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record_id (string)date (unknown)raw_date (string)title (string)place (string)empty_pg (bool)text (string)pg (int32)mean_wc_ocr (float32)std_wc_ocr (float64)name (string)all_names (string)Publisher (string)Country of publication 1 (string)all Countries of publication (string)Physical description (string)Language_1 (string)Language_2 (string)Language_3 (string)Language_4 (string)multi_language (bool)
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"T H I TRAY T OR A T RAGE BY: WITH Alterations > Amendments jjj and Additions. 3£ it is nofe atttfratt&etE&wtre J&opayip t&eic mw& Written by Mr. Rivers. L ON DON, Printed for Kuhard Farmer attheRoyal Exchange, mk Sam. ortjcoe in Uvent Garden, over against Wills Coffee-Uoufe. MDCXCsI. J"
7
0.343
0.22
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"TO THE Right Honourable Donnogh Earl of Clancarty, Viscount Musltery, and Baron WBlarney. May it pkafe your Honour. 1""^ 0 Pardon my Boldness in Presuming to shelter this Orpljutn under your Lord (hiss Protection, I am not ignorant , having never as yet deserved any Favour from yon, that it cannot but meet with a. severe Construction, but wholly relying upon your Clemency, who have ahvays been a favourer of the Muses . I flatter my self that your Lordship may^for the Authors J ak^, vouchsafe to grant it a favour able acceptance. I will not slander it with m$ Praije, it is Commendation enoughs to fay the Author was Mr. Rivers. / am very well affurd, after your perusal, your Honour will esteem it one of the best Tragedies that this Age hath Produc'd. I humbly beg your Lordfizp to pardon this Presumption, Os your Honours most Humble And mojl Obedient Servants"
9
0.365
0.147
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The Persons Names. Duke of Florence. Mr. Hodgson. Lorenzo, His>Kins_nan and Favorite the Traitor. Mr. Kynashn. Sciarrha, Brother to Amidea. Mr. Williams. Pisano, Lover to Oriana. Mr. Cibber. Cosmo, His Friend. Mr. Harris. Flcrio, Sciarrhas brother. Mr.Alexander. Depazzi, A creature of Lorenzos. Mr. Haynes. Frederico, 7K1 ,, "Mr. Mich Lee. Alonzo, £N°blemen- Mr. Bright. Petruchiv, Pisanoes Servant. Mr. Freeman. Regero, Page to Depazzi, -Tommy Kent. Gentlemen, Servants. Amidea, Sciarrhas Sister. Mrs. Bracegirdle. Oriana, Beloved of Pisano. Mrs. Ussells. Moroffk, Her Mother. Mrs. Cory. >Lusi, Pleasure. ' Furies."
10
0.464
0.163
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"![ * 3 THE TRAYTOR. Actus Primus. Enter Pisano and Petruchio. Pisano. DIDST bid him come? Pet. I did. Pis. Go i>ack again, And tell him, I am gone abroad. Pet. He's here already Sir. Cos. Dear Pisano, Let me enfold thee thus : Enter Cosmo, And yet my heart counts this Embrace a distance. Pis. I was woing Cosmo, My Man, to tell thee, I was gone abroad . Before thou cam'st. Cos How's this .<? Your words and looks Are strange, and teach me to infer I am fc Not welcome, that on riper Counsel, you Dp wish my absence, / B ?is."
11
0.512
0.198
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRAYTOR. _ Pis. What for telling truth ? He thus should have but madethe fit to see Thy friend, thou com'st with expectation To hear me talk, as I was wont of State, Our Friendship or of Women, Cosmo Yes.- no such matter. Cos. This is more wild than usual, your language Is not so clear as it was wont. Pis Right, right Cosmo, The reason is, I have straggled, And lost my self I know not where, in what Part of the World, and would not this be {hown As well in him, to have prepar'd thee now? Cos. What humour's this Pisano, I am yet to understand . Pis To understand ! Thou canst not understand me, yet thou hast - A name in Florence, for a ripe young man, Of nimble apprehension, of a wife And spreading observation, of whom Already our old Men do Prophesie Good, and great things, worthy thy fair dimensions. Cos This is an argument above the rest, Pisano is not well ; for being temperate, He was not wont to flatter, and abuse His Friend. Pis Besides there is another season, Thou (houldTt discover me at heart, through all These mists, .thou art in Love too, and who cannot, That feels himself the heat , but shrewdly guess At every symptom of that wanton Feaver. Oh my Friend ! Cos What misfortune can approach Your happy Love in Fairest Amidea. Let jealous Lovers fear, and feel what us To Languish, talk away their Blood, and Strength, Question their unkind Stars. You have your Game Before you Sir. Pis Before me where j? why dost Thou mock me Cosmo f Shee s not here. Cosmo. It is No Pilgrimage to travel to her Lip. Pis. ' sis not for you. Cos. How Sir, for me ? y've no Sulphion,"
12
0.479
0.167
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRAYTOR. 3 -Cos. Suspition^ I can be guilty of A Treason to our Friendship, be so just, ] If malice have been bufie, with my fame, To let me know Pis. You hastily interpret, Thy pardon I have only err'd, but not With the least scruple of thy faith, and honour To me, thou hast a noble Soul, and lov'st me . Rather too well, I would thou wer't my Enemy, That we had been born in distant climates, and never Took Cement from our Simpathies in Nature. Would we had never seen, or known each other, This may seem strange, from him that loves thee Cosmo, More pretious than his Life. Cos. Love me, and wish This separation ? Pis. I will give thee proof; So well I love thee, nothing in the world Thy Soul doth heartily affect, but I Do love it too, does it not trouble thy Belief ? I wear not my own heart about me, But thine exchang'd, thy eyes let in my objects, Thou hear'st for me, talk'st, kislest, and enjoyest All my felicities. Cos. What means this Language ? Pis. But what's all this to thee ? Go to Oriana, And bath thy Lips in Rofie dew of kisses . Ancl if at thy return thou find'st I have a being In this vain world, 'He tell thee more. Exit. Cos. But Sir, you must not part so. Pet. Not with my good will, I have no great ambition to be Mad. Cos Petruchio, let me conjure thee, tell What weight hangs on thy Masters heart ? why does he Appear so full of Trouble ? Pet. D'ye not guess? Cos. No. Pet. Why he loves— — ~ Cof. The Beauteous Amidea, I know that. Ptf. Some such thing was,But you are hisFriendMy LI, His Soul is now devoted to Oriana. And hcwill dye for her, if this Ague hold him. B 2"
13
0.537
0.182
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The T T R A Y T O R 4 Cosmo, Ha ! For 'tis not possible without some cure, He should live long : Good Sir, do you go in and Counsel him.' Jro, so, it works , Exit Cos This was my Lord Lorenzoes Plot, and; I Ha' been his Engine in the work, to batter His love to Amidea, by praysing Oriana to him, he is here, My Lord. Enter Lorenzo. Lor. Petruchio, where's your Lord > how moves the work ? Pet. To your own wish My Lord, he has thrown off The thought of Amedia, and is mad ¥ or Cosmos, Mistress, whom by your instructions I have commended so — Lor. My witty Villain Pet. Cosmo is with him, to whom cunningly I ha' discovered his disease, and I Beseech you interrupt 'cm not. Lor. This may Have Tragical effects Petruchio : For Cosmo, we (hall prune his fortune thus, Oriana's wealth would swell him in the 'State, He gt owes too fast already, be still ours. Pet. My Lord,you bought my Life,when you procured I My pardon from the Duke. Exit Lord and Pet, I Enter Pi ill. and Cosmo. Pis O Friend, thou canst not be so merciful, To give away such happiness, my Love Is for some fin I have committed, thus Transplanted, I look'd rather thou shouldst kill me, Then give away this comfort, tis a charity I Will make thee poor, and 'tvveie a great deal better That I should languish still, and die. Cos Oriana and I were but in Treaty. If you can find dispensation, to quit With Amidea, your first Love, be confident Oriana may be vvonc, and it were necessary You did prepare the Mother."
14
0.433
0.184
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"i Discover The TRAYTO R. Pis. Each tillable is a blessing. Cos. Although some complaints have past between ] Me and Oriana, I am not warm Yet in the Mothers fancy, whose power may Assist you much, but loose no time. Pis. Thou Miracle of Friendship ! Exeunt. Enter Duke Frederico, Florio, and Alonso. Dm. Letters to us > from whom > Al. Castruchio. D». The Exile, whence > Al. Scienna My good Lord, It came inclos'd within my Letter, which Impos'd my care and duty in the swift Delivery. Fr. TheDukeispaleofthefuddain. Du. A Palsie does possess me, Ha ! Lorenzo, Our Cousin, the Enemy of Our Life and State, My bosom Kinsman ? not too loud, theTraytor May hear, and by escape prevent Our Justice. Flo. WhatTraytor? Da. Alonso, come you hither, What correspondency maintain you with this Caflmchio ? Al. None My Lord, but I am happy Tn.his election, to bring the first Voice to your safety. Da. Most ingrateful man ! Turn Rebel : I have worn him in my blood, Al. 'Tis-time to purge the humour. Dit. I will do't. Our Guard, were he more precious, had he (har'd Our soul, as he but borrows of our flesh, TJiis action makes him nothing. He turne conspirator : Oh the fate of Princes I But stay, this paper fpeakes of no particular, He does not mention what design, what plot. Al. More Providence is necessary, Du. Right, right, good Alonso, th' art an honest man And lov'st us well, .what's to be done ? . Al. 'Tis best To make his person sore, by this you may"
15
0.514
0.182
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"TheT RAY T OK. 6 Discover soonest who are of his faction- <— Da. And at our leisure study of his punishment, Which must exceed death . every common trespass Is so rewarded, first apply all tortures To inforce confession, who are his confederates, And how they mectat to murder us, then some rare Invention to execute the Traytor, So as he may be half a year a dying, Will make us famdfor Justice. Enter Lorenzo, Depazzi. Al. He is here, Shal's apprehend him ? Lo. Happy morning to My gratious Soveraign. Du. Can Treason couch it self within that frame ? We ha' Letters for you. Lo. Letters, these dread Sir r'Have no directions to me, your Highness Ts only nam'd. D». They will concern your reading, Alonso, now qbserve and watch him Florio, Depazzi come you hither, does Lorenzo Look like a Traitor ? Dep. How sir, a Traytor ? Du. Ay Sir. Dep. I sir by my Honour not I sir, I defie -Him that speaks it , I am in a fine pickle. Lor. I ha' read Du. No blush ! not tremble : Read again. Lor- The substance is, that you maintain A vigilant eye over Lorenzo, who Hath threatned with your death, his Countries liberty And other things, touching reducing of A Common-wealth. D". I like not that. Dep. All's out : A pox upon him for a Traytor, he Irlds hedg'd me in but 'Ii econfess — Dh. What answer Make you to this Lorenzo ? Lor."
16
0.489
0.195
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRAYTOR. Lor. This o'th' fuddain. Sir I must owe the title of a Traitor To your high favours 5 Envy first conspir'd, And malice now accuses, but what story; Mentioned his name, that had his Princes bosome Without the Peoples hate, tisjsift enough In some men to be great, the throng of stars The rout, and common People of the skie Move still another way then the Sun does, shat guilds the creature, take your honors back, And if you can that purple of my veins, Which flowes in yours,- and you shall leave me in A state, I fh'anot fear the great ones envy, Nor common peoples rage, and yet perhaps r ou may be credulous against roe. D«4Ha! 5 Al: The D*4e is cool. D«^. Alonzo look you prove, Lorenzo what you fay. - Al. I fay my Lord ? I have discovered all my knowledge sir • Dep. Stand to't- Lor. With licence of your highness, what AA&°?ra? ?l l !houM 8ain bX Treason : Admit I should be impious, as to kill you lam your nearest kinsman, and should forfeit both name and future title to the State, By such a hasty, bloody disposition, 1 he rabble hate me now, how shall I then Expect a safety ? fa it reformation : r JisHW£Cyac,uscincof5. suggesting disaffect a Monarchy, which how and ridiculous would appear in me four wisdom judge, in you I live and flourish; Vhatm your death can I expect, to equal she riches I enjoy under your warm'th ? hould 1 for the heir, and talk of new goverment, md Common-wealth, loose all my «H5T md you above em all, whose favours have all n hke the Dew upon me. have I a foul ' think the guilt of such a murder easie, VV^e ' i"
17
0.396
0.156
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
""The T R A Y T O R. 8 Were tbereno other Torments ? Or can I Expect the People will reward your Murderer With any thing but Death, a Paricide ? Al. So, so, the Duke's already in his circle. Lor. But I am tame, as if I had no fence, Nor other argument to vindicate My Loyalty, thus poysoned by a paper, In my eternal fame, - and by a slave _ Call to my brow, someone that dare accuse me, Let him have honour, great as mine, to forfeit j Or since your grace hath taken me so near, Your own height, that may seale, may not expect Such a proportioned adversary, yet let him Have name within his Country, and allow him A Soul, 'gainst which, I may ingage my more, ;Then equal honor, then I'll praise your justice; ..- But let him not be one condemned already, A desperate exile — is it possible A Treason hatchtih Flore nee, gainst the Duke Should have no eyes at home to penetrate, The growing danger, but at Sienna, one Must with n perspective discover all : Ask this good Councellor, or these Gentlemen Whose faiths are tried, whose caresare always waking About your Person, how have I appear'd To them, that thus I should be rendered hateful, To you, and my good Country, they are vertuous, And dare not blemish a whitq faith, accuse My found heart of dishonor ; sir, you must Pardon my bold defence, my vertue bleeds By your much easiness, and I am compel] 'd To break all modest limits, and' to waken Your memory, (if it be not too late To fay you have one, ) with the story of My fair deservings, who, sir, overthrew ( With his designs ) your late ambitious brother, Hippolito, who like a Meteor threatned A black and fatal omen, Du, Twas Lorenzo. Lo. Be yet as just, and fay whole art directed A countermine to check the pregnant hopes QiSuhiati, who for his Cardinals Cap,"
18
0.447
0.177
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRAYTOR. 9 In Rome was potent, and here popular. Du. None but Lorenzo. Dip. Admirable Traitor ? Lor . Whose service was commended when the exiles One of whose tribe accuseth me had raised Commotions in our Florence When the hinge Of State did faint under the burthen, and The people sweat with their own fears, to think - y £ The Souldier should inhabit their calm dwellings? Who then rose up your safety, and crush'd all Their plots to ayre ? Du. Our dear Cousin Lorenzo, Lor. When he that should reward, forgets the men That purchas'd his security, 'tis vertue - To boast a merit with my services . I ha'not starved your treasury, the grand Captain Gonzales accounted to Ring Ferdinand, Three hundred thousand crowns, for spies, what bill s Have I brought in for such intelligence : Dep. I grow hearty. Du. All thy actions Stand fresh before us, and confirm, thou art Our best and de.irest friend, thus we assure Our confidence, they love us not that feed One jealous thought of our dear Cous. Lorenzo tiew welcome to us all, for you Alonzo Give o're your paper kites, le^rn wit, 'tis time. "" Where shall we meet to night? Lo. Pardon me sir I am a dangerous man Du. No more a that I'll credit my foul with thee, shall we revel This night with Amidca > Dep^The Duke courts him, Well go thy ways, for one of thcrnoft excellent Impudent Traitors Da. Yet a murmuring Of a Traitor ? we shall sooner suspect him, That thinks Lorenzo guilty. Dep. I my Lord Dare boldly swear, his honour is as. free— From any treason, as my self, I didprophesie this islue, i Dftki 'Tis an age €"
19
0.447
0.17
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The T T R A Y T O R. 10 Mine, Till night, I long to fold her in my armes, ; Prepare Sciarrah, but be very wise In the discovery, he is all touchwood. Ler.l know he is her brother,leave the managing Of things to me. D^.Still when we expect, Our bliss, time creeps, but when the happier things Call to enjoy, each sawcy hour hath wings. Exeunt. Acttis Secundus. Enter Sciarrah, and Lorenzo. Sciarrah. MY Sister,though he be theDuke,he dares not, Patience, patience, if there be such a vertue, I want it Heaven, my Sister ! It has thrown wild-fire in my brain Lorenzo, A thousand furies revel in my skull, Has he not sins enough in s Court to damn him. But my Roof must be guilty of new lusts, And none bnt/Amidea} these thehonour£. His presence brings our House ? Lor. Temper your rage. Sci. Are all the Brothels rifled? No quaint- piece. Left him in Florence, that will meet his hot And valiant Luxury, that we are come To supply his blood out of our Families r_ Diseases gnaw his title off. Lo. My Lord — » Sci. He is no Prince of mine, he forfeited' His greatness,., that black minute he first gave Consent to my dishonour. Lo. Then I'm sorry. Sei- Why should you be sorry sir ? You fay it is my Sister he would strumpet,"
20
0.527
0.182
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The. TRAYTOR. 11 To Mine, Amideat 'tis a wound you feel not, But it strikes through,and through the I do not think, but all the ashes of My Ancestors do swell in their dark urnes At this report, of Amidea's shame : It is their cause as well as mine, and should Heaven soffer the Duke's sin to pass unpunish'd. Their dust must of necessity conspire, To make an earth- quake in the Temple. Lo. Sir,, You said you would hear me out. Sci. Why is there more Behind ? Lo. And greater, Master, your high blood Till I conclude Sciarrah, I accuse not Your noble anger, which I have observed, Is not on every cheap, and giddy motfon Iriflam'd, but Sir, be thrifty in your passion, This is a petty trespass, Sci. Has mischief any name Beyond this ? will it kill me with the sound? Lo. My Lord,though the dishonoring your Sister, 3k such a fact, the blood of any other But Alexander could no less then expiate, Yet this sin stretches farther, and involves With hers, your greater stain: didyou ere promise him ? Yet why do I make any question ? It were another crime, to think Sciarrah Could entertain a thought, so far beneath His birth, you stoop to such a horrid baseness, Then all the vertue of mankind would sicken, And soon take leave of earth; Sei. You torture me. Lor. What then could the D. find, to give him any Encouragement you would be guilty of And act, so fatal unto honor, Sci. To what ? Lor. Though all the teeming glories of his Dukedome, Nay Florence State offered it self a bribe, Yet to imagine, you Would turne officious pander to his lust, And interpose the mercenary ba\vd . yC 2. ."
21
0.548
0.178
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The T R A Y T Q R. 12 Your To Court your Sister to his sinful coupling . 'Tis horrid, affrights nature, I grow stiff With the imagination. '$& Hah! :; \j>r. Yet this was his command I should impose.: Sci. Lorenzo. I am not what I was, My soul is but one flame, My breath is hot enough To thaw the Alpes. Lor. Your fancy would 1 Transport you. Sci. 'Tis-my rage, but let it-cool, And then we'll talk o' something, something sir,- Shall be to purpose. Lor. Now the flame is mounted, My Lord, I have given proof, although he be My. Duke and Kinsman, I abhor his vices, 'Tis policy in Princes, to create A Favorite, who must bear all the~gu.lt1 • Of things ill manag'd in the State, if any/ Design be happy, 'tis the Princes own. Heavens knows, how I have covnsell'd this young mary By vertue to prevent his fate, and govern With modesty: O the religious days . Of Common- wealths / We have, out-liv'd that blessing. Sei: But I have thought a cure for this great state Impostume. Lor. What? Sci. To lance it, is1t not ripe ? Let's draw cuts, whether your hand or mine ShaU do an act for Florence liberty, And send this Tyrant to ano&£r world. Lo. How, I d raw cuts ? Oct, Toy it not thus Ijirenzo, But answer, by the name and' birth you are His Kinsman % And let me tell you more : We know, you but disguise your heart, and- wissi - Florence would change her tile. I..0. How is this ? Sei. We know you have firm correspondence with The banisht men*, whose desperate fortunes wait"
22
0.406
0.166
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRAYTOR. 13 7hey Your call to tumult, in our streets, all this, Not to feed your ambition with a Dukedome, By the remove of Alexander* but To serve your Countrey, and create their peace, Who groan under the Tyranny of a proud, Lascivious Monarch, is't not true Lorenzo ? My phrase is blunt my Lord. Lo. My Genius And thine are friends, I see they have convers'd And I applaud the wisdom of my stars, That made me for his Friendship, who preserves 7he fame religious fire, let this secret be An argument, how much I dare repose. Upon Sciarrah's honor, I'll either live, in your exchange of £aith A Patriot, or die my Countries Martyr. Sci. Thou hast a fire beyond Prometheus. Lo. Heaven knows I've no particular design" To leap into a Throne, let me advance- Our liberty, restore the ancient Laws Of the republick, rescue from the jaws Of lust,your mothers, wives,your daughters,sisters~ Sci. Sisters/ Lor. From horrid jRape, poor Amidea: - Sci. I am resolv'd, by all that's blest, he dies The roof he would dishonour with his lust Shall be his tombe, bid him be confident, Conduct him good Lorenzo, I'll dispose .- My house for this great scene of death* ':'. Lo. Be constant. Exit. Enter Florio, and his Sifter Amidea. Flo. Now brother, what news brings the great Lorenzo > Sci. Let me ha ve truce vexation for some minutes, What news ? preferments, honours, offices ; Sister, you must to Court ? Am. Who, I to Court ? Sci. Or else the Court will come to you, the Duke Hath sent already for us Amidea : Is she not fair, Exceeding beautiful, and tempting Florio ? Look on her well, methinks I could turn Poet, -4nd make her a more excellent piece then heaver: Let not fond Men hereafter commend whet-"
23
0.505
0.177
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"Tu at .,4, The T RAY TOR. They most admire, by fetching from the Stars Or flowers their glory of similitute ; But from thy self the rule to know all beauty, These are the Duke's own Raptures, Amidea, His own Poetick flames, an argument. He loves my Sister. Ami. Love me ? Sci. Infinitely, I am in earnest, he employ 'd Lorenzo, No meaner Person in this Embassie, You must to Court, Oh happiness ! Ami. For what? Sci. What do great Ladies do at Goart, I pray ? Enjoy the pleasures of the world, dance, kiss The amorous Lords, and a thousand more Delights, which private Ladies never think of, But above all, The Duke himself shall call thee his, Ami. You make me wonder, Pray speak that I may understand. Sci. Come, come, I find your cunning ; The news does please, the rolling of your eye Betrays you, and I see a guilty blush Through this white veil upon yourcheek,you wo'd Have it confirmed, you shall, the Duke himself Shall swear he loves you. Am. Love me ? why ? Sci. To Court, __fnd ask him ; be not you too peevish now, And hinder all our fortune; I ha' promis'd him To move you for his arm-f ul, as I am Sciarrah, and your brother,more I ha' sent Word to him by Lorenzo _ that you should Meet his high flame, in plain Italian .Love him, and Ami. What for heaven, be the Duke's whore > Sci. No, no, his Mistriss, command him, make s. Ami. Give up my Virgin-honour to his lust > Seu You may give it a better name, but do t. Ami. I do mistake you .brother, do I not. Sci, No, no, my meaning is so broad, you cannet. Ami I would I did j/ien, is't not possible"
24
0.489
0.18
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"J5 My- The T R A Y T O ft That this should be a dream ? where did you drop Your vertue Sir ? Florio, why move you not ? Why are you flow to tell this man ? for sore Tis not Sciarrah, he hath talk so ill, And so mttch, that may have the cause to fear, The Ayr about's infected. Flo. Are not you My brother > Sci. Ee not you a Fool, to move These empty questions, but joyn to make her Supple, and pliant for the Duke. No matter for the talk of musty people, Look up to the Reward, thou art young and skili'd In these Court temptings, naturally soft, And moving, I am rough-hewn, assist, wo't, With some queint Charm, to win her to this game ? Flo. My Sister ? Sci. Ay, ay. Ami. Come not near him Florio, 'Tis not Sciarrah, sore my brothers Nurse Play'd the Impostor, and with some base Issue Cheated our House. Sei. Gipsie, use better language, Ot 111 forget your Sex. Flo. Offer to touch her With any rudeness, and by all that's vertuous Sci. Why how now Boy ? Flor. I do not sear your Sword, This with my Youth, and Innocence, is more Defence than all thy armory- what Devil Has crept into thy Soul ? Sci. You'll not help > Flor. He rather kill thee. Sci. 'Tis very well, Have you considr'd better o the motion ? Am. Yes. Sci. And what's your resolve Ami. To have my name Stand in the Ivorie Register of Virgins, When I am dead, before one factious thought Should lurk within me to betray my Fame, To such a blot, my hands shall mutiny, And boldly with a Poniard teach my heart To weep out a repentance. Sci. He embraces era,"
25
0.534
0.183
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"TheT RAY TOR, 16 My excellent -chnst-Sister, Florio Thou, hast my soul, I did buMry your Vert ties, 'Tis truth the Duke does love thee, viciously, This night he means to revel at our house, 7ne Tarquin shall be entertained 5 he shall. Ens. a Scrv. Serv. My Lord, r Pisano is come. Sci. Look up Sister And shine with thy own smiles, Pisand's come, Pisano thy contracted, honour'd Friend. Enter Pisiino, Cosmo, Freder. Welcome all, But you above the rest, my brother shortly, Emb.him. Sister and Florio entertain your noble Freinds, some few minute, I am absent, we Must not forget to prepare for the Dukes coming, lie soon return. .Exit. ■ Ami. You are not chearfull Sir. How 19't my Lord ? you were not wont to look So sad when you came hither Pis I am not well Amidea. Am. Oh, my heart. Pis Be you Co r. sorted Lady, let all griefs repair To this, their proper Centur. Flor. Sir how fare you ? Pis Altr'd of late a little, I wou'd Sciarra were come back. Fred. I might ha' finifh'd ere he went, and not .Delay'd his business much, two or three words, And I had dispatch 'd. Am. How Sir? your language is Another then you use to speak, you look not With thesime brow upon me. . Pis Madam, \ am come to render all my interest in your love. And to demand my self again, live happier In other Choice. Am. Ha ! Pis Here's witness, all is cancel 'd betwixt us , Nay, and you weep — — Farewell. Ami. He's gone. Flor. km amaz'd. Pis Now lead me to my blessing. Exeunt Flor. Shall a long suit and speeding with his love With the worlds notice, and a general fame Of Welcome all,"
26
0.443
0.192
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"f7 Pis. The TRAYTOR. Of Contract too, just in the In slant when A Marriage is expected, he broke off With Infamy to our House. Am. Brother, If ever you lov'd poor Amidea, let not this Arrive Sciarrhas Ear ; there's danger in His knowledge of it, this may be a Tryal of my Affection". Flo. A Tryal > No, It shewed too like a Truth. Am. My Tears intreac yoursilence. Flo. You have Power to command ft, dry your Eyes then, He's return'd. Enter Sciarrha. Sci. How now, Weeping? Where is Pisano and his Friends? Flo. They'r gone, Sir. Sci. Ha! Am. Guess by my Eyes, you may, something of Sorrow hath befaln No sooner you were departed, but some strange Distemper Invaded him ; we might discern a change In's Countenance : And though we pray'd him to Repose" with us, he would strait back again 5 So with Cosmo he return'd. Flo. The alteration was strange and suddain. Sci. 'Las noble Gentleman,- -but come, clear up Your Face again, we hope it won't lass > ." Look bright again, I fay, I ha' given order — — - Enter Gentleman. Gent. My Lord the Duke's already come Sci. Remove, Good Amide a, and reserve thy Person To Crown his Entertammenr, benot seen yet. Exit Am. Enter T>u\e Lorenzo, Alonzo, Attendants. Va. Sciarrha, we are come to be your Guest. Sci. Your Highness doth an Honour to our House. Vu. But, where's thy Sister, she must bid us wellcome. Sci. She is your Grace's Handmaid.. T>u. For this Night, Let die whole World conspireto our delight. Lorenzo Whisper. Lor. Sir be confident — —and perish. Enter Morosa, and Oriana, in the Garden, and Servant. Mor. Pray give access to none, — yet if Pisano Enquire, direct him to the Garden, Cosmo Exit Servant. is young, and promising, but while Lorenzo Lives, must expect no Sun- shine. Enter Pisano, Cosmo, Servant. sis. There's for thy paine.. Evit Servant./ They are now ar opportunity. Cos. My Lord, Do you prepare the Mother, and let me close with Orianz. Pis. What Service can reward thee/ ■ Cos. Take occasion to leave us private, This Hour be Propkious, win but the Mother to you. D"
27
0.408
0.151
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"Ori, ,8 TheT RAYTO R. Pis. She is prepared already. Cos. Lose no time, take the other walk. Exit Pis. & Hor. Ori. My dear Cosmo. Os. My best Oriana. ~ Ori. You have been too much absent, I must chide you.: Cos. You cannot iweet, 1 would I knew which way to make thee Angry : Yes, that I might see how well it would become thee. . Ori. You will make me angry. Cos. But you will love mestil., I fear. Ori. D'ye fear it ? I'st a misfortune ? Cos. What? Ori. My Love.; QT We may love too well, and that's a fault. Ori. Not where the Object's good. Cos. O yes; Always beware of the extreams. Ori. What mean you ? I affect none but my Cosmo, not him with too much Flame. N Cos. If you should Lady, 'twere.not nobly done* Ori To love another ? Cos. Yes, if there be cause, that may be call'd a Vcrtae. Ori. So we should be inconstant. Cos. Why nor, if our reason be convine'd. Let us examine all the Creatures, read The Book of Nature through, and we (hall find Noihing doth still the fame : Why then Should our Desires, that are so nimble, and Afore Subtle than the Spirits in our Blood, Be such staid Things within us, and not share Their natural Liberty, (hall we admit a change in smaller Things, And not allow it in what most of all concerns ns.? Ori. What-? Cos. Our Loves. Ori. Have you a suspition I am changed, and thus would School me for it ; or shall 1 imagine that you are alter'd. Cos. Yes, I am, and therefore proclaim thy Freedome, I do love thee less, To (hew I love thee more. Ori. What riddle's thiV Cos. 'Tis none- 1 have found I am not worthy of thee, Therefore come to make thee satisfaction for my Crime Of loving thee, by pointing out a way, And Person, will become thy Affection better. Whac dost think of brave Pisano, shall his Merit plead Succession in thy chast Thostghts ? , Ori. I know him. Cos. Thou can'st not chuse; and I could study none Worthy thy love, but him. Ori. 'Tis very likely you would resign then ? Cos. Ay, to honour thee. His Service will deserve thee at the best, And richest value."
28
0.427
0.158
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"t9 Tbe TRAYTOR. ' Ori. Why it shall be so. Cos. Nay but be serious, and declare me happy That I may fay, I have made thee just amends. Ori. Why fir I do love him. Q/IBut dost thou love him perfectly, with a Desire, when sacred rites of marriage Are past, to meet him in thy bed, and call him Thy Husband > Ori. Pray tell me . But truly, I beseech you, do you wish Pisano mine indeed .<? or, are you jealous, And name him to accuse me ? Cos. Not by goodness ■> But if there be a charm beyond thy innocense, By that I would conjure thde Ori ana, Love him and make three happy, it shall be My bliss to call you his, let me but own A servant in your memory. Ori. Unkind, \ And cruel Cosmo, dost thou think it possible, I can love any but thy self? thou wilt Undo my heart for ever. Enter Pisano and Mor ossa. Mor. Yon shall be _ Ever most welcome, if I be her Mother, __ . — j — _ _ She must declare obedience, Oriana Cos. Go chearfully, thy Mother calls, Alas poor Lady, I half repent me, since she is so constant: But a friends life weighs down all other love * Beside, I thus secure my Fate, Lorenze Threatens my spring, he is my enemy. Ori. You II not compel affection ? Pis. No, but Court it With honour, and religion. * Mor. I shall forget the nature of a Parent, Unless you shew more softness, and regard To what is urged, what promise couldiyou make To Cosmo, without me? or ifyou had Ctf/T'Here Cosmo doth give up all title to it, I have no part in Oriana now. D _"
29
0.492
0.185
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"ao The TRACTOR. Qri I've heard too much, do with me what you please* . I am all passive, nothing of my self, But an Obedience to Unhappiness. EM Cos. Follow her Fistno-- Pis Thou.' rt all Friendship. Cos Trace their warm steps, Virgins Resolves are weak. Leave not her Eyes, until you see Day break. £xeurit. Actus Tertius. Enter Depazzi and Rogero, Depazzi.YsS Ogero > Rogero. ,L\My Lord. Dep- Make fast the Chamber-door, stifle the Rey-hole,and the Cran* nies,T must discourse of secret Matters, dost thou smell nothing, Ro* gero . ha A Ro. Smell > not anv tbingv my Lord, to offend my Nostril. Dep. Come hither, what do the people talk abroad of me? Answer me justly, and to the Point, what do they say .. .Ro. Faith, my Lord., they say- that you are — Dep. They lie, I am not; they, .are a lowsy, impudent multitude ; a many-headed, and many-horned generation, to say that I am — Ro. A noble Gentleman, a just and discreet Lord, and one that dc serv'd to have his Honours without money. Dep. Oh is that it > F thought the Rabble would have said, I had been a Tray tor, lam half mad certainly e're since I consented to Lo renzo ; 'tis a very hard condition, that a Man must lose his Head , to recompcnce the procuring of his Honours : What if I discover him to the Duke, ten to one, if Lorenzo come but to speak, his Grace won't ha' the grace to believe me, and then I run the hazard to be thrown out of ail atother side: 'tis f4fest to be a Traytor, hum, who is that you whisper'd to .' Ro. I whisper ? Dep. Marry did you, Sirrah ? Ro. Not I, good faith, my Lord. Dep. Sirrah, Sirrah, Sirrah, I smell a Rat behind the Hangings: Here's no body, ha . Are there no Trunks to convey secret Voices ? Ro. Your Lordship has a pair on. ... &£p_"
30
0.459
0.168
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRAY TO R. 2x Dep. I do not like that Face i'th' Arras, a my Conscience he point* at me, a Pox upon this Treason, I have no stomack to't,I do see my seii upon a Scaffold, making a pitiful Speech already,! shall ha* my head cut off, seven years ago I laid my head upon a wager, I remember, and lost it; let me see ; it shall be so,'tis good policy tobearm'djfic^fr^imagin I were a Traytor. Rog. How, Sir > Dep. I but say imagin, we may put the Gase,and that I were appre hended for a Tray tor. Ro. Heaven defend. Dep. Heaven has something else to do,thanto defend Traytors : _ fay, Imagin I were brought to the Bar. ho. Good my Lord, you brought to the Bar ? Dep. I will beat you, if you won't imagin at my bidding.: I fay/op pose I now were at the Bar to answer for my Life. Ro. Well, Sir. Dep. Well, Sir, that's as it happens; you must Imagin I will<afiswe_ the best lean for my self: conceive, I prithee, that these Chairs were Judges,most grave and venerable Beards and Faces at my Arraignments and that thy self wert in the Name of the Duke and State to accuse me, what couldst thou fay to me ? Ro. I, accuse your good Honour ? for what, I beseech you ? Dep. For High:Treason , you Blockhead. Ro. I must be acquainted with some Particulars first. . Dep. Mass, thou iayst right : why imagin,_d'ye hear ? you must but imagm, that some great Man had a Conspiracy against the Duke's person, and that I being an honest Lord, and one of this great Mans Friends, had been drawn in; for that's the plain truth on't,*twas against my will, but that's ail one .• Well, thou understands, me, shew thy wic Rogero, scratch thy nimble. Pericranium, and thunder out my Accusa» tion extempore: Here 1 stand Signior Depazzi, to answer the Indict* mem- Wk Ro. Good my Lord, it will not become me, being your humble Ser vant. Dep. Humble -Coxcomb, is't not for my good . I fay, accuse me, bring it home, jerk me soundly to the quick, Rcgao, tickle me,as thou lov'st thy Lord ; I do defie thee, spare me not, and the Devil take thee if thou bee 'st not malicious. Ro. Why then have at you: First, Signior Depazzi, Thou art In dicted of High-Treason, Hold up tby Hand, Guilty, or.not Guilty ? Dtp. Very good. /.(.. Nay,very bad Sir ; Answer, I say. Guilty or not Guilty . Dep. Not Guilty,"
31
0.423
0.175
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"TlicTRAYTO R. 22 Ro. 'Tis your best course to fay so. Well, Imagin1— -I rise up the Duke's most lea/ned in the Laws, and 'his nimble tongu'd Orator,liave at your Signior- \\Vi-pl Come, come on Sir, here I stand. Sfo. swill prove thou liest in thy Throat, if thou denies! thy Trea son,' and so I address my self to the most understanding scats of Justice. Most wife, most honourable, and most uncorrupt Judges, sleep not,. I beseech you, my Place hath calsd me to plead in the behalf os my Prince and Country, against this notable, this-pernicious, and impudent Traytor, who hath plotted and contrived such high, heinous and sltor rible Treasons, as no Age nor History hath ever meation'd the like. Here he stands, whose Birth I will not touch, because its altogether unknown who begot him. He was brought up among the small Wares in th» City, became Rich by sinister and indirect Practices, married a Merchant's Wife at adventures, and was soon after advanc'd to be a Head Officer. Dep. < Why, you Rascal. Ro. Peace, Sirrah, peace ; nay, your Lordships shall sind him very audacious : This Fellow, not content to have his Branches spread within the City, I speak ifcto his Face, let him deny it, was afterward, by the corruption of his Confederate, and themeer grace of his Highness,rai scd to Honour, received infinite Favours from his Prince of blessed me mory ; yet, like a Wretch, a Villain, a Viper, a Rat of Niltu, he hath practised Treasons'against the sacred person of the Duke; for which he deferveth not only to die, but also to Tusser Tprtures,Whips, Racks, Strapadoes, Wheels, and all the sieryJarazen Bulls that can be invented, as I (hall make itappear to this honourable and illustrious Court. Dep. This* Rogue's transported. Ro. With all my heart, I obey your Lordships Thus then I pals from these Circumstances, and proceed, to the principal Villanies that we have to lay to his charge. Imprimis, Thou Signior Depazzi didst offer to a Groom a ioo Crowns to poyson his Highness hunting Saddle. Dep. Did I? Ro. Do not interrupt me,VarIet,I will prove it,his hunting Saddle, and wo shall be unto thy breech therefore ; and finding this serpentine Treason broken in the fhell,do but lend your reverend Ears to his next designs, I will cut em off presently. This Irreligious, nay, Atheistical Traytor, did with his own hands poyson the Duke's Prayer-Book, oh Impiety ! And had his Highness, as in former times he accustomed, but pray'd once in a month, which by special grace lie omkted, how fatal"
32
0.464
0.172
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The T R A Y T O K 7^ fatal had it been to Florence ? But as by Justice his Excellence did then, and by his own want of devotion, prevent this Asiasinates purpose ,so we hope in his own Discretion, and the Council of his State, he will take heed how he prays hereafter while he lives* to^which every true Subject will fay, Amen. Dep- May it please your Honors Ro. That impudent, brazen-fac'd Traytor, wilt thou deny it? More over,and like your good Lordships, he hath for this Fortnight,or Three Weeks before his Apprehension, walk'd up and down the Court with a Case of Pistols charg'd, wherewith, as he partly he intended to send the Duke to Heaven with a powder. Dep. This Rogue will undo the Devil at Invention, may it please his Honourable-r- Ro. These are but sprinklings of his Treason. Dep. Will you justifie this ? Did I any of these things, you Tadpole? Ro. Hold your self contented, my Lord, he that is brought to the Bar in case of Treason, must look to have more objected than he can answer, or any Man is able to justify. Dep. I confess, and please your good Lordships. Ro. Mark, he will confess. Dep. That's the way to be sent of an headless Errand ; indeed I con fess that I never intended any Treason to his Highness, nor ever fought the Prince's Life : true it is, that t heard of a Conspiracy. Ro. That, that, my Lord, hath. overthrown him ; he saith.he- never sought, the Prince's Life, Ergo, he sought his Death- Besides, he hadi heard of Treason, now he that heareth,and discovereth not, is equally. guilty in Fact : For in Offences of this Nature, there are not Accessa ries . ergo, he. is a Principal, and being a Principal Traitor, he defer veth Condemnation. Dep. ShaU j. not speak ? Ro. No, Traitors must not be suffered to speak, for when they have leave, they have Liberty, and he that is a Traitor deserveth to be close Prisoner. _ . Dep. All that this Fellow hath uttered, is false and forged , abomi nable Lies. Ro. I will speak Truth, and I will be fyeard, and naman else in this place. Dep. I never dream'd of a hunting Saddle, nor never had so much as a thought of any Prayer Book. Ro"
33
0.451
0.158
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"a4 The T T RAY T OR. Rv. You sit here to do Justice, I speak for the Duke and the safety of the Common- wealth. Dep. As for Pistols, 'tis well known I could never indure the report on 'era, I desie-Powde^and Shot, as I do him that accuseth me. Ro. I defie all the world that will hear a Traitor speak, for himself, 'tis against the Law which provides that no Man shall defend treason, and he that speaks for himself, being a Traitor, doth defend his treason, thou ■ art a Capital obstreperous-Malefactror. Dep. Thou art a Mad-man. Ro. Go to, you have play'd the fool too much. Dep Thou continual motion cease, a^pox upon thee hold thy tongue. Ri?. The pox won't serve your turn, Dep. Why then this shall. . Beats him. Po. Hold, hold, good -my Lord, I am sensible Iha done, imagine I*ha done, I but obey'd your Lordship, whose batoon I find stronger than my imagination, my Lord, you'll answer this to strike i'the' Court thus > Dep. I am as weary ; — heark Rogero Knocks. ' One knocks, see, see, there's to make thee amendends, see good Rogero ■and fay nothing, pray Heaven it be not Pursevant, Enter Petruchio, with a Letter. R.o. Petruchio^ my Lord, Pisanocs Secretary. ,Dep. But Lorenzo 's Engine a very knave. Pet.- My very good Lord. Des. What', here ? It can be no^goodnefs. Reads, Mj Lord, I would net have you go to Bed to night, he wont let me sleep now, I dreamt as much, something will be done to give Florence liberty in the depth os night -you may cunningly disperse some rumours in the City 'that thSiDu^Js dead, the people must be distra&ed, in the common fright be not you wanting in your Person to assist their fazrs, and speaks well of Lorenzo speakwellos the Divel : My humble service tc your Lord, and say he has power to command me in all things. Pet. My Very good Lord. ■Dep. No matter aud you were both hang'd 5 Ro^ro, &« him the Wine-scllar: Let me see I must reoort thepuke's death, I can't abide tnis word Death, yet he desires me but to report it 5 hum- if it be fils» why so much the better 5 there will be the less harm in't ■ .Fit stiouM prove true, they will believe me another time : Well, I will drink my 1' if halsdrunk, and be fortified. y Exeunt, Enter"
34
0.403
0.177
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"Enter Duke, Amidea, Lorenzo, Sciarrha; Florio, &c. Du. Sciarrha, you exceed in Entertainment, - Banquet our Eyes too. Lo. He will feast all Senses. Sci. Only a toy, my Lord, I cannot call't A Mask, not worthy of this presence, yet It speaks the freedom of my Heart, and gratitude For this great honour. Du. AmiJea must sit near us. Sci. Lords your places, 'two' not be Worth half this Ceremony, let 'em begin. Enter Lust, richly apparretd, the Pleasures attendim Du. Who's the Presenter? *' Sci. Lust, Sir, pray observe. Lust. Now let Lust possess the Throne Of Love, and rule in Hearts alone .- sou sweet Tempters to my Sin, - Beauty, Smiles, and Kisses win Vpon frail Mortals, let them know There is no Happiness, hut you Shoot no Arrows tipp'd with Lead, Each Shaft hath his golden head .- Call no Love, delude Men stiff, Through the Flesh, she Spirits kill, Nor spend all your Art to take Common Persons, Greatness make By your potent Charms to he Suhjefts unto Hell and me, Inflame hit Kings with loose desire, Te soon set all the World on fire. r, „T, , \Ettter ay°ml Man *» rich Habit and Crown d. Du. What s he ? Sci. A wild young Man that follows Lust, He has too much Blood it seems. Du. Why looks he back ? Sci. There is a thing call'd Death that follows him With a large train of Furies. Hang his Conscience, it whines too much. Lo. This is too plain. Sci. He does not tremble yet, r ac j. By-an-by, Sir, you shall see all his Tormentors ' Join with 'em, there's the sport on'r. £ ' Lo."
35
0.505
0.175
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
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"l6 the T RATIO Æ I.. Meth inks they Should have been first for th' antimask. Sci. Oh no !_ In Hell they do not stand upon the method, As we at Court, . Sister you do ill, To keep the Duke in talk, he cannot see The Divel for you [The Furies join in the Dame, and in the ends. carry, the young Man away. How does your Highness like this dance ? Dh. My eyes so feasted here, I did. not mind it, But I presume 'twas handsome. Sci. Oh the Lethargy Of Princes ! we ha' kept you, Sir, from bed : More lights. Du. Good night to all, to you the best : Sciarrha bind us ever by performance. Sci. We are all yours. Du. And Florence thine, once more- — * Brightest of Ladies. Lo. You are firm. Sci. Suspect not. [ Exeunt all, hut Ami* dea and Florio. Flo. I do not like my Brother's Moral-Mask, The Duke himself was personated, I Wonder it did not startle him. Am. I hope Sciarrha does not mean so ill as that Did promise, he's return'd, his looks are full [Enter Sciarrha, Of threatning. ScL Amidea., go not to bed, And yet no matter, I can do't alone : •' . ' Take both your rest, and in your Prayers. commend The Duke to Heaven, 'tis Charity, h'as made His Will already, and bequeathed his Body To you, Sister, pity his Soul for't, 'tis now Within few Minutes of departing. Am. How ? Sci. Why this way I must help him in his Groans To bring his flesh a-bed. Am. You wo'not kill him ? Sci. I am not of your mind. Am. I know you cannot. Sci."
36
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"The TRATTOR. z7 Sci. You are not studied so perfect in His destiny, I hope, I will endeavour — Am. To kill your Prince ? Flo. What, here ? Sci. No, in his Chamber. . Am. Shall it be read in Stories of our Florence, Sciarrha first did stain his Family With such a Treason ? Flo. Was he not invited ? Sci. Yes, by his Lust. Flo. And in your crowned Tables, And Hospitality will you murder him ? Sci. Yes, and the reason wherefore he was murder'd, Shall justifie the Deed to all Posterity, He came to wrong my Sister. Flo. Wanton heat, Let youthful Blood excuse him. Sci. So it must. Flo. Mistake me not, oh think but who he is, The Duke, that word must needs awake your piety. Am. How will good Men in this remembrance Abhor your Cruelty, that send to hell One with the weight of all his Sins upon him Sci. It is too late to (fool with Argument My incensed Blood ; will you go dally with him ? I ha' gone So far in promise, if you clasp not with him, It will be dangerous if he out-live This night. Am. I ha' thought on't, send him to my Bed. Sci. Ha ? Am. Do not question what I purpose, Heaven Witness to my chaste thoughts. Sci. Wo't thou trust him > Am. I will do much, Sir, to preserve his life, And your innocence : Be not you suspectful, At the worst, you can but respite your Revenge. Sci. Dost thou not fear unhappy Lucrece chance, Or wretched Philomel's dishonour? Ant, No. Give me his life, and fend your Wanton tome; Tie to my Chamber, fear me not Sciarrha, Have not one thought so bad, I sha'not prosper; Virgins in Heaven will suffer with me. [Exit Ami. & Flo Flo. Trust her. Ei . Sc."
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"i8 The TRATfOR. Sci. 'Tis but deferring of my Justice. She wo'not kill him sure : draw on her Soul" , The guilt she hates in mine, if she do yield . To the hot encounter : Ha? 'twill be just, That both th.ir Hearts weep Blood, to purge their Lust. [Exit. Enter Florio and Amideav Flo. JMy Ponyard?. Am. I've no black Intent To stain't with any Blood. Flo. Take it, I know, thou art my virtuous Sister. - It were- wickedness to doubt thy purpose, Or the event. Am. Now leave me. Fit. Thou hast a Guard of Angels. Am. They are coming. [Enter Sciarrha andDukem Sci. Look, there she is, Sir. Du. Dearest Sciarrha. Sci. To your recreation, here He obscure my self, florio ? 'tis well. [Withdraws hehind Du. Lady, you know me ? the Scenes. Am. Yes, my Prince. Du. I was so, Till I saw thee, but I gave up that Title,. A conquest to thy Beauty, which among Her other Wonders hath created me A Subject and Servant, and I shall Be happier to be receiv'd yours by One of those Names, than Duke of Tuscany. Am. Oh! take your self agen, use your Greatness- '", \Xo make the hearts of Florence bow .to you, And pay their Duties thus, D#. Rife Amidea, And since you have given my Power back, it will Become me, to command. Am. And me to obey, Du. I see thy noble Brother hath, bin faithful To my desires, he has prepar'd thee with A Story of my Love, which thou reward'st With too much humbleness: I could dwell ever Here, and imagine I am in a Temple, To offer on this Altar of thy Lip, [Kisses her ofteril Myriads of flaming Kisses with a Cloud Of Sighs breath'd from from my heart, Which by the Oblation would increase his Stock, To make my Pay eternal. Am. What mean you ? Du."
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"The TRATTOR. 29 Dm. That Question is propounded timely: Hadst Not interrupted me, I should ha' lost* My self upon thy Lips, and quite forgot There isa Bliss beyond if. Transform me there to Happiness ; I'll laugh at all the Fables of the Gods, And teach our Poets, after I know thee, > To write the true Elizium. Am. Good my Lord : I understand you not, and yet I fear You do not mean well, if you have brought with you . A sinful Purpose, which I may suspect. Du. Why, Madam, what do you imagine I Came hither for ? Am. I know not. Du. How ! Is't come to that > Your Brother gave you more •Desirous of the Sport, and brought me hither Ripe for your Dalliance : Did you not expect me? Am. Yes. Du. And to what other purpose ? Am. To tell you that you are not virtuous. Du. I'm of your mind. Am. But I am not so wicked, To be of yours : Oh, think but who you are ; Your Title speaks you nearest Heaven, and points You out a glorious Reign among the Angels : Do not depose your self of one, and be Of the other dis- inherited. Du. I would Your Brother heard you : Prithee, do not waste This tedious Divinity ; I am Resolv'd to grapple with you. Am. Keep off [Shews the Ponyardi Du. Ha! Turn'd Amazon! Am. Prince, come not too near me; For, By my Honour, since you have lost your own, Although I bow in Duty to your Person, I hate your black Thoughts. Tempt not my just Hand With violent Approach: I dare, and will Do that will grieve you, if you have a Soul. Du. Thou dar'st not kill me* Am. True : But I daredie. Du. Be thy own Murtherer!1 A Am,"
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"* 5o The T RAT TOR. Am. Rather than you should be my Ravifher. Du. Thou canst not be so merciless; 'tis less Sin To be unchaste. I am thy Prince, I prithee Throw by that cruel Weapon ; let our War Be soft Embraces, shooting amorous Smiles ; Kill and restore each other with a Kiss. I know thou canst not be unkind so long ; Then I command thee. Am. I must not obey To be your Strumpet : Though my Hand be unskilful, I shall soon find my Heart.. £>#. I'll not believe Am. Let this deserve your Faith, I dare be just : sShe wounds This Crimson River issuing from my Arm. t her Arm. Du. Hold. Am. Never : It shall flow ; and if this Chanel Yield not enough, I'll strike another Vein ; And after that, another, and not pity 0 The murmuring Stream, till through a prodigal Wound I have drain'd the Fountain. This doth weep for you, And shall extol my Death, if it may teach You to correct your Blood. Du. There's so much gone From me, I cool apace : This Action Hath shot an Ague through me. Amidea, Pity thy self. Am. Not till you swear Repentance : I do not faint yet, 'tis somewhat about; But I can find a nearer way : This does it. Du. Contain, I am sorry, sorry from my Soul. Trust me, I do bleed inward, Amidea, Can answer all thy Drops. Oh, pafdon me : Thou faint'foalready ; Dost not? Look to thy Wound. Am. May I believe you, Sir ? Du. I dare not think awry : Again I ask Forgiveness. In thy Innocence I fee My own Deformity. Enter Sciarrha, hastily emhraceth Amidea. Enter Florio. Sci. Now a thousand blessings Reward thy Goodness ; thou deserv'st a Statue, A tall one. But apply Betimes unto thy Wound. Florist, assist her. . [Ex. Am. ® Flo. And now, my Lord"
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"The I RAJ I V R. 3I Dm. Sciarrha, I'll begin to be thy Ldrd : I brought Intentions of Disoonour to thee, And thy fair Sister ; but I am reconcifd To Virtue, and will study how to satissie For you and Florence. Sci. You will be more precious, Than had you never fallen : I am all Joy In your Conversion. Du. Is Lorenzo a-bed ? Sci. Lorenzo ! I think he has not said his Prayers yet : But Du. What! Sci. I cannot tell ; may be he does not use it. Du. How ? Sci. My Lord, you now are lovely ; 'Twcre better you'd forget him, he's not right At Heart, I fear. Du. Fear nothing. Sci. To be plain, You cherish your Disease in him, and are Not safe while he is ne^r you. Du Do not envy him. Sci. Then I must tell you, Sir, he is a Traytor, Within my Knowledge, hath confpir'd your Death- Du. With whom ? Sci. With me : I should ha' kill'd you, Sir, This Night ; and every Minute he expects To hear you number'd with the Dead : I can Demonstrate this : Your Pardon ; But, in truth, The Injuries you meant u«, were severe; And he, with as much Violence, did urge em To your Destruction. But your Piety Hath charm'd my Purpose, and I look upon you With hew Obedience. [Enter Florio. Du. Possible! ; Sci. We wo' not shift the Scene, till you believe it. Florio, intreat my Lord Lorenzo hither : Step but behind the Arras, and your Ear Shall tell you who's the greatest Traytor living. Observe but when I tell him, you are stain ; How he'll rejoice, and call me Florence great Preserver; bless roy Arm, that in your Blood Hath given our groaning State a Liberty. Then trust Sciarrha. ftor, observe ; I hear him. 'Enter Lorenzo. Lo. Whom talk'd he to ? Sci. 'Tis done - Lo. What? Good Sciarrha.* Sci. The Duke is dead. Lo,"
41
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"* 1% j he 1 HA l I lAfi. ■ ■ Lo. We are not lest so miserable, Heaven is more kind to Florence. Sci. With this Hand I made a Passage for his Soul. , . I Lo. Defend, # Omnipotence! What, murder'd! And by noble Sciarrha ! How my Ear abuses me ! Sci. Did not we plot it too ? Lo. How? We? Collect: I fear you are not well. Pray, tell me why You talk thus ? Where's the Duke > He hath a Guard, An Army of Heaven about him. Who in Florence Dares be so black a Devil, to attempt His Death ? Sci. This is fine Cunning. Why, that Devil is Lorenzo, if he dares deny it : We are in private, . You need appear no Stranger to that's done ; By your Direction. Lo. J in the Practice ! Then let me creep into the Earth, and rise A Monster to affright Mankind. Sciarrha, I must abhor thee for it. Oh, my Prince! My dearest Kinsman! May thy Hand rot off. Treason, Treason. < Sci. Then my Sword shall fetch S As they draw, the Another Witness in thy Heart. <- Duke interposes. Du. Hold. Lo. My Royal Lord ! Nay, let him kill me now: I've so much Joy and Peace about me, 'twere A Sin to wish my Life beyond this Minute. Du. Putup,. Isay. Sci. My Lord, we are both cozen'd : That very Smile's a Traytor. Du. Come, becalm: You are too passionate, Sciarrha, and Mistook Lorenzo. Lo. But I hold him noble : I fee he made this Trial of my Faith, And I forgive him. Du. Ye shall be Friends ; you shall, I sa> Enter Cosmo and Alonzo. Cos. The Duke ! Alon. Where's the Duke r Cos. My Lord, we are bless'd to see you safe : Report Hath frighted all the City with your Death : People"
42
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"The TRATTOR. Jjf People forsake their Beds, and seeking how To be inform'd, increase the wretched Tumult, Alon. There's nothing but Confusion: All Men tremble* As if some general Fire invaded Florence. Sci. Have Comfort, Sir. Du. What's to be done ? Lo. Depazzi has remembred, My Lord, there is no Safety for the State, Unless you personally appease 'em. Du. How? Lo. I hope they'll tear him : Would he were dead any way. Alon. He hath counsels d well. Cos. Your Presence only hath the power to charm 'em. Du. I fear their Rage : Where is our Guard ? Alonzo, haste afore, proclaim Our Pardon, And that We live to give the Offenders Mercy. Why are We born to Greatness, mock'd with State, When every Tumult staggers Our proud Fate ? Sci. Our Quarrel is deferr'd, Sir. [Exeunt. AC TVS Quartus. Enter Lorenzo. Lo. \/f Y Plots thrive not, my Engines all deceive me, 1VJ. Are there No faithful Villains left in Nature? AH Turn'd honest ! Man nor Spirit aid Lorenzo] Who hath not Patience to expect his Fate, But must compel it ! How Sciarrha play'd The Dog-bolt wo' me ! And had not I provided In Wisdom for him, that Distress had ruin'd me. His frozen Sister Amidea too Hath half converted him ; but I must set New Wheels in motion, to make him yet More hateful, and then cut him from his Stalk, Ripe for my Vengeance : I'll not trust the Rabble. Confusion on the giddy Multitude, That but two Minutes e'er the Duke came at 'em, Bellow'd out Liberty, shook the City with Their Throats ; no sooner saw him, but they melted . . With the hot Apprehension of a Gallows, Sudden Rot Consume this base Herd : And the Deyi) want Any Cattle for his own Teeth, these arefor him. [Enter a Servant, F Sen"
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"The f RAT TOR. 34 Ser. Sciarrha, my Lord desires to speak with you. Lo. Sciarrha /Come near- you understand ;adsnit himiEx.Se Welcome, my noble Lord; [Enter Sciarrhx You were not wont to visit me. -SVi.Nor mean ever to do't again. Lo. You bring Frowns. I can be sullen too-- What is your pleasure? Ss.Youhaveabus'd me. Lo. You have injur'd me. Sci. In what? Lo. Betray 'd me basely to the Duke. Sci. You deny*d then you were a Traytor. Lo. Yes : I was no Fool, to run my Neck upon . The Axe, and give you such a Cause of Triumph. Were it again in question — -*-— <- Sci. Y'are a Villain, Sir; And I must have it certified under your own Hand, To shew the Duke. Lo. You shall be humbled to Confess the contrary ; nay, subscribe That I am honest, and desire my Pardon. Look, I have a Sword, and Arm, and Vigour; Dare sight with thee, didst ride upon a Whirl- wind; Provoke the on a Rock, in Waves, in Fire j And kill thee without Scruple : Such a Strength Is Innocence. Sci. Innocence ! Dost not fear a Thunder-bolt ? I shall be charitable to the World, and I Cut thee in pieces. Didst not thou rail upon the Duke > Lo. I grant it. Sci. Call him a Tyrant ? Lo. More I do confess; I did exasperate you to kill or murder him ; , Give it what Name you please : With Joy I brought him, "Under the colour of your Guest, to be The common Sacrifice. All this I remember. But is Heaven's Stock of Mercy spent already, That Sins, though great and horrid, may not be . , Forgiven- to the Heart that groans with Penitence? Are the Eternal Fountains quite scal'd up ? I was a Villain, Traytor, Murderer, In my Consenting to his Death ; but hope Those Stains are now wafh'd off Sci. Hast thou repented ? Lo. Trust me, I have. Sci. The Devil is turn'd religious. Lo. As he was j{ yafc"
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"The T RAT Tor. 32 A lustful Duke, a Tyrant, I had lost him: In his Return to Piety : He commanded My Prayers, and fresh Obedience to wait on him. He's now my Prince again. Sci. This is but Cunning, to save your Life, s Enter divers Gen- Lo. My Life! Within there, ha ? Welcome. I tlemenarmd. i. My gracious Lord. •t. Wil't please your Honour, Command my Service? 3. Or me ? . 4. Or any ? j. Our Swords and Lives are yours. ' Sci. Perhaps your Lord Ihip hath some Business With these Gentlemen : I'll take some other time. Lo. By no means, good Sciarrha .- You visit seldom, those are daily with me; Men that expect Employment, that wear Swords, And carry Spirits, both to be engag'd, If I but name a Cause. -Gentlemen, Draw. Sei- My Providence has betray 'd me. Lo.Now,Sciarrha, you that with single Valour dare come home To affront me thus ; Know, but too late, thy Heart Is at the Mercy of my Breath ; these Swords Can fetch it when I please ; and to prevent Your Boast of this great Daring : I beseech, As you do love and honour your Lorenzo, No Hand advance a Weapon; sheath again, And leave us : I owe Service to your Loves, But must not so dishonour you. AUGentl. We obey. [Exeunt Gentlemen. Sci. .They're gone : This is seme Nobleness. Lo. You fee I do not fear your Sword, alone I have Too much Advantage ; yet you may imagine How easily I could correct this Rashness: But in my Fear to offend gracious Heaven With a new Crime, having so late obtain'd My Peace, I give you Freedom. Sci. Do I dream ? Lo. Pray, chide me still ; I will be patient To hear my Shame. Sci. Is this to be believ'd ? Doth not Lorenzo counterfeit thi&Vertue? He does : It is impossible he should repent. F % Lo."
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"36 The TRATTOR. Lo. Why, tell me, Sciarrha; and let us argue a while- In cooler Blood. Did not you once resolve To kill the Dike too? Sci. I confess— Lo. To give him Death with yourownHand ? Methinks it should be the fame Parricide In you, if not a greater; yet youchang'd Your purpose. Why did you not go through, And murder him ? Sci. He was converted. Lo. Good: That taught you Mercy, and perhaps Repentance For your Intent. Sci. It did. Lo. Why should not, Sir,' The fame Conversion of the Duke pofless My Heart with as much Piety to him, And Sorrow for my self ? If I should fay, You are but cunning ; is this Shape of Honesty ? And still suspect.your Soul to be a Traytor ? Might you not blame my Want of Charity ? Sci. He says but right : We are Both Men, frail things: Tis not impossible. Lo. I am reconcil'd to Heaven already, and the Duke.- If yoir Be still unsatissi'd, I am ready, Sir. Sci. The Circumstance consider'd, I incline To think this may be honest. Lo. Come, Schiarrha, We are both hasty : My Nature is corrected at this Minute: I'm Friends with all the World ; but in your Love Shall number many Blessings. sac. I am converted. [Enter Petruchio. Lo. What's the News? Pet. My Lord Depazzi prays some Conference In the next Chamber : We arriv'd by- chance Together at your Gate : I do not like his TaIk,Sir, , Lo. Hang him, Property, let him Expect ; thou art come i'the Opportunity : I could have wifh'd— Be wise, and second me; Sci. He waits upon Pisano, Whose Health I may enquire ; I ha' not seen him Since he departed sick : A fit Occasion. • - * Lo. Married to Orianal Thou mistak'st: 'Tis Amidea, Lord Sciarrha ?s Sister. Pet. That Contract's broken, and the old Lady P&omffa"
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"The TRATTOR. 37 Morroffa is violent to have the Marriage Finished with her Daughter. Jjo. Sciarrha, Is't true, Pisano marrries Oriana, The rich Morrossds Daughter ? Sci. Ha ? Lo. We did expect to hear your Sister should Have been his Bride: Has he forsaken Amidea ? Sci. Do not you serve Pisano ? Pet. Yes, my Lord. Sci. And dare you talk he's to be married To Oriana ? Fe?. If they live 'till to Morrow: There's great Provision to my knowledg, and Sci. Take that, and learn to speak a Truth hereafter. £0. That Blow, shall cost his Life, It is not possible he dares affront You thus ; the World takes notice of a Contract. Pet. I am not to give Account for my Lord'* Actions, let him answer And justifie his Honour : But, my Lord, Since I am provoked, I must declare he has Call'd back his Vows to Amidea, given Her freedom, and does mean to use his own, And this he dares publish. Lo. What, difclaim'd a Lady of her Birth and glorious Merit .' Sci. Th'art a Villain. Lo. My Lord, he is not worth your Anger, he Declares but what his Master hath committed. 'Tis none of his Fault. Pet. It becomes my Duty To take Correction, my Lord, from you. I am a Servant, a poor Gentleman. Sci. Shall I suspect the Circumstance at his departure ? Lo. It is strange you knew not this before. Sci. I must examine, if he dares- j Sci. Teach Fools and Children patience, The dogs eat up Sciarrha, If Pisano out-lives my Sister's Wrongs. False Heaven, why should thy Altars save ? *Tis just that Hymen light him to his Grave. Lo. Farewel, dull passionate Fool, Kill Pisano, and be lost thy self ; or if his Sword Conclude thy Life, both ways I am reveng'd. Lo. Be patient. [Exit. Petruchio,"
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"38 the TRATTOR, \ Petruchio, thou didst hit my Instructions rarely, And I applaud thee : Now send in Depazzi, and visit me anon. Pet. I shall, my Lord. [Exit, Enter Depazzi and Rogero. Dep. My Lord, I would speak a Word or two in private. Lo. You may. Dep. Is no body within heariqg ? All clear behind the Arras .* Lo. Make no doubt, Sir. Dep. My Lord, the truth is, I am very fearful : Is your Lord sliip sure there are no Eves-droppers ? Lo. What needs this Circumstance .* I pray cpme to the point. Dep. 'Tis not unknown to your Lordship, that you have bin my very good Lord, neither am I ignorant, that I am your humble Servant; you advanc'd me, brought me into the num ber of the Nobles, and I brought you a reasonable number of Crowns: lam not the first wise Citizen that hath bin conver ted into a foolish Courtier : But, my Lord, I beseech you par don me : It will out. Lo. What's the Matter ? Dep. I am ready to burst. Lo. With what ? Dep. Treason, Treason, now'ts out, and I feel my Body the lighter for't already: The last Plot did not take, you see, and I would humbly intreat your Lordship to excuse me, and get some body else hereafter to be your Traytor in my stead. Lo. How, Sir ? Dep, If you did but know the tenderness of my Constitution, or feel the Pangs and Convulsions that I suffer, you would pity me : I fall away, you see, I cannot sleep for dreaming of an Ax, I have caus'd my hangings of Holofernes to be taken down in my Dining-room, because I dare not look upon a Head that is cut off in it, something of my Complexion : My Wisdom tells me, lama fool to be so fearful, but my Conscience tells me, I am a greater fool, if I ha' not Wit enough in my Pate, to keep my Head on my Shoulders. I beseech your Lordship, take me into your consideration, I am but a mortal, though I be a Lord ; eve ry Man hath not the like Gift of Impudence, I have a weak Stomach, and Treason is Physick to me. Lo. You wo' not betray me ? Dep. But, alas ! in such a Casc,I may soon bewray my sclf,and then your Lordlhip may soon be smelt out: To prevent there fore some mischief that may happen, I desire to leave of£ while I am well, and that youir Lordsnip may know I mean plainly i I ha'"
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"The TRATTOR. j9 I ha' brought you all your Letters, I durst not trust any ether place with 'em for feat of State-Rats. I have unript my Bo- som to you, and there they are to a Tittle — — now I may safe- ly swear, I have no hand with your Lordship. Lo. This is very strange. Dep. Mistake not, my good Lord, I am still your Creature, but I have a great mind to be honest a little while, among the weaker sort of Nobility : Yet thus much perswade your self, I will ne'er wrong your Lordship in a Syllable ; should you tell me of a thousand Treasons and Stratagems, I will never reveal any, I scorn that ; but your Lordship must pardon me, I will be a Traitor no longer, that's certain ; I will be honest, and the ra- ther, because no Body shall hit me in the teeth after I am dead, and say, look where Depazzi carries his head Very high ; and, my Lord,1 the more to induce your Lordship to dismiss me. Rogero. Ro. My Lord. - Dep. Give me the Gold. I have brought r joo Crowns more. Lo. Wherefore? Dep. That I may have my Lordihips good Will, to leave my Of- fice before it be taken from me, and preferr'd to a worse, 'tis half the price I paid for't. I love Peace and a little Honesty. I know your Honour will find an able Man for it, and it is fit I should pay for my Quiet as, Lo. And what do you resolve ? Dep. To return to the Dunghill from whence I came, for though I W2S born in the City, I have some Land in the Coun- try, durty Acres and Mansion-house, where I will be the Miracle of a Courtier, -and keep good Hospitality, love my Neighbours, and their Wives, and consequently get their Children, be ad- mir'd amongst the Justices, sleep upon every Bench, keep a Chap- lain m my own House to be my Idolater, and furriifll me with Jests ; and when I have nothing, else to do, I will think of the Court, and how much I have bin oblig'd to your Lordstiip : My Lord, I may do you Service with a leading. Voice in the Coun- try, the Kennel will cry a'my Side ; if it come to Election, you or your Friend shall carry it, against the Common-wealth. Lo. Well, Sir, since you 'have express'd your self so freely, I will not counsel you against your Disposition to stay at Court, you may go when, and Whither you please ; and though at par- ting, I have nothing worth your Acceptation, I will bestow these Crowns upon your Servant. ■Dep. Thou slialt give 'em me agen Ro,"
49
0.54
0.184
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"4© The TRATTOR. Ro. Indeed, my Lord, I love a little Honesty, 'tis his Lordship's Bounty, it will be a Stock to set me up, for my self at Court, when your Lordship is retir'd into the Country, I humbly thank your Lordship, and take my leave of yours. Enter a Servant. Ser. The Duke my Lord. [Exit, Servant. Dep. How the Duke ? Du. Signior Depazzi. Lo. He has bin earnest with m?, arid please your Highness, To be his humble Suitor, he may have Freedom to leave the Court. Du. He shall be banisht. Dep. How * Lo. What time will your Grace allow to provide > Du. Two hours. Dep. I had rather lose my Head at home, and save Charges Of Travail, I beseech your Grace. Du. Well, 'tis granted, let him not trouble us. Cyou- Lo. Enjoy the Country, and return when the Duke sends for Dep. I humbly thank his Highness, and will pray for your in- D«. Lorenzo, are we private ? (crease of Grace. Exit. Lo. Yes, my Lord. Du. I am very melancholy. . Lo. I know the cause, 'us Amidea. Du. Right. Lo. I do not wish her dead. Du. It were a Sin. Lo. Not in Heaven, Sir ; yet There be Ladies, that would think it a promotion. D«. It were pity she should leave The World, till she hath taught by her Example The nearest way. Lo. I am very confident she's yet honest. Du. Yet, Lorenzo ? Lo. Ay, Sir, but l'me not of Opinion it is Impossible to know a change. D«. Take heed. Lo. I must confess, she has been very valiant, In making you remove your Siege, and she w'd Prety dexterity at the Ponyard, See her self bleed : You were startled To see her strike her Arm, and grew compassionate. D«. I was not Marble; we break Adamant With blood, and could I be a Man, and not Be mov'd to see that hasty Ebb of Life For my fake? Lo. Ascend agen, And fix in your lov'd Orb, be brings this comfort"
50
0.568
0.187
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRATTOR. 41 That can assure it. Du. Ha! Lo. You shall enjoy her. Du. Enjoy fair Amidea ? do not tempt, Or rather mock my frailty with such a promise. Lo. Shake off your melancholly slumber, I Have here decreed you shall possess her. Du. Is this in nature ? Lo. Thus: Sciarrhds Life And Fortunes are already growing forfeit, These brains have Plotted so; your mercy shall Purchase what you can wish. Du. Do this, And I'll repent the folly of my penitence, And take thee to my Soul, a nearer pledge Than Blood or Nature gave me: I'm renew'd, I feel my natural warmth return, when, where. Is this to be expected .•> I grow Old, While our Embraces are deferr'd. Lo. I go, to hasten your delight, Sciarrhds Fate is cast Firmer than Destiny. Du. Thou art my Prophet, I'll raise thee up an Altar.' Lo. Trust these brains. Du. Thou mak'st my Spirit caper in my veins. [Exit. Cosmo, and two Gentlemen above. 1 Gent. This way they pass. Cos I would not see 'em. x Gent. Why ."• 1 Gent. What melancholy o'th' suddain .■> It is now past cure. Cos I know it is, and therefore do not Desire to Witness their Solemnity, sliould Oriana See me to day. 2 Gent. What then ? Cos. I fear she'd be displeas'd. z Gent. We dispute not those nice formalities. Enter Alonzo, Piero, Pisano^ Oriana, Morossa. 1 Gent. She has spied you already. Cos. I am sorry for'r. [Oriana faints, Mor. How is'r, my Child ? Pis. She faints, what grief is so unmannerly To interrupt thee now, Oriana ? Mor. Daughter. Pis. Will Heaven divorce us e'er the Priest have made Our Marriage perfect . She returns. G Ot h."
51
0.51
0.175
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"4t The TRATTOR. Oria. Why were you so unkind to call me fret* A pleasing slumber ? Death has a fine dwelling. Pie. This shews her heart's not yet consenting ; 'tis Her Mother's fierce command. Ori. Something spake to me from that Window.1 Pis. There is nothing. Ori. Nothing siOW. Pis. Set forward. Alon. I do not like this Interruption; Tis Ominous. Enter Amidea. Am. Not for my fake, but your own, go back, , Or take some other way ; this leads to death. My Brother. — Pis. What of him ? Am. Transported with The fury of Revenge for my dishonour, Hath vowed to kill you in your Nuptial Glory. Alas ! I fear his haste : Now, good my Lord, Have mercy on your self ; I do not beg Your pity upon me, I know too well You cannot love me now. But again, I would beseech you, cherish your own life, Though I be lost for ever. Alon. It is worth Your care, my Lord. Pis Alas ! her Grief hath made her wild, poor Lady ! T should not love, Oriana, to go back; Set forward, Amidea, you may live To be a happier Bride : Sciarrha is not So irreligious to prophane these Rites. Am. Will you not then believe me ? Pray perswade him. You are his Freinds. Lady, it will concern You most of all indeed : I fear you'll weep To see him dead as well as I. Vis. No more, Go forward. Am. I have done, pray be not angry, That still 1 wish you well, may Heaven divert All harms that threaten you : I hope there is no sin in this; Indeed I cannot chuse but pray for youi This might have been rny Wedding-day. Or/. Goods"
52
0.477
0.188
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRATTOR. 41 Ori. Good Heaven ! I would it were ; my heart can tell, I take No Joy in being his Bride. I will resign my Place, and wait on you, If you will marry him. Am. Pray do not mock me. Ori. Dear Amidea, do not think I mock Your Sorrows; by these Tears, that are not worn By every Virgin on her Wedding-day ; I am compell'd to give away my self : Your Heart were promis'd, but he ne'er had mine : Am not I wretched too ? Enter Sciarrha, Lorenzo, aloof with a Guard. Alon. Sciarrha ! then I prophesie — — Sci. Pisano, where's Pisano .•> Pis Here, Sciarrha. I should have answered with less Clamour. Sci. But I would not lose my Voice, I must be heard, And I must tell you, 'tis not safe to marry. Pis. Why. Sci. Twill be fatal ; Hymen is gone abroad, And Venm •, Lady of your Nativity, Is found by wise Astrologers this day I'th* House of Death. Pis. This must not fright me, Sir ; set forward. Sci. One cold Word, you are a Villain ; I do not flatter. Pis. I am patient.- . This day I consecrate to Love, not Anger ; We?lFmeet some other time. Sci. Deride my Fury _• Then to thy Heart I send my own revenge [Stahs him with And Amideds. a Pony ar d. Pis.\ ammurder'd. Mor. Help, murder Gentlemen, Oh my Unhappiness \ Enter Lorenzo with a Guard. Pis. Bloody Sciarrha. Lo. Hold. Sci. Come all at once, Yet let me tell you, my Revenge is perfect, And I would spare your Blood, if you despise My Charity—— Lo. No Man attempt his Death ; I'll give you Reasons j this Attempt deserves An exemplary Justice. G_ Enter"
53
0.511
0.182
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRATTOR. Enter Cosmo. Sci. I am above Your politick reach, and glory in the wound That punish'd our Dishonour .• Is he dead ? I would not be so miserable, not to hi' sped him For the Empire. Cos Oh my Friend, poor Oriana. Lo. Disarm him: Return and comfort one another; some [Exeunt all hut Remove Pisano s Body, while I make it Lorenzo, Sciar. My care Sciarrha scape not. and Guards. . Sci. None of all give me a scratch ? Lo. You have forc'd him with discretion. Sci. Now what must I expect? Lo. You are my Prisoner. Sci. I am so. Lo. And be confident to find that favour. Sci. Favour, Lo. Be at distance, My Lord, I am sorry for your great Misfortune, And if you can but study how I may Assist you, you shall soon discern my love, My readiness to serve you- Sci. Ha, this ishonest. Lo. I will impose no more Restraint than your own House ; you're Honourable : . You have many severe Enemies : The Duke Look'd graciously upon Pisano, but Sci. You stia'not lose the smallest beam of favour, - To buy a Man so desperate ; I am arm'd to die, and give Example of that Fortitude:. Shall shame the Law's Severity. Lo. fyha' thoughe a way To recover you, if you incline to't. Dire you consent ? Sci. To any thing that's noble, Although I never fear'd to suffer ; I Am not so foolish to despise a Life. . Lo. There is no difficulty attends it; listen, The time will not permit much circumstance j The Duke you know.did love your Sister* Sci. Vitiously. Lo. Her Virtue did but cool him for the present, As sprinklings on a siame, he's now more passionate To enjoy her. Sci. Hal i £.0*"
54
0.481
0.172
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"4 Vm The TRATTOR. Lo. Is she consent to meet His soft embrace, with his first kiss he seals Your Pardon. v . The Duke may be so taken With her Return to his Delight, who knows But he may marry her, and discharge hisDutchess With a quaint Sallet : You do apprehend me. Sci. And repent more I had one good thought of thee, Than had I kill'd a Thousand : Save my life And prostitute my Sister, though I have No Weapon, I will look thee dead, or breathe A damp shall stifle thee. Lo. I ha' done, And praise your Heathen Resolution Of Death ; go practise Immortality, And e'er thy Body hath three Days inhabited A melancholly Chamber in the Earth, This Sister shall be ravish'd, Mauger thy Dust and Heraldry. Sci. Ha, ravish'd ? When I am dead, was't not so ? Oh my Soul, I feel it weep within me, and the Tears Soften my Flesh : Lorenzo, I repent my Fury. Lo- I advis'dyou the best way my Wisdom could direct," Sci. I thank you for't : You have awak'd my Reason ; I am afham'd I was no sooner sensible. Does the Duke Affect my Sister still, fay you ? Lo. Most passionately. Sci. She shall obey him then, upon my Life : That's it, my Life ; I know she loves me dearly. I shall have much ado to win her to it, But slie shall com«, I'll send her. Lo. Perform thi*.' Sci. I wo'not only send her, but prepar'd Not to be disobedient to his Highness : He shall command her any thing. Lo. Do this, And be forever happy ; when these have Only for form but waited on you home .• This disingages 'em. Sci. My humblest Service To the Duke, I pray,- and tell him, Amidea This Night shall be at his Dispose, by this. Lo,"
55
0.539
0.182
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"4_ The TRATTOR. Lo. Vm confident, JareWell; attend Sciarrah. Sci. Pity the Seaman, that to avoid a shelf, Must strike upon a Rock to save himself. [Exeunt, ACT US Quintus. Enter Sciarrha, ana Amidea. Sci. /TTvHe doors are fast, X Enough is wept already for Pisano : There's something else that must be thought on, and Of greater consequence : I am yet unsafe. That for thy sake am guilty of his blood. Am. Though all my stock of tears were spent already, Upon Pisano's loss, Yet the remembrance that you have made A forfeit of your dear life, Is able to create a weeping spring Within my barren head : Oh, my lost Brother ! Thou hast a cruel Destiny, my Eyes, In pity of thy Fate, desire to drown thee. The Law will only seek thee upon Land, Hid in my tears, thou shalt prevent the stroak Kills both our Name, and thee. — Sci. I know thou lov'st me, Poor Girl, I shall desire to cherish life, If thou lament me thus ; so rich a comfort Will tempt me, wish I might delay my journey To Heaven. Am. Good Heaven, that we might go together. Sci. That must not be. Am. Then let me go before. Sci. How ? Am. Make my suit unto the Prince, my blood May be your ransome ; let me dye, Sciarrha. Sci. How my Honour blushes To hear thee, Amidea ? Suffer for me! why, thou art innocent.- I have provok'd the Punishment, and dare Obey it manly; if thou couldst redeem me With any thing but death, I think I should ' Consent to live. Am. Nothing can be too precious To save a Brother, such a loving Brother As you have been. Sci."
56
0.58
0.176
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRATTOR. 47 Set Sci. Death's a devouring Gamester, And sweeps up all ; what thinkst thou of an Eye ? Gouldstthou spare one, and think the blemish recompenc'd, To see me safe with t'other ; or a hand, This white hand, that hath so often With admiration trembled on the Lute, Till we have pray'd thee leave the strings a while, , And laid our ears close to thy Ivory fingers, Suspecting all the Harmony proceeded From their own motion, without the need Of any dull or passive Instrument. No, Amidea, thou shalt not bear one scar To buy my life; the Sickle shall not touch A Flower that grows so fair upon his stalk .- I would live, and owe my Life to thee, So 'twere not bought too dear. Am. Do you believe I should not find . The way to Heaven? Were both mine Eyes thy Ransom, I shall climb up those high arid rugged Cliffs Without a hand. Sci. One way there is, if thou Dost love with that tenderness. Am. Pronounce it, And let no danger that attends, incline you To make a pause. Sci. The Duke thou know'st did love thee. Am. Ha ! Sci. Nay, do not start already, nor mistake me ; I do not, as before, make tryal of thee, Whether thou canst, laying aside thy Honour, Meet his lascivious arms ; but by this Vertue I must beseech thee to forgoe it all, And turn. a sinful Woman, Am. Bless me ! Sci. I know the Kingdoms of the World contain not Riches enough to tempt thee to a fall That will so much undo thee; but I am Thy Brother, dying Brother ; if thou lov'st Him therefore, that for thee hath done so much; Dy'd his pale hands in blood to revenge thee, And in that Murther wounded his own Soul Almost to death, consent to lose thy innocence; Am. Oh! never, never. Sci. What, not to save my Life ? _, Am. But stain my self for ever."
57
0.523
0.173
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRATTOR. 48 .- "- — -- — Sci. Where ? In thy face, who shall behold one blemish^ Or one spot more in thy whole frame? Thy Beauty Will be the very same, thy Speech, thy Person Wear no deformity. Am. Oh ! do not speak So like a Rebel to all Modesty, - To all Religion. If these Arguments Spring from your jealousie, that I am fain, After a Proof you did so late applaud—— _-_-Tll.l'«l_tl*-_._^"_t -•.* Sci. I had not kill'd Pisano then : Then 1 but try'd thy Virtue : Now my Condition calls for mercy to thee, Though to thy self thou appear cruel for't : Come, We may live both; if you please. .Am. Who has made you afraid to dye? I pity you, And wish my self in any Noble Cause Your Leader. Sci. So Valiant, I will not interpose another Syllable To entreat your pity ; say your Prayers, and then Thou'rt ripe to be Translated from the Earth, To make a Cherubim Am. What means my Brother ? Sci. To kill you. Am. Do not fright me, good Sciarrha. Sci. And I allow three minutes for your Devotion. Am. Will you murther me f Sci. D'ye tremble? Am- Not at the terrouri of your Sword, But at the horror will affright thy Soul For this black deed ? I see Pisano s blood Is texted in thy forehead, and thy hands Retain too many, too many Crimson Spots already ; Make not thy self, by murthering of thy Sister, All a Red Letter. Sci. You shall be the Martyr. Am. Yet stay, is there no Remedy but Death, And from your hand ? then keep your word, and let me Use one short Prayer. Sci. I shall relent. Am. Forgive me Heaven, and witness I have still [Kneels. My Virgin Thoughts, 'tis not to save my Life, But his Eternal one. Sciarrha"
58
0.527
0.174
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TR At TO R. 49 Sciarrha give me leave to vail my Face, [ Riser. I dare not look upon you and pronounce, I am too much a Sister, live, hereafter I know you will condemn my frailty for it. I will obey the Duke. Sci. Dar'st thou consent. s Wounds her. Am. Oh! let me see the Wound. [She unvailu 'Tis well, if any other hand had done it : Some Angel tell my Brother now, I did But seem consenting. Sci. Ha, but seem ? Am. You may believe my last breath. Sci. Why didst thou say so ? Am. To gain some time, in hope you might call in Your bloody purpose, and prevent the guilt . Of "being my Murderer; but Heaven forgive thee. Sci. Agen, agen, forgive me, Amidea, And pray for me ; live but a little longer To hear me speak, Lorenzo has My Oath to send thee to his Bed : For otherwise In my denial, Hell and they decree, . When I am dead, to Ravish thee : Mark that, To Ravish thee : And I confess in Tears, I did resolve, when I had found thee ripe, And nearest Heaven,, with all thy best desires To fend thee to thy Peace. Am. With the fame heart I beg Heaven for my kh\ fareWel. Sci. Thou shalt not die yet, Amidea, Sister.- [Florio knocks. I cannot come : But one word more : Oh! which way went thy Soul ? [ Fior'o break s open the door. Sci. Look, here's our Sister ! so, so, chafe her : She may return ; there is some Motion. Flo. Sister? Sci. Here, Florio would fain take his leave ; so, so, she comes. Flo. Amidea, how came this Wound ? Am. I drew the Weapon to it : Heaven knows, my Brother lov'd me : Now I hope The Duke wo'not pursue me with new Flames. Sciarrha, tell the rest, love one another The time you live together : I'll pray for you In Heaven, farewel, kiss me when I am dead ; You else will stay my Journey. [ She dies. Sci. Did'st not hear An Angel call her? Florio, I have much H To"
59
0.532
0.178
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"\ 5o , The T R AT TO R. To tell thee, take her up : She is not dead, Let her alone ; nay then she's gone indeed. But hereabouts her Soul must hover still '- Let's speak to that fair Spirit. Flo. You talk idly^ Sci. Do you talk wisely then? An excellent Pattern As ihe now stands for her own Alablaster. Cannot thy Tears and mine preserve her, Florio \ But we lose time, I charge thee by thy love To this pale Relick, be instructed by me, Not to thy danger ; some revenge must be, •And I am lost already ; if thou fall, Who shall survive to give us Funeral ? {Exeunt. Enter Lorenzo and Petruchio. Lo. Petruchio i Pe. My Lord. Lo. Th'art now my Servant. Pe. I ever was in heart your humblest Vassal. Lo. Th'art faithful, I must cherish thy desert, I shortly slnll reward it, very shortly . Next morning must salute me Duke^ the Sun, And I must rise together. Pe. I shall pray Your Glory may out-shine him in your Florence', And when he sets, we may enjoy your Sun-beam. Lo. Tis handsom flattery, and becomes a Courtier., Pe. I flatter nor, my Lord. Lo. Then th'art a Fool :■■ No Musickto a Great Man Chimes so sweetly : And Men must thrive; come hither, How many Hast thou kill'd ~ Pe. Bat one, my Lord. Lo. But one ?. Pe. And I must owe My Life to your Lordship, I had been hang'd else. Lo. But one ? wait at the Door, he is Not fit to kill a Duke, whose Hand is guilty But of a single Murder; or at least Not fit alone to act it : I ha' been Practis'd already, and though no Man sce't, Nor fcace the Eye of Heaven, yet every day I kill a Prince ; appear thou Tragick Witness. \_He disco'- vers the Dukes Pitlure, a Pony ar d sticking in it. Which though it bleed not, I may boast a Murder. Here first the Duke was painted to the Life : Bat with this Pencil to the Death A I love My"
60
0.455
0.181
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"*» TJ)e TRATTOR. My Brain for the Invention, and thus Confirm'd, dare trust my Resolution. I did suspect his Youth, and Beauty might Win some Compassion when I came to kill him .- Or the Remebrance that he is my Kinsman, Might thrill my Blood: Or something in his Title, Might give my Hand Repulse, and startleNature .* But thus I have arm'd my self against all pity, That when I come to strike, my Ponyard may Through all his Charms as confidently wound him, As thus I stab his Picture, and stare on ir. He smiles, he smiles upon me .- I will dig Thy wanton Eyes out, and supply the dark And hollow Cells with two pitch burning Tapers : Then place thee Porter in some Charnel House, To light the Coffins in. Enter Petruchio. Pet. My Lord. Lor. The Duke's not come already. Pet. Signior Florio desires to speak with you. .Lor. This must retire again into my Closet: Admit him* Enter Florio. • Welcome, how does Sciarrha i Flo. He commends HisServibe to your Lordship, and hath sent Lor. His Sister? Flo. Much ado he had to effect it : He hopes his Grace will quickly sign his Pardon. Lor. It sliall be done. Flo. I have a suit, my Lord. Lor. To me .* 'Flo. My Sister would intreat your Honour She may be admitted privately, and that I may have Privilege to prepare her Chamber : She does retain some modesty, and wou'd not Trust every Servant with her Shame .- Their Eyes Are apt to instruct their Tongues. Lor. I wo not see her my self, command what you desire. Flo. Y'are gracious. r Lor. I'll give directions instantly : Poor Lady, This is the Duke's hot Blood, but Heaven convert him: Follow me, good Florio. Flo. I attend, my Lord. H % Lor,"
61
0.509
0.172
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"sx The T RAT TO R Lor. Things shall be carried honourably. Flo. We are all bound to you. [ Exeunt. Recorders. [ Amidea discovered in a Bed, prepard by two Gentlewomen.. i. This is a fad Employment. 2. The last wee'er shall do my Lady. [ Enter Florio. Flo. So, now you may return, it will become Your modest Duties, not to enquire the Reason Of this strange service, nor to publish what Y'avebeen commanded ; let me lOok upon I Ex. Gentlmth- My Sister now., still she retains her Beauty. men. Death has been kind to leave her all this sweetness.. Thus in a Morning have lose saluted My Sister in her Chamber, sate upon Her Bed, and talk'dof many harmless passages ;: But now 'tis night, and a long night with her, 1; ne'er shall see these Curtains drawn again,. Until we meet in Heaven. The Duke already. Enter Duke and Lorenzo. Du. May I believe? Lo. Trust me, my Lord, hereafter;. Du. Call me no more thy Lord, but thy Companion, I will not wear that Honour in my Title, Shall not be thine. Who's that ? Lo. Her Brother Florio. Dh. She is a Bed Lo. The readier for your pastime. She means to make a Night on'c. Flo. This shall declare thee to Posterity \ The bett of Sisters What of that ? and is not A Brother's Life more precious than a Trine? I prithee do not sigh: How many Ladies Would be ambitious of thy place to night, And thank his Highness ? Yes, and Virgins too. Du. He pleads for me. Lo. He will deserve some Office 'bout your Person. Du. With what words shall I express my joy? Lo. I leave you, Sir, to action. Florio is soon dismist. [Exit. . Flo. He's come, good night Dh, florio ? Flo. Your Slave. Du.. My Friend, thou shalt be near our bosom. Flo. Pleasures Crown your expectation. [Exit.. Dit. AlLperfect, 'till this minute, I could never Beast I was happy .-All this World jbas not Ac"
62
0.491
0.174
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"The TRATTOR. sf A Blessing to exchange ; this World ! 'tis Heaven, And thus I take Possession of my Saint: Asleep already ? 'Twere great pity to Disturb her Dream ; yet if her Soul be not Tir'd with the body's weight, it must convey Into her Slumbers, I wait here, and thus Seal my Devotion What Winter dwells [Kisses.. Upon this Lip? 'Twas no warm kiss. I'll try Agen the Snow is not so cold, I have Drank Ice, and felt a numbness spread through My blood at once ha ! Let me examine A little better ; Amidea ! she is dead, she is dead ! What howor doth invade me ? Help, Lorenzo' Murder, where is Lorenzo? [Enter Lorenzor and Petruchi*. Lo. Here, my Lord. Du- Some Traytor hid within the Chamber, see My Amideds dead. Lo. Dead ? 'Tis impossible ; Yet fh'as a wound upon her breast. Du. I prithee kill me. [They wound him', Lo. With all my heart. Du. Ha! wilt thou murder me, Lorenzo, Villain? Oh, spare me to consider ; I would live A little longer; Treason. Lo. A little longer, say ye? It was my duty to obey you, Sir. Pet. Let's make him sure, myLora\ . \\ Du. Oh spare me, I may live and pardon thee: Thy Prince begs mercy from thee, that did never Deny thee any thing ;, pity my poor Soul, I have not prayed. Lo. . I could have wifh'd you better prepar'd, But let your Soul e'en take his chance. [Wounds him again.. Du. No tear prevail? Ob, whither must I wander? Thus Cæsar fell by Brutus. I shall tell News to the World I goto, will not be Believ'd, Lorenzo kill'dme. Lo. Will it not h I'll presently put in security. Du. I am coming, Amidea, I am coming: For thee, inhumane Murderer, expect My blood shall flye to Heaven, and there inflam'd,, Hang a prodigious Meteor all thy life.. Oh,"
63
0.484
0.173
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"54 The T RAT TOR. Oh I faint! Thou flattering World farewell : Let Princes gathe My dust.into a Glass, and learn to spend Their hour of State, that's all they have; for when That's out, Time never turns the Glass again. [Dies.\ Lo. So, lay him beside his Mistress. The Duke dismist the Train came with him? Pe. .He did, my Lord. Lo. Run to Sciarrha, pray him come, and speak wo' me ; Secure his passage to this Chamber, haste. [ Exit Pet. He's dead, I'll trust him now, and his Ghost too: Fools start at shadows, I'm in love with night, And her Complexion. [ Enter Pet. Pe. -My Lord, he's come without your Summons. Lo. Already ? leave us. [Enter Sciarrha, and Florio. Welcome, let embraces Chain us together. Noble /Verio welcome .- Jf' But I must honour thy Great Soul. Sci. Where's the Duke ? Lo. They are a Bed together. Sci. Ha ! - Lo. He's not stirring yet : Thou kil'dst.thy Sister, didst not? Sci. I prescrv'd her. Lo. So, it was bravely done. Sci. But where's the wanton Duke ? Lo. Asleep, I tel! you. Sci. And he sliajl sleep eternally. Lor. You cannot wake him, look you. Sci. Is he dead ? Lo. And in his Death we two begin our Life Of Greatness, artd of Empire, nay, he's dead. Sci. Thlit labour's sav'd. Lo. Now I pronounce, Sciarrha, Thy Pardon, and to recom pence thy loss: The share of Florence, I'll but wear the Title, The Power we'll divide. Sci. I like this well: You tolda Tale once of a Common wealth, and Liberty.. Lo. It was to gain a Faction With discontented Persons, a fine Trick To make a Buzz of Reformation. My ends are compaft'd, Dam the Ribble Rabble. Sci. Shall we Sweat for the People? Lose our Breath To get them fame ? Lo. I'll have it given out The Duke did kill thy Sister. Sci. Excellent. ._>__ Having"
64
0.441
0.165
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"ne TRATTOR. SS Lo. Having first ravistv'd her, hetannot be Too hateful ; it will dull the Examination Of his own Death ; or if that come to question Sci. What if I fay, I kill'd him in Revenge Of Amidea . They will pity me. Beside, 'twill be in your power to pardon Me altogether. Lo. Most discreetly thought on. Sci. The Devil wo' not leave us o'ttie fuddain. Lo. Rare wit : How hastily he climbs the Precipice, From whence one Fillup topples him to ruine r We two shall live like Brothers. Sci. Stay, we two now I consider better, I have no mind to live at all and you fha'notj , I'll give you proof; if you but make a noise, You gallop to the Devil. Lo. I'mbetray'd. Sci. To Death inevitable. Brother be you Spectator only. Lo. This is somewhat Noble. Sci Thank me, not Lorenzo, I'll not engage His Innocence to blood, thy hands are white, Preserve 'em, Florio ; and unless my arm Grow feeble, do not interpose thy Sword I charge thee. Lo. None to assist me . help, Petruchio, help. Petr. Murther, Murther I They fight, Enter Petruchio, who offering to run at Sciarrha, is intercepted by Florio, Petruchio, rum in crying help, Florio makes fast the door. Lo. R.each thy jaws wider, Villain, cry out Murther, Treason, any thing; hold Oh. Lo. falls. Sci. Will you not fall, Colossus? Flo. Are not you hurt * Sd. I know not, ha ? Yes, he has prick'd me somewhere^ But I'll make sure of him; now must I follow: I'll fight with him i'th' tother World thy hand, Florio. Farewell. [ Die s, F/o. He's dead too, 'tis in vain for me to fly. Within. Break open the doors. Flo. You shan't need. Enter Pretruchio, Cosmo, AUonso, Fredericot with Guard. Al. Disarm him. Cos. Lorenzo, and Sciarrha Slain h Al. Where is the Duke ? fteti."
65
0.493
0.175
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"003112351"
"1692-01-01T00:00:00"
"1692"
"The Traytor, a tragedy [in five acts and in verse] with alterations, amendments and additions. Written by Mr. Rivers"
"London"
false
"0 The T RAT TOR. Pe:. Look here, my lords. Al. What, "Tray tor. Fre. See Amidea murder'd too. Cos I tremble, here is a heap of Tragedies. Al. We must have an account from Florio. Flo. He can inform you best that brought yoi Al, .Lay handsupon Petruchio, disarm him. Cos Wn'at- blood is that upon his Sword . 'tis Pet. rmc'atjghf. "-* Ces. To Tortures with him. Pet. Spare-yonr fury, know the best' blood in Florence, -I must quit Young FUtio ; Lorenzo, and my self, Are only guilty of the Prince's Death. Al. Inhumane Tray tors. Cos. But. who kill'd Amidea} Flo. The Duke's Lust .• There was no other way. to save her Honour. My Brother has rev^ng'dit here, but Fate Deny'd him Triumpn. Al. I never heard ifjk Such killing Stories, but Tis meet*, we first Settle the State j Cosmo, you are the. next Of Blood, to Challenge Florence. .- Cos. Pray deferr That 'till the Morning, drag that Murderer To Prison ; Florio, you must not expect? Your Liberty, 'till all things be examin'd. Lorenzo, now I am above thy malice, And will make satisfaction to Oriana. 'Tis a fad Night, my Lords, ../ these you fee There is no stay in proud Mortality. \Ex?«kI. F I N I &"
66
0.429
0.17
"Shirley, James, 1596-1666 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"The Virgin- Mart j?. 7* Enter bio-UKm, Maximinus, Epire, Pontqi, Mactdon meeting Artemia; attendants. Art. Glory and Conqueft ftill attend upon Triumphant €*f«r. Ditc. Let thy wi_h(fair daughter) Be equally divided; and hereafter Learn thou to know and reverence Maximinus. Whofe power, with mine united, make one C£fa.\ Max. But thatl fear 'twould be held flattery, The bonds corifider'd in which we ftand tied, As love, and Empire, I fhouldfay, till now I ne're had feen a Lady I thought worthy To be my Miitreffe. Art Sir you fhew your felf Both Courtier and Souldieij but take heed, Take heed my Lord, though my dull pointed beaiujfc. Stain'd by a harlh refufall in my fervanr, ** Cannot dart forth fuch beams as may inflame you You may encounter fuch a powerfull one, That with a pleafingheat wil thaw your heart. Though bound in ribs of Ice; love ftill is love, His Bow & Arrows are the fame; great Julius, That to Lis fucceflbrs left the name of Cxfar- Whom war could never tame, that with dry cys Beheld the Urge plains of Vkarfalia, cover'd With the dead Carkafles of Senators And Citizens of Rome, when the world knew No other Lord but him,ftruck deep in years too, (And men gray hair'd forget the lufts of youth) After all this,meeting fair Cleopatra, Afupplyant to the Magickof her eye, Even in his pride of conqueft, took himcaptivcj - "T Nor a re you more fecure . Max. Were you deforiri'd, (But by theCodsyou are r.ioft excellent") lourgravity and difcretion would o'recome me9 Audi ihould be more proud in being aprifoner K To"
9
0.446
0.161
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"the Virgin- MdHjt.. 7 « To your fair virtues, then of all the honours, Wealth, title, Empire, that my fword hath purchased,. ~Dioc. This meets my wiflies : welcome it, Artemia> With out ftretch'd arms, and ftudie to forget That Antoninus ever was ; thy fate . Referv'd thee for this better choice, embracc-lt. E/> This happy match brings new nerves to bring ftfength To our continued league. Maced. Eynton himfef Will bleffe this marriage, which we will folemnize In the prefence of thefe Kings. . Ton. Who reft moft happie, To be eye-witnefles of a match that brings Peace to the Empire. Dioc We much thank your lOves : But whei e's Sapritiui our Governour, And our moft zealous Provoftrgood Tbeopbilus> If ever Prince were bleft in a true fervant, Or could the Gods be debtors to a man, Both they, and we,ftand far ingag'd to cherifh His piety and fervice. Art. Sir the Governour Brooks fadly his fons death, although he turn'd Apoftata in death; but bold 1heophilust Who, for the fame caufe, in my prefente feal'd His holy anger on his daughters hearts. Having with tortures firft tried to convert her, Drag'd the bewitching Chriftian to the fcaffold, And (aw her loofe her head. Die. He is all worthy. And from his own mouth I would gladly hear The manner how fhe fuffer'd. Art. "Twill be deliver'd. With fuch contempt and fcorn f I know his nature J That rather 'twill beget your highnefs laughter, Then the leaft pity, Enter Theophilus, Sapritivis,Macrintts Dioc. To that end [would hear it. jrt. He comes, with him the governour. "Dio.OSapritius, I am tQ chide you for your tendcrnefle j But"
10
0.472
0.157
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"The Virgin- MArtyr. 7 5 Butyet vemembring thatyou area father, I will forget it: good 7beophilusy I will fpeak withyou anon: neareryour ear. Safritius, Ibe. By Antoninus foul, I do conjure you, And though not for religion, for his friendthip, Without demanding what's the caufe that moves me, Receive my fignet,by the power of this, Goto myprifons,andreleafeall ChriftianS That are in fetters there by my command. Mac. But what (hall follow > Ibe. Hafte then to the port, Youfhall findetheretwo tall (hips ready rigg'd, In which embarkethe poor diftrefled (ouls, And bear them from the reach of tyranny; Enquire not whether you are bound, the Diety That they adore will give you profperous winds, And make your voyage tuch,and largely pay fos Your haizard,and your travel: leave me here j Thereisafcenethatlmuftaft alone. ffiiftgood Macrims* and the great God guide you. Mac. He undertake't.there's fomething prompts me to it, ' Tis to fave innocent blood, a faint-like a£t; And to be mercifull, had never been Bymortallmen themfelves efteemed a fin. Em. Mac. Dio. You know your Charge. Sap. And will with care obferve it. Vioc For I profeffe, he is not Cafars friend, That ftieds a tear for any torture that A Chriftianfuffers; welcome, my beftfervanc, My carefull zealous Provoft, thou haft toild To fatisfie my will, though in extreams, I love thee for't;thou art firm rockjno changeling Prithee deliver, and for myfake do £, Without excelTe of bitternefie, or (cottes, Before my brother and thefe Kings, how took The Chriftian her death. The. And fuch a prefence , • Through every private he^d in this large room. Were cfrcled round with an' imperiall crown,"
11
0.46
0.162
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"Th'b VirgifaMitrlyti 74 Her ftory will deferve, it is fo full i \ Of excellency and wonder4 Disc.Wn! how's this > Jhe. O marke it therefore, and with that attention. As you would hear an Embaffiefrom heaven Jy a wing'd Legate; for the truth delivered, Both how and what this blefled Virgin (uffeYed a And D.rotkeabut hereafter nam'd, You will rife up with reverence; andno-more! Ai things unworthy of your thoughts, remember What the Cannoniz'd Spartan Ladies were, W-h lying Greece (o boa ft s of; your own Matrons^-, Your Roman Dames, whofe figures you yet keep Ai holy relickSj in her htftory WiL iindeafecond Urn: GracchusCer-zlia. Paulina, that in death defir'd to follow Met h usband , Seneca, nor Erutus Portia, That fwallow'd burning coles to overtake him, Though al their feveral worths were given toon* With this is to be mention 'd. Max Is he mad.? Dio. Why they did die Tbeopbilus, and boldly, This did no more. - The. They out of defperation, Or for vain- glory of an after name, Parted with life : this had not mutinous fonsj, As the rafh Gracchi were; nor was this Saint A doting Mother, as Cornelia was : This loft no husband, in whofe overthrow Her wealth and honour funk, no fear of want- Did make her being tedious, but aiming At an immortaH crown, and in his caufe Who only can beftow it, who fent'downi Legions ofminiftring angels to be. . up Harfpotlefle foule to heaven; who entertained it} - With choice celeftial mufick, equall to The motion of the fpheres, (he ancompel'd Chang'd this life for a better. My Lord Sapritiutj -, were prefent at her death, did you ere here"
12
0.413
0.159
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"1 he Virgin*Martyr. 75 Such ravifhing founds? Sap. Yet you fa id then it was witchcraft And devihfhellufions, The. 1 then heard it With finful ears,8i. belch'd oucblafphemous words* Againft his Diety, which then I knew not, Nor did believe in him. Vio. Why doft thou now^Or dar'ft thou in our hearing? Iht , \\ ere my voice- As loud as is his thunder to be heard Through all the world, all Potentates on earth Ready to burft with rage}£hould they but hear its Though hell to'aid their malice-lent her furies, Yet I would fpeak, and fpeak again, and boldly, I am a Chriftian, #*\d the powers you worftiip But dreams of fools and madmen. Max. Lay hands on him. T)io Thou twice a child (for doting age fo makes thee-^ Thou Coula'ft not clfe, thy pilgrimage of life Being almoft pad through in this laft moment^ . Deftroy what ere thou haft done good, or great! Thy youth did promilc much,and grown a mans . Thou madeft it good, and with increafe of years Thy a&kms ftill better'd : as the Sun Thou didft rife glorioufly,kepft a eonftant eourfe In all thy journey, and now in the evening, When thou (houldft pafs with honour to thy refts Wilt thou fall like a Meteor > Sap. Yet confeffe ♦ That thou art mad, & that thy tongue 8c heart Had no agreement. Max. De, noway isleftelfe, To fave thy life, Tbeophilus. Vio. But refufe it, DeftrucYion as horrid , and as fuddain Shall fall upon thee, as if Hell flood open,' , And thou wert finking thither. Ihe. Hear me yet, Hear me for my ferricepaft. &*■> m_"
13
0.411
0.15
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"the Virgin-Martyr. T^g Art. What will he fay > The. As everIdeferv'dyourfavour,hearme, And grant one boon, 'tis not for IK". ' n' for; Nor is it fit3that I, that neere knew pity To any Chriftian, being one my felf, Should look for any: no, I rather b;g The utmoft of yourcruelty; I (land Accomptablefor thoufand Chriftians deaths* And were it poflible that I could dy A day for every one , th en live again To be again tormented, 'twere to me An eafie pennauce, and I (hould pafle through A gentle cleanfing fire; but that denied me, It being beyond the ftrength of feeble nature, My fute is, you would have nopity on me: In mine own houfe there are a thoufand engirw Offtudied cruelty, which I did prepare For miferable Chriftians, let me feel, As the Sicilian, did his Brazen Bull, Thehorridftyoucan finde, and lwillfay In death that you are mercifull. Viae. Defpair not, In this thou (halt prevail; go fetch 'em hither: fome go for Death (hall put on a thoufand fhapes at once. the ruck,. And fo appear before thee, racks, and whips, Thy flefh with burning pinfors torn, (hall feed The fire that heats them, and what's wanting to The torture of the body, Lie fupply In punifhing thy minde: fetch all the Chriftians That are in hold/and here, before his face, Cut'em in pieces. The. *Tis not in thy power, It was the firft good deed I ever did; They are remov'd out of thy reach-|how ere 1 was determin'd for my fins to die, I firft took order for their liberty, . And ftill I dare thy worft. Vioc. Bind him I fay, Make every artery and finew crack, \ The"
14
0.492
0.163
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"the Virgin- Martyf. 77 The (lave that makes him give the loudeft (hrike, Shall have ten thoufand Drachms: wretch He force thee To curfe the power thouworftiippeft. the. Never, never. No breath of mine (hall everbefpent on him, Thptorture But what (hall fpeak hisma'-eftie or Mercie; him. I am honour'd in my fuffermgs; weak tormentors, -More tortures, more: alas you are unskiifull, For heavens fake more, my breaftis yet untorn : Here purchafe the reward that was propounded. The Irons cool, here arms yet, and thighs, Spare no part of me, Max. He endures beyond Thefufferanceofa man. Sap. No figh nor groan To witneffe he hath feeling. Vioc. Harder villains. Enter Harpax. Har. Unleflethat he blafpheme,he's loft for ever : If torments ever could bring forth defpair, Let thefe compell him to it: oh me My ancient enemies again. Falls do-tut. Enter Dorothea in a white Kobe. Crtwns upon her Kobe. a. Crown upon her head,leaiinby the Angel, Antoninus, Califte,««d Chr'i&et., following all in white.but lefie glorious, the Angell with a Crown for bint. the. Moft glorious Virion, Did ere fo hard a bed yeeld man a dream So heavenly as this> I am confirm'd, Confirm'd you blefled fpirits, and make hafte To take that Crown of immortality You offer to me; death,till this blelTed minute I never thought thee flow pac'd,nor could 1 Haften thee now, for any pain I fuffer, Bu that thou keeps me from a glorious wretch, Which trough this ftormy way, I would creep to, And humbly kneeling with humility wear .t. Oh now I feel thee, blefled fpirits 1 come,"
15
0.433
0.153
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"002417091"
"1661-01-01T00:00:00"
"1661"
"The Virgin Martir, a Tragedie [in five acts and in verse and prose.]"
"London"
false
"7© the Virgin- Martyr. And witnefle for me all thefe wounds and fears,' ■ * I di« a fouldier in the Chriftian wars. T Sap. I have feen thousands tortur'd, but nee're yet A conftancielike thi9. Har. I am twice damn'd. Ang. Hafte to thy place appointed, curfed fiend, In fpiteof hell, this prifoner's not they prey, 'Tis I have won, thou that haft loft the day, Exit Angeti9 Vio. I think the center of the earth be crackt, thedevijl Yet I (land (till unmov'd, and will go on} finies rthb The perfecution that is here begun, lightning. Through all the world with violence (hall run. fi*wiJ?.3Exetmt+ F I JVll S."
16
0.401
0.15
"Massinger, Philip"
"Dekker, Thomas, approximately 1572-1632 [person] ; Massinger, Philip, 1583-1640 [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"THE SPANISH ROGUR As it was A C T E D B Y H I S Majesties Servants. Written by THO: DVFFETT. Hor. Serni. — 0 bone! ne te Frustrere : Insanis & tu, Stultiaue prope omnes. L r N D o K> Printed for William Cademan at the Pope's Head in the Lower WaI_\ in the New Exchange in the Strand, M.jDC.LXXIjV."
7
0.487
0.225
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"T O MADAM ELLEN G V T N, Madam, T is not. because you were pleas'd to be very kind to this Playa when it was act- ed j for I know not whether ■M^tver honour' d it with your Present Nor is it to return you a troublesome acknowledgment for Favours ; for I am sore you do not know me : Nor the hope of obliging you to my future ad vantage j for the utmost return I expect is your pardon : None of these has made me guilty of this presumption. But since a Play in print, without an Epistle Dedicatory^ is now like a Mo dish Gallant without a Mistriis. ora Papist with- a out"
9
0.567
0.239
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"The Epistle Dedicatory. out a tutelar Saint. I resolv'dto obey Custom in making a Dedication, and my own free inclinati on in the choice of your Excellent Self, at whose Feet I humbly lay this ; wherein, though my rash Boldness' may be censor'd, .I'm sure my Prudence will be applauded : For if this Censorious Age will submits* the most perfect Beauty , or the greateli Goodness in the World,under your Pro tection it- will be safe. Nature almost overcome by Art, has in your Self rally 'd all herseatter'd Forces, and on your charming Brow, sits smiling at the (lavish toyls which yours and her envious Foes endure ; striving in vain with the fading weak supplies of Art, to rival your Beauties ; which are ever the lame, and alwayes incomparable. Notwithstanding this great Truth is celebrated by All that know you; You still are Mistriis of so much obliging Affability, so free from sollen Pride, and affected Statelinels, the usoal Atten dants of extraordinary Felicity; not contented to be safe in the barren praise of doing no ill, but so readily and so frequently doing good, as if it were not your Nature, but your Business; that, next to your Beauty, these Virtues are the great- est"
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"The Efifile Dedicatory. est Miracle of the Age. If I am the first that has taken the boldness to tell you this, in Print, 'tis because / am more ambitious than all others, to be known by the Title of, Madam, Tour Admirer, and humblest Servant, T. D."
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"The Persons Names^ Don Fenife — Mr. Harris. Don Alonzo *? — — Mr. Lyddal. Don Manuel Mr. Watson.. Laraseo— — Mr. Powell. Mingo — Mr. Cash. Sanchez Mr. Griffin. Alcinda — i Mrs. Boutell. Roselia — - Mrs. Uphill. Teresa — Mrs. Corye. t r* Leonella — ' -Mrs. Kneppe. *■* *■ Neighbours, &c,"
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"PROLOGUE Spoken by Mrs. BOUTELL. OV R poor forsaken Stage does now appear, Like some ca ft Mistrifs that has once been fair: In ev'ry part a fad decay we find, Tet fondly look, that you pould still be kjnd 3 At leaft we hope, what our Defetts deny, Tour eager want will at this time supply : For, as fierce Captain that from Camp returns, Flies at each Vizard-mask. he fees,- — and burns: So, in this Dearth of Wit, methinkj to Night Tou should not stand to mind if all be right* None sure will rail at faults we Women make, When the kind failing's onely for your fake. And, tell me Gallants! which wottld you like be ft ? The tedious Fool thatjiayes 'iilljhe is dfeft, Or the kind Girl, who when the hour it some, Slips on the Morning Gown, and steals from home? After the good old Englisi) way we treat, Though it be plain, we give you wholefom Meat. Our Friends of th' other Bouse, do often take ye With such Ragousts as nasty French Cooky make ye. With gar nisi)' d Dishes they delight your Eyes, And give you nought but Vermine in disguise. 'Tis not a Ladies Paint, can gain her Bearts, Nor (illy Lords fine Cloaths,can mend his Parts : Loaded with Livries, the Gilt Coach may roul, And yet the Spat k. within' may be a Fool. To your own Cofti mo ft of you Gallants know, That h not alwayes be ft that makes a Show. Were the Truth known, here's many a Sparks 1 star , That has been lewdly Cheus'd in fine Sem.ar. Thus Fools are caught, but the old crafty Sinner, Takes the found Wench j though in Straw-Bat andy 'inner. I THE"
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"1 THE Spanish Rogue. ACT I. Scene i. Enter Don Fenise and Larasco in FeniseV Bouse: ■Espairing Merchants, when their Fleets appear, After the dangers of a stormy year, Have swelling hopes like mine -_, yet doubt their Fate, Till in their greedy arms they hug their freight. Assist me Fortune! fix thyrouling wheel Some few short minutes, and for ever reel. Not yet ! —how dull and lazily it creeps > [_ Looks on his O Expectation ! how each moment sleeps ! Watch. Lar. Sleep on, old time! for thou hast need of Rest, Who art for ev'ry Lovers service prest. Had my grave Courage been as rash as his. We both had flep'd eternally ere this. These Lovers, whom the Devil cannot frigh\ -j When near enjoyment fires their appetite 3 \ Design'd to meet like Cats, i'th d ead of night : But I told him, whom nothing else cou'd stay, TT was her command he should not stir till day. This time much better fits my peaceful mind, Though Love wont, let them see, must I be blind ? She has, poor thing! expected him all night, And, though he's freed from's peevish Mistriss by't, I know he'll Rant . but my resolve is set — • These valiant Friends did never fail me yet. \_His Feet. Fen. B Fen. Ev'n"
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"f» Fen. Ev'n in consent, she's cruel too, the night Much better wou'd disguise a Lovers flight. None but her self can such delay es repair } Impatience is as restless as despair. — — ExeuntFenife and Larasco. Scene 2. Enter Alcinda andLeoneWa in Don Manuel'-f Boll. Ale. Is this a Lovers haste >■ Did he not fay, Each minute in my absence seem'd a day } False man! unworthy of my meanest thought ! To slight a Love he has so dearly bought — My flame increases by his cold delay . Revenge shall lead me off, though love wou'd stay. Exit Alcinda. Leon. The language of those begging eyes I know, Implores a reason that she may not go : I'll rather make her hate him if lean, For she's too good for such a faithless man. - — \_Goingont_2 Jhe sees Fenise and Laraseo comings and returns rvith a dark Lanthorn. Enter Fenise and Larasco. Fen. The King of Planets from his daz'ling Crown, With more than common Red gilds ore the Town : Blushing to see Lov.es secrets trust the Light. Leon. Stand ! Who goes there ? what sturdy mortal Wight, When dismal shades the sleeping World orespread, And yawning Graves, let out their wandring dead, Disturbs the silent night ? and rashly pryes Into pale Hecates drowsie sacrifice ! Speak daring Mortal ! say, what makes thee creep Through unknown paths, when time it self's asleep ? Declare thy dire intent — — Fen. Let's make all sore, And play these Frolicks when we are secure. Leon. This"
16
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"This CO Leon. This voyce I know 5 deceive me not pale Moon! Tis he ! hey ho! what made you come so soon ? This Love's a restless Bedfellow 3 take heed, Tread soft and fore 5 this shews you love indeed T' adventure out this dreadful stormy Night, You might have taken cold, or met a Spright Lar. A Spright! where! where! Ah good Sir ! dear Sir ! stay no longer here — Fen. Pry 'thee release my patience, I'll approve This sport another time — But where's my Love > Leon. Where is your Love indeed? to make her wait Were it not lost, you had not come so late. Go boast your Treachery, and then declare How long you woo'd,how oft you perjur'd are; When you consult your Conquest, sum your Cost Of precious time, and Oaths; See who has lost. She will your scorn with interest return, And, for your falseness, Heav'n will make you mourn. Fen. Thy Looks are well, but in thy Words I find The certain signs of a distemper'd mind 5 Is it to me you speak ? and can you prove My wandring Faith, or my decaying Love ? Disperse these wonders which your words create ; It was my Penance to attend so late ; And if I suffer, for your own designe, ~ Your loud Complaints more justly will be mine. Leon. Ah Sir ! Excuses which so weak appear, Betray too little Love, or too much Fear : Do jealous Lovers, which abhor the light, Call Phœbus to attest their secret flight > She sommon'd you ere Night y/ax'd grey, as soon As the Antipodes en joy 'd their Noon. Fen. Thou heartless Fool ! what mischief hast thou done Instructing me to wait the rising Sun ; Kneel to good Fortune, for thy Life's the stake 5 Raise not my Ruine on this' Ro'gues mistake, I'll lead her hence, or perish at her feet. Leon. Sooner the Eve and Infant dav may meet 5 B2"
17
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"c,; This injury reviv'd her dying scorn, And stay'd me here to hasten your return. Ill Tydings flie, too soon you'll hear the rest — Fen. The rest! Can my Misfortune be increase? I know too little, since there's more behind. Leon. If she can hate you, to your self be kind. Fen. Villain be gone! thy swiftest fears out-flie Leon. Your Sword would blush to wear so base a Die. Fen. In such extremes of Fate, I want a guide : None can securely stem wild pasiions Tyde. Proceed ! hold ! ( curs'd fortune ) dispatch the rest — Leon. Y'are banish'dfrom her presence, andherbrest. Fen. His baseness is too weak a guard He dyes ! For such a Saint too poor a Sacrifice. Fenise draws, and Larasco runs in crying. Lar. Dear! Dear! merciful! pardon my mistake, For Heavens, Oh Sir! for fair Alcinda' s fake [Within. Murther! Murther! I'm dead! I'm dead! Exit Larasco-, Fen. Nothing to stop his Throat > no hearty Curse ? Leon. O for an J.risi) Wolf to make him hoarse. Thieves! Thieves! Thieves! Rogues! Villains! Dogs! Thieves! [ Manuel within. Leon. The Blood-hounds up, no cunning can relieves. Fen. Curse on his yelping Jaws! what shall we do } Leon. Here, here! quick! y Sir, step in here Exeunt Mingo and Leonella. Enter Don Manuel in a ridiculous Morning dress. Man. Thieves! Thieves! Wife! Daughter! Maid ! no body hear t All the dores open, undone ! rob'd ! undone ! All the World asleep ? am I heard by none > Murther ! murther ! I'm dead, down right stone dead. Ha! 'tis so, 'tis so, my wild girls are fled. Pray Heav'n it be no worse, I'll raise the Town. [ Exit Manuel locking the dore after him. Enter"
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"CO Enter Don Fenise and Leonella. Leon. Consult her safety, though you flight your own 3 Her Honour suffers in your longer stay, No dull consideration ; but away — — Still more unhappy ! he has lock'd the dore. Exit Leonella. Fen. Never to see, nor think of me no more ! Why can she not my Love transform to hate > And rule my Passion, as she rules my Fate > Why did those mighty Powers we adore, Give Beauty so much strength, and give no more ? Have I for this, outwatch'd a Tyrants Spie ? A Hermits Zeal, or Statefmans Jealousie ? When Mad-men sleep, and madder Chymists rest. Loves greater madness still annoyes my Brest. Repent ! too cruel Fair thy Vow repent ! Let the Offender bear the punishment Unkind Alcinda ! Must we ever part } Can She so easily command her heart? To my insulting Fate too much I bow : If I must never more, I'll see her now • I dare not go; Dull Fenise I canst thou bear These injuries from Love, and blame his fear ? He's innocent, or thou must guilty prove ; As he toifear submits, thou yeild'st to Love. Enter Leonella pulling Larasco in. Leon. Among the Women you can domineer — Lar. Kill me Sir ! Kill me ! rid me of my fear. Fen. This Fellow may his frighten'd sense regain. The Object once remov'd, removes his pain; Love, like an angry Ghost, allows no rest, But still torments the guilty Lovers Brest. Yet I'll shak't off! * Ha ! 'tis she ! treacherous sense ! [ * Alcinda at a A Thousand Devils cannot force me hence. Window. Urge"
19
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"CO Urge it no more, but to her lead the way. • Leon. Her strict Commands I dare not disobey. Fen. The saddest prospect of my Fate I see, She being lost, much worse it cannot be. Thou shalt relent here's gold — Leon. Who can resist the charms your tongue affords? This is a language sweeter far than words. tar. O Wondrous Virtue of imperious gold! For thee is Honour bought, and Heaven fold. Yet, had I all ere fruitful Peru bred, I'd give it freely to be safe in Bed. What new design ? something she talks of me, I fear some plot upon my Chastity. Fen. Sirrah ! Observe her Orders ■ Lar. More Catterwouling yet! Hell stop her breath ! Fen. Another Murmur shall foretel thy death. far. I wish'd a task, whose danger might declare What I dare do, my Folly to repair. Leon. Watch, and inform us when he comes, See right, Let not your shadow put you in a fright. Lar. Ill fight the proudest he that wears a head. ' Leon. What darest thou stake against my Maidenhead > I do not take thy rusty^Sword away. Thou a Fighter ! Lar. Donna ! your beauty may. That man is mad that will with Women fight. Your loss by day you can revenge at night. Fen. Dispatch his charge, my dearest blood I'd pay To buy each minute which you throw away. Villain ! be watchful - — [ Exeunt Fenise and Leonella, Lar. Sir ! I will not stay — If all my art and strength can get away. This Lock is vengeance strong, No passage here : No Window big enough for creeping Fear ? Ne'r talk on't! I can't enduye to be kill'd. He cares not so his wild desire's sulfill'd. I'll try the Garden wall ■ - is this door fast? Then life adieu ! the fatal Die is cast. A King-"
20
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"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
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"7 AKingdom to secure my life! — he's there ! [ A Noise Oh my dear pretty heart ! thy end draws near. within. O Death what shall I do ? where shall I hide ? No cunning place to tye my self aside ! A little stay — my knife! yet do not come : — - Pox on't ! now I have left my knife at home : Else I could cut my throat. Poor carkass ! how Must thou be Slic'd and Carbonado'd now ? I might have stop'd the Lock too, fool that I was ! Oh my belly ! good Lock don't let him pass ! Dear Lock stand too't! sweet Lock don't let 'em come ! 'Wounds ! how I shall be Slaih'd ? there's forty o'm — Enter Don Manuel and Neighbours ridiculoufiy arm'd ; They fee Larasco, and run off again. So, so, now they consult about my End Enter again Don Manuel and Neighbours. Man. You that soch daring courage did pretend, What made you run ? I'll bravely go before, Come Neighbours! enter all, and shut the dore. What all gone agen ? my case is hard, [ Larasco stands up I dare not see, my house without a guard. lil^e a Statue. Ha ! one of the Villains ! or but a shape Set up to fright me, while the Rogues escape; It does not move, nor breath, it must be so - Were it a Man,thus wou'd I forward go —^~ Lar. Now must I go to Pot! — how my bones ake !- — [Aside.. Man. And Slash him thus, — * ha! did not something shake ? What shall a Scarecrow make me thus afraid ? Yet, by this light ! 'tis very neatly made ; Substance! true mortal substance too!-— Lie swear, Not one convenient member wanting here. This shape may any maid alive deceive — Lar. I am a very Image I believe, But I have heard that Images can't feel. [Aside. Man. I fear no flesh alive, by this bright steel ! Ofor"
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"(8) Osar nCdftf now, or for that brave Undaunted Soul that did the world enslave 5 Like Tennis-balls I'd whirl them about, And thus make way to let their Courage out [ Hejirifes Laraseo. Lar. Oh ! Curse on your valour ! — C -Aside. Man. I'll try to place His head upright, and paint some red in s face. The nose too should be mended, and the eyes Lar. How to escape this dog I can't devise Now he has i urn'd his back. Lie cut his throat — — [ Laraseo draws, Manuel fees him, and runs off ; then Laraseo /<*/// grov'ling on the ground. Man. Murther! murther! murther! Lar. Oh dismal note ! Enter Leonella hastily. Leon. What noise was that ? what's the disturbance here > Lar. Mercy ! good Sir, Mercy ! Oh do but hear, Til confess all Noble Don Manuel ! Your cursed Wench, by some infernal Spell Entic'd Don Fenise hither, and has sold The fair Alcinda to him for his gold. He's now within persuading her away ; I am a servant, Sir, forc'd to obey — -* Dear Sir be merciful! Leon. Rise, and be free Lar. Ha ! is it you? confound foch Sorceriej The Hall's inchanted, or this cou'd not be. Enter Fenise and Alcinda. Fen. Since that blest hour I gave my heart to you, My busie thoughts no other object knew. My Eyes ne'r stray 'd to any other face, My heart ne'r fram'd a wish beyond this place. I plead no merit, Madam ! for I know My Service weak, and my desert too low. Akin. Fenise!"
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"9 Alcin. Fenise f Upbraid me not with your desert, I know 'tis great, and well deserves my heart; Were you unworthy, my obliging Vow Has made me yours, nor will I break if now. Yet Gratitude (for Love ne'r reach'd my Brest/ Nor yet had power to disturb my rest ) Makes me your Pris'ner now ; and let's me se e, You prize your fading pleasures more than me. Your satisfaction you resolve to buy, Though at the price of my dear liberty. Fen. By what you want, judge not the love I have. You cannot be a Pris'ner to your Slave. If Love cannot incite you to depart. Trust gratitude awhile to guide your heart. j Ale. Give Reason yours, and an Example shew, Or ask no more what you refuse to do. You cannot cease to Love ; I can't begin ; You cannot break the Snare, nor I get in ; x Yet, to content your self, you'll punish me — Alas ! this is not Love, but Cruelty. Fen. How strangely Madam ! at the self-fame time, You do excuse, and charge me with a Crime. If Love can't be compell'd, as 'tis most true, Fenise adores, but Fortune injures you. Ale. Justly your Passion may suspected grow, Since you demand those proofs you dare not show. You gain my Faith by leaving me behind, Lessen your Love, and practise to be kind. Leon. Tempt not your Destiny, but let's be gone. Her wand ring Fancy must return anon: Madam! if you will go, let's haste away, To flie those Dangers which attend your stay. Ale. Thou know'st my heart, let Fenise be our Guide Leon. Spread all your Sails, you have the Wind and Tide. ; Ale. What Noise is that ? [ A Noise at the dore. Leon. This comes of your delay ■ O Heav'ns ! Don Manuel has stop'd your way. C _4.V.What"
23
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"10 Ale. What' will Don Fenise do ? persuade him in. Lar. Now does my storm of misery begin. Ale. Haste to the Garden, there's a private dore. Ah Fenise ! now we part to meet no more. Lar. Sweet Master! Dear Master ! Ale. Once morefarewel! [Exeunt Alcinda and Leonella. Lar. Pray! pray for us! Now Toll the Passing-bell . Oh that I had but dy'd, Ten years before My Mothers onely hopeful Son was bore : I had been car'd for, I had happy been, This Catterwouling I had never seen. Will you be murther'd in your Muse? Dye here ? Fen. It must be so, this (hews my Love so clear, She can no more deny me — ~ Lar. What, more horoick Tricks ? Oh how I (hake I" Is this a time for Love, when Life's at stake ? Now will he dye to shew this Cat his heart Fen. She knows I may compel her to depart 3 And now, just at this time, to let her stay ■ Enter Don Manuel and his Friends. Man. Here be the Rogues, Now Neighbours kill and flay • Lar. How fierce and big the Suck-bloods look? I'll spread My Carkafs on the ground, and fay I'm dead. [ Larasco lies down.. Fen. Her Vows I'll give her back, and when (he's free, Justice will bind her to love none but me. Since all my Vows so unsuccessful prove. That even yet you seem to doubt my Love: I hope this single Act will make it plain, Here Fenise gives you back your self again — Man. How's this? Don Fenise! sure it cannot be — Fen. Ha ! where is Alcinda ? what's this I sec ? Larasco murther'd by these Cowards Swords! This Tempest must not be allay'd with words. Have at your hearts 3 lie there 3 are you so quick ? [One falls as kjll'd--, Manuel and the rejt fliejeenife pursues them. Lar. Oh my poor heart! I'm verystomack sick. Are"
24
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"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
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"11 Are they all gone? this was a brave Design 5 Cowardly Rogues! to striken Man behind ; If I had not been dead, I'd fain have seen, Who durst affront one of my haughty meen. Sure he has wounded me, but I'm alive yet, And pretty sound 3 but most confounded wet. HI take advice to know where 'tis I bleed ; Ha are you there? here's one lies dead indeed. Quite mortal dead: Well Fellow! go thy way, I'd Rifle thee, but that I dare not stay - - Had'st thou been wise, but all have not the gift, [ Exit Larasco. [Tis pity helhou'd live, that has no (hist. Neighbour. Yes Coxcomb ! lean (hist as well as you I think I am the sweeter of the two. Send me well home, I'll ne'r come here agin, I think him wisest that preserves his Skin. [Exit. Scene 3. Enter Mingo alone. Mingo. Where am I now ! But 'tis no wonder if I've lost my way, My Master bad me near the Temple stay 5 A place I seldom seek 3 The Donna's Road To choose new Servants, and the newest Mode. Where earthly Saints are pray'd to, those above Sometimes are call'd on, in Intrigues of Love. Where pious Dons with zealous Wives conspire, To raise the fortunes of their Husbands higher. I'th' Temple I wasChristen'd, but my sear Tells me 1 'twill fall if I agen come there- — Hold, my Master ! Enter Alonzo. Alon. What didst thou find the place ? Min/Yes Sir, and (aw your Friends but thus it was 3 After my hasty steps had found the dore, All that I met, Nights silent liv'ry wore. C2 ASer-"
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"12 A Servant led me, where I saw Despair, Just like Don Fenise, sitting in a Chair. Not that Eon De»ise,who did use to be The life of Mirth, and all good Company. Not he, whose Soul was free as boundless Air. Whose very name could chafe away Despair. Alon. Rack me- not with these delayes! Min. Sir I saw, A form would make a frozen Tartar thaw, And melt his rocky H.art th'rough weeping Eyes : His heavy Head upon his Shoulder lies. His crossed Arms supported by his Brest, He had no motion, yet he had no rest. His busieEyes six'd to the earth ■ in brief, He was thelively shape of killing grief. At last as if the Dream had had an end, He cry'd, Alonzc ! Where's my dearest Friend ? Then did I your approach and message tell, That did his eager grief a while repel, But Sorrow soon did repossess his Face 3 As Currents stop'd, more swiftly end their Race. Alon. It is not sure within the pow'r of Fate, To cause those Wonders which thou dost relate. His heart ne'r entertain'd the boldest fear, And how could base Despair find entrance there. What ever cause such strange effects create, I will avert, or help to bear his Fate. True Friendship;, like rich Diamonds, we mark, Whose rayes are most resplendant in the dark. Mingo ! make haste, and sum up thy account. Thy merits may to higher Service mount 3 Yet I have alwayes us'd thee well »*-■-■■- Min. Most true ■ * Alon. And have I not been oft abus'd by you ? Your wild Debaucheries, in ev'ry place, Made me a mark of Scorn, and rude Disgrace. I need not number up your Faults again, Yetlresolv'd to bring thee back to Spain: Here"
26
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"London"
false
"13 Here I dismiss you Sir 3 but ere you goe, [ Kicky him, and gives -I'll pay thee less, and more than I do owe. him Money. Min. Ah Sir ! I am a Rogue, but pray forgive Alon. Forget your (aucy Tricks, and Civil live, Perhaps you may be mine, if you amend Exit Alonzo. Min. This Gold is dear Well ! go thy wayes old Friend ! Revenge sink deep, torment my injur'd — - brest, 'Till on his Ruirel have built my rest. How, turn hbirast ! turn Beggar, give me Gold : I'll think on Honesty when I grow old. For feeble helplesi Age it may be good, Tis but a dull disease in youthful blood. Among the modish French 'tis plain disgrace, Some of our Signiors too come on apace 3 When they take up, the Tradesman must not wait, But hears the News, and has the courteous Hat, Talks handsom Sense, is heard like.-a Divine 3 Pray Mistre ! stay and take a Glass of Wine — — But when he Dunns, and Cringes like a Slave, Dam'ee! what would this paltry Fellow have ? Now I'm for any thing, all wayes I'll tread, To find the path that does to Mischief lead- Kick'd! and turn'd offl lam a Rogue I know, But to my Master I was never so. Cafhier'd ! and quite thrown by 1 well Don take heed, Ere all be done, thy heart or mine (hall bleed. [ Exit. ACT II. Scene 1. Enter Don Manuel and Teresa in the street. Man. A Meer mischievous Plot, without all doubt 3 _fcJ_ Would any come to force a Woman out ? He could not do it but by her consent, No ! no ! I'll ne'r believe her innocent. Ter. Are you lure 'twas Don Fenise ? Think agen Man. Poh! think 3 1 know him from a Thousand men. Ter. You"
27
0.669
0.219
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"14 Ter. You may mistake. Man. Mistake! pray is it day ifthe Sun shine? That Question's less impertinent than thine. Enter Mingo. -Mingo. I've rack'd my Brains, and yet no way can find To act a close Revenge, Mischief be kind! And help me at a pinch — "" Oh this dull Head, this barren Scull of mine ! I Aside. Will nothing come? no Project? no Design? Ha ! what are these ? Man. Yes you are 3 foolish and impertinent ■ Ter. Ingrateful Rascal ! I was not impertinent, When I help^thee tcrmy Masters wealth, And t<3 two pretty little Girls, without one stroke of thy Own labour 5 Heaven knows, and I have sound To my sorrow, it will be long enough before thou Wilt see one little, little Child, of thy own getting. Man. No, nor thou wert not impertinent, when thou Didst most inhumanely murther honest Sanchez. Ter. Out thou Villain ! was it not for thy lake ? Thy hands too were as deep in as mine, Heaven knows I meant no harm, Ingrateful ! dost upbraid me with my good will ? I'll be reveng'd though I dye for't — — Thy Cheats are VillaniesI will confess, Thy punishment, will make my pain seem less. Man. Poh ! you take Jesting so unkindly •■■■ ■ You know Honey that I love you, And if my life onely Were to be lost, it should go rather than I Would see thee troubl'd thus : But ■ It grieves my heart to think of losing thee. Ter. Ay, ay, these are your old wheedling Tricks Man. One can't praise you for your Contrivance, Or your Courage, but y'are so angry Pry 'thee my Dearest 1 forgive me — >*-;I love The very ground you treat! on, And had rather see Thee"
28
0.647
0.22
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"15 Thee than my own heart-blood -Come you (hall be kind Ter. My poor dear Rogue ! I will forgive thee 1 I will be kind, don't trouble thy self. ' [ she weeps, and kisses him. What shall we do about Don Fenise Dear ! Man. That bus'ness must not be disputed here 3 Let's hasten home, least some observing Eye Should ruine us, Nay pry'thee no Reply _ . Ill serve thee Honey with my dearest blood. Ter. My dear, dear Don! I'll dye to do thee good. £ Exit Teresa. Man. I mean no less 3 in ev'ry foolish strife, She threatens me to take away my life 3 When (he's dispatch' d aside, I shall be free And then, ray coy Alcinda ! I'm for thee With more then common madness — » he's possess, That l.ayes up secrets in a female Brest. [ Exit Manuel. Mingo. Thanks ! Satan thanks 1 — These bloody Murttlers, Cheats, and Villanies, And something more thatundiscover d lies, Are Riddles very dark, and intricate 3 Teach me the rest, and I'l 1 adore thee Fate ! What I've already heard, commands a (hare For secresie, as great as their parts are : But I am injur'd, since he's wicked grown, ForlresoLv'd to be a Rogue alone. Some way their bus'ness (hall my own advance, I'll follow them, and leave the rest to chance. At least their Crimes will teach me to invent, A Rogue in mischief is in's Element. [Exit Mingo. Scene 2. Don Manuel' j Bouse. Enter Rosella, Alcinda, and Leonella. Ale. What Visage wears my Fate? what have they done ? The noise was very loud. Is Fenise gone >• Safely"
29
0.65
0.218
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"16 Safely got off or no? Why don't you speak? Should he be kill'd, my sullen heart would break. Leon. He's safely gone, but all I fear is known — Ale. Sure I heard their Swords ; had he no wounds? Leon. None Ale. Henceforth we never meet. Rose!. Did acts of Love, Fth' Sphere of Justice as of Power move, A (harp repentance wou'd succeed your Fact 3 And you would soffer what you late did Act. Some worthless object, on your self would throw That cruel scorn , you did to Fenise (how. Ale. Justice is blind, and grown so modish too, Like other Females, bribes must make her do : Sword, Self-interest and Passion swayes, But Love and beauty ev'ry thing obeyes. Rvses. She runs the common fate of all our Sex, Whom natures too imperious Law, subjects » . To her great Master- peice, victorious man : , And you Alcinda ! know, you'r beauty can Command so large a pow'r ore any heart, As will oppose Astrœas weaker part. Ale. Beauty, the Toy you talk of, I disown: To my dull sense it still had been unknown, If to your self I had a stranger been 3 Where all those charming Vanities are seen, Those rare Chymœrds, flatt'ring Poets place In the description of a beautious face 3 Thosethat want faith, the fair Rosella view 3 All Lovers write is verify 'd in you. Rosel. Each wandring glance you make, a heart your prize, By the Magnetick Venue of your Eyes 3 The am'rous Gallants here their service pay, You are their Saint, and at your feet they pray. Leon. The longest day would seem a midnights dream, While they continue on this pleasing theam. Is not one Minute to Don Fenise due? Rosel. Oncemorel must that hopeless suit renew. Ale. Desist"
30
0.683
0.195
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"17 Ak. Desist Rosclla \ from a Sute so vain -~~~ The Earth may move, before we meet again. Res. So brave a choice your Reason may approve, Ale. Reason was ne'r the messenger of Love. Res. Think, think Alcinda \ you may Love too late — Ale. My humor's fix'd above the pow!r of Fate. Leon. Madam! My zeal to serve you, (hews my troubl'd mind, To see you she the Blessings Heav'n designs O ! could you think the joyes, that do attend A marry 'd life, this humor soon would end. Think what entrancing pleasure 'tis, to hold Your Lover in your arms, and sweetly fold With close embraces, and more lovely Twines, Than clasping Ivy, or the winding Vines. This idle peevish thing call'd Modesty, IsWomans most invet'rate Enemy: Lay it aside, none but our selves are here, Blushes are vain when none but Women hear. Sleep with a Man ! what joy the thought oft brings, This is no World to refuse good things. There needs no words, Your Eyes speak your intent, A Womans silence (hews her full consent. Ale. Perpetual silence seize thee ! I admire What leprous Dæmon does thy Soul inspire. Rof. Base I 1 know not what to call her, sure Nature wants Definitions so impure. [Exeunt Alcinda and Rosclla. Leon. Truth seldom is accepted when 'tis plain 5 But hang't ! I'll soon retrieve their love again. Enter Don Manuel and Teresa, and Mingo after, observing them. Ter. If you consent, we yet may lose our Fears, And with their Bodies, cloyster up our Cares, Send them to th* Nunnery, and let's pretend Zeal to Religion is our oncly end. Let them drop Beads. Man. From thence what can arise? Ter. In their Concealment all our safety lies. D Man, Can"
31
0.578
0.203
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"18 Man. Can that contribute ought to hide our Crimes? Ter. Yes, very much these Superstitious times 3 'Twill gain their highest praise, who can depaint Mischief so fair, it may deceive a Saint. In this quick-sighted Age that we live in, Religion is the safest Veil for Sin. While they do breathe an unconfiried Air, Our Ruines imminent, Objects so fair Endure the search of many prying Eyes 3 You know what Dangers may from thence arise. Man. I like thy counsel well — but Ter. But! but what ? Vengeance pursues us, yet his blood seems hot And reeking for Revenge0 methinks I hear The wind cry Murther in my guilty Ear * — ■ Man. Dear Duck ! enough, th'art wise 3 it shall be so . Rosel/a to the Nunnery (hall go , That will secure us, though Alcinda stay, On her side there's no danger in delay. Ter. Steal to yourruine 3 do !. — — let both be gone 3 Why should one go, or t'other stay alone? Man. Nay no great matter, but 'tis chargeable 3 Truth is, I love Alcinda yet too well. . [ Afide. Ter. What should this mean? -the charge will be but (mall Better lose part, than give account for all.. Man. Let's in and think upon't • Exeunt Manuel and Teresa, Leon. What can this be? Vengeance and Blood, this is too hard for me Some monstrous mischief, though 'tis close as Night, Time will reveal it, That brings all to light. Exit Leonella, Mingo, Strange ! above wonder strange ! and Ms so right As if the gods themselves lov'd deeds of Night. To bring me there, just at that minute too 3 I'll talk no more, but study what to do. In vain you strive to prop your falling State, Your Lives are mine, this Tongue commands your Fate. Sure"
32
0.597
0.212
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false
"000997538"
"1674-01-01T00:00:00"
"1674"
"The Spanish Rogue [a comedy, in five acts and in verse]"
"London"
false
"19 Sure that was Leonilla stai'd behind — £2 My qnondam Mistri(s3 I'll soon make her kind. What sights are here ? Enter Alcinda and Leonella, Rosclla following them. Ale. Receive no answer, nor no message hear. Ros. Examine ore your heart, (he (hall not go : You too much malice with your power (how. Ale. Are you unkind? then who can be believ'd? I had commanded had my Father liv'd. - . [ Exit Alcinda weeping. Ros. Go, serve her will, us strange, a gallant man Should love so truly, and so long in vain 5 Dearly I love him, yet I know not why, I'm ne'r so happy as when he is nigh. Yet, for a husband if I make my choice, His Interest will never win my voice. And yet I love him still ha ! to what end ? Were it not virtuous I should hate my friend 3 Love is as yet a stranger in my brest. I will not like aTyrant treat a guest: Yet, to secure my heart from a surprize, I'll set a guard of Virtue in my Eyes, And while my Love to Virtue does submit, I will believe it fair, and welcome it. And love him still Enter Alcinda. Ale. Will you my Rival grow ? Ros. Ne'r did a Sister love a Brother so. Ale. You shall not love him, nor (hall he love you, His Vows have made him mine, sure Vows are true. Ros. You slight his Vows, his Courtship disapprove 3 This Jealousie shews the excels of Love — - Because You hate him must I do so too ? * I Aside. Ale . 4 Fool not your self, I love him more than you : D 2 You"
33
0.644
0.222
"Duffett, Thomas"
"Duffett, Thomas [person]"
"England"
"England"
"English"
false

Dataset Card for British Library Books

Dataset Summary

This dataset consists of books digitised by the British Library in partnership with Microsoft. The dataset includes ~25 million pages of out of copyright texts. The majority of the texts were published in the 18th and 19th Century, but the collection also consists of a smaller number of books from earlier periods. Items within this collection cover a wide range of subject areas, including geography, philosophy, history, poetry and literature and are published in various languages.

While the books are predominately from the 18th and 19th Centuries, there are fewer books from earlier periods. The number of pages in the corpus by decade:

page count
1510 94
1520 32
1540 184
1550 16
1580 276
1590 540
1600 1117
1610 1132
1620 1856
1630 9274
1640 4232
1650 2944
1660 5858
1670 11415
1680 8348
1690 13756
1700 10160
1710 9556
1720 10314
1730 13282
1740 10778
1750 12001
1760 21415
1770 28490
1780 32676
1790 50014
1800 307806
1810 478008
1820 589419
1830 681212
1840 1113473
1850 1726108
1860 1725407
1870 2069089
1880 2585159
1890 3365031

[More Information Needed]

Supported Tasks and Leaderboards

This collection has been previously used across various digital history and humanities projects since being published.

The dataset consists of text and a range of metadata associated with this text. This metadata includes:

  • date of publication
  • place of publication
  • country of publication
  • language
  • OCR quality
  • physical description of the original physical item

Language model training

As a relatively large dataset, blbooks provides a source dataset for training language models. The presence of this metadata also offers interesting opportunities to use this dataset as a source for training language models based on:

  • specific time-periods
  • specific languages
  • certain OCR quality thresholds

The above is not an exhaustive list but offer some suggestions of how the dataset can be used to explore topics such as the impact of OCR quality on language models, the ‘transferability’ of language models across time or the impact of training multilingual language models on historical languages.

Supervised tasks

Whilst this dataset does not have annotations for a specific NLP task, such as Named Entity Recognition, it does include a wide variety of metadata. This metadata has the potential to be used for training and/or evaluating a variety of supervised tasks predicting this metadata.

Languages

This dataset consists of books published in several languages. The breakdown of the languages included (at the page level) is:

Language Pages
English 10039463
French 1442929
German 1172793
Spanish 286778
Italian 214255
Dutch 204759
Russian 193347
Danish 93366
Hungarian 88094
Swedish 76225
Polish 58901
Greek, Modern (1453-) 26104
Latin 25611
Portuguese 25410
Czech 20160
Bulgarian 7891
Finnish 5677
Irish 2743
Serbian 1975
Romanian 1544
Norwegian Nynorsk 1398
Croatian 1306
Norwegian 1227
Icelandic 902
Slovak 840
Lithuanian 714
Welsh 580
Slovenian 545
Indonesian 418
Cornish 223

This breakdown was derived from the first language in the associated metadata field. Some books include multiple languages. Some of the languages codes for this data were also derived using computational methods. Therefore, the language fields in the dataset should be treated with some caution (discussed in more detail below).

Language change

The publication dates of books in the data cover a broad period of time (1500-1900). For languages in the dataset with broad temporal coverage, significant language change might be found. The ability to study this change by taking reasonably large samples of languages covering different time periods is one of the opportunities offered by this dataset. The fact that the text in this dataset was produced via Optical Character Recognition (OCR) causes some challenges for this type of research (see below).

Optical Character Recognition

The digitised books in this collection were transformed into machine-readable text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. The text produced via OCR software will usually include some errors. These errors include; mistakes at the character level; for example, an i is mistaken for an l, at the word level or across significant passages of text.

The books in this dataset can pose some additional challenges for OCR software. OCR errors can stem from:

  • the quality of the original printing: printing technology was a developing technology during the time period covered by this corpus; some of the original book text will include misprints, blurred or faded ink that is hard to read
  • damage to the page: some of the books will have become damaged over time, this can obscure all or parts of the text on a page
  • poor quality scans: scanning books can be challenging; for example, if the book has tight bindings, it can be hard to capture text that has fallen into the gutter of the book.
  • the language used in the books may differ from the languages OCR software is predominantly trained to recognise.
OCR word confidence

Many OCR engines produce some form of confidence score alongside the predicted text. These confidence scores are usually at the character or word level. The word confidence score was given for each word in the original ALTO XML versions of the text in this dataset in this dataset. The OCR confidence scores should be treated with some scepticism. For historical text or in a lower resource language, for example, a low confidence score may be more likely for words not included in a modern dictionary but may be accurate transcriptions of the original text. With that said, the confidence scores do give some sense of the OCR quality.

An example of text with a high (over 90% mean word confidence score):

8 direction to the Conduit, round which is a wide open space, and a good broad pavement called the Parade. It commands a pleasant peep of the slopes and terrace throughout its entire length. The street continuing from the Conduit, in the same general direction, was known anciently as Lodborne Lane, and is now named South Street. From the Conduit two other streets, at right angles to these, are Long Street, leading Eastwards, and Half-Moon Street (formerly Lodborne), leading to Westbury, Trendle Street, and the Horsecastles Road.

An example of text with a score below 40%:

Hannover. Schrift und Druck von Fr. CultniTmn,',
 "LeMNs'utluirui.",
 'ü 8u«llim» M^äalßwi 01de!lop 1<M.',
 'p^dnalmw vom Xr^u/e, lpiti>»**Kmm lie« !»^2!M kleine lii!<! (,«>* ttünee!<»e^ v»n tndzt Lievclum, 1872,

The quality of OCR - as measured by mean OCR confidence for a page - across the dataset correlates with other features. A groupby of publication decade and mean word confidence:

decade mean_wc_ocr
1510 0.499151
1520 0.544818
1540 0.511589
1550 0.4505
1580 0.321858
1590 0.461282
1600 0.467318
1610 0.495895
1620 0.501257
1630 0.49766
1640 0.512095
1650 0.528534
1660 0.521014
1670 0.592575
1680 0.583901
1690 0.567202
1700 0.575175
1710 0.61436
1720 0.627725
1730 0.658534
1740 0.64214
1750 0.657357
1760 0.6389
1770 0.651883
1780 0.632326
1790 0.664279
1800 0.682338
1810 0.708915
1820 0.730015
1830 0.730973
1840 0.713886
1850 0.697106
1860 0.696701
1870 0.717233
1880 0.733331
1890 0.762364

As might be expected, the earlier periods have lower mean word confidence scores. Again, all of this should be treated with some scepticism, especially as the size of the data grows over time.

As with time, the mean word confidence of the OCR software varies across languages:

Language_1 mean_wc_ocr
Croatian 0.755565
Welsh 0.7528
Norwegian Nynorsk 0.751648
Slovenian 0.746007
French 0.740772
Finnish 0.738032
Czech 0.737849
Hungarian 0.736076
Dutch 0.734977
Cornish 0.733682
Danish 0.733106
English 0.733037
Irish 0.732658
Portuguese 0.727746
Spanish 0.725111
Icelandic 0.724427
Italian 0.715839
Swedish 0.715633
Polish 0.715133
Lithuanian 0.700003
Bulgarian 0.694657
Romanian 0.692957
Latin 0.689022
Russian 0.685847
Serbian 0.674329
Slovak 0.66739
Greek, Modern (1453-) 0.632195
German 0.631457
Indonesian 0.6155
Norwegian 0.597987

Again, these numbers should be treated sceptically since some languages appear very infrequently. For example, the above table suggests the mean word confidence for Welsh is relatively high. However, there isn’t much Welsh in the dataset. Therefore, it is unlikely that this data will be particularly useful for training (historic) Welsh language models.

[More Information Needed]

Dataset Structure

The dataset has a number of configurations relating to the different dates of publication in the underlying data:

  • 1500_1899: this configuration covers all years
  • 1800_1899: this configuration covers the years between 1800 and 1899
  • 1700_1799: this configuration covers the years between 1700 and 1799
  • 1510_1699: this configuration covers the years between 1510 and 1699

Configuration option

All of the configurations have an optional keyword argument skip_empty_pages which is set to True by default. The underlying dataset includes some pages where there is no text. This could either be because the underlying book page didn't have any text or the OCR software failed to detect this text.

For many uses of this dataset it doesn't make sense to include empty pages so these are skipped by default. However, for some uses you may prefer to retain a representation of the data that includes these empty pages. Passing skip_empty_pages=False when loading the dataset will enable this option.

Data Instances

An example data instance:

{'Country of publication 1': 'England',
'Language_1': 'English',
'Language_2': None,
'Language_3': None,
'Language_4': None,
'Physical description': None,
'Publisher': None,
'all Countries of publication': 'England',
'all names': 'Settle, Elkanah [person]',
'date': 1689,
'empty_pg': True,
'mean_wc_ocr': 0.0,
'multi_language': False,
'name': 'Settle, Elkanah',
'pg': 1,
'place': 'London',
'raw_date': '1689',
'record_id': '001876770',
'std_wc_ocr': 0.0,
'text': None,
‘title’: ‘The Female Prelate: being the history and the life and death of Pope Joan. A tragedy [in five acts and in verse] . Written by a Person of Quality [i.e. Elkanah Settle]’}

Each instance in the dataset represents a single page from an original digitised book.

Data Fields

Included in this dataset are:

Field Data Type Description
record_id string British Library ID for the item
date int parsed/normalised year for the item. i.e. 1850
raw_date string the original raw date for an item i.e. 1850-
title string title of the book
place string Place of publication, i.e. London
empty_pg bool whether page contains text
text string OCR generated text for a page
pg int page in original book the instance refers to
mean_wc_ocr float mean word confidence values for the page
std_wc_ocr float standard deviation of the word confidence values for the page
name string name associated with the item (usually author)
all names string all names associated with a publication
Publisher string publisher of the book
Country of publication 1 string first country associated with publication
all Countries of publication string all countries associated with a publication
Physical description string physical description of the item (size). This requires some normalisation before use and isn’t always present
Language_1 string first language associated with the book, this is usually present
Language_2 string
Language_3 string
Language_4 string
multi_language bool

Some of these fields are not populated a large proportion of the time. You can get some sense of this from this Pandas Profiling report

The majority of these fields relate to metadata about the books. Most of these fields were created by staff working for the British Library. The notable exception is the “Languages” fields that have sometimes been determined using computational methods. This work is reported in more detail in Automated Language Identification of Bibliographic Resources. It is important to note that metadata is neither perfect nor static. The metadata associated with this book was generated based on export from the British Library catalogue in 2021.

[More Information Needed]

Data Splits

This dataset contains a single split train.

Dataset Creation

Note this section is a work in progress.

Curation Rationale

The books in this collection were digitised as part of a project partnership between the British Library and Microsoft. Mass digitisation, i.e. projects intending to quickly digitise large volumes of materials shape the selection of materials to include in several ways. Some considerations which are often involved in the decision of whether to include items for digitisation include (but are not limited to):

  • copyright status
  • preservation needs
  • the size of an item, very large and very small items are often hard to digitise quickly

These criteria can have knock-on effects on the makeup of a collection. For example, systematically excluding large books may result in some types of book content not being digitised. Large volumes are likely to be correlated to content to at least some extent, so excluding them from digitisation will mean that material is underrepresented. Similarly, copyright status is often (but not only) determined by publication date. This can often lead to a rapid fall in the number of items in a collection after a certain cut-off date.

All of the above is largely to make clear that this collection was not curated to create a representative sample of the British Library’s holdings. Some material will be over-represented, and others under-represented. Similarly, the collection should not be considered a representative sample of what was published across the period covered by the dataset (nor that the relative proportions of the data for each time period represent a proportional sample of publications from that period). Finally, and this probably does not need stating, the language included in the text should not be considered representative of either written or spoken language(s) from that time period.

[More Information Needed]

Source Data

The source data (physical items) includes a variety of resources (predominantly monographs) held by the British Library. The British Library is a Legal Deposit library. “Legal deposit requires publishers to provide a copy of every work they publish in the UK to the British Library. It’s existed in English law since 1662.” source.

The source data for this version of the data is derived from the original ALTO XML files and a recent metadata export #TODO add links

[More Information Needed]

Initial Data Collection and Normalization

This version of the dataset was created using the original ALTO XML files and, where a match was found, updating the metadata associated with that item with more recent metadata using an export from the British Library catalogue. The process of creating this new dataset is documented here #TODO add link.

There are a few decisions made in the above processing steps worth highlighting in particular:

Date normalization

The metadata around date of publication for an item is not always exact. It often is represented as a date range e.g. 1850-1860. The date field above takes steps to normalise this date to a single integer value. In most cases, this is taking the mean of the values associated with the item. The raw_date field includes the unprocessed date string.

Metadata included

The metadata associated with each item includes most of the fields available via the ALTO XML. However, the data doesn’t include some metadata fields from the metadata export file. The reason fields were excluded because they are frequently not populated. A cut off of 50% was chosen, i.e. values from the metadata which are missing above 50% of the time were not included. This is slightly arbitrary, but since the aim of this version of the data was to support computational research using the collection it was felt that these fields with frequent missing values would be less valuable.

Who are the source language producers?

[More Information Needed]

Annotations

This dataset does not include annotations as usually understood in the context of NLP. The data does include metadata associated with the books.

Annotation process

[More Information Needed]

Who are the annotators?

[More Information Needed]

Personal and Sensitive Information

[More Information Needed]

Considerations for Using the Data

There a range of considerations around using the data. These include the representativeness of the dataset, the OCR quality and the language used. Depending on your use case, these may be more or less important. For example, the impact of OCR quality on downstream tasks will depend on the target task. It may also be possible to mitigate this negative impact from OCR through tokenizer choice, Language Model training objectives, oversampling high-quality OCR, etc.

[More Information Needed]

Social Impact of Dataset

[More Information Needed]

Discussion of Biases

The text in this collection is derived from historical text. As a result, the text will reflect this time period's social beliefs and attitudes. The books include both fiction and non-fiction books.

Examples of book titles that appear in the data (these are randomly sampled from all titles):

  • ‘Rhymes and Dreams, Legends of Pendle Forest, and other poems’,
  • “Précis of Information concerning the Zulu Country, with a map. Prepared in the Intelligence Branch of the Quarter-Master-General’s Department, Horse Guards, War Office, etc”,
  • ‘The fan. A poem’,
  • ‘Grif; a story of Australian Life’,
  • ‘Calypso; a masque: in three acts, etc’,
  • ‘Tales Uncle told [With illustrative woodcuts.]’,
  • 'Questings',
  • 'Home Life on an Ostrich Farm. With ... illustrations’,
  • ‘Bulgarya i Bulgarowie’,
  • 'Εἰς τα βαθη της Ἀφρικης [In darkest Africa.] ... Μεταφρασις Γεωρ. Σ. Βουτσινα, etc',
  • ‘The Corsair, a tale’, ‘Poems ... With notes [With a portrait.]’,
  • ‘Report of the Librarian for the year 1898 (1899, 1901, 1909)’,
  • “The World of Thought. A novel. By the author of ‘Before I began to speak.’”,
  • 'Amleto; tragedia ... recata in versi italiani da M. Leoni, etc']

While using titles alone is insufficient to integrate bias in this collection, it gives some insight into the topics covered by books. Further, the tiles highlight some particular types of bias we might find in the collection. This should in no way be considered an exhaustive list.

Colonialism

Even in the above random sample of titles examples of colonial attitudes, we can see examples of titles. We can try and interrogate this further by searching for the name of places that were part of the British Empire when many of these books were published.

Searching for the string India in the titles and randomly sampling 10 titles returns:

  • “Travels in India in the Seventeenth Century: by Sir Thomas Roe and Dr. John Fryer. Reprinted from the ‘Calcutta Weekly Englishman.’”,
  • ‘A Winter in India and Malaysia among the Methodist Missions’,
  • “The Tourist’s Guide to all the principal stations on the railways of Northern India [By W. W.] ... Fifth edition”,
  • ‘Records of Sport and Military Life in Western India ... With an introduction by ... G. B. Malleson’,
  • "Lakhmi, the Rájpút's Bride. A tale of Gujarát in Western India [A poem.]”,
  • ‘The West India Commonplace Book: compiled from parliamentary and official documents; shewing the interest of Great Britain in its Sugar Colonies’,
  • “From Tonkin to India : by the sources of the Irawadi, January’ 95-January ’96”,
  • ‘Case of the Ameers of Sinde : speeches of Mr. John Sullivan, and Captain William Eastwick, at a special court held at the India House, ... 26th January, 1844’,
  • ‘The Andaman Islands; their colonisation, etc. A correspondence addressed to the India Office’,
  • ‘Ancient India as described by Ptolemy; being a translation of the chapters which describe India and Eastern Asia in the treatise on Geography written by Klaudios Ptolemaios ... with introduction, commentary, map of India according to Ptolemy, and ... index, by J. W. McCrindle’]

Searching form the string Africa in the titles and randomly sampling 10 titles returns:

  • ['De Benguella ás Terras de Iácca. Descripção de uma viagem na Africa Central e Occidental ... Expedição organisada nos annos de 1877-1880. Edição illustrada',
  • ‘To the New Geographical Society of Edinburgh [An address on Africa by H. M. Stanley.]’,
  • ‘Diamonds and Gold in South Africa ... With maps, etc’,
  • ‘Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa ... With notes by F. S. Arnot. With map and illustrations. New edition’,
  • ‘A Narrative of a Visit to the Mauritius and South Africa ... Illustrated by two maps, sixteen etchings and twenty-eight wood-cuts’,
  • ‘Side Lights on South Africa ... With a map, etc’,
  • ‘My Second Journey through Equatorial Africa ... in ... 1886 and 1887 ... Translated ... by M. J. A. Bergmann. With a map ... and ... illustrations, etc’,
  • ‘Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa ... With portrait and fullpage illustrations’,
  • ‘[African sketches.] Narrative of a residence in South Africa ... A new edition. To which is prefixed a biographical sketch of the author by J. Conder’,
  • ‘Lake Ngami; or, Explorations and discoveries during four years wandering in the wilds of South Western Africa ... With a map, and numerous illustrations, etc’]

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Other Known Limitations

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Additional Information

Dataset Curators

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Licensing Information

The books are licensed under the CC Public Domain Mark 1.0 license.

Citation Information

@misc{bBritishLibraryBooks2021,
  author = {British Library Labs},
  title = {Digitised Books. c. 1510 - c. 1900. JSONL (OCR derived text + metadata)},
  year = {2021},
  publisher = {British Library},
  howpublished={https://doi.org/10.23636/r7w6-zy15}

Contributions

Thanks to @davanstrien for adding this dataset.

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