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As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike act upon his impulse ? || It depended on the impulse
0False
[ "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man .", "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike act upon his impulse ? || He didn't - he first thought things through
0False
[ "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man .", "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike act upon his impulse ? || All of his friends were called slaves to impulse
0False
[ "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man .", "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike act upon his impulse ? || He tells his chauffeur to go to the Court of General Sessions to say a personal word to the judge
1True
[ "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man .", "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike act upon his impulse ? || He usually went for it, but gave himself time to think first
0False
[ "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man .", "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Why was it a charming morning ? || The traffic policemen who cleared the way for him were charming
0False
[ "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Why was it a charming morning ? || Some genius of memory
0False
[ "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Why was it a charming morning ? || It was cold and grey but he was somehow happy
0False
[ "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Why was it a charming morning ? || Spring was at full tide, and the air was clean and sweet
1True
[ "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Why was it a charming morning ? || He enjoyed thinking of details of his daily routine, found it charming
0False
[ "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the Wisest Man 's name ? || Arnold Spear
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the Wisest Man 's name ? || Mr. Arnold Thorndike
1True
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the Wisest Man 's name ? || Arnold Thorndike
1True
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the Wisest Man 's name ? || Spear Thorndike
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the Wisest Man 's name ? || Spear
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was Arthur Thorndike thinking of on his morning drive ? || The purchase of a railroad, the Japanese loan, the new wing to his art gallery, an article in a newspaper he owned attacking his favorite trust, and that a young man named spear was going to be sentenced for theft
1True
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was Arthur Thorndike thinking of on his morning drive ? || The salutes
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was Arthur Thorndike thinking of on his morning drive ? || The daily news
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was Arthur Thorndike thinking of on his morning drive ? || His mother
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was Arthur Thorndike thinking of on his morning drive ? || His daily routine, before he started thinking of Spear
1True
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was Arthur Thorndike thinking of on his morning drive ? || The policemen that cleared the way for him
0False
[ "As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Who did Mr. Thorndike tell to " Stop at the Court of General Sessions " ? || The policemen who cleared the way for him
0False
[ "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Who did Mr. Thorndike tell to " Stop at the Court of General Sessions " ? || Young Spear
0False
[ "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Who did Mr. Thorndike tell to " Stop at the Court of General Sessions " ? || The Chauffeur
1True
[ "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Who did Mr. Thorndike tell to " Stop at the Court of General Sessions " ? || The judge
0False
[ "He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder .", "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike describe the weather of the day ? || He says the spring air is sweet and clean and the sun is warm. He calls it a charming morning
1True
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike describe the weather of the day ? || Charming, even though cold
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike describe the weather of the day ? || Charming, the air is sour and filled with strange things
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
How does Mr. Thorndike describe the weather of the day ? || Okay, warm
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was the weather like ? || It was spring, the air was clean and sweet
1True
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was the weather like ? || Predator
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was the weather like ? || Charming, but cold
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was the weather like ? || Ugly
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What was the weather like ? || Cold and gray
0False
[ "The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful .", "It was a charming morning .", "The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the name of the shy , silent stenographer about to be put in jail for theft ? || Spear
1True
[ "But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft .", "A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the name of the shy , silent stenographer about to be put in jail for theft ? || Arnold
0False
[ "But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft .", "A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the name of the shy , silent stenographer about to be put in jail for theft ? || Thorndike
0False
[ "But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft .", "A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What is the name of the shy , silent stenographer about to be put in jail for theft ? || The probation officer
0False
[ "But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural .", "Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft .", "A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What did Mr. Thorndike want to do at the Court of General Sessions ? || He wanted to help young Spear
1True
[ "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What did Mr. Thorndike want to do at the Court of General Sessions ? || He liked the walk from there to his home
0False
[ "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What did Mr. Thorndike want to do at the Court of General Sessions ? || Speak with the district attorney or Judge personally
1True
[ "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What did Mr. Thorndike want to do at the Court of General Sessions ? || He wanted to see the judge
0False
[ "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
What did Mr. Thorndike want to do at the Court of General Sessions ? || He needed to do some business in relation to the Japanese loan
0False
[ "\" Stop at the Court of General Sessions , \" he commanded .", "What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes .", "A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Mr. Thorndike mentions impulses -- what does he say ? || He's a slave to impulses
1True
[ "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Mr. Thorndike mentions impulses -- what does he say ? || That his friends say he is a slave to impulses because he tends to act quickly, but those impulses have led to his success
1True
[ "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Mr. Thorndike mentions impulses -- what does he say ? || He's glad he never listen to his impulses
0False
[ "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Mr. Thorndike mentions impulses -- what does he say ? || He hates impulses
0False
[ "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad , the Japanese loan , the new wing to his art gallery , and an attack that morning , in his own newspaper , upon his pet trust . But his busy mind was not too occupied to return the salutes of the traffic policemen who cleared the way for him . Or , by some genius of memory , to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft . It was a charming morning . The spring was at full tide , and the air was sweet and clean . Mr. Thorndike considered whimsically that to send a man to jail with the memory of such a morning clinging to him was adding a year to his sentence . He regretted he had not given the probation officer a stronger letter . He remembered the young man now , and favorably . A shy , silent youth , deft in work , and at other times conscious and embarrassed . But that , on the part of a stenographer , in the presence of the Wisest Man in Wall Street , was not unnatural . On occasions , Mr. Thorndike had put even royalty— frayed , impecunious royalty , on the lookout for a loan — at its ease . The hood of the car was down , and the taste of the air , warmed by the sun , was grateful . It was at this time , a year before , that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother . A year from now where would young Spear be ? It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse . It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man . He leaned forward and touched the chauffeur 's shoulder . " Stop at the Court of General Sessions , " he commanded . What he proposed to do would take but a few minutes . A word , a personal word from him to the district attorney , or the judge , would be enough .
Mr. Thorndike mentions impulses -- what does he say ? || He likes acting upon his impulses rarely, from time to time
0False
[ "It was characteristic of the great man to act quickly , so quickly that his friends declared he was a slave to impulse .", "It was these same impulses , leading so invariably to success , that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was the profession of the first man in line ? || Die-Cutter
1True
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was the profession of the first man in line ? || Judge
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was the profession of the first man in line ? || He was a die-cutter by profession
1True
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Does it appear that the man is speaking directly to the judge ? || No
1True
[ "The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant .", "His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Does it appear that the man is speaking directly to the judge ? || Yes
0False
[ "The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant .", "His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was the stenographer 's name ? || Stenographer's name was Spear
1True
[ "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met .", "At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was the stenographer 's name ? || Thorndike
0False
[ "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met .", "At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was the stenographer 's name ? || Andrew
0False
[ "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met .", "At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Who spoke up on behalf of the wife ? || District attorney
1True
[ "He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . \" \" Is the wife in court ? \" the judge said .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered .", "\" Mrs. Austin says , \" continued the district attorney , \" she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Who spoke up on behalf of the wife ? || The court attendant
0False
[ "He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . \" \" Is the wife in court ? \" the judge said .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered .", "\" Mrs. Austin says , \" continued the district attorney , \" she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Who spoke up on behalf of the wife ? || Judge
0False
[ "He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . \" \" Is the wife in court ? \" the judge said .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered .", "\" Mrs. Austin says , \" continued the district attorney , \" she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Who spoke up on behalf of the wife ? || The probation officer
0False
[ "He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . \" \" Is the wife in court ? \" the judge said .", "\" Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . \" The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered .", "\" Mrs. Austin says , \" continued the district attorney , \" she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Would the first man line 's wife take him back ? || The man's wife stated she would take him back
1True
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "Would she take him back ?", "Indeed she would take him back ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Would the first man line 's wife take him back ? || No
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "Would she take him back ?", "Indeed she would take him back ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Was the first man in line a good husband ? || Maybe
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Was the first man in line a good husband ? || Mr. Thorndike
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Was the first man in line a good husband ? || No
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Was the first man in line a good husband ? || Yes
1True
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Was the first man in line a good husband ? || The man's wife stated that he could not have been a better husband to her
1True
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "\" Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? \" asked the young judge .", "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was Mr. Thorndike 's occupation ? || Die-Cutter
1True
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was Mr. Thorndike 's occupation ? || Mr. Thorndike was a financier
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was Mr. Thorndike 's occupation ? || Judge
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was Mr. Thorndike 's occupation ? || the court-room
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was Mr. Thorndike 's occupation ? || assistant district attorney
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
What was Mr. Thorndike 's occupation ? || stenographer
0False
[ "Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews .", "He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Did the woman speak good things about her husband ? || No
0False
[ "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Did the woman speak good things about her husband ? || Yes
1True
[ "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
Mr. Thorndike had risen , and , in farewell , was holding out his hand to Andrews . He turned , and across the court - room the eyes of the financier and the stenographer met . At the sight of the great man , Spear flushed crimson , and then his look of despair slowly disappeared ; and into his eyes there came incredulously hope and gratitude . He turned his head suddenly to the wall . Mr. Thorndike stood irresolute , and then sank back into his chair . The first man in the line was already at the railing , and the questions put to him by the judge were being repeated to him by the other assistant district attorney and a court attendant . His muttered answers were in turn repeated to the judge . " Says he 's married , naturalized citizen , Lutheran Church , die- cutter by profession . " The probation officer , her hands filled with papers , bustled forward and whispered . " Mrs. Austin says , " continued the district attorney , " she 's looked into this case , and asks to have the man turned over to her . He has a wife and three children ; has supported them for five years . " " Is the wife in court ? " the judge said . A thin , washed - out , pretty woman stood up , and clasped her hands in front of her . " Has this man been a good husband to you , madam ? " asked the young judge . The woman broke into vehement assurances . No man could have been a better husband . Would she take him back ? Indeed she would take him back . She held out her hands as though she would physically drag her husband from the pillory . The judge bowed toward the probation officer , and she beckoned the prisoner to her .
Did the woman speak good things about her husband ? || Maybe
0False
[ "The woman broke into vehement assurances .", "No man could have been a better husband ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
Why did Rachel stop dancing with him || She was heading to the bar
1True
[ "Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there .", "The next time the crowd split , I saw him ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
Why did Rachel stop dancing with him || Vowing
0False
[ "Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there .", "The next time the crowd split , I saw him ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
Why did Rachel stop dancing with him || She was with another guy
1True
[ "Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there .", "The next time the crowd split , I saw him ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
Why did Rachel stop dancing with him || She did not like the song
0False
[ "Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there .", "The next time the crowd split , I saw him ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
What phrases draw a parallel between this party scene and a typical church scene . || "The DJ's moving sermon," and "people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air"
1True
[ "A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon .", "On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
What phrases draw a parallel between this party scene and a typical church scene . || It was just a little set-up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share, mostly beer
0False
[ "A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon .", "On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
What phrases draw a parallel between this party scene and a typical church scene . || A couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ’s moving sermon. On the dance floor, people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air
1True
[ "A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon .", "On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
Who was the girl he was dancing with || Rachel
1True
[ "Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd .", "I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes ." ]
The old vaulted church was stripped down : there was no cloth on the altar , just a DJ 's toolkit and his beer . Through the dark , I could see three bolts left in the wall from where they 'd taken down the crucifix . A confessional too beaten - up to have been sold was shaking in a way that suggested activity inside , and where the pews had been taken out , a couple hundred people were testifying to the DJ 's moving sermon . Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd . There was a terrific echo , each beat reverberating inside of the next , and the old stained - glass windows rattled in their frames . On the dance floor , people moved with their eyes closed and their hands in the air . I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes . She told me that she was heading for a drink and slipped out of the crowd . When she had n't come back halfway through the next song , I glanced over at the bar . It was just a little set - up where someone had stacked a few crates and brought something alcoholic to share , mostly beer . Rachel was standing with a plastic cup , looking like she was having a conversation , but I could n't see anyone else there . The next time the crowd split , I saw him . He stood in front of a blue light , so I could n't see him clearly , but what I saw was memorable . He wore a jacket of what might have been blue velvet , and his hair gleamed black against his white skin . The blue haze seemed to stop just shy of his pallor , setting off his striking face without illuminating its details , and his wrists flashed white in the darkness . He did n't move , just stared and held his drink . The next time I saw them , his mouth was moving . She nodded and he took her arm . I watched them through the crush of dancers as they squeezed along the wall , and the feeling came to me that something was very wrong . Saturday morning , I woke up and saw that she still had n't come home .
Who was the girl he was dancing with || Sarah
0False
[ "Rachel stepped forward into the crowd while I took a moment to drink in the ceiling 's blue - lit , shadowed vault and the light - catching haze from who - knows - what rising between the DJ and the crowd .", "I danced with Rachel for a while , but then something by the bar seemed to be pulling her eyes ." ]

Dataset Card for "eraser_multi_rc"

Dataset Summary

MultiRC (Multi-Sentence Reading Comprehension) is a dataset of short paragraphs and multi-sentence questions that can be answered from the content of the paragraph.

We have designed the dataset with three key challenges in mind:

  • The number of correct answer-options for each question is not pre-specified. This removes the over-reliance of current approaches on answer-options and forces them to decide on the correctness of each candidate answer independently of others. In other words, unlike previous work, the task here is not to simply identify the best answer-option, but to evaluate the correctness of each answer-option individually.
  • The correct answer(s) is not required to be a span in the text.
  • The paragraphs in our dataset have diverse provenance by being extracted from 7 different domains such as news, fiction, historical text etc., and hence are expected to be more diverse in their contents as compared to single-domain datasets.

The goal of this dataset is to encourage the research community to explore approaches that can do more than sophisticated lexical-level matching.

Supported Tasks and Leaderboards

More Information Needed

Languages

More Information Needed

Dataset Structure

Data Instances

default

  • Size of downloaded dataset files: 1.67 MB
  • Size of the generated dataset: 63.65 MB
  • Total amount of disk used: 65.32 MB

An example of 'validation' looks as follows.

This example was too long and was cropped:

{
    "evidences": "[\"Allan sat down at his desk and pulled the chair in close .\", \"Opening a side drawer , he took out a piece of paper and his ink...",
    "label": 0,
    "passage": "\"Allan sat down at his desk and pulled the chair in close .\\nOpening a side drawer , he took out a piece of paper and his inkpot...",
    "query_and_answer": "Name few objects said to be in or on Allan 's desk || Eraser"
}

Data Fields

The data fields are the same among all splits.

default

  • passage: a string feature.
  • query_and_answer: a string feature.
  • label: a classification label, with possible values including False (0), True (1).
  • evidences: a list of string features.

Data Splits

name train validation test
default 24029 3214 4848

Dataset Creation

Curation Rationale

More Information Needed

Source Data

Initial Data Collection and Normalization

More Information Needed

Who are the source language producers?

More Information Needed

Annotations

Annotation process

More Information Needed

Who are the annotators?

More Information Needed

Personal and Sensitive Information

More Information Needed

Considerations for Using the Data

Social Impact of Dataset

More Information Needed

Discussion of Biases

More Information Needed

Other Known Limitations

More Information Needed

Additional Information

Dataset Curators

More Information Needed

Licensing Information

https://github.com/CogComp/multirc/blob/master/LICENSE

Research and Academic Use License Cognitive Computation Group University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Downloading software implies that you accept the following license terms:

Under this Agreement, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois ("University"), a body corporate and politic of the State of Illinois with its principal offices at 506 South Wright Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801, U.S.A., on behalf of its Department of Computer Science on the Urbana-Champaign Campus, provides the software ("Software") described in Appendix A, attached hereto and incorporated herein, to the Licensee identified below ("Licensee") subject to the following conditions:

1. Upon execution of this Agreement by Licensee below, the University grants, and Licensee accepts, a roylaty-free, non-exclusive license:
    A. To use unlimited copies of the Software for its own academic and research purposes.
    B. To make derivative works. However, if Licensee distributes any derivative work based on or derived from the Software (with such distribution limited to binary form only), then Licensee will (1) notify the University (c/o Professor Dan Roth, e-mail: danr@cs.uiuc.edu) regarding its distribution of the derivative work and provide a copy if requested, and (2) clearly notify users that such derivative work is a modified version and not the original Software distributed by the University.
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No license is granted herein that would permit Licensee to incorporate the Software into a commercial product, or to otherwise commercially exploit the Software. Should Licensee wish to make commercial use of the Software, Licensee should contact the University, c/o the Office of Technology Management ("OTM") to negotiate an appropriate license for such commercial use. To contact the OTM: otmmailaccount@ad.uiuc.edu; telephone: (217)333-3781;  fax: (217) 265-5530.
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Citation Information

@unpublished{eraser2019,
    title = {ERASER: A Benchmark to Evaluate Rationalized NLP Models},
    author = {Jay DeYoung and Sarthak Jain and Nazneen Fatema Rajani and Eric Lehman and Caiming Xiong and Richard Socher and Byron C. Wallace}
}
@inproceedings{MultiRC2018,
    author = {Daniel Khashabi and Snigdha Chaturvedi and Michael Roth and Shyam Upadhyay and Dan Roth},
    title = {Looking Beyond the Surface:A Challenge Set for Reading Comprehension over Multiple Sentences},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL)},
    year = {2018}
}

Contributions

Thanks to @lewtun, @patrickvonplaten, @thomwolf for adding this dataset.

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