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The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || Cannot be swayed by wealth or political or social influences
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || The law is not vindictive
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || It was not vindictive
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || It was unjust
0 (False)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || It was vindictive
0 (False)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || The judge told Mr. Thorndike that the law is not vindictive. He said the law only wishes to be just. Judge said the law cannot be swayed by wealth, political, or social influences
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge tell Mr. Thorndike about the law ? || It wishes only
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike want to help ? || Issacs
0 (False)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike want to help ? || The defendant
1 (True)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike want to help ? || The judge
0 (False)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike want to help ? || Spear
1 (True)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike want to help ? || Himself
0 (False)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || He was pleased
1 (True)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || He was angry
0 (False)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || Mr. Thorndike felt is was a bit absurd and embarassing. He inwardly glowed with pleasure because it had been awhile since someone told him he had done well
1 (True)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || Glowed with pleasure
1 (True)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || As unselfish
0 (False)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || He was scared
0 (False)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || Public-spirited
0 (False)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel about the judge making his speech in regards to him ? || He was embarrassed
1 (True)
[ "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the judges result and did it please or displease Mr. Thorndike ? || Not-guilty
1 (True)
[ "Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the judges result and did it please or displease Mr. Thorndike ? || Spear was free
1 (True)
[ "Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the judges result and did it please or displease Mr. Thorndike ? || Guilty
0 (False)
[ "Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the judges result and did it please or displease Mr. Thorndike ? || He set Spears free and it pleased Mr. Thorndike
1 (True)
[ "Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the judges result and did it please or displease Mr. Thorndike ? || Innocent
1 (True)
[ "Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the judges result and did it please or displease Mr. Thorndike ? || Hung jury
0 (False)
[ "Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || He had neglected his own interests
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || Because had no part in freeing Spear
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || Because Spear went to jail
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || He had neglected his own interests and had not helped Spear
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || Because he did not help
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || Moving out of the railed enclosure
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel his morning had been wasted ? || Because he did not get the verdict he wanted
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "His morning had been wasted .", "He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why is the law just and not vindictive ? || Because the rules say so
0 (False)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why is the law just and not vindictive ? || It cannot be swayed by wealth or political or social influence
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why is the law just and not vindictive ? || Because good people speak good words
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why is the law just and not vindictive ? || Because or the police
0 (False)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || Because he helped to free Spear
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || Because he was the star witness
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || To scold him
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || He wished more people were unselfish and public-spirited
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || Because he sacrificed his time
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || Because he was unselfish
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did the judge loudly thank Mr. Thorndike for coming ? || So that other citizens could hear
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did the judge send to summon Mr. Thorndike ? || Andrews
1 (True)
[ "The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews .", "He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name .", "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did the judge send to summon Mr. Thorndike ? || The jury
0 (False)
[ "The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews .", "He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name .", "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did the judge send to summon Mr. Thorndike ? || Mr. Andrews
1 (True)
[ "The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews .", "He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name .", "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did the judge send to summon Mr. Thorndike ? || Spears
0 (False)
[ "The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews .", "He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name .", "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel when the judgment was rendered for Spear ? || Disappointment
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty .", "His morning had been wasted ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel when the judgment was rendered for Spear ? || Twingle
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty .", "His morning had been wasted ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel when the judgment was rendered for Spear ? || Disappointed
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty .", "His morning had been wasted ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel when the judgment was rendered for Spear ? || Mr. Thorndike felt a little disappointed. He felt like his time was wasted. He was pleased by the result but wished he had more a part in giving Spear his liberty
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty .", "His morning had been wasted ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel when the judgment was rendered for Spear ? || Afraid
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty .", "His morning had been wasted ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
How did Mr. Thorndike feel when the judgment was rendered for Spear ? || Embarassed
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty .", "His morning had been wasted ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who told Mr. Thorndike he had done well ? || The bailiff
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who told Mr. Thorndike he had done well ? || The judge
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who told Mr. Thorndike he had done well ? || The judge of the trial
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who told Mr. Thorndike he had done well ? || Jury
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who told Mr. Thorndike he had done well ? || The lawyers
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who told Mr. Thorndike he had done well ? || Spear
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What does the judge say about the law ? || It is vindictive
0 (False)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What does the judge say about the law ? || It is not just
0 (False)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What does the judge say about the law ? || It is just
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What does the judge say about the law ? || It is not vindictive, it wishes to be just and cannot be swayed by wealth, political or social influences
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What does the judge say about the law ? || It is not vindictive
1 (True)
[ "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "\" It wishes only to be just .", "Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who thanked Mr. Thorndike for coming that day ? || Mr. Andrews
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who thanked Mr. Thorndike for coming that day ? || Issacs
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who thanked Mr. Thorndike for coming that day ? || The judge
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who thanked Mr. Thorndike for coming that day ? || Jury
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who thanked Mr. Thorndike for coming that day ? || The judge presiding over the trial
1 (True)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who thanked Mr. Thorndike for coming that day ? || Spear
0 (False)
[ "\" His honor , \" he said impressively , \" wishes to speak to you . \" The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand .", "\" The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , \" he said .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge personally tell Mr. Thorndike about himself ? || He was public-spirited
1 (True)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge personally tell Mr. Thorndike about himself ? || He was unselfish
1 (True)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge personally tell Mr. Thorndike about himself ? || He messed up
0 (False)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge personally tell Mr. Thorndike about himself ? || Judge told Mr. Thorndike that he was a gentleman and that he thanks him for coming He said he wishes more citizens were as unselfish and public-spirited as him
1 (True)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What did the judge personally tell Mr. Thorndike about himself ? || He was embarrassing
0 (False)
[ "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen .", "I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . \" It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || Interests
0 (False)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || People who neglect their own interests for others
1 (True)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || Punishing wrongdoers
0 (False)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || Public-spirited citizens
1 (True)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || Judge's speech was mainly about public-spirited citizens who neglect their own interest and comes to the assist of others in misfortune. He says that he likes to know when there is a good man in front of him
1 (True)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || Citizens
0 (False)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
What was the beginning of the judge 's speech mainly about ? || Spear
0 (False)
[ "The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune .", "But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike credit with getting Spear his liberty ? || The judge
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike credit with getting Spear his liberty ? || Isaacs & Sons
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike credit with getting Spear his liberty ? || The lawyers
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike credit with getting Spear his liberty ? || Spear
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Who did Mr. Thorndike credit with getting Spear his liberty ? || Himself
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel a twinge of disappointment ? || Because the judge called him out
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel a twinge of disappointment ? || He wished, in bringing it about, he had had some part
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel a twinge of disappointment ? || Because a guilty man got away
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel a twinge of disappointment ? || His morning was wasted
0 (False)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel a twinge of disappointment ? || He wished he had played some part in the judge's decision
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
The judge leaned back in his chair and beckoned to Mr. Andrews . It was finished . Spear was free , and from different parts of the courtroom people were moving toward the door . Their numbers showed that the friends of the young man had been many . Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment . Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part . He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty . His morning had been wasted . He had neglected his own interests , and in no way assisted those of Spear . He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name . " His honor , " he said impressively , " wishes to speak to you . " The judge leaned over his desk and shook Mr. Thorndike by the hand . Then he made a speech . The speech was about public - spirited citizens who , to the neglect of their own interests , came to assist the ends of justice , and fellow - creatures in misfortune . He purposely spoke in a loud voice , and every one stopped to listen . " The law , Mr. Thorndike , is not vindictive , " he said . " It wishes only to be just . Nor can it be swayed by wealth or political or social influences . But when there is good in a man , I , personally , want to know it , and when gentlemen like yourself , of your standing in this city , come here to speak a good word for a man , we would stultify the purpose of justice if we did not listen . I thank you for coming , and I wish more of our citizens were as unselfish and public - spirited . " It was all quite absurd and most embarrassing , but inwardly Mr. Thorndike glowed with pleasure . It was a long time since any one had had the audacity to tell him he had done well .
Why did Mr. Thorndike feel a twinge of disappointment ? || Because he was not able to help
1 (True)
[ "Mr. Thorndike felt a certain twinge of disappointment .", "Even though the result relieved and pleased him , he wished , in bringing it about , he had had some part ." ]
Mr. Andrews pointed to one of the oak chairs . " You sit there , " he commanded , " it 's reserved for members of the bar , but it 's all right . You 're with ME . " Distinctly annoyed , slightly bewildered , the banker sank between the arms of a chair . He felt he had lost his individuality . Andrews had become his sponsor . Because of Andrews he was tolerated . Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police - court lawyers . No longer was he Arnold Thorndike . He was merely the man " with Mr. Andrews . " Then even Andrews abandoned him . " The judge'll be here in a minute , now , " said the assistant district attorney , and went inside a railed enclosure in front of the judge 's bench . There he greeted another assistant district attorney whose years were those of even greater indiscretion than the years of Mr. Andrews . Seated on the rail , with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr. Thorndike , they laughed and talked together . The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin , as he appeared in vaudeville . To Mr. Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him . He arose , and touched his sleeve . With infinite sarcasm Mr. Thorndike began : " My engagements are not pressing , but— " A court attendant beat with his palm upon the rail . " Sit down ! " whispered Andrews . " The judge is coming . " Mr. Thorndike sat down . The court attendant droned loudly words Mr. Thorndike could not distinguish . There was a rustle of silk , and from a door behind him the judge stalked past .
Why did Thorndike touch Andrews ' sleeve ? || To dust it off
0 (False)
[ "He arose , and touched his sleeve .", "\" The judge is coming . \" Mr. Thorndike sat down ." ]
Mr. Andrews pointed to one of the oak chairs . " You sit there , " he commanded , " it 's reserved for members of the bar , but it 's all right . You 're with ME . " Distinctly annoyed , slightly bewildered , the banker sank between the arms of a chair . He felt he had lost his individuality . Andrews had become his sponsor . Because of Andrews he was tolerated . Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police - court lawyers . No longer was he Arnold Thorndike . He was merely the man " with Mr. Andrews . " Then even Andrews abandoned him . " The judge'll be here in a minute , now , " said the assistant district attorney , and went inside a railed enclosure in front of the judge 's bench . There he greeted another assistant district attorney whose years were those of even greater indiscretion than the years of Mr. Andrews . Seated on the rail , with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr. Thorndike , they laughed and talked together . The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin , as he appeared in vaudeville . To Mr. Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him . He arose , and touched his sleeve . With infinite sarcasm Mr. Thorndike began : " My engagements are not pressing , but— " A court attendant beat with his palm upon the rail . " Sit down ! " whispered Andrews . " The judge is coming . " Mr. Thorndike sat down . The court attendant droned loudly words Mr. Thorndike could not distinguish . There was a rustle of silk , and from a door behind him the judge stalked past .
Why did Thorndike touch Andrews ' sleeve ? || To pull him closer
0 (False)
[ "He arose , and touched his sleeve .", "\" The judge is coming . \" Mr. Thorndike sat down ." ]
Mr. Andrews pointed to one of the oak chairs . " You sit there , " he commanded , " it 's reserved for members of the bar , but it 's all right . You 're with ME . " Distinctly annoyed , slightly bewildered , the banker sank between the arms of a chair . He felt he had lost his individuality . Andrews had become his sponsor . Because of Andrews he was tolerated . Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police - court lawyers . No longer was he Arnold Thorndike . He was merely the man " with Mr. Andrews . " Then even Andrews abandoned him . " The judge'll be here in a minute , now , " said the assistant district attorney , and went inside a railed enclosure in front of the judge 's bench . There he greeted another assistant district attorney whose years were those of even greater indiscretion than the years of Mr. Andrews . Seated on the rail , with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr. Thorndike , they laughed and talked together . The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin , as he appeared in vaudeville . To Mr. Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him . He arose , and touched his sleeve . With infinite sarcasm Mr. Thorndike began : " My engagements are not pressing , but— " A court attendant beat with his palm upon the rail . " Sit down ! " whispered Andrews . " The judge is coming . " Mr. Thorndike sat down . The court attendant droned loudly words Mr. Thorndike could not distinguish . There was a rustle of silk , and from a door behind him the judge stalked past .
Why did Thorndike touch Andrews ' sleeve ? || To get his attention
1 (True)
[ "He arose , and touched his sleeve .", "\" The judge is coming . \" Mr. Thorndike sat down ." ]
Mr. Andrews pointed to one of the oak chairs . " You sit there , " he commanded , " it 's reserved for members of the bar , but it 's all right . You 're with ME . " Distinctly annoyed , slightly bewildered , the banker sank between the arms of a chair . He felt he had lost his individuality . Andrews had become his sponsor . Because of Andrews he was tolerated . Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police - court lawyers . No longer was he Arnold Thorndike . He was merely the man " with Mr. Andrews . " Then even Andrews abandoned him . " The judge'll be here in a minute , now , " said the assistant district attorney , and went inside a railed enclosure in front of the judge 's bench . There he greeted another assistant district attorney whose years were those of even greater indiscretion than the years of Mr. Andrews . Seated on the rail , with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr. Thorndike , they laughed and talked together . The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin , as he appeared in vaudeville . To Mr. Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him . He arose , and touched his sleeve . With infinite sarcasm Mr. Thorndike began : " My engagements are not pressing , but— " A court attendant beat with his palm upon the rail . " Sit down ! " whispered Andrews . " The judge is coming . " Mr. Thorndike sat down . The court attendant droned loudly words Mr. Thorndike could not distinguish . There was a rustle of silk , and from a door behind him the judge stalked past .
Why did Thorndike touch Andrews ' sleeve ? || To tell him the judge was coming
1 (True)
[ "He arose , and touched his sleeve .", "\" The judge is coming . \" Mr. Thorndike sat down ." ]
Mr. Andrews pointed to one of the oak chairs . " You sit there , " he commanded , " it 's reserved for members of the bar , but it 's all right . You 're with ME . " Distinctly annoyed , slightly bewildered , the banker sank between the arms of a chair . He felt he had lost his individuality . Andrews had become his sponsor . Because of Andrews he was tolerated . Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police - court lawyers . No longer was he Arnold Thorndike . He was merely the man " with Mr. Andrews . " Then even Andrews abandoned him . " The judge'll be here in a minute , now , " said the assistant district attorney , and went inside a railed enclosure in front of the judge 's bench . There he greeted another assistant district attorney whose years were those of even greater indiscretion than the years of Mr. Andrews . Seated on the rail , with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr. Thorndike , they laughed and talked together . The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin , as he appeared in vaudeville . To Mr. Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him . He arose , and touched his sleeve . With infinite sarcasm Mr. Thorndike began : " My engagements are not pressing , but— " A court attendant beat with his palm upon the rail . " Sit down ! " whispered Andrews . " The judge is coming . " Mr. Thorndike sat down . The court attendant droned loudly words Mr. Thorndike could not distinguish . There was a rustle of silk , and from a door behind him the judge stalked past .
Who sits down after Andrew whispers " Sit down " ? || His police officer
0 (False)
[ "\" Sit down ! \" whispered Andrews .", "\" The judge is coming . \" Mr. Thorndike sat down ." ]
Mr. Andrews pointed to one of the oak chairs . " You sit there , " he commanded , " it 's reserved for members of the bar , but it 's all right . You 're with ME . " Distinctly annoyed , slightly bewildered , the banker sank between the arms of a chair . He felt he had lost his individuality . Andrews had become his sponsor . Because of Andrews he was tolerated . Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police - court lawyers . No longer was he Arnold Thorndike . He was merely the man " with Mr. Andrews . " Then even Andrews abandoned him . " The judge'll be here in a minute , now , " said the assistant district attorney , and went inside a railed enclosure in front of the judge 's bench . There he greeted another assistant district attorney whose years were those of even greater indiscretion than the years of Mr. Andrews . Seated on the rail , with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr. Thorndike , they laughed and talked together . The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin , as he appeared in vaudeville . To Mr. Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him . He arose , and touched his sleeve . With infinite sarcasm Mr. Thorndike began : " My engagements are not pressing , but— " A court attendant beat with his palm upon the rail . " Sit down ! " whispered Andrews . " The judge is coming . " Mr. Thorndike sat down . The court attendant droned loudly words Mr. Thorndike could not distinguish . There was a rustle of silk , and from a door behind him the judge stalked past .
Who sits down after Andrew whispers " Sit down " ? || The banker
1 (True)
[ "\" Sit down ! \" whispered Andrews .", "\" The judge is coming . \" Mr. Thorndike sat down ." ]
End of preview (truncated to 100 rows)

Dataset Card for "eraser_multi_rc"

Dataset Summary

Eraser Multi RC is a dataset for queries over multi-line passages, along with answers and a rationalte. Each example in this dataset has the following 5 parts

  1. A Mutli-line Passage
  2. A Query about the passage
  3. An Answer to the query
  4. A Classification as to whether the answer is right or wrong
  5. An Explanation justifying the classification

Supported Tasks and Leaderboards

More Information Needed

Languages

More Information Needed

Dataset Structure

Data Instances

default

  • Size of downloaded dataset files: 1.59 MB
  • Size of the generated dataset: 60.70 MB
  • Total amount of disk used: 62.29 MB

An example of 'validation' looks as follows.

This example was too long and was cropped:

{
    "evidences": "[\"Allan sat down at his desk and pulled the chair in close .\", \"Opening a side drawer , he took out a piece of paper and his ink...",
    "label": 0,
    "passage": "\"Allan sat down at his desk and pulled the chair in close .\\nOpening a side drawer , he took out a piece of paper and his inkpot...",
    "query_and_answer": "Name few objects said to be in or on Allan 's desk || Eraser"
}

Data Fields

The data fields are the same among all splits.

default

  • passage: a string feature.
  • query_and_answer: a string feature.
  • label: a classification label, with possible values including False (0), True (1).
  • evidences: a list of string features.

Data Splits

name train validation test
default 24029 3214 4848

Dataset Creation

Curation Rationale

More Information Needed

Source Data

Initial Data Collection and Normalization

More Information Needed

Who are the source language producers?

More Information Needed

Annotations

Annotation process

More Information Needed

Who are the annotators?

More Information Needed

Personal and Sensitive Information

More Information Needed

Considerations for Using the Data

Social Impact of Dataset

More Information Needed

Discussion of Biases

More Information Needed

Other Known Limitations

More Information Needed

Additional Information

Dataset Curators

More Information Needed

Licensing Information

More Information Needed

Citation Information


@unpublished{eraser2019,
    title = {ERASER: A Benchmark to Evaluate Rationalized NLP Models},
    author = {Jay DeYoung and Sarthak Jain and Nazneen Fatema Rajani and Eric Lehman and Caiming Xiong and Richard Socher and Byron C. Wallace}
}
@inproceedings{MultiRC2018,
    author = {Daniel Khashabi and Snigdha Chaturvedi and Michael Roth and Shyam Upadhyay and Dan Roth},
    title = {Looking Beyond the Surface:A Challenge Set for Reading Comprehension over Multiple Sentences},
    booktitle = {NAACL},
    year = {2018}
}

Contributions

Thanks to @lewtun, @patrickvonplaten, @thomwolf for adding this dataset.

Update on GitHub