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"The logo of cryptocurrency exchange Binance displayed on a smartphone with the word "cancelled" on a computer screen in the background.Budrul Chukrut | SOPA Images | LightRocket via Getty ImagesBinance said Monday that it is temporarily pausing bitcoin withdrawals "due to a stuck transaction causing a backlog."At first, Binance founder and CEO Changpeng Zhao said in a tweet that the issue would be fixed within 30 minutes. But he later amended that to say, "Likely this is going to take a bit longer to fix than my initial estimate." He added that, "[t]his is only impacting the Bitcoin network," and that holders "can still withdraw Bitcoin on other networks like BEP-20.""Funds are SAFU," he added. The acronym stands for "secure asset fund for users," which is a fund the company established in 2018 to help safeguard users.The news comes as bitcoin tumbled more than 10% on Monday, breaking below $24,000 and sinking to the lowest level since December 2020.The largest cryptocurrency has been hit by macroeconomic concerns, including rampant inflation.Binance is the world's largest crypto exchange. The company handles spot trading volumes of more than $14 billion and nearly $50 billion in derivatives volume in a single day, according to data from CoinGecko.- CNBC's Ryan Browne contributed reporting."
"Binance pauses bitcoin withdrawals due to a 'stuck transition' as crypto sell-off deepens."
"Police officers, some in riot gear, guard a group of men, who police say are among 31 arrested for conspiracy to riot and are affiliated with the group Patriot Front, after they were found in the rear of a U Haul van in the vicinity of a Pride event in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, U.S. June 11, 2022 in this still image obtained from a social media video. North Country Off Grid/Youtube/via REUTERS Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 13 (Reuters) - Thirty-one members of the white nationalist group Patriot Front were expected to appear in an Idaho court on Monday for an arraignment following their weekend arrest on suspicion of plotting to violently disrupt an LGBTQ pride event.The men, arrested on Saturday after the U-Haul rental truck they were riding in was pulled over, face misdemeanor charges of conspiracy to riot and possibly additional offenses, according to Lee White, the police chief in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.A local resident called authorities after spotting the group of men, all dressed alike with white gaiter-style masks and carrying shields, loading themselves into the truck "like a little army," White told reporters following the arrests.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comHe said the truck was stopped by police about 10 minutes after the call a short distance from the "Pride in the Park" event in Coeur d'Alene, an Idaho Panhandle city about 380 miles north of the capital, Boise, and about 36 miles east of Spokane, Washington.Video taken at the scene of the arrest and posted online showed a group of men in police custody, kneeling next to the truck with their hands bound, wearing similar khaki pants, blue shirts, white masks and baseball caps.Police officers seized at least one smoke grenade, a collection of shields and shin guards and documents that included an "operations plan" from the truck, all of which made their intentions clear, White said."They came to riot downtown," he said.The men had come from at least 11 states across the country, White said, including Texas, Colorado and Virginia.The Patriot Front formed in the aftermath of the 2017 white nationalist "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, breaking off from another extremist group, Vanguard America, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups.Saturday's pride event, described by organizers as the largest ever seen in North Idaho, drew a crowd of several hundred people for festivities that included a talent show and drag queen dance hour, local media reported.KREM-TV in Spokane reported several smaller groups turned out to protest the gathering, with dozens of individuals seen carrying guns on the fringe of the park in what organizers said was an attempt to intimidate those attending the LGBTQ event.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Joseph Ax; Editing by Daniel Wallis and Chris ReeseOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"White nationalist group members face riot-planning charges in Idaho court."
"A woman walks past a row of cash machines outside a branch of Lloyds Bank in Manchester, Britain, February 21, 2017. REUTERS/Phil NobleRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comLONDON, June 13 (Reuters) - Britain's biggest domestic bank Lloyds (LLOY.L) told staff on Monday it would give the vast majority of them a one-off 1,000 pound ($1,220) payment to help combat the soaring cost of living.The offer has been made to around 64,000 of the lender's staff, with executives and senior managers exempted from the payout, according to a memo seen by Reuters.The move highlights the pressures on employers to help mitigate the impact of price rises on staff, with inflation in Britain forecast by the Bank of England to top 10% later this year. read more Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comLloyds said in the memo the one-off payments would be made in August, adding it would factor in the economic picture into its pay negotiations with employees for 2023.Employee union Unite had demonstrated outside Lloyds' annual general meeting in Edinburgh in May to highlight the plight of bank staff struggling with the costs of food, fuel and heating."Staff will welcome the 1,000 pound bonus but there is still a long way to go to eradicate low pay in what is one of the economy's most profitable sectors," said Sharon Graham, Unite's general secretary.($1 = 0.8189 pounds)Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Iain Withers Editing by Lawrence White and Mark PotterOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Lloyds to give staff 1,000 pounds to ease cost of living crisis."
"The Amazon logo is seen outside its JFK8 distribution center in Staten Island, New York, U.S. November 25, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comBRUSSELS, June 13 (Reuters) - Amazon (AMZN.O) has offered to share marketplace data with sellers and boost the visibility of rival products on its platform, trying to persuade EU antitrust regulators to close their investigations without a fine by the end of the year, people familiar with the matter said.The world's largest online retailer is hoping its concessions will stave off a potential European Union fine that could be as much as 10% of its global turnover, Reuters reported last year. read more The European Commission in 2020 charged Amazon with using its size, power and data to push its own products and gain an unfair advantage over rival merchants that sell on its online platform.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comIt also launched an investigation into Amazon's possible preferential treatment of its own retail offers and those of marketplace sellers that use its logistics and delivery services.Amazon's process for choosing which retailer appears in the "buy box" on its website and which generates the bulk of its sales also came under the spotlight.Amazon has now proposed to allow sellers access to some marketplace data while its commercial arm will not be able to use seller data collected by its retail unit, the people said.The company will also create a second buy box for rival products in the event an Amazon product appears in the first buy box, the people said.The EU competition enforcer is expected to seek feedback from rivals and users in the coming weeks, which could lead to tweaks in the proposal and a final decision by the end of the year, the people said.The Commission and Amazon declined to comment. The company had previously said it disagreed with the watchdog's assertions and that it represents less than 1% of the global retail market.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Foo Yun Chee Editing by Emdund Blair and Mark PotterOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Amazon offers to share data, boost rivals to dodge EU antitrust fines - sources."
"An unexploded shell from a multiple rocket launch system is seen stuck in the ground, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in the town of Lysychansk, Luhansk region, Ukraine June 10, 2022. REUTERS/Oleksandr RatushniakRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comHELSINKI, June 13 (Reuters) - Finnish President Sauli Niinisto said on Monday both sides in the war in Ukraine were using heavier weapons, including in Russia's case thermobaric bombs."We are supporting Ukraine with increasingly heavy weaponry. And on the other hand Russia has also begun to use very powerful weapons, thermobaric bombs that are in fact weapons of mass destruction," Niinisto said during security policy talks at his summer residence in Naantali, Finland.Ukraine and NATO countries have also accused Russia of using thermobaric bombs, which are also known as vacuum bombs and are much more devastating than conventional explosives.Finland and neighbouring Sweden have applied to join NATO following Russia's invasion of Ukraine on Feb. 24.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Anne Kauranen Editing by Gareth JonesOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Both sides using heavier weapons in war in Ukraine, says Finnish president."
"courtneyk | E+ | Getty ImagesThis week is the last chance to bypass a tax penalty if you're earning money and the IRS still hasn't received its share, according to the agency.While some employees pay taxes through withholdings, everyone else must make a second-quarter estimated payment by June 15 — and you're on the hook with income from self-employment, small businesses, gig economy work, investments and more.You may also make quarterly payments if you haven't been withholding enough from your paychecks and want to avoid a tax bill next April.More from Personal Finance:Why saving in a 401(k) plan may be tough for frequent job switchersHere's how to fight a higher-than-expected property tax billHere are changes Americans are willing to make to fix Social Security"Everyone needs to pay taxes," said certified financial planner Bryan Hasling, partner at Lodestar Private Asset Management in Alamo, California. "And the IRS strongly prefers that you pay them steadily across the year as opposed to waiting until the last minute."The fastest way to make a quarterly estimated tax payment is through IRS DirectPay or sending money through your IRS online account. However, there are other available options listed at the IRS online payments webpage.The late-payment penalty is 0.5% of your balance due, for each month after the due date, up to 25%.If your employer withholds money from each paycheck, you can skip estimated tax payments. But you can use the withholding estimator tool to make sure your employer is taking enough.You can avoid penalties by covering 90% of your 2022 taxes or paying 100% of your 2021 bill if your adjusted gross income is $150,000 or less. (You'll need 110% of your 2021 bill if you earn more than $150,000.)If you expect to have a similar income to last year, you can check your 2021 return for last year's tax liability and divide that number into four quarterly payments.Independent contractors often get paid at the end of large projects. And those timelines might not line up with quarterly schedules from the IRS.Bryan HaslingPartner at Lodestar Private Asset ManagementOther scenarios that may require estimated tax payments could be selling a property, cashing out investments — including cryptocurrency — or taking money from inherited retirement accounts, said Olga Espiritu, a CFP and president of Tree Of Life Wealth Advisory Group in Cooper City, Florida. "Those are things that people don't usually deal with every year, and they might come as a surprise," she said. Skipping paymentsHowever, there may be some scenarios where filers purposely skip estimated payments, despite the late fee, because they don't have the cash or prefer not to drain their savings, Hasling from Lodestar Private Asset Management said. "Independent contractors often get paid at the end of large projects," he said. "And those timelines might not line up with quarterly schedules from the IRS."Whether to make estimated tax payments may be less about the penalty and more about their cash flow, Hasling said."
"The last chance for some tax filers to avoid late penalties is June 15."
"Warren Buffett, left, and his eldest son, Howard G. BuffettPeter Kramer | NBC | Getty ImagesHoward Buffett, son of billionaire investor Warren Buffett, is donating millions of dollars from his foundation in support of Ukraine after meeting with President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.The Howard G. Buffett Foundation donated $2.7 million to the citizen-funded nonprofit Spirit of America, which is delivering nine 50-passenger buses to the Ukrainian Territory Defense Forces. The Buffett Foundation's donation also funded 375 advanced trauma kits for Ukrainians on the front lines."I've never quite seen anything like this in my lifetime," Buffett said on CNBC's "Squawk Box" Monday. "It's millions of refugees trying to leave the country and it's just an overwhelming situation for the country... I believe we've got to support Ukraine in this fight. It's a difficult fight for them."Buffett, the chairman and CEO of Howard G. Buffett Foundation as well as a director at Berkshire Hathaway, met with Zelenskyy on Wednesday in Ukraine capital Kyiv."We appreciate this signal of solidarity," Zelenskyy said in a tweet Wednesday. "Expressed gratitude for the humanitarian support. Invited him to join projects on restoring irrigation systems in the Odesa region, demining and school nutrition reform."Russia's forces invaded Ukraine in February, with the conflict now turning into a town-by-town fight as Russia tries to consolidate territory in the east. The U.S. has been sending Ukraine military assistance, including advanced rocket-launcher systems and missiles.The Howard G. Buffett Foundation was established in 1999 and has been fighting conflicts, food insecurity and human trafficking among the world's most impoverished and marginalized populations. It had $529 million in assets at the end of 2020.Warren Buffett has pledged to give away all of his Berkshire shares through annual gifts to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Howard G. Buffett Foundation and others.Howard Buffett is expected to eventually succeed his father as Berkshire chairman to preserve its unique culture."
"Warren Buffett’s son donates $2.7 million for Ukraine aid after meeting with Zelenskyy."
"U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin reviews an honour guard as he meets with Thailand's Prime Minister and Minister of Defense Prayuth Chan-ocha (not pictured) during his official visit to Thailand, in Bangkok, Thailand, June 13, 2022. REUTERS/Athit PerawongmethaRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comBANGKOK, June 13 (Reuters) - U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said on Monday that his meeting with China's defense minister was an important step in efforts to develop lines of communication between the two militaries.Austin and Chinese Defence Minister General Wei Fenghe met on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue security summit in Singapore for nearly an hour on Friday, with both sides standing firm on their opposing views over Taiwan's right to rule itself. read more Despite tensions between the United States and China, U.S. military officials have long sought to have open lines of communication with their Chinese counterparts to be able to mitigate potential flare-ups or deal with any accidents.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com"It was an important step in our efforts to develop open lines of communication with PLA (People Liberation Army) leadership ... It was an important opportunity to raise our concerns about the potential for instability in the Taiwan Strait," Austin told reporters during a visit to Thailand.The United States is Taiwan's most important international supporter and arms supplier, a source of constant friction between Washington and Beijing.China, which claims self-ruled Taiwan as its own territory, has increased military activity near the island over the past two years, responding to what it calls "collusion" between Taipei and Washington.In a speech on Sunday, Wei said it was up to the United States to improve the bilateral relationship with his country, as ties were at a critical juncture. read more Austin said in his speech at the meeting on Saturday that there had been an "alarming" increase in the number of unsafe and unprofessional encounters between Chinese planes and vessels with those of other countries. He added that the United States would stand by its allies, including Taiwan.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Idrees Ali. Additional reporting by Martin Petty; Editing by Catherine Evans and Alison WilliamsOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"China meeting a step in effort to develop lines of communication, U.S. defense secretary says."
"48 Hours Updated on: June 13, 2022 / 8:47 AM / CBS News CBS News' Richard Schlesinger announces his retirement CBS News correspondent Richard Schlesinger announces his retirement 09:01 After 38 years, correspondent Richard Schlesinger is retiring from CBS News. Schlesinger is widely regarded as one of the best writers and interviewers in the business. Throughout his career, Schlesinger contributed to every platform in the news division, but spent most of his time reporting for "48 Hours" and "CBS Sunday Morning." "His reactions would amplify the point of every sound bite. With a glance, Richard could communicate a thousand words," said "48 Hours" executive producer Judy Tygard. CBS News "We all learned so much from Richard," says "48 Hours" executive producer Judy Tygard. "His writing was spare, beautiful and razor-sharp. His interview style was knowing exactly when and how to ask a simple question to elicit an outsized response. His reactions would amplify the point of every sound bite. With a glance, Richard could communicate a thousand words. He always treated characters and colleagues with respect. In our downtime, his observational humor made us howl with laughter."  Richard Schlesinger reporting from Nicaragua. He joined CBS News in 1984 as a reporter in the network's Miami bureau, where he covered stories throughout the southeastern U.S. and South America. He moved to the CBS News northeast bureau in 1987. CBS News Schlesinger joined CBS News in 1984 as a reporter in the network's Miami bureau, where he covered stories throughout the southeastern U.S. and Latin America.  He's been a reporter for the "CBS Evening News" and occasionally anchored for the network's morning news and "CBS Weekend News."  He was witness to some of the most important world events, including the fall of the Berlin Wall, 9/11, and the war on terror.  Richard Schlesinger was witness to some of the most important world events: the fall of the Berlin Wall, 9/11 and the war on terror. CBS News "Richard Schlesinger is the epitome of a CBS News journalist," said Neeraj Khemlani, president and co-head of CBS News and Stations. "He's a great writer. He's a terrific interviewer. He knows how to tell a story that keeps you on the edge of your seat. For nearly four decades, Richard has had an impact on our audiences. He's also left an indelible impression on the journalists who followed him. Though he's retiring, we know his influence will be felt here for years to come." Throughout his career at CBS News, Richard Schlesinger, second from left, contributed to every platform in the news division, but spent most of his time reporting for "48 Hours" and "CBS Sunday Morning." CBS Schlesinger's work has been acknowledged with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Awards and 10 Emmy Awards. He earned his first duPont-Columbia Award for his work on the 1997 documentary "CBS Reports: Enter the Jury Room." It marked the first time network television cameras were given access to jury deliberations. He was also part of the "48 Hours" team coverage of the Newtown, Conn., elementary school shooting, which earned CBS News a 2014 duPont-Columbia award. Richard Schlesinger greets Anthony Graves, left, after Graves' release from prison in 2010 after being wrongfully convicted of capital murder and spending nearly two decades in jail. CBS News Schlesinger says one of the most meaningful awards he's received was an Emmy honoring his reporting on the case of Anthony Graves for "48 Hours." Graves was a Texas man wrongfully convicted of murder. He spent 18 years in prison, most of that time on death row. Schlesinger witnessed Graves' emotional release from custody, writing, "And his first stop is home to his sons who had grown up without him, and at long last to an embrace with his mother — the first in 18 years."   Schlesinger's reporting helped Anthony Graves in his fight to be compensated for all those lost years.  There wasn't a story Richard Schlesinger couldn't tell, and "CBS Sunday Morning" showed his range.  "Richard is truly a virtuoso. A one-of-a-kind correspondent with a singular story sense," said Rand Morrison, executive producer of "CBS Sunday Morning." CBS News Schlesinger is also known for his incredible range. There didn't seem to be a story he couldn't tell. He moved easily from law and justice reporting for "48 Hours" to his work on "CBS Sunday Morning," delivering memorable pieces on everything from the resurgence of Yiddish to a celebrity profile of Liza Minnelli.  "Richard is truly a virtuoso. A one-of-a-kind correspondent with a singular story sense," said Rand Morrison, executive producer of "CBS Sunday Morning." "His wry wit, spot-on interviews and literate (and delightfully whimsical) writing style put him in a class of his own. It's too often said that 'no one can replace'  an outgoing figure in our industry. In Richard's case, it's absolutely true." No tribute would be complete without a mention of Richard Schlesinger's true love—flying. He found a way to combine his piloting skills with his reporting in an episode of "48 Hours." CBS News Schlesinger even found a way to combine his two great passions — reporting and flying — in an episode of "48 Hours." There was Schlesinger on camera at the controls of a plane testing the theory of a crime.  It was alleged a man may have been pushed out of a private plane in flight and Schlesinger explained the aerodynamics that made that allegation nearly impossible. Before joining CBS News, Schlesinger was the Washington bureau chief for the Post-Newsweek television stations (1980-1984). He had previously been a political reporter for WPLG-TV Miami (1976-80).He was born in New York and graduated from the University of Missouri in 1976 with a degree in journalism.  Last year, Richard Schlesinger went into cardiac arrest while out for a walk. He has recovered beautifully with the help of his partner John Guenther and their trusty dogs — Cyrus and Gus. Richard Schlesinger Schlesinger is stepping back from his career a year after he survived a brush with death. In the summer of 2021, he went into cardiac arrest while out for a walk near his home in Connecticut.  He was saved by his quick-thinking neighbors.  Richard has recovered beautifully with the help of his partner John Guenther and their trusty dogs, Cyrus and Gus. In life, just like every story he's ever done, Schlesinger never misses the chance for a perfect ending.  "For nearly four decades, Richard has had an impact on our audiences. He's also left an indelible impression on the journalists who followed him,"  said Neeraj Khemlani, president and co-head of CBS News and Stations. Richard Schlesinger "I now know that the expression 'Time flies when you're having fun' can actually be true," said Schlesinger. "The past 38-plus years have flown by, propelled by great stories and great colleagues and a great organization. I am a very lucky man." In: 48 Hours CBS Sunday Morning Richard Schlesinger Thanks for reading CBS NEWS. Create your free account or log in for more features. Please enter email address to continue Please enter valid email address to continue"
"Richard Schlesinger, "48 Hours" correspondent, announces his retirement: "Time flies when you're having fun"."
"The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol will hold the second of several public hearings on Monday morning at 10 a.m. ET to reveal more of what it has learned during its 11-month probe.Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."The hearing will be broadcast as a CBS News Special Report anchored by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell. She will be joined by CBS News chief political analyst John Dickerson, chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes, chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and congressional correspondents Scott MacFarlane and Nikole Killion.Monday's hearing will have two panels of witnesses. The first panel will consist of former Trump campaign manager William Stepien and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. The second panel will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt.  Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election.""But, despite this, President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information — to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him. This was not true," Cheney said at Thursday's hearing.  Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, delivers opening remarks 33:48 Cheney and committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson led the first public hearing, a nearly two-hour session on Thursday evening. In that hearing, the committee attempted to link Trump's baseless claims of a stolen election to the chaos and violence of Jan. 6, which Thompson described as the "culmination of an attempted coup." Testimony was shown from some of the top figures in Trump's orbit who said they told him he had not won the election. Thompson played a recording from former Attorney General William Barr's testimony before the committee, in which he said he told the former president his claims of a stolen election were "bullsh**." In another clip, Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, said she "trusted" Barr and accepted his insistence that her father had lost the election.Cheney also said there were members of Congress who sought pardons from Trump for their role in the attack. Cheney named Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania as one of those Republicans, a claim which he denied on Friday. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Cheney's fellow Republican on the committee, told "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "we're not going to make accusations or say things without proof or evidence backing it."  Kinzinger says Jan. 6 committee will present evidence that lawmakers sought pardons from Trump 08:20 Cheney on Thursday had harsh words for Republicans who have fallen in line with Trump after the attack: "There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone but your dishonor will remain." The first hearing also touched on the Proud Boys' role in the Jan. 6 attack. In video testimony shown Thursday, some of the group's members said they believed Trump's remark at a presidential debate to "stand back and stand by" was a call to action. Quested testified that the Proud Boys were organized and heading to the Capitol at 10 a.m., before Trump's speech at the Ellipse had even started. Thompson and Cheney sought to show that, amid the chaos at the Capitol, Trump did not perform his duties as president. They showed video testimony from Gen. Mark Milley, the current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, saying that former Vice President Pence — not Trump — issued the orders for the National Guard to come to the building. While Pence is not likely to participate in the hearings, some of his top advisers are. Greg Jacob, Pence's former chief counsel, Marc Short, his former chief of staff, and conservative jurist J. Michael Luttig, who advised Pence ahead of Jan. 6, are all likely to testify in the coming weeks.    3:14 PM / June 12, 2022 How to watch the second Jan. 6 hearing What: House Jan. 6 public hearingDate: Monday, June 13, 2022 Time: 10 a.m. ETLocation: U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C.TV: CBS stations (Check your local station here) Online stream: Live on CBS News in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device.Follow: Live updates on CBSNews.com    29m ago On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"How to watch the second House Jan. 6 hearing Monday, as focus turns to Trump's false claims."
"Ferrari Roma is unveiled during its first world presentation in Rome, Italy, November 14, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo MangiapaneRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comSummaryCompaniesCompany to unveil new business plan on ThursdayFerrari faces electrification challengeCEO Vigna took job in SeptemberShares outperformed in last 12 monthsMILAN, June 13 (Reuters) - Nine months after taking the top job, Ferrari (RACE.MI) CEO Benedetto Vigna will be expected this week to explain how the carmaker will preserve its cachet - and top tier prices - in a future of electrified cars.The Italian luxury sports carmaker is set to unveil its much awaited business plan on Thursday, heading into the new era of cleaner, silent and electric mobility.That is a particular challenge for the likes of Ferrari, which built its brand over decades by perfecting the roaring and super powerful engines that drive its cars.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comA tech veteran with 26 years of experience in the semiconductor industry, Vigna, who started at Ferrari last September, is tasked with marrying innovation with tradition."We should expect a clear focus on technology transition, qualifying the key burning question, namely how the company will evolve in this new environment, not only in terms of products portfolio," said Marco Santino, a partner for automotive practice at management consultants Oliver Wyman.Ferrari has already presented four hybrid models and promised its first full-electric car in 2025.It has said strategic partnerships will be key to accessing new technologies while keeping capital expenditure under control.The company is expected to reveal the relevant areas for new partnerships, which could develop along the lines of an existing tie-up with Britain's Yasa, now part of Mercedes (MBGn.DE), which is supplying technologies for electric drive for Ferrari's hybrid models.The CEO said earlier this year that Ferrari would rely on partners to develop bio and synthetic fuels which could be an additional green option alongside all-electric technology.Margin on adjusted core profitNEW SUVBy announcing its first sport-utility vehicle (SUV), the Purosangue, for the coming months, Ferrari is also moving into a lucrative market segment where competitors such as Lamborghini, part of Volkswagen group (VOWG_p.DE), already operate."A key challenge in the mid-term is to maintain best-in-class profitability while supporting a unique effort in developing new technologies and innovative solutions," Santino said.Besides core technology, Vigna has a number of other areas where he could leave a mark, analysts say, including data and connectivity, intellectual property, Formula One motor sports performance and increased manufacturing complexity.Ferrari's range has risen to nine models, plus limited edition cars, in recent years, with six-, eight-, 12 cylinder, hybrid and soon full electric engines under production.Investors appear to be keeping faith. Shares in the company have been almost flat in the past 12 months, versus an 18% drop for the European auto index (.SXAP) and a 13% drop for the luxury index (.STXLUXP).Rival Aston Martin lost almost 70% over the same period, while Tesla (TSLA.O) shares were among the few to outperform Ferrari.But Vigna has something to prove."A lot is riding on the upcoming Capital Market Day to change valuation parameters for a business which seems to have been on autopilot in recent years and may need a transformational strategy," analysts at Jefferies said.($1 = 0.9510 euros)Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comAdditional reporting by Stefano Bernabei Editing by Keith Weir and Mark PotterOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Vigna to set out Ferrari's route into electric vehicle era."
"The logo of cryptocurrency exchange Binance displayed on a smartphone with the word "cancelled" on a computer screen in the background.Budrul Chukrut | SOPA Images | LightRocket via Getty ImagesBinance said Monday that it is temporarily pausing bitcoin withdrawals "due to a stuck transaction causing a backlog."At first, Binance founder and CEO Changpeng Zhao said in a tweet that the issue would be fixed within 30 minutes. But he later amended that to say, "Likely this is going to take a bit longer to fix than my initial estimate." He added that, "[t]his is only impacting the Bitcoin network," and that holders "can still withdraw Bitcoin on other networks like BEP-20.""Funds are SAFU," he added. The acronym stands for "secure asset fund for users," which is a fund the company established in 2018 to help safeguard users.The news comes as bitcoin tumbled more than 10% on Monday, breaking below $24,000 and sinking to the lowest level since December 2020.The largest cryptocurrency has been hit by macroeconomic concerns, including rampant inflation.Binance is the world's largest crypto exchange. The company handles spot trading volumes of more than $14 billion and nearly $50 billion in derivatives volume in a single day, according to data from CoinGecko.- CNBC's Ryan Browne contributed reporting.Correction: Binance said it is temporarily pausing bitcoin withdrawals "due to a stuck transaction causing a backlog." The headline on an earlier version misstated the quote."
"Binance pauses bitcoin withdrawals due to a 'stuck transaction' as crypto sell-off deepens."
"UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet attends an event at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, November 3, 2021. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comSummaryBachelet to leave post after one termSurprise announcement comes after China visit in MayFlags Russian worries, abortion rights in broad-ranging speechGENEVA, June 13 (Reuters) - The United Nations human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet, said on Monday that she would not seek a second term for personal reasons, refuting speculation that it was a decision linked to blowback over her trip to China last month.Bachelet, 70, was criticised by rights groups as well as some Western governments, including the United States, who said the conditions Chinese authorities imposed on the visit did not enable a complete and independent assessment of the rights environment. read more "As my term as High Commissioner draws to a close, this Council's milestone fiftieth session will be the last which I brief," she said in a surprise announcement at the end of a wide-ranging speech to the Geneva-based Human Rights Council.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comLater, she said the decision was not related to the trip, adding that she intended to return to Chile and spend time with her family."Two months ago, before even going to China, I made a decision and I informed my boss, the Secretary-General (Antonio Guterres). So it has no relationship," she told reporters.Some diplomats said they had expected Bachelet, a 70-year-old former president of Chile, to stay on after her four-year term expires later in August. There was murmuring in the Geneva Council room when she made the announcement.In her speech, she said her office was working on an updated assessment of the human rights situation in China's western region of Xinjiang, where there are widespread allegations that mostly Muslim Uyghur people have been unlawfully detained, mistreated and forced to work.China denies all accusations of abuse there."It will be shared with the government for factual comments before publication," she said of her report, which was due to be published months ago. Asked about the timing, Bachelet said it would be released before her term ends.Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch called her China trip an "unmitigated disaster" and criticised Bachelet for using China's term "VETCs", for vocational education and training centres, to describe mass detention facilities in Xinjiang.She repeated the term in her speech on Monday.On the rights situation in Russia, she said the arbitrary arrest of a large number of protesters there opposed to the invasion of Ukraine was "worrying".Bachelet also raised concern about abortion restrictions, referring to the United States where the Supreme Court is expected to strike down a landmark ruling on nationwide abortion rights. read more Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Emma Farge and Wendell Roelf; additional reporting by Tony Munroe in Beijing; Editing by Robert Birsel and Tomasz JanowskiOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Michelle Bachelet, U.N. rights chief, says no to second term amid China trip backlash."
"Brown-Forman and The Coca-Cola Company announce plans to debut Jack Daniel's® Tennessee Whiskey and Coca-Cola®™ Ready-to-Drink CocktailCourtesy: Coca-Cola CompanyCoca-Cola is teaming up with Jack Daniel's distiller Brown-Forman to make a Jack-and-Coke cocktail in a can.It marks the fourth new alcoholic drink in Coke's portfolio in less than two years, but the first pairing for its namesake soda. The Atlanta-based beverage giant has already partnered with Molson Coors Beverage on Topo Chico Hard Seltzer and Simply Spiked Lemonade, which launched this month, and Constellation Brands on Fresca Mixed Cocktails.As soda consumption declines, Coke isn't the only beverage maker pushing its soft drink brands into alcohol through partnerships. Rival PepsiCo launched Hard Mtn Dew earlier this year through a partnership with Sam Adams brewer Boston Beer.Brewers also benefit from the partnerships with Coke and Pepsi by diversifying their portfolios away from beer, while spirits companies can use well-known brands to market more canned cocktails. Brown-Forman has already been selling canned cocktails for more than three decades, including a Jack-and-Coke drink made with generic cola. But the category has gotten a boost in recent years as alcohol consumers look for convenient options.Ready-to-drink beverages have been the fastest-growing alcohol segment since 2018, stealing market share from beer, according to IWSR Drinks Market Analysis. Hard seltzers are the largest part of the category, but spirits-based canned cocktails have been gaining ground.The Jack Daniel's and Coca-Cola canned cocktail will launch in Mexico later this year before expanding to other markets.A zero-sugar version of the canned cocktail will also be available. Coke CEO James Quincey predicted in early 2021 that Zero Sugar Coke would be the biggest source of growth for the company over the next few years.Packaging for the new drink will show both the logos for both Coke and Jack Daniel, as well as symbols showing it's only for people of legal drinking age. As soda brands push into the alcohol category, the National Beer Wholesalers Association and other industry players have expressed concerns about underage drinking.As Coke broadens its alcohol portfolio, the company said that it developed a policy around marketing and selling its alcoholic drinks responsibly. The approach includes only targeting consumers above the legal purchasing age in its advertising and refraining from implying that consumers receive any health benefits from those products."
"Jack-and-Coke in a can: Coca-Cola and Brown-Forman team up for new drink."
"The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol will hold the second of several public hearings on Monday morning reveal more of what it has learned during its 11-month probe.The hearing will have a delayed start on Monday because one of the witnesses who was set to testify, former President Donald Trump's campaign manager William Stepien, will no longer appear due to a "family emergency." The meeting is now set to start between 10:30 to 10:45 a.m. ET."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."The hearing will be broadcast as a CBS News Special Report anchored by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell. She will be joined by CBS News chief political analyst John Dickerson, chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes, chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and congressional correspondents Scott MacFarlane and Nikole Killion. Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Monday's hearing will have two panels of witnesses. The first panel will consist of former Trump campaign manager William Stepien and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. The second panel will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election.""But, despite this, President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information — to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him. This was not true," Cheney said at Thursday's hearing.  Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, delivers opening remarks 33:48 Cheney and committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson led the first public hearing, a nearly two-hour session on Thursday evening. In that hearing, the committee attempted to link Trump's baseless claims of a stolen election to the chaos and violence of Jan. 6, which Thompson described as the "culmination of an attempted coup." Testimony was shown from some of the top figures in Trump's orbit who said they told him he had not won the election. Thompson played a recording from former Attorney General William Barr's testimony before the committee, in which he said he told the former president his claims of a stolen election were "bullsh**." In another clip, Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, said she "trusted" Barr and accepted his insistence that her father had lost the election.Cheney also said there were members of Congress who sought pardons from Trump for their role in the attack. Cheney named Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania as one of those Republicans, a claim which he denied on Friday. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Cheney's fellow Republican on the committee, told "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "we're not going to make accusations or say things without proof or evidence backing it."  Kinzinger says Jan. 6 committee will present evidence that lawmakers sought pardons from Trump 08:20 Cheney on Thursday had harsh words for Republicans who have fallen in line with Trump after the attack: "There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone but your dishonor will remain." The first hearing also touched on the Proud Boys' role in the Jan. 6 attack. In video testimony shown Thursday, some of the group's members said they believed Trump's remark at a presidential debate to "stand back and stand by" was a call to action. Quested testified that the Proud Boys were organized and heading to the Capitol at 10 a.m., before Trump's speech at the Ellipse had even started. Thompson and Cheney sought to show that, amid the chaos at the Capitol, Trump did not perform his duties as president. They showed video testimony from Gen. Mark Milley, the current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, saying that former Vice President Pence — not Trump — issued the orders for the National Guard to come to the building. While Pence is not likely to participate in the hearings, some of his top advisers are. Greg Jacob, Pence's former chief counsel, Marc Short, his former chief of staff, and conservative jurist J. Michael Luttig, who advised Pence ahead of Jan. 6, are all likely to testify in the coming weeks.    3:14 PM / June 12, 2022 How to watch the second Jan. 6 hearing What: House Jan. 6 public hearingDate: Monday, June 13, 2022 Time: 10:30 a.m. ETLocation: U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C.TV: CBS stations (Check your local station here) Online stream: Live on CBS News in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device.Follow: Live updates on CBSNews.com    9m ago Trump campaign manager will no longer appear, citing "family emergency"  Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear at Monday's hearing."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning.," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."   38m ago On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"Watch Live: House Jan. 6 committee's focus turns to Trump's false claims in second hearing."
"A bipartisan House select committee on Monday is set to begin detailing the initial findings from its investigation of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, keeping its focus squarely on former President Donald Trump.The second hearing will center on the push by Trump and his allies to spread false claims of sweeping election fraud following the then-president's loss to Joe Biden in the 2020 contest. The committee said it will demonstrate that Trump knew he lost the race, but nevertheless worked to falsely convince "huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him," Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., said last week.Witnesses are set to testify on two panels during Monday's hearing. The first will feature Chris Stirewalt, the former Fox News political editor who came under fire from Trump's supporters after Fox called Arizona for Biden before other outlets on Election Day 2020.Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien was slated to speak, as well — but less than an hour before the hearing was set to start at 10 a.m. ET, the committee announced that Stepien would not attend "due to a family emergency."Stepien's lawyer will appear and make a statement on his behalf, the committee said, adding that the event would be delayed by about 30 to 45 minutes as a result. Stepien is reportedly currently advising Cheney's Trump-endorsed Republican primary challenger Harriet Hageman.The second panel is set to include testimony from election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt and BJay Pak, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia.(The hearing is slated to start around 10:30 a.m. ET. Please refresh the page if the video above doesn't play.)"
"Watch live: Jan. 6 committee to question Fox News' former political editor, Georgia official in second hearing."
"U.S. June 13, 2022 / 7:55 AM / AP UNICEF warns Haiti is "nowhere near safe" UNICEF warns Haiti is "nowhere near safe" as abductions worsen 02:08 They were told to dress totally in black and to leave cellphones and all identifying documents, including passports, behind.The group of about two dozen Haitians, maybe more, departed on a small motor boat from the coast of the Dominican Republic headed to Puerto Rico, about 80 miles away across the treacherous Mona Passage.That was in early March. And that's the last anyone heard of them. Their disappearance remains a mystery and a source of anguish for relatives, who refuse to accept that a boat full of people could just vanish. The agencies that routinely patrol the area - the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Dominican Navy - say they have no record of a boat fitting that description capsizing in the passage. A Coast Guard HH-65 Dolphin helicopter from Air Station Borinquen flies past the Coast Guard Cutter Key Largo to assist in patrolling the Mona Strait in search of migrants off the coast of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico on October 25, 2006.  David S. Holloway / Getty Images "People are going missing and no one is paying attention," said Mozeline Beauvais, 48, a nurse from Philadelphia whose 20-year-old foster daughter, Fedena Louis Jeune, is among the missing. "They're young girls. They're young boys, people in their 20s. They are moms with babies." The missing people are among the thousands of Haitians who have been desperately taking to the sea in the past few months, fleeing the desperation in their homeland in the largest exodus of Haitians since 2004. Though most leave from the northwestern Haitian coast bound for the Florida Keys, many others journey through the neighboring Dominican Republic, where they pay smugglers to get them on boats to Puerto Rico. Since October alone, the U.S. Coast Guard has intercepted more than 5,300 Haitians at sea.No one knows how many have tried to make the trip and never made it. The only certainty, U.S. authorities say, is that the voyages are frequently deadly.Beauvais says she last spoke to her daughter on Feb. 27. Louis Jeune gave no indication of her plans to take a dangerous sea voyage to the United States. Beauvais says she found out about the trip after friends of her daughter's called and said they had not heard from her. After asking questions, Beauvais said she learned that her daughter, whom she had cared for from infancy, and a friend had boarded a boat bound for Puerto Rico.After digging around, Beauvais found out a little more: Her daughter had taken one of the small, makeshift open boats known as yolas that smugglers use to take migrants from the Dominican Republic to Puerto Rico through the Mona Passage. Beauvais has spent months contacting what is now a three-page-long list of agencies and immigration detention facilities around the U.S. trying to find out if any of them has her daughter in custody."My head spins because I don't know what I am supposed to do," she said. "I just want to focus on finding her."Other relatives of the missing, desperate for information, have come together in a group on the WhatsApp social media platform, where they have shared photos and compiled a list of the passengers. Among them: Rosedarline Aulistin; Fedena Saint Germain; Dort Mikerlange, and 36-year-old Daphnee Benoit and her six-year-old son, Jovendjy.Through text messages and anonymous voice notes they've tried to drill down: From where and when exactly did the boat depart? How much did passengers pay? Who was on the trip? And most important: How could a boatload of Haitians disappear without a trace?Through their pain, they have also provided portraits of some of the missing. There is the "pretty, young lady who is well-educated," whose uncle in Canada said he thought she was being smuggled on a cruise ship when his sister told him about the voyage; a man who sold his car to find the money to pay for the trip; and Mirielle Lamy, a singer whose YouTube channel now features a purple banner with her face illuminated by golden light."I cannot sleep. Every time I close my eyes I see my sister," said Naomie Lamy, who lives in Miami and is searching for Mireille, her younger sister, a singer known as "Miyou."Family members interviewed by the Miami Herald say they have checked with authorities in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic for information about the missing boaters. So far they have come up empty. One relative told the Herald that the migrants were told to wear all black and leave all documents behind, an account that was also separately mentioned by one of the people in the WhatsApp group. Leonel Charles, a Haitian lawyer in the Dominican Republic, said he was contacted by the sister of one of the missing to look into the disappearance. He hired an investigator to track down the organizers of the voyage, but said they never found them. "We never found anything concrete," he said.Charles said he was told by the family that the boat left from an area of the country near Punta Cana, the Dominican Republic's easternmost tip. Other family members believe the boat may have left from La Romana in the southeast.The U.S. Coast Guard in Puerto Rico, U.S. Customs and Border Protection in Puerto Rico and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement told the Herald they had no records on a missing migrant boat fitting the description provided by reporters, or information about a capsizing in early March. The Dominican Navy also said it had no record of a boat or passengers matching the descriptions."We are not aware that that was a case that was reported to the Coast Guard or that there was a response from the Coast Guard," said Ricardo Castrodad, the Coast Guard spokesman in San Juan.Jeffrey Quiñones, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokesman, said his agency has no record of interceptions or people washing up on shore in Puerto Rico during the time period matching the passenger count, or any details of the missing boat.U.S. authorities emphasized that each and every illegal boat that crosses the Mona Passage risks capsizing. Yolas are poorly constructed, often by smuggling operators in underground, makeshift shipyards in remote locations. Engines are unreliable. The weather and ocean conditions can change in the blink of an eye. Sharks, which are known to have killed migrants in the Mona Passage, lurk below the surface. Life jackets on board are a rare occurrence.It's "a mass rescue waiting to happen," said Castrodad. "Each of these trips represents an incredible risk for all the people who are on the trip… and for the people responding because for people trying to rescue that amount of people in adverse maritime conditions is a very risky operation. Time is critical, and anything can happen." Castrodad says it's possible for a boat to capsize or get in trouble without the Coast Guard or other authorities finding out. Often, news that something has gone wrong comes from family members calling the agency about relatives who went on these journeys, or from migrants themselves asking to be rescued.It doesn't take much for the often overloaded yolas to sink in the channel's unstable currents. Last month a boat capsized in the passage near Puerto Rico. Eleven women, all Haitian, were confirmed dead, while 38 others were rescued. Authorities believe more are still missing based on what survivors said. @USCG, @CBPCaribbean, partner agencies continue to respond. pic.twitter.com/2bvzd2joBA— USCGSoutheast (@USCGSoutheast) May 13, 2022 It was one of at least three capsizing incidents in the Mona Passage that authorities responded to in May.People frequently die or disappear without a trace on the passage "due to the extreme environmental conditions... and because the boats used are handmade and are not equipped to make crossings at sea," said Edwin Viales, who works with the United Nations' International Organization for Migration.Viales is the regional monitor of the Missing Migrants Project for the Americas. Since 2014, the agency has been collecting information about migrants who die in the process of traveling toward an international destination, regardless of their legal status. It has recorded 6,265 missing in the Americas, while noting that the figure is an undercount, given the challenges.The Caribbean area has the second highest number of deaths and disappearances in the region after the U.S.-Mexico border, Viales noted. Last year 65 people died or went missing in the shark-infested passage last year, and as of February of this year the figure was already at 71, according to the Missing Migrants Project.Viales said most of the people who lose their lives on the Mona Passage route are Haitian, Dominican, Cuban or Venezuelan. But he said there is a huge under-reporting of data in the Americas region because of what has become known as "invisible shipwrecks" - migrants who die at sea whose deaths are never officially recorded. Guerline Jozef, co-founder of the Haitian Bridge Alliance, which works with Haitian migrants, fears that as the situation grows more desperate in Haiti and more Haitians make the dangerous journeys, whether overland from South America to the U.S.-Mexico border or at sea, more people will die.Like the family members, she too has questions: "Is human trafficking involved? Did they ever make it to the boat? Did the boat ever leave shore?""We don't know," Jozef said. "Until the person reaches the United States and either gets detained or deported, you don't know the countless lives that have been lost, just disappeared never to have been heard from again."Lamy, who believes her sister Mirielle could have traveled with another artist, said the singer moved to the Dominican Republic from Port-au-Prince last year fleeing the shootings and kidnappings in the Haitian capital, where violent gang clashes have forced the displacement of tens of thousands.Mirielle had rented a home and was working in transportation, Lamy said. She posted videos of herself singing on YouTube, where she had amassed almost 2,800 followers.On the early morning of March 2, Mirielle called Lamy. Between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m, she also sent her several voice notes. In one, she told her sister that she needed to talk to her. In another, she texted an address and asked her to send money to a woman. But in another voice message, Mirielle reversed course, telling her sister not to send the money, that she was leaving on a boat at 2 p.m.Lamy and a nephew who lives in Haiti said they had no idea that Mirielle had any plans to go on an illegal voyage across the Mona Passage. "Knowing my aunt, she doesn't like going to the water, she doesn't even like going to the pool," said Josué Lamy, who was making preparations to head to the Dominican Republic to retrace his aunt's final steps. Last time the family visited the southeast Haitian port city of Jacmel, he said, "we went to the beach, and she didn't even want to go in the water. That's what's so crazy about this to us."Naomie Lamy traveled to the Dominican Republic in search of her younger sister in May, but had no luck. A 15-minute YouTube video pays homage to the singer, saying, "It's with a lot of sadness that we announce the disappearance of Mirielle Lamy."While some family members of the missing still hold out hope, others fear the worst. Some on the WhatsApp group have even suggested that the reason for the black clothing was to deliberately sacrifice the group on the high seas as part of a dark magic sacrifice.The voice notes in Creole on the app group have gone from pleas for answers and an exchange of information to anger, threats and suspicion of group members about each other, and accusations that some of them have connections to the traffickers.In recent days, some people in the chat have begun to attack someone identified only as "Jimmy." In anonymous voice notes, they accuse him of lying and knowing what happened to their loved ones. While some threaten bodily harm, others have promised to call law enforcement.They accuse Jimmy of refusing to answer their phone calls and lying to them about the whereabouts of their loved ones. Some in the group say Jimmy has told them their family members are being detained in Puerto Rico without access to phones.But that is not true, said a man who did not give his name in a voice note. His niece, he said, was on the boat, and he warned that he had already contacted Dominican authorities about Jimmy. Now living in Canada, the man described his own experience after he came to Miami from Haiti in 2007 and was locked up in the Krome Detention Center in Southwest Miami-Dade, where he says he was given access to a phone. Others, have said, they have reached out to Dominican officials and even vow to go in search of Jimmy. "What did Jimmy do with the people?" said Doinois Emile, whose 26-year-old daughter Daphnee is among the missing. "You can't keep people in all of this suffering. I just want to hear her voice one last time."Emile, who lives in Indiana, said he believes the people in the group are still alive and being hidden somewhere; he refuses to believe that his daughter, who knew how to swim, and the rest could go missing with no trace."Where are the people? I don't believe that a boat can just sink and you have no evidence. The mariners on the waters would come across the people," he said. "All of them could have died and you mean to tell me and not one body would have come up to the surface?"Emile says he relocated Daphnee and a younger sister to the Dominican Republic from Haiti several years ago so they would not become victims of their homeland's raging gang violence and kidnappings. Several months ago Daphnee, who was impatient about joining her father in the U.S., called. She needed money, she said, to pay for a voyage. Reluctantly, Emile, who works at a car dealership, wired $5,000 in cash."If I didn't send this money she would have hated me," he said.The trip did not happen immediately. One of the passengers, who had traveled from Haiti to make the boat trip, spent four months living with Emile's daughters and her 6-year-old waiting for the boat to depart."She became like a mother for them inside the house," said Emile, who spoke with the young mother on several occasions. The day the women left, Emile said his younger daughter was home and saw "when the bus came to pick them up."Emile says if there were evidence his daughter had perished at sea, he could accept that she was dead. He could also accept that she is imprisoned in a U.S. detention center."The pain would be one hit," he said. But waking up each day not knowing is too much, he said, breaking into tears."They took my child and I don't know what they did with my child. I don't know where she is," he said. "I just want to hear her voice one last time." In: Haiti Thanks for reading CBS NEWS. Create your free account or log in for more features. Please enter email address to continue Please enter valid email address to continue"
"Boat with two dozen U.S.-bound Haitian migrants disappears at sea: "People are going missing and no one is paying attention"."
"Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 12 (Reuters) - "A Strange Loop," the story of a Black gay man and his mental struggles as a playwright, won the Tony award on Sunday for best new musical as Broadway honored its first season since the long pandemic shutdown."The Lehman Trilogy," about the rise and fall of investment firm Lehman Brothers, took the best new play honor at a live ceremony held at Radio City Music Hall in New York."Strange Loop" triumphed over "MJ," a crowd-pleasing musical about Michael Jackson. Star Myles Frost won best actor in a musical for playing the King of Pop.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comBeing on stage to accept the Tony felt like a "miracle," said Ben Power, the writer of "Lehman Trilogy", after COVID-19 halted preview shows of the play for 577 days."In New York, even after everything, even after today, anything is possible," Power said, adding that the play had been written as "a hymn to the city of New York.""Strange Loop" writer Michael R. Jackson based the musical on his own internal doubts as well as external obstacles as he tried to pen a Broadway show."I just wanted to create a little bit of a life raft for myself as a Black gay man," he said.Best actor winner Frost addressed his mother in the audience as he accepted his award for "MJ.""Mom, I made it," he said, and thanked her for bringing him up to be a "strong Black man."For best revival of a musical, voters honored "Company," the final project backed by composer and theater legend Stephen Sondheim, who died in November.The new "Company" reverses the gender roles of the original, which centered on a single man considering his life choices as he turned 35. Producer Chris Harper thanked Sondheim "for letting us re-imagine the classic musical."Michael R. Jackson speaks as the award for Best Musical is given to "A Strange Loop" at the 75th Annual Tony Awards in New York City, U.S., June 12, 2022. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid"Hamilton" creator Lin-Manuel Miranda introduced a tribute to Sondheim, saluting his "immortal" songs and lyrics and his mentorship of younger artists, including Miranda himself.The three-hour telecast of the awards event featured a slew of performances from nominated shows, to help entice audiences back to theaters.Hugh Jackman sang "76 Trombones" from "The Music Man" while Mare Winningham performed Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," featured in the musical "Girl from the North Country."Michael Jackson's children, Prince and Paris, introduced a rendition of "Smooth Criminal" by the "MJ" cast.Patti LuPone won her third Tony award, for a supporting role in "Company." She thanked "all of the COVID safety people" for making Broadway's return possible. In the audience were 150 COVID-19 safety managers who had kept shows running.Simon Russell Beale, the star of "Lehman Trilogy", won the Tony for lead actor in a play. Joaquina Kalukango took best actress in a musical for playing a 19th-century tavern owner in race relations story "Paradise Square.""I give thanks to all of the nameless ancestors who have suffered. This show gives power to them," Kalukango said.Sunday's Tonys were the 75th edition and the ceremony honored some of Broadway's biggest hits over the decades. Host Ariana DeBose opened it with a medley honoring shows from "Cabaret" to "Wicked," "The Wiz" and "Hamilton."She and others at the ceremony welcomed the industry's efforts to diversify the stories and casts on stage."I’m so proud that the theater is becoming more reflective of the community that adores it," said DeBose, the Oscar-winning Afro-Latina star of "West Side Story."Best play revival went to "Take Me Out," the story of a gay baseball player.Deirde O'Connell, who won the Tony for lead actress in a play for "Dana H," urged aspiring writers to "make the weird art."Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Lisa Richwine; Editing by Clarence FernandezOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"'Strange Loop,' 'Lehman Trilogy' earn Tony honors as Broadway celebrates return."
"The Bank of England (BoE) building is reflected in a sign, London, Britain, December 16, 2021. REUTERS/Toby MelvilleRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comLONDON, June 13 (Reuters) - The Bank of England said on Monday that it would remove a post-COVID capital buffer adjustment now that risks from the pandemic had subsided."Removing a temporary capital adjustment that is no longer necessary aims to achieve simplicity and enhances proportionality, thereby facilitating effective competition," the BoE said in a statement.In July 2020, the BoE's Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) announced the temporary increase of the buffer for all firms that received a Pillar 2A reduction under its PS15/20 policy to reconcile capital requirements and macroprudential buffers.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comWriting by William Schomberg; editing by David MillikenOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Bank of England to drop post-COVID capital buffer rule."
"A total of 989,800 people tested positive for the virus in the week from May 27 to June 2 — up from 953,900 a week earlierDan Kitwood | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesU.K. Covid-19 cases have risen for the first time in two months, according to new data, which warns of a possible further spike ahead.A total of 989,800 people tested positive for the virus in the week from May 27 to June 2 — up from 953,900 a week earlier — estimates from the U.K.'s Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed Friday.That figure equates to around 1.5% of the population, or one in 65 people.It comes at a time when Health Secretary Sajid Javid has dubbed the country "properly post-pandemic."Javid on Saturday told The Times newspaper that Covid-19 was "no longer a pandemic," describing it as "endemic" like the flu and other viruses. "We should be proud as a country of how we tackled it," he added.The uptick recorded by the ONS was likely driven by the original omicron variant BA.1 and the newer variants BA.4 and BA.5.While all four countries in the U.K. recorded an increase in cases, the ONS said the overall trends in Scotland and Wales were "uncertain." As of June 2, England had 797,500 cases; Northern Ireland had 27,700; Wales had 40,500; and Scotland had 124,100.The data, which are based on confirmed positive Covid-19 test results of those living in private households, give an early projection of the course the virus may take in the coming weeks.It is compiled by testing thousands of people from U.K. households at random, whether or not they have symptoms, and is thought to provide the clearest picture of Covid-19 infections in Britain since free public testing was abandoned in England and Scotland.A new wave ahead?Some health researchers and physicians have warned that the uptick suggests a new wave of infections is coming."A new wave is now starting," Christina Pagel, director of University College London's Clinical Operational Research Unit and a member of the scientific advisory group Independent Sage, said during a virtual press conference Friday."Given where we are now, I expect that to go up again next week," she added.People gathered on The Mall watch a fly-past over Buckingham Palace during celebrations marking the Platinum Jubilee of Britain's Queen Elizabeth, in London, Britain, June 2, 2022. Dylan Martinez | ReutersThe data released Friday predates the U.K.'s Platinum Jubilee bank holiday, a four-day weekend of celebrations and social gatherings to commemorate Queen Elizabeth II's 70 years on the throne.The U.K.'s Health Security Agency said that could mean data for the following week is somewhat delayed or distorted."Recent data has shown a small rise in positivity rates and in hospitalizations with Covid-19. These small increases should be interpreted with caution as data may be subject to delays due to the Jubilee bank holiday," Dr. Jamie Lopez Bernal, consultant epidemiologist for immunization and countermeasures at the UKHSA, said Thursday.'Never a good combination'According to the latest ONS data, positive cases increased among people aged 35 to 49, with early signs of increases among 16 to 24-year-olds. Cases dropped in those aged 50 to 69 and over 70.Simon Clarke, associate professor in cellular microbiology at the University of Reading, told CNBC Monday that the recent spike was "inevitable" as regular social interactions resume and vaccine immunity wanes over time.Omicron BA.1 is the initial variant of omicron that caused infections to surge across the U.K. in December and early January this year. Newer variants BA.4 and BA.5, meanwhile, were designated as "variants of concern" by the UKHSA in May, and initial research suggests they have a degree of "immune escape," making it harder for the immune system to recognize and fight the virus.Professor Rowland Kao, chair of veterinary epidemiology and data science at the University of Edinburgh, noted that the lack of Covid testing combined with an increase in positive cases did not provide a positive outlook."The number of people taking tests is going down and the positivity is going up, and that is never a good combination," he said.However, he added that the most serious effects of another outbreak may not be felt until the winter months."Short-term it may be OK," he said, citing concern for vulnerable groups. "But it's really looking four, five months ahead [that's concerning].""
"Far from being 'post pandemic,' UK Covid cases are on the rise again."
"A sub-scale sized model of an heavy-class military helicopter NH90 by Airbus is displayed at Euronaval, the world naval defence exhibition in Le Bourget near Paris, France, October 23, 2018. REUTERS/Benoit TessierRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comPARIS, June 13 (Reuters) - The French armed forces ministry announced on Monday a new contract to help the performance of the NH90 military helicopter, just days after Norway said it would axe its fleet. read more The French government said the new contract was aimed at addressing a problem regarding a shortage of materials for the helicopter, which is developed by a consortium between Airbus (AIR.PA), Italian company Leonardo and Fokker.Norway said last week that it would return the NH90 military helicopters it ordered from the NHIndustries consortium because they are either unreliable or were delivered late.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Sudip Kar-Gupta; Editing by Kirsten DonovanOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"French government announces new contract to help NH90 helicopter after Norway blow."
"The logos of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google in a combination photo/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comWASHINGTON, June 13 (Reuters) - Dozens of companies and business organizations are sending a letter to U.S. senators on Monday to urge them to support a bill aimed at reining in the biggest tech companies, such as Amazon.com (AMZN.O) and Alphabet's (GOOGL.O) Google.Democratic U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar and lawmakers from both parties said last week they had the Senate votes needed to pass legislation that would prevent the tech platforms, including Apple (AAPL.O) and Facebook , from favoring their own businesses on their platforms.The companies supporting the measure, which include Yelp, Sonos, DuckDuckGo and Spotify, called it a "moderate and sensible bill aimed squarely at well-documented abuses by the very largest online platforms."Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comOther signatories included the American Booksellers Association, the American Independent Business Alliance, the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and Kelkoo Group.The organizations urged the Senate to pass the bill, saying it would modernize antitrust laws so smaller companies have space to compete.Klobuchar said last week she believed she had the 60 Senate votes needed to end debate and move to a vote on final passage. There is a similar bill in the House.The Senate is expected to vote on the bill this summer, perhaps as early as late June, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The House is then expected to vote on the Senate version, sources said. read more Amazon.com, the Chamber of Commerce and others have taken aim at the measure. read more The tech giants have said the bill would imperil popular consumer products like Google Maps and Amazon Basics and make it harder for the companies to protect their users' security and privacy.Amazon has lambasted the bill saying in a blog post the bill "jeopardizes two of the things American consumers love most about Amazon: the vast selection and low prices made possible by opening our store to third-party selling partners, and the promise of fast, free shipping through Amazon Prime."Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Diane Bartz Editing by Chris ReeseOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Dozens of companies, small business groups back U.S. bill to rein in Big Tech."
"The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol will hold the second of several public hearings on Monday morning to reveal more of what it has learned during its 11-month probe.The hearing will have a delayed start on Monday because one of the witnesses who was set to testify, former President Donald Trump's campaign manager William Stepien, will no longer appear due to a "family emergency." The meeting is now set to start between 10:30 to 10:45 a.m. ET."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."The hearing will be broadcast as a CBS News Special Report anchored by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell. She will be joined by CBS News chief political analyst John Dickerson, chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes, chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and congressional correspondents Scott MacFarlane and Nikole Killion. Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election.""But, despite this, President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information — to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him. This was not true," Cheney said at Thursday's hearing.  Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, delivers opening remarks 33:48 Cheney and committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson led the first public hearing, a nearly two-hour session on Thursday evening. In that hearing, the committee attempted to link Trump's baseless claims of a stolen election to the chaos and violence of Jan. 6, which Thompson described as the "culmination of an attempted coup." Testimony was shown from some of the top figures in Trump's orbit who said they told him he had not won the election. Thompson played a recording from former Attorney General William Barr's testimony before the committee, in which he said he told the former president his claims of a stolen election were "bullsh**." In another clip, Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, said she "trusted" Barr and accepted his insistence that her father had lost the election.Cheney also said there were members of Congress who sought pardons from Trump for their role in the attack. Cheney named Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania as one of those Republicans, a claim which he denied on Friday. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Cheney's fellow Republican on the committee, told "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "we're not going to make accusations or say things without proof or evidence backing it."  Kinzinger says Jan. 6 committee will present evidence that lawmakers sought pardons from Trump 08:20 Cheney on Thursday had harsh words for Republicans who have fallen in line with Trump after the attack: "There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone but your dishonor will remain." The first hearing also touched on the Proud Boys' role in the Jan. 6 attack. In video testimony shown Thursday, some of the group's members said they believed Trump's remark at a presidential debate to "stand back and stand by" was a call to action. Quested testified that the Proud Boys were organized and heading to the Capitol at 10 a.m., before Trump's speech at the Ellipse had even started. Thompson and Cheney sought to show that, amid the chaos at the Capitol, Trump did not perform his duties as president. They showed video testimony from Gen. Mark Milley, the current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, saying that former Vice President Pence — not Trump — issued the orders for the National Guard to come to the building. While Pence is not likely to participate in the hearings, some of his top advisers are. Greg Jacob, Pence's former chief counsel, Marc Short, his former chief of staff, and conservative jurist J. Michael Luttig, who advised Pence ahead of Jan. 6, are all likely to testify in the coming weeks.    3:14 PM / June 12, 2022 How to watch the second Jan. 6 hearing What: House Jan. 6 public hearingDate: Monday, June 13, 2022 Time: 10:30 a.m. ETLocation: U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C.TV: CBS stations (Check your local station here) Online stream: Live on CBS News in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device.Follow: Live updates on CBSNews.com    28m ago Trump campaign manager will no longer appear, citing "family emergency"  Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear at Monday's hearing."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning.," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."   57m ago On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"Watch Live: House Jan. 6 committee's focus turns to Trump's false claims in second hearing."
"A worker holds a nozzle to pump petrol into a vehicle at a fuel station in Mumbai, India, May 21, 2018. REUTERS/Francis MascarenhasRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comNEW DELHI, June 13 (Reuters) - Russia rose to become India's second biggest supplier of oil in May, pushing Saudi Arabia into third place but still behind Iraq which remains No. 1, data from trade sources showed.In May Indian refiners received about 819,000 barrels per day (bpd) Russian oil, the highest thus far in any month, compared to about 277,00 in April, the data showed.Western sanctions against Russia for its invasion of Ukraine prompted many oil importers to shun trade with Moscow, pushing spot prices for Russian crude to record discounts against other grades.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comThat provided Indian refiners, which rarely used to buy Russian oil due to high freight costs, an opportunity to snap up low-priced crude.Russian grades accounted for about 16.5% of India's overall oil imports in May, and helped raise the share of oil from the C.I.S. countries to about 20.5%, while that from the Middle East declined to about 59.5% %, the data showed.The share of African oil in India's crude imports last month surged to 11.5% from 5.9% in April, the data showed.Share of various regions in India's oil imports"Diesel is calling the tune ... if you want to boost production of diesel and jet fuel then you need Nigerian and Angolan grades. China has cut imports of Angolan grades because of COVID-related shutdowns so some of these barrels are going to Europe and some to India," said Ehsan Ul Haq, analyst with Refinitiv.He said apart from availability of cheaper Russian barrels, higher official selling prices of Middle Eastern oil also pushed Indian refiners to buy Nigerian crude.India's oil imports in May totalled 4.98 million bpd, the highest since December 2020, as state refiners raised output to meet growing local demand while private refiners turned focus to gain from exports, the data showed.India's oil imports in May were about 5.6% up from the previous month and about 19% from a year earlier, the data obtained from sources showed.India has defended its purchase of "cheap" Russian oil saying imports from Moscow made only a fraction of the country's overall needs and a sudden stop would drive up costs for its consumers. read more Higher oil imports from Russia, curbed OPEC's share in India's overall imports to 65% in April.India's oil importsRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Nidhi Verma; editing by David EvansOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Russia becomes India's second biggest oil exporter, trade sources' data show."
"get the free app Updated on: June 13, 2022 / 9:59 AM / CBS News CBS News Live CBS News Live Live The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol will hold the second of several public hearings on Monday morning to reveal more of what it has learned during its 11-month probe.The hearing will have a delayed start on Monday because one of the witnesses who was set to testify, former President Donald Trump's campaign manager William Stepien, will no longer appear due to a "family emergency." The meeting is now set to start between 10:30 to 10:45 a.m. ET."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."The hearing will be broadcast as a CBS News Special Report anchored by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell. She will be joined by CBS News chief political analyst John Dickerson, chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes, chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and congressional correspondents Scott MacFarlane and Nikole Killion. Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election.""But, despite this, President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information — to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him. This was not true," Cheney said at Thursday's hearing.  Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, delivers opening remarks 33:48 Cheney and committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson led the first public hearing, a nearly two-hour session on Thursday evening. In that hearing, the committee attempted to link Trump's baseless claims of a stolen election to the chaos and violence of Jan. 6, which Thompson described as the "culmination of an attempted coup." Testimony was shown from some of the top figures in Trump's orbit who said they told him he had not won the election. Thompson played a recording from former Attorney General William Barr's testimony before the committee, in which he said he told the former president his claims of a stolen election were "bullsh**." In another clip, Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, said she "trusted" Barr and accepted his insistence that her father had lost the election.Cheney also said there were members of Congress who sought pardons from Trump for their role in the attack. Cheney named Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania as one of those Republicans, a claim which he denied on Friday. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Cheney's fellow Republican on the committee, told "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "we're not going to make accusations or say things without proof or evidence backing it."  Kinzinger says Jan. 6 committee will present evidence that lawmakers sought pardons from Trump 08:20 Cheney on Thursday had harsh words for Republicans who have fallen in line with Trump after the attack: "There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone but your dishonor will remain." The first hearing also touched on the Proud Boys' role in the Jan. 6 attack. In video testimony shown Thursday, some of the group's members said they believed Trump's remark at a presidential debate to "stand back and stand by" was a call to action. Quested testified that the Proud Boys were organized and heading to the Capitol at 10 a.m., before Trump's speech at the Ellipse had even started. Thompson and Cheney sought to show that, amid the chaos at the Capitol, Trump did not perform his duties as president. They showed video testimony from Gen. Mark Milley, the current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, saying that former Vice President Pence — not Trump — issued the orders for the National Guard to come to the building. While Pence is not likely to participate in the hearings, some of his top advisers are. Greg Jacob, Pence's former chief counsel, Marc Short, his former chief of staff, and conservative jurist J. Michael Luttig, who advised Pence ahead of Jan. 6, are all likely to testify in the coming weeks.    3:14 PM / June 12, 2022 How to watch the second Jan. 6 hearing What: House Jan. 6 public hearingDate: Monday, June 13, 2022 Time: 10:30 a.m. ETLocation: U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C.TV: CBS stations (Check your local station here) Online stream: Live on CBS News in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device.Follow: Live updates on CBSNews.com    34m ago Trump campaign manager will no longer appear, citing "family emergency"  Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear at Monday's hearing."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning.," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."   5m ago Committee aides say hearing will focus on the "Big Lie" Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a second panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."   9:01 AM On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"Watch Live: House Jan. 6 committee's focus turns to Trump's false claims in second hearing."
"An Apple Store employee shows the Series 5 Apple Watch during the preview of the redesigned and reimagined Apple Fifth Avenue store in New York, U.S., September 19, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 13 (Reuters) - San Francisco-based startup Rune Labs on Monday said it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to use the Apple Watch to monitor tremors and other common symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease.The Rune Labs software uses the motion sensors built into the Apple Watch, which can already be used to detect when a person falls. Rune Labs Chief Executive Brian Pepin told Reuters in an interview the Apple Watch data will be combined with data from other sources, including a Medtronic (MDT.N) implant that can measure brain signals.Rune Labs' goal is for doctors to use the combined data to decide whether and how to fine-tune the patients' treatment, an approach called precision medicine. At present, Pepin said, most doctors have to gather data on a patient's movements by observing the patient during a short clinical visit, which is not ideal because Parkinson's symptoms can vary widely over time.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comThe Apple Watch will give doctors a continuous stream of observations over long stretches, Pepin said."When you think about the process of getting someone to their optimal therapy or combination of drugs or devices, or even whether or not a patient might be a good fit for certain clinical trial, it's a very hard decision to make when you only have a little context," Pepin said.The Rune Labs FDA clearance is the first prominent use of software tools that Apple released for measuring movement disorders in 2018.Last year, a group of scientists at Apple published a study in the journal Science Translational Medicine showing the device was effective at monitoring Parkinson's symptoms. After contacting Apple about the tools, Pepin said "it took about eight minutes for the team lead to get back to me and say, 'Hey, perfect, let's explore this.'"Apple has partnered with a range of other companies to use the Apple Watch as a health monitoring device, including a deal with Johnson & Johnson(JNJ.N) to study whether the watch can be used to help lower stroke risk.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Stephen Nellis in San Francisco; editing by Diane CraftOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Rune Labs gets FDA clearance to use Apple Watch to track Parkinson's symptoms."
"As the future of Roe v. Wade hangs in the balance, several major U.S. companies including Apple, Citigroup and Yelp have taken public stances in support of abortion care and promised to cover employees' travel expenses to access the procedure. The Supreme Court is expected to make a decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, a Mississippi case that directly challenges the right to abortion established by Roe v. Wade nearly 50 years ago, sometime this month. Following the leak of a draft decision on the case in early May, which showed that the court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, more employers have introduced new health-care benefits or expanded existing policies to support employees in obtaining an abortion, regardless of what the court decides. Still, the logistics of such offerings remain unclear, including how companies will protect employees' privacy and if state legislatures could come after corporate insurance policies as part of an abortion ban. How will abortion benefits work? In April, Yelp announced that it would cover costs for employees and their spouses who must travel out of state to access abortion care in response to the Texas law that bans the procedure after about six weeks of pregnancy.Following the announcement, executives received an "outpouring" of messages from leaders at other companies asking them "how to do the same," Miriam Warren, Yelp's chief diversity officer, tells CNBC Make It. "They want to know how the benefit works, what employees' feedback has been, everything right down to the brass tacks," she says. "Many companies, like ours, are thinking about abortion care, and thinking really hard about it — not just how to safeguard employees' right to health care, but what it means as a brand to stand up for this right." Johnny C. Taylor Jr., the president and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management, has also fielded calls from business leaders interested in offering benefits to cover abortion care. "One of the safest, least controversial moves a company can make without isolating employees or customers who don't support abortion is tweaking their benefits policy, whether it's offering a travel stipend or getting abortion to be categorized as an elective procedure," he explains, which would be covered under an employer-sponsored health-care plan.Both Warren and Taylor predict that companies introducing abortion benefits would follow Apple, Citigroup, Tesla and other well-known companies in focusing on travel reimbursement for employees who have to leave their state to access the procedure. Companies are getting creative in how they offer this benefit, too, Taylor notes, to avoid potential legal and administrative hurdles, whether it's offering employees a one-time bonus or setting up donation-based relief funds that employees and their spouses can access if they need to travel for an abortion. In all cases, companies need to consider how they will protect the privacy of employees who do seek an abortion, Warren says. Under Yelp's policy, for example, employees submit travel receipts directly to their health insurance provider for reimbursement, so no one else at the company would know.  Ultimately, Taylor adds, "the overwhelming majority of CEOs want to remove barriers to people who choose to have an abortion to access the procedure, without taking a position on whether abortion is good or bad."  Will more companies take a public stance on abortion? The thorniest issue companies have faced since the draft opinion became public — and during the heated debate over abortion access that's followed — is whether to make a public statement in support of or against the court's decision, if Roe v. Wade is overturned. "I'm convinced that organizations are going to do their best to avoid making any public statements, because it is such a divisive issue," Taylor says. "You might see some larger companies take a stance, but we forget that most companies in America are small and medium-sized … and we're not seeing any indication that those CEOs are willing to do this, and risk losing talent or customers."Instead, Taylor predicts that companies will quietly tweak their benefits policies or send an internal memo to employees once the court's decision is announced. Warren, however, expects more employees to call on their companies to take a firm stance on abortion in the coming months. A new Gallup poll has found that 55% of Americans consider themselves "pro-choice.""Folks might feel like they don't have to speak up about abortion care right now because we're in a bit of a holding pattern until the decision is announced," Warren adds. "But I can't imagine that they'll feel the same ability to stay quiet if Roe v. Wade is overturned."Check out:How the CEO of Planned Parenthood is preparing for a future without Roe v. Wade: 'We've been planning for this moment for years'Corporate boards continue to make slow progress toward gender parity, new report showsJanet Yellen: Overturning Roe v. Wade would be 'very damaging' to the economy, womenSign up now: Get smarter about your money and career with our weekly newsletter"
"More U.S. companies could introduce abortion benefits soon—here's what to know."
"A still image, taken from footage of the Supreme Court of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic, shows Britons Aiden Aslin, Shaun Pinner and Moroccan Brahim Saadoun captured by Russian forces during a military conflict in Ukraine, in a courtroom cage at a location given as Donetsk, Ukraine, in a still image from a video released June 8, 2022. Supreme Court of Donetsk People's Republic/Handout via REUTERS Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 13 (Reuters) - The father of a Moroccan man sentenced to death by a court in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) on mercenary charges said his son should be treated as a prisoner of war as he is a Ukrainian national who handed himself in voluntarily.Morocco-born Brahim Saadoun and Britons Aiden Aslin and Shaun Pinner were found guilty of "mercenary activities and committing actions aimed at seizing power and overthrowing the constitutional order" of the DPR, Russian media said last week.The three men were captured while fighting for Ukraine against Russia and Russian-backed forces. read more Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comThe Moroccan fighter received Ukrainian nationality in 2020 after undergoing a year of military training as a requirement to access aerospace technology studies at a university in Kiev, his father Tahar Saadoun said in an email to Reuters.He handed himself in "voluntarily" and should be treated as a "prisoner of war", the father said.The sentence will be appealed, he said."We as a family suffer from the absence of contact with the lawyer to exchange legal information and this adds to our ordeal," he said.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Ahmed Eljechtimi; Editing by Toby ChopraOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Moroccan sentenced to death in Donetsk has Ukrainian nationality, is not a mercenary, his father says."
"Crime June 13, 2022 / 10:06 AM / CBS News A 16-year veteran with the Wicomico County Sheriff's Office in Maryland was shot and killed while attempting to apprehend a fugitive on Sunday, authorities said. Deputy First Class Glenn Hilliard was killed in Pittsville while trying to apprehend a suspect who is wanted multiple felony warrants in multiple jurisdictions, the sheriff's office said.Hillard pursued the suspect on foot after he spotted him coming out of an apartment complex, the sheriff's office said. He was shot by the suspect, who was later captured after an extensive manhunt by dozens of law enforcement officers from throughout the region.The Wicomico County Sheriff's Office said Hillard "was a son, a husband and a father to three beautiful children, a brother to those he worked with, and an exemplary public servant to the citizens of Wicomico County and to the State of Maryland."Sheriff Mike Lewis and members of the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office regret to announce the Line of Duty death of one...Posted by Wicomico County Sheriff's Office on Monday, June 13, 2022 "As an organization, we are heartbroken over this senseless and tragic murder," the sheriff's office said in a statement posted on Facebook. "This loss exacts an enormous emotional toll on the Sheriff's Office family, but we will do what is necessary and proper to honor Glenn and support those who knew and loved him." Hillard worked in several areas within the sheriff's office, and recently requested to be transferred back to patrol. He would have celebrated his 42nd birthday next Wednesday, June 22nd.According to tweets from the sheriff's office, the suspect was identified is Austin Davidson. He is awaiting arraignment.  In: maryland Caitlin O'Kane Caitlin O'Kane is a digital content producer covering trending stories for CBS News and its good news brand, The Uplift."
"Maryland sheriff's deputy Glenn Hilliard shot and killed while attempting to capture fugitive."
"Britain's Prince Andrew leaves St. Mary the Virgin church in Hillington, near royal Sandringham estate, in Norfolk, Britain January 19, 2020. REUTERS/Chris Radburn/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comLONDON, June 13 (Reuters) - Britain's Prince Andrew will not attend some parts of a royal ceremony later on Monday after a "family decision" was taken, effectively keeping the queen's son out of the public eye after he was stripped of his royal titles earlier this year.A Buckingham Palace source said Andrew would not attend an annual procession and chapel service for the so-called Order of the Garter - a 700 year-old chivalric group whose members include Queen Elizabeth, senior royals and 24 knights or ladies chosen by the monarch in recognition of their public work.However the source said Andrew would attend a behind-closed-doors lunch and the investiture ceremony for new members, which this year include former British prime minister Tony Blair.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comThe queen is also expected to attend the investiture and lunch, but not the procession.The palace source described the arrangements around Andrew's attendance as a "family decision".Andrew, the queen's second son, was forced to quit royal duties over his friendship with late convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. read more The prince settled a U.S. lawsuit in February in which he had been accused of sexually abusing a woman when she was a teenager. Andrew, 62, officially known as the Duke of York, has denied any wrongdoing. read more The Garter Day procession is one of the most colourful events in the royal calendar, involving members walking around the queen's Windsor Castle in plumed hats and velvet robes.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by William James; Editing by Andrew HeavensOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"UK royals to keep Queen Elizabeth's son Andrew out of spotlight."
"Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 11 (Reuters) - A patient with the same facial-paralysis causing virus that has affected Justin Bieber said on Saturday she had been saddened to see what the Canadian pop star is going through and proud that he is making people aware of the illness."I've watched his video and I'm not going to lie, I shed a couple of tears. I never thought that I would relate to someone so much that I didn't know," Nicoya Rescorla told Reuters in a video interview from Marazion, in southwest England.Former teen star Bieber, 28, disclosed on Friday that he had been diagnosed with a virus that left half of his face paralysed and forced him to cancel some upcoming performances. He said in a video posted on Instagram he had contracted Ramsay Hunt syndrome, which affected nerves in his ear and face, and his right eye was not blinking. read more Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRescorla said she developed the syndrome 20 months ago, around the time her 11-week-old child was admitted to hospital with a severe infection and her grandfather, who she was caring for, had to move to a care home.Justin Bieber performs a medley of songs at the 2016 Billboard Awards in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., May 22, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni/File Photo"I think personally for me stress was a huge factor, a huge factor," said Rescorla, who is also 28 and has three children."It's hard to think of someone else going through something that you're going through. Obviously, Justin Bieber ... he's a huge celebrity, and I also felt so proud that he was spreading awareness of Ramsay Hunt syndrome."It was heartwarming that he was spreading awareness, but also heartbreaking that he was going through it."Speaking of the impact of the illness on her life, Rescorla said she can no longer drive or leave the house on her own. She said she has to drink from a straw and has problems with vertigo."I went from being so independent, fiercely independent, to having my husband care for me because I haven't been able to do it for myself," she said.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comEditing by Frances Kerry and Mike HarrisonOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Bieber illness video is heartbreaking, says UK patient with same condition."
"People are reflected in a glass window of a shop at a marketplace in New Delhi, India, October 10, 2018. REUTERS/Anushree FadnavisRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comSummaryFood inflation up 7.97% on year in May vs 8.38% in AprilCore inflation seen 6.09%-6.1% in May, say economistsEconomists say inflationary pressures broadeningEconomists expect central bank to hike rates in AugustNEW DELHI, June 13 (Reuters) - India's retail inflation eased marginally in May, after touching an eight-year high of 7.79% in April, but remained above the central bank's tolerance band for a fifth month in a row, suggesting it would continue with rate hikes in August.A surge in crude oil and commodity prices since Russia invaded Ukraine in February has pushed up consumer prices globally, forcing many central banks to raise interest rates to tame inflation.Consumer price index-based inflation rose 7.04% in May year-on-year, helped by slower increases in food prices, data released by the National Statistics Office showed on Monday.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comMay's print was marginally lower than the 7.10% forecast by economists in a Reuters poll, after the government cut taxes on petrol and diesel and put export restrictions on food items including wheat and sugar. read more Reuters Graphics Reuters GraphicsThe dip in prices was likely to be temporary, economists said, as a heatwave in June has pushed up prices of vegetables, while the government cut estimates of wheat production because of dry spells in northern India.The Reserve Bank of India's (RBI) Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) raised its benchmark repo rate (INREPO=ECI) by 50 basis points to 4.90% last week, after a 40 basis points hike in April, while hinting at more rate hikes to come. read more Garima Kapoor, economist at Elara Capital, said price pressures were broadening due to rising energy prices and supply-side disruptions."The MPC is expected to hike policy repo rate by an additional 60 to 75 basis points this financial year to rein in inflationary pressures," she said.INFLATIONARY PRESSURESThe RBI has raised its inflation forecast to 6.7% for the 2022/23 year ending in March 2023, and 7.4% for the July-Sept quarter.The MPC will meet from Aug. 2-4, and is expected to raise rates by 25-50 basis points.Food inflation, which accounts for nearly half the CPI basket, rose 7.97% year-on-year in May, compared with a revised 8.31% in the previous month - the highest in nearly two years.A nearly 5% fall in the rupee against the dollar this year has also made imports costlier.The benchmark 10-years bond yield rose to its highest in more than three years as investor concerns over faster rate increases in the United States resurfaced following U.S. inflation data.Stock prices tumbled before the release of the inflation data. The benchmark NSE Nifty 50 index (.NSEI) fell 2.6%, its lowest level since July 2021%.Core inflation, excluding volatile food and energy prices was estimated at 6.09%-6.1% in May by three economists, after the data release.In May, vegetable prices surged 18.26% year-on-year, compared with 15.41% in April, while milk prices were up 5.64% compared with 6.97% in the previous month.Kunal Kundu, economist at Societe Generale, said Indians should be ready for strong action from the RBI at its next meeting."With the price of Indian basket of crude inching close to its Ukraine conflict high and food inflation hovering around 8.0%, we may not have yet heard the last about peak inflation unless oil companies continue to bear the burden of loss," he said.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comAdditional reporting by Chris Thomas, Nallur Sethuraman and Rama Venkat in Bengaluru; Editing by Alex RichardsonOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"India's May retail inflation eases amid broadening price pressures."
"U.S. One dollar banknotes are seen in front of displayed stock graph in this illustration taken, February 8, 2021. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 13 (Reuters) - U.S. two-year Treasury yields rose above 10-year borrowing costs on Monday - the so-called curve inversion that often heralds economic recession - on expectations interest rates may rise faster and further than anticipated.Fears the U.S. Federal Reserve could opt for an even larger rate hike than anticipated this week to contain inflation sent two-year yields to their highest levels since 2007.But a view is also playing out that aggressive rate hikes may tip the economy into recession.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comThe gap between two and 10-year Treasury yields fell to as low as minus 2 basis points (bps), before rising back to around five bps, Tradeweb prices showed .The curve had inverted two months ago for the first time since 2019 before normalising.An inversion of this part of the yield curve is viewed by many analysts as a reliable signal that recession could come in the next year or two.The move follows inversions on Friday in the three-year/10-year and five-year/30-year portions of the Treasury curve, after data showed U.S. inflation continued to accelerate in May , .Yield curveTwo-year Treasury yields rose to a 15-year high around 3.25% before easing to 3.19%, while 10-year yields touched the same level, the highest since 2018 .Friday's data showed the largest annual U.S. inflation increase in nearly 40-1/2 years, dashing hopes the Federal Reserve might pause its interest rate hike campaign in September. Many reckon the central bank may actually need to up the pace of tightening.Barclays analysts said they now expected a 75 bps move from the Fed on Wednesday rather than the 50 bps which has been baked in.Money markets are now pricing a cumulative 175 bps in hikes by September and also see a 20% chance of a 75 bps move this week, which if implemented would be the biggest single-meeting hike since 1994 .UBS strategist Rohan Khanna said hawkish European Central Bank communication alongside the inflation print "have completely shattered this idea that the Fed may not deliver 75 bps or that other central banks will move in a gradual pace"."The whole idea went out the drain ... that's when you get turbo-charged flattening of yield curves. It is just a realisation that peak inflation in the U.S. is not behind us, and unless we are told so, maybe peak hawkishness from the Fed is also not behind us," Khanna added.Meanwhile bets on the U.S. terminal rate - where the Fed funds rate may peak this cycle - are shifting. On Monday, they priced rates to approach 4% in mid-2023, up almost one percentage point since end-May .Deutsche Bank said it now saw rates peaking at 4.125% in mid-2023.Some Fedwatchers are sceptical the Fed will move faster with rate hikes. Pictet Wealth Management's senior economist Thomas Costerg noted, for instance, that most inflation drivers such as food and fuel remain outside central bankers' control."Over the summer, they will be aware of growth data and housing which is starting to look more wobbly," Costerg said. "I doubt they will do 75 bps ... 50 bps is already a big step for them."The sell-off in Treasuries has set other markets on edge, sending German 10-year yields to the highest since 2014 and knocking S&P 500 futures 2.5% lower.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Yoruk Bahceli and Sujata Rao Editing by Dhara Ranasinghe and Mark PotterOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Huge sell-off rocks Treasury markets, yield curve inverts."
"Bayer's Roundup is shown for sale in Encinitas, California, U.S., June 26, 2017. REUTERS/Mike BlakeRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comWASHINGTON, June 13 (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday took no action on Bayer AG's (BAYGn.DE) bid to dismiss legal claims by customers who contend its Roundup weedkiller causes cancer as the German company seeks to avoid potentially billions of dollars in damages.The case was not mentioned on a list issued by the court on Monday as it decided on whether to hear pending appeals, raising at least the possibility that the justices are considering hearing it. Bayer has asked the justices to take up its appeal of a lower court decision that upheld $25 million in damages awarded to California resident Edwin Hardeman, a Roundup user who blamed his cancer on the pharmaceutical and chemical giant's glyphosate-based weedkillers.The Supreme Court's decision on whether to take up the appeal is being closely watched as Bayer maneuvers to limit its legal liability in thousands of cases.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comU.S. President Joe Biden's administration in May urged the court not to hear the Bayer appeal, reversing the government's position previously taken under former President Donald Trump.Bayer has lost three trials in which Roundup users have been awarded tens of millions of dollars in each. Bayer has pinned hopes for relief on the conservative-majority Supreme Court, which has a reputation for being pro-business. Bayer has won three trials, including one last week.Bayer has asked the Supreme Court to review the verdict in Hardeman's case, which was upheld by the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in May 2021. Hardeman had regularly used Roundup for 26 years at his home in northern California before being diagnosed with a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.Bayer has said it should not be penalized for marketing a product deemed safe by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and on which the EPA would not allow a cancer warning to be printed.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will DunhamOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"U.S. Supreme Court takes no action on Bayer bid to nix weedkiller suits."
"People walk past fences outside the Heaven Supermarket bar, where a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak emerged, in Chaoyang district of Beijing, China June 13, 2022. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia RawlinsRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comSummaryOutbreak prompts return of mass testing, targeted lockdownsCluster caused by 'complacency' - state-backed newspaperShanghai emerges from weekend testing with no new curbsBEIJING, June 13 (Reuters) - Authorities in China's capital Beijing on Monday raced to contain a COVID-19 outbreak traced to a raucous 24-hour bar known for cheap liquor and big crowds, with millions facing mandatory testing and thousands under targeted lockdowns.The outbreak of nearly 200 cases linked to the city centre Heaven Supermarket Bar, which had just reopened as curbs in Beijing eased last week, highlights how hard it will be for China to make a success of its "zero COVID" policy as much of the rest of the world opts to learn how to live with the virus.The re-emergence of COVID infections is also raising new concerns about the outlook for the world's second-largest economy. China is only just shaking off a heavy blow from a two-month lockdown of Shanghai, its most populous city and commercial nerve centre, that also roiled global supply chains.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comDine-in service at Beijing restaurants resumed on June 6 after more than a month in which the city of 22 million people enforced various COVID curbs. Many malls, gyms and other venues were closed, parts of the city's public transport system were suspended, and millions were urged to work from home."We have to test every day now. It's a bit of a hassle, but it's necessary," said a 21-year-old resident surnamed Cao, who runs a convenience store in Beijing's largest district Chaoyang, where the bar cluster was discovered. "The virus situation has hurt our business a bit, it's down about 20-30%."Chaoyang kicked off a three-day mass testing campaign among its roughly 3.5 million residents on Monday. About 10,000 close contacts of the bar's patrons have been identified, and their residential buildings put under lockdown, and some planned school reopenings in the district have been postponed.Queues snaked around some testing sites on Monday for more than 100 metres, according to Reuters' eyewitnesses. Large metal barriers have been installed around several residential compounds, with people in hazmat suits spraying disinfectant nearby.'IN VAIN'Last week, as dine-in curbs were lifted, Heaven Supermarket Bar, modelled as a large self-service liquor store with chairs, sofas and tables, reclaimed its popularity among young, noisy crowds starved of socialising and parties during Beijing's COVID restrictions.The bar, where patrons check aisles to grab anything from local heavy spirits to Belgian beer, is known among Beijing revellers for its tables plastered with empty bottles, and customers falling asleep on sofas after midnight.With the almost 200 COVID cases linked to the bar since June 9, authorities described the outbreak as "ferocious" and "explosive" - people infected live or work in 14 of the capital's 16 districts, authorities have said.Officials have not commented on the exact cause of the outbreak, nor explained why they are not yet reinstating the level of curbs seen last month.The bar cluster was caused by loopholes and complacency in epidemic prevention, state-backed Beijing Evening News wrote in a commentary piece on Monday."At a time when ... normality in the city is being restored, the fall of Heaven Supermarket Bar means the hardship and effort of countless people have been in vain," the newspaper wrote.If the outbreak grows, "consequences could be serious, and would be such that nobody would want to see," it added.STUCK IN 'PARADISE'Heaven Supermarket Bar, and other businesses nearby, including the Paradise Massage & Spa, were under lockdown, with police tape and security staff blocking the entrances.A handful of customers and staff at the parlour would be locked in temporarily for checks, authorities said.In all, Beijing reported 51 cases for Sunday, versus 65 the previous day, in line with a national trend of falling cases. read more Shanghai, which completed mass testing for most of its 25 million residents at the weekend after lifting its lockdown and many of its curbs at the start of the month, reported 37 cases, up from 29.As Beijing authorities wrestled with new COVID cases in April, retail sales in the capital shrank 16% year-on-year, while property sales nosedived 25%. Data for May, due later this month, is expected to be dire as well.Before the bar cases, there had been high hopes for a rebound in June. read more Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Martin Quin Pollard, Ryan Woo and the Beijing and Shanghai bureaus; Writing by Marius Zaharia; Editing by Kenneth MaxwellOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Beijing tests millions, isolates thousands over COVID cluster at 24-hour bar."
"Workers handle palm oil fruits at an oil palm plantation in Slim River, Malaysia August 12, 2021. REUTERS/Lim Huey TengRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comKUALA LUMPUR, June 6 (Reuters) - Malaysia is missing a golden opportunity to capitalise on high palm oil prices and could suffer more production losses due to a "severe" shortage of about 120,000 workers, the Malaysian Estate Owners' Association (MEOA) told Reuters on Monday.The world's second biggest palm oil producer has been struggling to harvest palm fruit due to a labour shortage exacerbated by its pandemic-related immigration restrictions.Foreign workers, mostly from Indonesia, typically make up about 80% of the workforce in Malaysian estates, which numbered about 437,000 at the start of the pandemic.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comPalm oil prices hit record highs this year due to the labour crunch, export caps at top producer Indonesia and the Russia-Ukraine war, but Malaysian producers are unable to take advantage of that, the MEOA said."The sad reality is that Malaysia is missing the golden opportunity presented on a platter as we are not able to cope with the harvesting of all the oil palm bunches at the appropriate harvesting rounds set against the present limited labour force," the MEOA said.In September, Malaysia approved the recruitment of 32,000 migrant workers for palm plantations, but the foreign labour has yet to enter the country due to permitting holdups.The group said industry projections for 2022 production to be at 18.6 million tonnes could be lowered further if labour does not come in immediately.Last week, state agency the Malaysian Palm Oil Council (MPOC) lowered its production outlook to 18.6 million tonnes for the year from an earlier estimate of 18.9 million tones."This projection can be further reduced if the government is not able to act now amid the slow progress in issuing the 32,000 extended permits," the MEOA said.Indonesia last week cancelled a plan to send its citizens to work in Malaysian palm oil plantations, citing procedural issues.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Mei Mei Chu; Writing by A. Ananthalakshmi; Editing by Martin PettyOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Malaysia palm group warns of losses ahead from 'severe' labour crunch."
"Rain clouds cover the skyline of Manhattan at the start of the Memorial Day weekend, as seen from Weehawken, New Jersey, U.S., May 27, 2022. REUTERS/Eduardo MunozRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comNEW YORK, June 13 (Reuters) - New York City plans next month to auction a midtown Manhattan apartment owned by a Venezuelan media mogul with ties to socialist President Nicolas Maduro's government, after U.S. sanctions forced him to miss condominium payments, court records show.Raul Gorrin, who owns Venezuelan TV channel Globovision, paid $18.8 million for the 4,500-square-foot, 47th floor unit in the Baccarat Hotel & Residences in November 2017, at the height of Venezuela's economic collapse.Now, Gorrin stands to lose the apartment, which boasts views of the Empire State Building and Central Park, after being sanctioned in January 2019 as part of the Trump administration's push to oust Maduro. The city's sheriff is scheduled to conduct the auction on July 6, previously-unreported court records show.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comSanctions block those designated from accessing the U.S. financial system, freeze their U.S. assets and generally bar Americans from transacting with them.In sanctioning Gorrin, Washington said he bribed Venezuela's treasury for the right to conduct currency exchange transactions that siphoned billions of the country's funds to insiders.The U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), which enforces sanctions, said Gorrin also bought gifts for Maduro's wife, Cilia Flores, who was sanctioned in 2018. Venezuela's information ministry did not respond to a request for comment.Gorrin faces U.S. criminal charges in Florida over the alleged graft. His lawyers did not respond to requests for comment. Gorrin, who remains a fugitive and is believed to be in Venezuela, has not responded to the charges.Since being sanctioned, Gorrin has missed more than $600,000 in monthly condominium charges and late fees for his apartment, according to lawsuits the condominium board filed in a New York state court. The apartment's common charges exceed $10,000 per month, court records show.The unit is formally owned by RIM Group Properties of New York II Corp, which Gorrin controls, according to corporate records.Gorrin said in a 2020 filing that sanctions prohibited him from paying condominium charges. He said he asked OFAC for a license to pay, but was not approved.Daniel Ruzumna, a partner at law firm Patterson Belknap, said sanctions can pose difficulties for those "unwittingly caught up in the web.""They may not be sanctioned themselves, but they may have interactions with those who are under sanctions. Case in point is this particular condo group," Ruzumna said.OFAC did not respond to a request for comment.The board won a court order in August 2020 to collect $184,876 from RIM Group for late payments in 2019, court records show. The board is seeking another judgment for missed payments from 2020 onwards.Last year, the board received OFAC's permission to sell the unit to collect the money, according to the license, obtained by Reuters under the Freedom of Information Act. The license was renewed in February, court records show.Any additional funds must be deposited into a blocked account in RIM Group's name, which Gorrin could not access while he remains sanctioned.A lawyer for the board declined to comment.Maduro remains in power, and accuses Washington of trying to oust him in a coup. Globovision, which once extensively covered protests against Maduro's predecessor Hugo Chavez, softened its criticism of the government after Gorrin bought the channel in 2013, reporters said at the time.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Luc Cohen in New York; Additional reporting by Daphne Psaledakis in Washington; Editing by Noeleen WalderOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Exclusive: Sanctioned Venezuelan mogul's apartment on the block in New York City."
"get the free app Updated on: June 13, 2022 / 10:38 AM / CBS News CBS News Live CBS News Live Live The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol will hold the second of several public hearings on Monday morning to reveal more of what it has learned during its 11-month probe.The hearing will have a delayed start on Monday because one of the witnesses who was set to testify, former President Donald Trump's campaign manager William Stepien, will no longer appear due to a "family emergency." The meeting is now set to start between 10:30 to 10:45 a.m. ET."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."The hearing will be broadcast as a CBS News Special Report anchored by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell. She will be joined by CBS News chief political analyst John Dickerson, chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes, chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and congressional correspondents Scott MacFarlane and Nikole Killion. Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election.""But, despite this, President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information — to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him. This was not true," Cheney said at Thursday's hearing.  Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, delivers opening remarks 33:48 Cheney and committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson led the first public hearing, a nearly two-hour session on Thursday evening. In that hearing, the committee attempted to link Trump's baseless claims of a stolen election to the chaos and violence of Jan. 6, which Thompson described as the "culmination of an attempted coup." Testimony was shown from some of the top figures in Trump's orbit who said they told him he had not won the election. Thompson played a recording from former Attorney General William Barr's testimony before the committee, in which he said he told the former president his claims of a stolen election were "bullsh**." In another clip, Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, said she "trusted" Barr and accepted his insistence that her father had lost the election.Cheney also said there were members of Congress who sought pardons from Trump for their role in the attack. Cheney named Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania as one of those Republicans, a claim which he denied on Friday. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Cheney's fellow Republican on the committee, told "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "we're not going to make accusations or say things without proof or evidence backing it."  Kinzinger says Jan. 6 committee will present evidence that lawmakers sought pardons from Trump 08:20 Cheney on Thursday had harsh words for Republicans who have fallen in line with Trump after the attack: "There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone but your dishonor will remain." The first hearing also touched on the Proud Boys' role in the Jan. 6 attack. In video testimony shown Thursday, some of the group's members said they believed Trump's remark at a presidential debate to "stand back and stand by" was a call to action. Quested testified that the Proud Boys were organized and heading to the Capitol at 10 a.m., before Trump's speech at the Ellipse had even started. Thompson and Cheney sought to show that, amid the chaos at the Capitol, Trump did not perform his duties as president. They showed video testimony from Gen. Mark Milley, the current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, saying that former Vice President Pence — not Trump — issued the orders for the National Guard to come to the building. While Pence is not likely to participate in the hearings, some of his top advisers are. Greg Jacob, Pence's former chief counsel, Marc Short, his former chief of staff, and conservative jurist J. Michael Luttig, who advised Pence ahead of Jan. 6, are all likely to testify in the coming weeks.    3:14 PM / June 12, 2022 How to watch the second Jan. 6 hearing What: House Jan. 6 public hearingDate: Monday, June 13, 2022 Time: 10:30 a.m. ETLocation: U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C.TV: CBS stations (Check your local station here) Online stream: Live on CBS News in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device.Follow: Live updates on CBSNews.com    7m ago Stepien's lawyer says his wife went into labor Kevin Marino, lawyer for former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, said Stepien can't testify in person because his wife went into labor. Instead, his understanding is that video testimony of Stepien's will be played. Marino called Stepien one of the "finest political consultants in the country." And Stepien's testimony will present the numbers and dad he followed as he advised Trump, Marino said. Committee vice chair Liz Cheney confirmed they would play video testimony of Stepien."We're going to have a very important and effective set of hearings as you know Mr Stepien has appeared previously and so we'll be able to provide the American people with a lot of interesting new and important information that Mr. Stepien has provided to us previously," Cheney told reporters.    33m ago January 6 committee to hear from Republican witnesses on Trump's baseless claims January 6 committee to hear from Republican witnesses on Trump's baseless claims 05:28 The House January 6 committee is holding its second televised public hearing for this month. The panel will focus on how former President Trump spread baseless claims of election fraud. CBS News congressional correspondent Scott MacFarlane joined "CBS News Mornings" with a preview.    9:30 AM Trump campaign manager will no longer appear, citing "family emergency"  Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear at Monday's hearing."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning.," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."   46m ago Committee aides say hearing will focus on the "Big Lie" Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a second panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."   9:01 AM On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"Watch Live: House Jan. 6 committee's focus turns to Trump's false claims in second hearing."
"Logo of an Apple store is seen in Washington, U.S., January 27, 2022. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 13 (Reuters) - Apple Inc's (AAPL.O) revenue from gaming and music offerings is expected to jump 36% to $8.2 billion by 2025, J.P.Morgan said on Monday, as the iPhone maker taps its huge user base to drive its subscription services.The two services are likely to have a combined subscriber base of about 180 million by 2025 - 110 million for music and 70 million for gaming - boosted by the rapid spread of the internet and a booming gaming industry, according to JPM analysts, led by Samik Chatterjee.Apple Music, which was launched in 2015 and is the second-biggest music-streaming service after Spotify Technology (SPOT.N), is expected to account for a bigger chunk of that revenue, raking in about $7 billion by 2025, the brokerage said.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comApple Arcade, the gaming subscription service launched in 2019, is estimated to pull in $1.2 billion.Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The company does not give a sales breakup for gaming and music services but the overall segment, which includes App Store, Apple TV+, Arcade and Apple Music, reported revenue of $19.82 billion for the March quarter. The business is seen as Apple's engine for expansion.Chatterjee, who is rated five stars for his estimate accuracy on Apple by Refinitiv Eikon, expects the gaming-market size to hit $360 billion by 2028 and music streaming to reach $55 billion by 2025.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Siddarth S and Pushkala Aripaka in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D'SilvaOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Apple music, gaming to bring in over $8 billion in revenue by 2025, J.P. Morgan says."
"get the free app Updated on: June 13, 2022 / 10:38 AM / CBS News CBS News Live CBS News Live Live The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol will hold the second of several public hearings on Monday morning to reveal more of what it has learned during its 11-month probe.The hearing will have a delayed start on Monday because one of the witnesses who was set to testify, former President Donald Trump's campaign manager William Stepien, will no longer appear due to a "family emergency." The meeting is now set to start between 10:30 to 10:45 a.m. ET."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."The hearing will be broadcast as a CBS News Special Report anchored by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell. She will be joined by CBS News chief political analyst John Dickerson, chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes, chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and congressional correspondents Scott MacFarlane and Nikole Killion. Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election.""But, despite this, President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information — to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him. This was not true," Cheney said at Thursday's hearing.  Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of House Jan. 6 committee, delivers opening remarks 33:48 Cheney and committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson led the first public hearing, a nearly two-hour session on Thursday evening. In that hearing, the committee attempted to link Trump's baseless claims of a stolen election to the chaos and violence of Jan. 6, which Thompson described as the "culmination of an attempted coup." Testimony was shown from some of the top figures in Trump's orbit who said they told him he had not won the election. Thompson played a recording from former Attorney General William Barr's testimony before the committee, in which he said he told the former president his claims of a stolen election were "bullsh**." In another clip, Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, said she "trusted" Barr and accepted his insistence that her father had lost the election.Cheney also said there were members of Congress who sought pardons from Trump for their role in the attack. Cheney named Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania as one of those Republicans, a claim which he denied on Friday. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Cheney's fellow Republican on the committee, told "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "we're not going to make accusations or say things without proof or evidence backing it."  Kinzinger says Jan. 6 committee will present evidence that lawmakers sought pardons from Trump 08:20 Cheney on Thursday had harsh words for Republicans who have fallen in line with Trump after the attack: "There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone but your dishonor will remain." The first hearing also touched on the Proud Boys' role in the Jan. 6 attack. In video testimony shown Thursday, some of the group's members said they believed Trump's remark at a presidential debate to "stand back and stand by" was a call to action. Quested testified that the Proud Boys were organized and heading to the Capitol at 10 a.m., before Trump's speech at the Ellipse had even started. Thompson and Cheney sought to show that, amid the chaos at the Capitol, Trump did not perform his duties as president. They showed video testimony from Gen. Mark Milley, the current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, saying that former Vice President Pence — not Trump — issued the orders for the National Guard to come to the building. While Pence is not likely to participate in the hearings, some of his top advisers are. Greg Jacob, Pence's former chief counsel, Marc Short, his former chief of staff, and conservative jurist J. Michael Luttig, who advised Pence ahead of Jan. 6, are all likely to testify in the coming weeks.    3:14 PM / June 12, 2022 How to watch the second Jan. 6 hearing What: House Jan. 6 public hearingDate: Monday, June 13, 2022 Time: 10:30 a.m. ETLocation: U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C.TV: CBS stations (Check your local station here) Online stream: Live on CBS News in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device.Follow: Live updates on CBSNews.com    8m ago Stepien's lawyer says his wife went into labor Kevin Marino, lawyer for former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, said Stepien can't testify in person because his wife went into labor. Instead, his understanding is that video testimony of Stepien's will be played. Marino called Stepien one of the "finest political consultants in the country." And Stepien's testimony will present the numbers and dad he followed as he advised Trump, Marino said. Committee vice chair Liz Cheney confirmed they would play video testimony of Stepien."We're going to have a very important and effective set of hearings as you know Mr Stepien has appeared previously and so we'll be able to provide the American people with a lot of interesting new and important information that Mr. Stepien has provided to us previously," Cheney told reporters.    33m ago January 6 committee to hear from Republican witnesses on Trump's baseless claims January 6 committee to hear from Republican witnesses on Trump's baseless claims 05:28 The House January 6 committee is holding its second televised public hearing for this month. The panel will focus on how former President Trump spread baseless claims of election fraud. CBS News congressional correspondent Scott MacFarlane joined "CBS News Mornings" with a preview.    9:30 AM Trump campaign manager will no longer appear, citing "family emergency"  Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear at Monday's hearing."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning.," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."   46m ago Committee aides say hearing will focus on the "Big Lie" Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a second panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."   9:01 AM On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"Watch Live: House Jan. 6 committee's focus turns to Trump's false claims in second hearing."
"The Spotify logo hangs on the facade of the New York Stock Exchange as the company lists its stock with a direct listing in New York, U.S., April 3, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File PhotoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comJune 13 (Reuters) - Spotify Technology SA (SPOT.N) on Monday announced it has formed a Safety Advisory Council to provide third-party input on issues such as hate speech, disinformation, extremism and online abuse.The group represents another step in Spotify’s efforts to deal with harmful content on its audio streaming service after backlash earlier this year over “The Joe Rogan Experience,” in which the podcaster was accused of spreading misinformation about COVID-19.The 18 experts, which include representatives from Washington, D.C. civil rights group the Center for Democracy & Technology, the University of Gothenburg in Sweden and the Institute for Technology and Society in Brazil, will advise Spotify as it develops products and policies and thinks about emerging issues.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com“The idea is to bring in these world-renowned experts, many of whom have been in this space for a number of years, to realize a relationship with them,” said Dustee Jenkins, Spotify’s global head of public affairs. “And to ensure that it's not talking to them when we're in the middle of a situation … Instead, we're meeting with them on a pretty regular basis, so that we can be much more proactive about how we're thinking about these issues across the company.”The council is purely advisory in nature, and Spotify can accept or reject its advice. Unlike Facebook's (META.O) oversight board, which decides what cases it reviews, Spotify will submit issues for its council to consider and provide feedback.Sarah Hoyle, Spotify’s head of trust and safety, said the advisory council was not formed in reaction to “any particular creator or situation,” but rather a recognition of the challenges of operating a global service at a time when threats are constantly evolving.“How do we augment the internal expertise that we already have at Spotify, to tap into these folks whose life's work has been studying this, and they're on the ground in markets all around the world, just like our users, just like our creators,” said Hoyle.(In third paragraph, corrects location of University of Gothenburg to Sweden)Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Dawn Chmielewski in Los Angeles Editing by Chris ReeseOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"Spotify forms council to deal with harmful content after Joe Rogan backlash."
"get the free app Updated on: June 13, 2022 / 10:51 AM / CBS News CBS News Live CBS News Live Live The House Jan. 6 committee's second of several public hearings kicked off Monday morning with a delayed start and one of the witnesses backing out due to a "family emergency."Originally set to start at 10 a.m. ET, the hearing started at 10:46 a.m. ET. The committee said Monday morning that former Trump campaign manager William Stepien, one of the scheduled witnesses, will not appear after all when his wife went into labor, Stepien's lawyer said."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."In addition to video of Stepien and his counsel, former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had, will also appear Monday. There will also be a panel of witnesses featuring election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt.  Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi and chairman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, speaks during a prime-time hearing in Washington, D.C., on June 9, 2022.   Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   Committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney said last week that the second hearing will show that "Donald Trump and his advisers knew that he had, in fact, lost the election."   1m ago Hearing begins Chairman Bennie Thompson gaveled in the hearing at 10:46 a.m. "My colleagues and I don't want to spend time talking about ourselves during these hearings, but as someone who's run for office a few times, I can tell you at the end of a campaign, it all comes down to the numbers," Thompson said. "The numbers tell you the winner and the loser. For the most part, the numbers don't lie." And those numbers are the voice and the will of the people. Politicians are to accept the will of the people, he said. But Trump didn't. "This morning will tell the sort of how Donald Trump lost an election, and knew he lost an election, and as a result of his loss, decided to wage an attack on our democracy," Thompson said. Thompson said Trump "lit the fuse" for Jan. 6, 2021.    14m ago Stepien's lawyer says his wife went into labor Kevin Marino, lawyer for former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, said Stepien can't testify in person because his wife went into labor. Instead, his understanding is that video testimony of Stepien's will be played. Marino called Stepien one of the "finest political consultants in the country." And Stepien's testimony will present the numbers and dad he followed as he advised Trump, Marino said. Committee vice chair Liz Cheney confirmed they would play video testimony of Stepien."We're going to have a very important and effective set of hearings as you know Mr Stepien has appeared previously and so we'll be able to provide the American people with a lot of interesting new and important information that Mr. Stepien has provided to us previously," Cheney told reporters.    39m ago January 6 committee to hear from Republican witnesses on Trump's baseless claims January 6 committee to hear from Republican witnesses on Trump's baseless claims 05:28 The House January 6 committee is holding its second televised public hearing for this month. The panel will focus on how former President Trump spread baseless claims of election fraud. CBS News congressional correspondent Scott MacFarlane joined "CBS News Mornings" with a preview.    9:30 AM Trump campaign manager will no longer appear, citing "family emergency"  Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien will no longer appear at Monday's hearing."Due to a family emergency, Mr. William Stepien is unable to testify before the Select Committee this morning.," the committee said in a statement. "His counsel will appear and make a statement on the record."   52m ago Committee aides say hearing will focus on the "Big Lie" Committee aides said Monday's hearing will focus on the "Big Lie," documenting how former President Donald Trump declared victory on election night despite being told he didn't have the numbers to win, and how he continued to embrace baseless claims of election fraud.   "We're going to hear testimony from government officials who were the ones who looked for the fraud, and about how the effort to uncover these baseless allegations bore no fruit," a committee aide said. "Simply, the fraud that they were looking for didn't exist and the former president was told that, again and again, claims were baseless, but he continued to repeat them anyway."Monday's hearing will first have the statement from Stepien's counsel and former Fox News political director Chris Stirewalt, who was let go by Fox News shortly after the 2020 presidential election, during which his team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden before other networks had. Then there will be a second panel that will consist of election attorney Benjamin Ginsberg, former U.S. attorney for the northern district of Georgia BJ Pak, who resigned effective Jan. 4, 2021, and former Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt. Some of the witnesses are expected to provide testimony about the basic logistics of election litigation and how such action usually proceeds. A committee aide said the committee will also demonstrate that the Trump campaign aides used the election fraud claims to raise hundreds of millions of dollars between the election and Jan. 6th. And finally, the aide said, the committee will show that "some of those individuals responsible for the violence on the 6th echoed back those very same lies that the former president peddled in the run up to the insurrection."   9:01 AM On Day 1 of hearings, Capitol police officer described "carnage" and "chaos" of riot One of two witnesses to testify live during the prime-time hearing on Thursday was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury on Jan. 6. Edwards described seeing a "war scene" on Capitol Hill that day."It was something like I had seen out of the movies," Edwards said. "I could not believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. They were bleeding. They were throwing up. I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. I was catching people as they fell. It was carnage. It was chaos." Watch her testimony in the video below. Capitol Police officer describes "carnage" and "chaos" during Jan 6. attack 13:07"
"Watch Live: House Jan. 6 committee's focus turns to Trump's false claims in second hearing."
"A dead fish lies on the dried-up Penuelas lake in Valparaiso, Chile April 19, 2022. REUTERS/Ivan AlvaradoRegister now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comSummaryPhoto essay:PENUELAS, Chile, June 13 (Reuters) - The Penuelas reservoir in central Chile was until twenty years ago the main source of water for the city of Valparaiso, holding enough water for 38,000 Olympic-size swimming pools. Water for only two pools now remains.A huge expanse of dried and cracked earth that was once the lake bed is littered with fish skeletons and desperate animals searching for water.Amid an historic 13-year drought, rainfall levels have slumped in this South American nation that hugs the continent's Pacific coast. Higher air temperatures have meant snow in the Andes, once a key store of meltwater for spring and summer, is not compacting, melts faster, or turns straight to vapor.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comThe drought has hit mine output in the world's largest copper producer, stoked tensions over water use for lithium and farming, and led capital Santiago to make unprecedented plans for potential water rationing."We have to beg God to send us water," said Amanda Carrasco, a 54-year-old who lives near the Penuelas reservoir and recalls line fishing in the waters for local pejerrey fish. "I've never seen it like this. There's been less water before, but not like now."The reservoir needs rainfall - once reliable in winter but now at historic lows, said Jose Luis Murillo, general manager of ESVAL, the company that supplies Valparaiso with water."Basically what we have is just a puddle," he said, adding that the city now relied on rivers. "This is especially significant if you think that several decades ago the Penuelas reservoir was the only source of water for all greater Valparaiso."Behind the issue, academic studies have found, is a global shift in climate patterns sharpening natural weather cycles.Normally, low-pressure storms from the Pacific unload precipitation over Chile in winter, recharging aquifers and packing the Andes mountains with snow.But naturally occurring warming of the sea off Chile's coast, which blocks storms from arriving, has been intensified by rising global sea temperature, according to a global study on sea temperature and rainfall deficits. Ozone depletion and greenhouse gasses in the Antarctic, meanwhile, exacerbate weather patterns that draw storms away from Chile, according to a study on variables affecting Antarctic weather.'WATER TOWERS'Analysis of tree rings going back 400 years shows how rare the current drought is, said Duncan Christie, a researcher at the Center for Climate and Resilience in Chile. It is totally unrivalled for duration or intensity.He said that meant the Andes - which he called the country's "water towers" - were not getting a chance to replenish, which in turn meant that as snow melted in spring there was far less water to fill rivers, reservoirs and aquifers.Miguel Lagos, a civil engineer and water specialist, traveled to measure snow cover near the Laguna Negra station in central Chile some 50 kilometers (31 miles) east of Santiago - part of a process to estimate summer water supply."There was just nothing," he told Reuters. "There were so few precipitation events and such warm conditions that the snow melted that same winter."As snow compacts, creating new layers, this helps keep it colder for longer. But with warmer weather and less snowfall, Lagos said, top layers of snow were melting faster or turning straight to vapor, a process called sublimation.A 2019 study in the International Journal of Climatology that analyzed Chile's drought from 2010 to 2018 said shifting weather events could ease the drought in future, but much would depend on the trajectory of human emissions impacting climate.Segundo Aballay, an animal breeder in the Chilean village of Montenegro, is praying change comes soon."If it doesn't rain this year we will be left with nothing to do," he said. "The animals are getting weaker and dying day by day."Unfortunately for agriculture workers like Aballay, researchers at the University of Chile predict the country will have 30% less water over the next 30 years, based on mathematical models and historic data."What we call a drought today will become normal," Lagos said.In the Laguna de Aculeo, another dried up lake south of Santiago, local campsite manager Francisco Martinez recalled hundreds of people coming to the area to take out kayaks or swim in the waters.Now rusting piers and old boats sit in the barren landscape. An eerie island in the middle of what was once water rises up above the dust."Now there is no water, it is a desert here," Martinez told Reuters. "The animals are dying and there is nothing to do here in the lagoon any more."Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comReporting by Alexander Villegas; Additional reporting by Rodrigo Gutierrez; Editing by Adam Jourdan and Rosalba O'BrienOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles."
"'We beg God for water': Chilean lake turns to desert, sounding climate change alarm."
"A Rivian R1T truck body lowered onto a chassis in the assembly line at the Rivian electric vehicle plant in Normal, Illinois. Georgia is giving the company $1.5 billion in subsidies to bring a new $5 billion EV plant to the southern state.Brian Cassella | Tribune News Service | Getty ImagesIt is one of the few areas all parties seem to agree on: America's domestic supply chain is broken. One of the main reasons is not in dispute either: an acute shortage of workers — 5.5 million more job openings than there are workers available to fill them, according to the Labor Department.Those historic imbalances in the economy have turbocharged the competition between states for business and jobs. CNBC's acclaimed America's Top States for Business study is back for a 15th year to determine who is winning. We will reveal the full results, including scores and rankings for all 50 states, on July 13.Our study scores the states in ten categories of competitiveness. Our tried-and-true methodology assigns a weight to each category based on how frequently states mention it in their economic development marketing. That way, we rate the states on the attributes they use to sell themselves.War for workersIt should come as no surprise that in 2022, Workforce carries the most weight in the Top States for Business rankings. Practically every state mentions it, most multiple times."Ohio's greatest asset is our workforce," proclaims JobsOhio, that state's economic development arm. "This workforce is educated, committed, skilled, and productive."The pitch helped the Buckeye State land one of the biggest economic development prizes in recent history: a $20 billion semiconductor facility being built outside Columbus by Intel.Speaking with CNBC on the day of the announcement, Intel CEO Patrick Gelsinger cited "talent" as one of the main reasons the company chose Ohio."You know, we have all of the Midwest schools," Gelsinger said, noting that The Ohio State University campus is just 20 miles from Intel's site in New Albany. "We wanted a place that had a history; a passion for manufacturing at scale."Many experts believe worker shortages will be a long-term feature in the U.S. economy, not just because of the Great Resignation, but because of demographics."We see that population growth is at its lowest in history, and this is based on birth rates just not replacing themselves," said Cara Christopher, senior vice president for business development at EMSI Burning Glass, an Idaho-based labor market consulting firm that provided some data on workforce attraction for the CNBC study. "Unfortunately, I think we're going to continue to see a labor shortage. So, it's really on employers and communities to think outside the box, finding dislocated workers."With that in mind, we have expanded our Workforce category for 2022. In addition to measuring things like college-level educational attainment, the concentration of technical workers, migration patterns and right-to-work laws, we are also looking at the availability of workers with two-year degrees and industry-recognized certifications."States really rely on people, and they rely on businesses for economic development," Christopher said. "It's really on states in partnership with many organizations within their walls to help address this and to really thrive."Infrastructure and the supply chainThe national effort to rebuild the supply chain takes more than people. Infrastructure is key, and it is the second most important category in this year's rankings."When a business makes a decision to commit half a billion dollars or more in capital to a new facility, the infrastructure darn well better be in place — the roads, the bridges, the water, access to employees, the electrical components, redundancies within the system," said Tom Stringer, managing director of the national site selection practice at BDO in New York.The new emphasis on physical facilities comes after two years of focus on remote work because of the pandemic. Stringer said the supply chain crisis has changed everything. "When there's a hiccup in the system, everybody seems to catch the cold now," Stringer said. "So, there is a big push now in manufacturing across the board."Our study looks at roads, bridges, ports and airports, access to major population centers, broadband, and utilities including the electrical grid. We also look at sustainability in the face of climate change.Infrastructure has been an important consideration in a number of major corporate location decisions, particularly in the fast-growing electric vehicle sector. This includes Rivian, which is building a $5 billion assembly plant in Georgia, and Ford, which is teaming up with South Korean battery manufacturer SK Innovation to spend $11 billion on facilities in Kentucky and Tennessee.Inflation and corporate subsidiesStates are also helping companies make their decisions by offering generous incentives for companies to set up shop there. Ford stands to collect $500 million in incentives and enjoy nearly $400 million more in infrastructure improvements for its Tennessee investment, under a deal approved by the state last year. Rivian will receive $1.5 billion in state and local subsidies for its Georgia facility.Not to be outdone, General Motors will pick up a billion in state subsidies to manufacture electric vehicles and batteries in its home state of Michigan.Subsidy watchdog Greg LeRoy of the non-profit group Good Jobs First believes the state incentives for the electric vehicle industry in particular have gotten way out of hand."It's pretty easy for states and governments to get caught up in the hype," he said. "The downside risk is overspending."He said that when states are paying, in essence, hundreds of thousands of dollars in incentives per job, the cost-benefit analysis is out of whack."Will the average worker in this factory ever pay hundreds of thousands of dollars more in taxes than they consume in state and local public services, they and their family, over their working lifetime? The answer is no way," he said. "Large, multinational, multistate companies are paying less in taxes, and everybody else is paying more." But Stringer, who worked on a number of electric vehicle deals, said states have been careful to build protections into their incentive packages."They've been performance based. So once the jobs are created, once the capital is expended, once the factory is built, then those incentives start to take hold," he said.Incentives are increasingly important in a time of record inflation, as companies seek to reduce their costs. They are among the things we measure in our Cost of Doing Business category, along with things like wages, utility costs, and rent.Culture clashIn some states, traditional friendliness toward business is running headlong into raging culture wars. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis sought to punish Disney for speaking out against the gender education law that critics call the "Don't Say Gay" law. He pushed through a law to revoke the special tax district in Orlando that helped lure the company there in the 1960s. But Disney spoke out only after employees criticized the company for its silence about the law. Many other companies have been critical of that and other laws that are seen as targeting various groups over cultural issues, complaining that the laws not only hurt their customers, they also limit their ability to attract and retain workers.Walt Disney employees and demonstrators during a rally against the Florida "Don't Say Gay" bill at Griffith Park in Glendale, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 22, 2022.Alisha Jucevic | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesIn 2022, our America's Top States for Business study again considers Life, Health and Inclusion. We measure the inclusiveness of state laws, as well as other quality of life issues including crime rates, environmental quality, and health care — the pandemic is not over, after all.And this year, for the first time, we consider the availability of child care, which U.S. Chamber of Commerce found is a "leading obstacle" to employees reentering the workforce.Categories of competitivenessAlso on the scorecard: Technology and Innovation; Education, with a new emphasis on career education and community colleges; Access to Capital; and Cost of Living.We are also paying attention this year to two emerging industries: cryptocurrencies and cannabis. Both help shape our Business Friendliness category, which also looks at each state's legal and regulatory climates.More CNBC features about state competitiveness are coming as we put the finishing touches on this year's rankings. As always, we want to hear from you on social media, using the hashtag #TopStates."
"Worker shortages, supply chain crisis fuel 2022 Top States for Business battle."
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