole Hen son, one of the laborers, being in the path of the falling bucket, and unable to escape, had his leg broken. His j fellow workman escaped with only a j few bruises. Of course the printer is proverbially a hungry cuss, and a sight met the eyes of the News man the other night that caused the saliva to run right out of his mouth, and ever since visions of ham and eggs, venison and jelly, pork chops, lamb chops, beef steak,sausage, halibut, and nice, large, juicy pics have mingled with his thoughts by day and his dreams by night. The cause of all this was a glance into one of the show j windows of the Delmonico restaurant. ! When you pass that way just peep in j and if you don't feel hungry go to Dr. j Harrison and have your teeth pulled ! out for you will never need them any : more. THE A1ELLIN MINING CO. Hasa Streak of nisfortune. 1800 Feet of Tram- ' way Destroyed. The Mellin Company has been put ting up a twenty stamp mill at Berners Bay and the work had so far progress ed that the company intended to have the wheels turning by January first, but whether this wish will I>0 realized j or not will probably depend on the! time it will take to repair the tramway, of which some 1800 feet were destroyed by a snow slide a week ago last Mon- j day morning, it is a gravity tramway : and on its condition will the mill de- j pend for the ore it will use. The Mellin Company, we are inform ed, has a high grado ore, a well equipp- j ed mill, and it seems too bad that this j hard luck should strike it just at a time j when there was about to be some re- : turn for the great expenditure of mon- j ey that the company has been put to j in construction and tunnel work. "Brick" Lewis Dead. "Brick" Lewis, the jailor at Fort Wrangel, died Thanksgiving eve in that city. He is an old timer in Alaska and at one time was well fixed. His lower limbs were injured years ago, but with the aid of a cane he could get about j and attend to his duties. He seemed i like a nice, harmless, goodnatured old man and he had many friends in that city. He must have been about seven ty years of age and Judge Clark in forms us that his true name was Lewis W. Lewis. His demise was a most peace ful one. The soul took its flight while those near by thought he was slumber- { ing. If he had an enemy in Fort Wran gel we never knew it. A Pressing Need. While Douglas City and Treadwell are doing very well and have no reason to complain, still, as the religious ed itor would say: "One thing thou lack est". The path or trail between the cities is a miserably poor excuse, and at times, when covered with snow for in stance, is almost dangerous to travel over. We understand a start has been made in the past towards securing a good new walk and we hope the proj ect has not been abandoned. Nothing helps to facilitate trade so much as good walks and good roads, and those interested in the welfare of our city should bestir themselves in that direction. \ Boots, Shoes, Rubber Goods Ladies and Gentlemen's and Oil Clothing Furnishing Goods. Prank Bach, Dealer in GENERAL [KINOISE MINERS' SUPPLIES, ETC. LADIES' CLOAKS?CAPES LADIES' 115 FRONT STREET, - DOUGLAS CITY, ALASKA. ? Good Goods. <71 You ro to that three corner store, ^?3 That's where I pet the best, The Price isn't a darned cent more, O Than I've paid all over the West. ?? OS (/) The name isn't over the door t o Put you'll find the place just the same The people flock there by the score, While the rest of the city is tame. s l ~ o Low Prices. ^ THE STANDARD MUSIC HALL JOHNSON & COTTRELL, PROPRIETORS. Douglas City, = Alaska. *S??0PEN ALL NI0HT.?^e Hot and Mixed Drinks a Specialty. The Finest Brands of Liquors and Cigars al ways on hand. ) ?ww/vwwwv?> S J SUBSCRIPTIONS J ) >One Year 1 %3.oof J Ssix Months 1.50^ j ^Three Months i.ooi \ ? Advertising Rates 5 C ^ ON APPLICATION ^ ( ? ^wwwww-w \ iW I ADVERTISING MEDIUM / S /|\ S ^ of ** r J %1'sOUTHEKST ALASKA ? WW/WW WW S J FIRST CLASS ( 5 "JOB WORK.. 5 ) / A SPECIALTY ? S J SATISFACTION ? > J GUARANTEED ? Cwwwwwww ? ? ? ? READ THE ?NEWS? \ AND GET THE -NEWS.. ? 9 ? ? n p . rij t ? n This company's New, I,arp:o, Fast and Kle fSCl a ?C ^32St Steamship L0? ffant Stcamors leave and arrive as follows : LEAVE?NORTH BOUND. * i c?.. i i I Dyea I LEAVE?SOUTH BOUND. Steamers City Topeka I Cottage City Al-Ki I City Topeka Cottage City Al-ki City Topeka Cottage City Al-ki J Fran I cisco 5 sTov. 22 N " 27 L )oc. 2 " 7 " 12 M 17 '? 22 M 27 fan. 1 J *u?et Ju sound i ov. 26 No >ec. 1 De " 6 41 44 11 4 44 16 4 44 21 4 44 26 4 44 31 Ja an, 5 4 katr iay DC. 1 " 6 ? 12 " 16 u 21 u 27 in. 1 u 5 u 11 s lOIUl i iv. 30 I> ic. 5 11 15 50 26 31 Jt n. 4 ' 10 L Duo Sitka Dec," 7 *'? "22 Jan. 6 uyea Skaj;- J nay )ec. 2 I M 6 M 18 M 17 " 21 " 28 an. 8 J " 5 14 12 Sitka I Dec. 7 "?v"22 J Jan. 6 Pupret ! Sound Pi Dec. lfl I> 11 15 44 20 41 25 44 30 Jt Jan. 4 44 9 44 14 44 19 11 rion.il )ee. 3 44 8 44 14 " 18 44 23 41 29 an. 3 11 7 14 13 San ran'o ec. IS " IK u 23 " 28 in. 2 7 " 12 44 ,? " 22 The above dates aro only approximate. For further information obtain folder. The Company reserves the right to change, without previous notice,Steamer's sailing dates, and hour of sailing. H.F.ROBINSON, Alaska Supt., Juneau Alaska, Sitka, Ed. De Grokf ; Skaguay, F. A. Twitchell; Portland, Oro., N. Posten,; D. Trow bridge, P. S. Supt. Seattle Wash. GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Subscribe for the News. '
sn84021930
1898-12-14
1
1
sn84021930/1898/12/14/ed-1/seq-1/ocr.txt
3,007
DOUGLAS ISLAND NEWS. _ VOL. 1. DOUGLAS CITY AND TREAD WELL, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1898. NO. 4. B. M. BEHRENDS BANKER AND MERCHANT -Headquarters For Holiday Goods The Largest Stock of Toys. Novelties and Fancy tioods in the Northwest. A General Banking Busiuess Transacted. Jiiueau, Alusk u. Caterers to Family Trade J. P. SMITH & CO., I Groceries Meats Vegetables Fruits I I ' Fresh Meat Supplies reeeiveil on every in- j I coining Pacific Coast Steamer. ? kL . . f 1 Butter and Kggs of first-class grade always i L i on liuml. t! ? I Douglas City, - - Alaska. M ALASKA TREAD WELL COLD MINING CO Mercantile Department DOUGLAS ISLAND, - - ALASKA. WHOLELALE MERCHANBISEZ KETA,LI Full Line of Christmas Vovelties Just Received Hardware Iron & Steel Pipe Fittings OUTFITS FOR THE GOLD FIELDS. Gel ov i' Prices before Purchasing clseirhere. We mil do the right thing. IDE MEIIffl ID IE. A News Man Visits the Mill. The Engine Room and Crusher. Red Whiskers. I, HOW AN ENGINE WAS LOST. A News man boarded the ferry boat Ia*t Friday afternoon for a trip to the Alaska Mexican Gold Mining Com pany's mill, which is located about a half a mile down the channel from Treadwell. Capt. Tibbets looked so pleasant and happy that it made us feel good all the balance of the day., There was a strong head wind going to Treadwell and the Lone Fisherman en gaged in several hysterical jumps and | twists before she got to tier landing place. Engineer Danforth, of the Alaska, and his charming wife were also passengers. Our old friend Capt. Bell, formerly of the Alaska, was also "in evidence,* and we started out on our mission 01 utiws om- . rounded by friends aud acquaintances. At Treadwell we inspected the Alaska. We like the little craft for several reasons. One is, that she is owned by Capt. Willson and Mr. R. Sylvester of Fort Wrangel, two of the best men that are this side of the pearly gates. j Then, like Desdemona's love forOthel-j lo we like her for the danger she has I endured, for she has gone through j many narrow escapes and it is only be- j cause she is well officered that she lives to ride the waves and dare the storms. Bidding our friends good bye we are soon at the Treadwell store, j Here we tried to pump some news out of chief clerk Bertram^ but the pump wouldn't work. We shied around to keep out of Manager Corbus* way, but our success was only partial. We didn't know how we would come out if *? l-? ? ?? 'Mil- rr?Qr?finr> of bim we LLitJt LI 1111 (11LCI uui luvuviv*. last week, but fortune favored us and we are still sound in limb. But we were goiug to the Mexican and off we started up the railroad track which happened to be clear of cars and engines. The track runs along the wa- j ter front and on the land side is built up with cabins that are occupied by the Indians and dogs, the latter seem-! ingly by far exceeding the former in population. There are many hard working Indians but for some reason i wo never happened to see them when sc engaged, but while on the way down the track we saw a big burley fellow chopping wood and he was doing a good job. So much were we pleased with the swing of the ax and the grunt blow that we stoDDed IIIAV iuuv/nv\4 vuv -v.* and gazed at him with admiration, but when we stopped the fellow laid down his ax and we are still deprived of an occular demonstration that an Indian can and will do hard work. This reminds us that we have made enquiry several times about the In dians as laborers, and we are told that as a rule, one white man will do about as much work as two Indians. They never work up to positions of re sponsibility. A number are employed at the mines however and the company keeps them. Several years ago an Indian was told to take fifty pounds of powder down the track we were walking on. He took | the stuff and carried it part way, and when in front of an Indian cabin he laid the explosive down on the track. Presently one of the little engines came tooting along. John Laughlin J was the engineer, and John did like to ride fast, and the little locomotive was doing its best. The engine struck the fifty pounds of explosive. Like grand father's clock "it stopped short, never to go again," and for a long time, what i was left of the engine laid a twisted j ^ mass of steel and iron alongside the [ I ] track. John was shook up but not ;' ? ? /x AA?>nr\finTT f h A ! lLIJUltMl. J. I1C tUUi^uuj ir|'iuv/vu vuv , engine with a new one which John ruus now. It was one year two mouths I' and some odd number of days before j1 he quit swearing and "thinking swear" 11 at the Indian. For the first time we are at the Mex icau mill. Fortunately the first man 1 we met was C. W. Forman, foreman of 1 the stamp mill. He piloted us to the boiler room, for in the winter they run , with steam. From there to the engine j room where two powerful machines are 1 running. We don't know who the en gineer is, but his engines and room are the neatest and cleanest we ever saw. The floor looked as though it had just been scrubbed with lye aud finish- j ed with sand paper. From there we I went through the stamp mill, where j 120 stamps are pounding the rock into j powder. The noise, no one can do- j scribe it. We asked the foreman how : many tons of ore were put through the mill in a day. This he refused to tell j us, but as our readers would like to i know, we will tell them that the j amount is over 300 tons. Each stamp will use between two and a half and i three tons a day, the former being a fair average. We were given permission to go to ; see the crusher and we climbed stairs until we were up a quarter of a mile or I more. We found three or four men making some repairs and of course the j machine was not at work. Wo got a good look at its construction. To us j it is one of the most interesting depart ments of a stamp mill. A small man with red whiskers seemed to be boss around there. He gave us an awful look and we thought our presence was offensive. We put on one of those in-1 nocent small pica looks and waited to I be ordered away, but the order didn't come. When we had seen all there ( was to see we took a glance at the man i with the red whiskers, he looked at us, j I--J1 -1 Vli nnr neiinl ! UriCl UUUUUUK l/ciom/j wi uu?>.. | movements, we decouded to mother { earth. We did not see all there was to see. j ; Mine Foreman Stephenson was ? not in 1 evidence. We wandered to the black smith shop where four men were en gaged in sharpening the drills. We asked one of them, a large, good look | ing, good natured man, how much bor I iDg a drill would do until it would need re-sharpening. He informed us that it depended altogether on the rock through which the drilling was done. In very hard rock it might need re sharpening very often. The informa tion thus gained was so convincing and satisfactory that we departed for home, with the expectation, however, of again visiting the Mexican boys. in Brain. Both Towns Doing Well. Boat Building for the Yukon. MR. G. L. RICE, OF JUNEAU. The last trip of the Cottage City brought Mr. (r. L. Rice back to Juneau for a few days. Mr. Rice has been in Alaska for some time and is the pro prietor of the Nevada Restaurant, which is probably the best in all Alas ka. He was just in from Bennett. tVtllCn IS IOCJ11CU Ull l lit? innu niwi which it is named. A News man looked up Mr. Rice for the purpose of learning something of the true con dition of things up there. After the usual salutations the reporter asked Mr. Rice for the Bennett news. 8 Of course we are publishing a paper for all Alaska. "Well," said Mr. Rice, Bennett, which is thirty-eight miles from Skaguay, is quite a little town with five hotels, two general stores, bakery, barber shop and other business houses. A detach ment of the North-west mounted po lice is stationed there. J. J. McKenna, mining recorder for the Atlin district, is stopping there for the winter and sc also is Capt. Rant the justice of the peace." "Any boat building up your way?" "Oh yes, there will bo a number of boats built at Bennott in the spring. The North American Transportation Co. will build five; the Fort Steel Co. three, Steve Bailey of Seattle three, tin Upper Yukon Co. two and it is also re ported that Captain Roberts will build ? ill ..,,,1 o ttirCe. i.UCrO IS a SilW iihu mum atiu ci plant for the construction of smal] boats." "Have any people come out from Dawson on the ice this season?" "No, wo look for the first to come out about the 15th of this month. Last year the first party got out on the 22nd The railroad company is breaking i trail from the end of the road to Taku Arm." In answer to a question as to the general health of the people he stated that there is no sickness there this winter but that last summer there was considerable typhoid fever. There arc about 150 people wintering at Bennott but Mr. Rico looks for a town of 1,00C in the spring. "But how about Atliu?" said the News man, "we have a trail 01 our owli to that place." "Atlin, which is located on Lake At lin, is right in the boom at this time I am putting up a 40 x 80 two story lio tel in that place myself, There an probably fifty buildings in course oj construction now and the town is go ing right along. There are from 800 tc 1000 people in the district who will staj there for the winter and be ready foi early work in the spring." "What, in your opinion, are the pros pects for that district?" "I think the Atlin district will moel all expectations. Some people thinl the output will not be much, but mj judgment is that it will be a greal milling region and one that will con- j tin 110 for years. Juneau and Douglas j City will certainly be benefitted by the opening of this new district ana more especially by the opening of a new trail | across to the mines." # Mr. Rice will probably be on his way back before this issue is publish-1 ed. lie is a man of good business judgment and has, we have been in-: formed by others, been doing well. Mr. Rice was in Dawson last summer, but reported nothing new about that town or country. The Collector. 1 We were pleased to meet the collect ; or of this district, Mr. Ivey, while at Juneau last week. We had heard so i ' ' much both in favor of and against him I that we were anxious to see and know 1; the man. We were pleased to find : * ?? _i .I.I.i full of mirth. | 111UI ^cuiai auu um ......... lie is of that nature that makes strong | friends and bitter enemies. If he is j j weighted down with cares he certainly j does not manifest it. We sincerely ! hope the collector will get his matters j 1 j all fixed up and that otiicial scandals ! may lie far removed from Alaska, i k| Whether some of his appointees are 1 { corrupt or not we do not know, but we ; feel certain that if they are Mr. Ivey will l>e the last person to shield them, j i Reward for Dishonesty. > , j The rubber-necked single-taxers of j Washington got the democrats, popit- j lists, and silver republicans in their. ? fusion convention to indulge in a kind I of half-way indorsement of the single- j L j tax humbug. After the election was . j over, or as soon as the shouters for j Jeffersonian purity were restored to I rf<v?irlnrl that thev i j CUllSl/IUUBUOTO, U1H,J ? ( 11 had been stepped on and severely in- j . I jured, and now they are "going for" | [ i fusion and the pops. The pops are not all single-taxers, although single taxers are all pops. The half-way indorse- j ment of the single-tax idea is what! . cleaned out the whole fusion outlit. | . It ought to have done so. The Demo crats are not single-taxers; you can't t make a third-rate, second-hand, half t; soled, single-taxer out of the poor est kind of a Cleveland Democrat, and ,! such political dishonesty deserves de [ | feat. The elements that compose fu sion may oppose and defeat any future 5 alliance, but one thing is certain, , neither one possesses sufficient merit } j to ever elect anything single handed I j and alone. With a three-handed j fight the democratic and populist de-1 > sire for spoils must remain unsatisfied, j L ' 4-Urv Ivrvaf nonoro 1T1 n 11 Alaska UUtJ Ui mn uooi j/(n?u?u ??- v.? , ' J is the Skaguny News. It has been ' leased by I?. J. White and A. M. Rous ' j seau. The paper containing this an 5! nouncement only reached us last week. ^ Its advertising patronage is first-class from which we judge the business men * of that city know a good thing when they see it. Our old friend Capt. Bell, who was j so long the master of the Alaska is t now on the Lone Fisherman. There : are few men in Alaska who are as well 7 posted on Alaskan waters as Capt. t Bell. The District Attorney. The new district attorney, Gen. Fred erichs, and his able assistant, Mr. Daily, think they are running in hard luck because they lost a few cases at this term of court. They are both off wrong. They tried the cases well, made good, close arguments and man fully did their duty, but juries in nine teen times out of twenty will do just as these juries did. In the Lambson case the defendant a captain of a vessel, under considerable provocation, land ed nineteen number six shot in the body of an Italian. The charge was about 230. The captain probably was too hasty?probably did not stop ex actly at the line of demarkation be tween the criminal act and self de fense, but how often will poor, frail humanity do so. The jury took hu manity as it was, gave the defendant the benefit of the doubt and acquitted him. It was not hard luck to lose this case. In fact after listening to a part of the trial, we hoped they would ac quit him. In the burglary and larceny ease from Fort Wrangol the "bad man," the man who did the actual breaking and selling of the stolen goods , broke jail and has never been heard of since. The defendant, an alleged accomplice, was tried. lie was urged to plead guilty, by his lawyer, but refused, be cause he said he was innocent. Some circumstances pointed to his guilt? they often do toward an innocent man. The jury thought these circumstances not sufficient to base a conviction on and there are many people besides tho jurors that thought so, and are still of the same opinion. The district attor ney tried the case well aud ho lost, not 011 account of "hard luck," but because he should have. The jury is tho judge of the facts. There are twelve minds and they must agree, aud while juries, owing to the proneness of humanity to make mis takes, sometimes commit errors, yet it is a fact beyond question that a jnry is a better trier of facts than the ablest courts. Wo do not think the honest, conscientious decision of a jury 1 1 1 1? ".*? rv.l Tfn mr.m Ko*?a Sheep Creek wharf. Since then wo have been informed that our descrip tion of the matter was not altogether correct. Wo stated that the noise ho made whilo calling for help could bo heard three miles, but should have said live. "Dad" Earl wants a good old fash ioned heaven too. Our desertation on future happiness has met with the ap proval of saint and sinner. U S '-V. SllOUia L)U lUlJ'U^ncu. u? wouiwia take the same oath to do their duty, that the court and district attorney do, and they make no more, probably less, mistakes. The judges are reversed much oftener than the jury. We offer these suggestions not in the spirit of criticism. Wo only wish the district attorney to know that his work has been well done and the few cases he has lost is not through any fault of his and that neither is the court nor the jury to be blamed. A Corroction. Last week we published an account nf ? man fallincr into the bay at the

US-PD-Newspapers is an agregation of all the archives of US newspapers digitized by the Library of Congress for the Chronicling America digital library.

With nearly 100 billion words, it is one of the largest open corpus in the United States. All the materials are now part of the public domain and have no intellectual property rights remaining.

Content

As of January 2024, the collection contains nearly 21 millions unique newspaper and periodical editions published from the 1690 to 1963 (98,742,987,471 words).

The collection was compiled by Pierre-Carl Langlais based on the dumps made available by the Library of Congress. Each parquet file matches one of the 2618 original dump files, including their code name. It has the full text of a few thousand selected at random and a few core metadatas (edition id, date, word counts…). The metadata can be easily expanded thanks to the LOC APIs and other data services.

The American Stories dataset is a curated and enhanced version of the same resource, with significant progress in regards to text quality and documentation. It currently retains about 20% of the original material.

Language

While most of the collection is in English, it also covers a wider variety of European languages, especially German (600k editions) and Spanish (400k editions).

Uses

The primary use of the collection is for cultural analytics on a wide scale. It has been instrumental for some major digital humanities projects like Viral Texts.

The collection also aims to expand the availability of open works for the training of Large Language Models. The text can be used for model training and republished without restriction for reproducibility purposes.

License

The composition of the dataset adheres to the US criteria for public domain (any publication without a copyright removal). In agreement with the shorter term rules, the dataset is in the public domain for all countries with a Berne author-right model.

The Library of Congress does not claim any additional rights: "As a publicly supported institution, we generally do not own the rights to materials in our collections. You should determine for yourself whether or not an item is protected by copyright or in the public domain, and then satisfy any copyright or use restrictions when publishing or distributing materials from our collections."

Future developments

This dataset is not a one time work but will continue to evolve significantly on several directions:

  • Correction of computer generated errors in the text. All the texts have been transcribed automatically through the use of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. The original files have been digitized over a long time period (since the mid-2000s).
  • Enhancement of the structure/editorial presentation of the original text. Some parts of the original documents are likely unwanted for large scale analysis or model training (header, page count…). Additionally, some advanced document structures like tables or multi-column layout are unlikely to be well formatted. Major enhancements could be experted through applying new SOTA layout recognition models on the original PDF files.
  • Expansion of the collection to other cultural heritage holdings, especially coming from Hathi Trust, Internet Archive and Google Books.

The American Stories dataset already include some of theses features (especially better OCR and article-level segmentation) and may be a preferable solution if text quality is a concern.

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