Dataset Preview Go to dataset viewer
source (string)story (string)question (string)answer (json)
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant.
When was the Vat formally opened?
{ "input_text": "It was formally established in 1475", "answer_start": 151, "answer_end": 179 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475
what is the library for?
{ "input_text": "research", "answer_start": 454, "answer_end": 494 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research
for what subjects?
{ "input_text": "history, and law", "answer_start": 457, "answer_end": 511 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law
and?
{ "input_text": "philosophy, science and theology", "answer_start": 457, "answer_end": 545 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology
what was started in 2014?
{ "input_text": "a project", "answer_start": 769, "answer_end": 879 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project
how do scholars divide the library?
{ "input_text": "into periods", "answer_start": 1048, "answer_end": 1127 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods
how many?
{ "input_text": "five", "answer_start": 1048, "answer_end": 1128 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five
what is the official name of the Vat?
{ "input_text": "The Vatican Apostolic Library", "answer_start": 4, "answer_end": 94 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library
where is it?
{ "input_text": "in Vatican City", "answer_start": 94, "answer_end": 150 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City
how many printed books does it contain?
{ "input_text": "1.1 million", "answer_start": 328, "answer_end": 412 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million
when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library?
{ "input_text": "at the beginning of the 17th century;", "answer_start": 917, "answer_end": 1009 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century;
how many items are in this secret collection?
{ "input_text": "150,000", "answer_start": 915, "answer_end": 1046 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000
Can anyone use this library?
{ "input_text": "anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs.", "answer_start": 546, "answer_end": 643 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs.
what must be requested to view?
{ "input_text": "unknown", "answer_start": -1, "answer_end": -1 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Q: what must be requested to view? A: unknown
what must be requested in person or by mail?
{ "input_text": "Photocopies", "answer_start": 643, "answer_end": 764 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Q: what must be requested to view? A: unknown Q: what must be requested in person or by mail? A: Photocopies
of what books?
{ "input_text": "only books published between 1801 and 1990", "answer_start": 644, "answer_end": 724 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Q: what must be requested to view? A: unknown Q: what must be requested in person or by mail? A: Photocopies Q: of what books? A: only books published between 1801 and 1990
What is the Vat the library of?
{ "input_text": "the Holy See", "answer_start": 78, "answer_end": 125 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Q: what must be requested to view? A: unknown Q: what must be requested in person or by mail? A: Photocopies Q: of what books? A: only books published between 1801 and 1990 Q: What is the Vat the library of? A: the Holy See
How many books survived the Pre Lateran period?
{ "input_text": "a handful of volumes", "answer_start": 1192, "answer_end": 1384 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Q: what must be requested to view? A: unknown Q: what must be requested in person or by mail? A: Photocopies Q: of what books? A: only books published between 1801 and 1990 Q: What is the Vat the library of? A: the Holy See Q: How many books survived the Pre Lateran period? A: a handful of volumes
what is the point of the project started in 2014?
{ "input_text": "digitising manuscripts", "answer_start": 785, "answer_end": 881 }
wikipedia
The Vatican Apostolic Library (), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. Formally established in 1475, although it is much older, it is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula. The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail. In March 2014, the Vatican Library began an initial four-year project of digitising its collection of manuscripts, to be made available online. The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items. Scholars have traditionally divided the history of the library into five periods, Pre-Lateran, Lateran, Avignon, Pre-Vatican and Vatican. The Pre-Lateran period, comprising the initial days of the library, dated from the earliest days of the Church. Only a handful of volumes survive from this period, though some are very significant. Q: When was the Vat formally opened? A: It was formally established in 1475 Q: what is the library for? A: research Q: for what subjects? A: history, and law Q: and? A: philosophy, science and theology Q: what was started in 2014? A: a project Q: how do scholars divide the library? A: into periods Q: how many? A: five Q: what is the official name of the Vat? A: The Vatican Apostolic Library Q: where is it? A: in Vatican City Q: how many printed books does it contain? A: 1.1 million Q: when were the Secret Archives moved from the rest of the library? A: at the beginning of the 17th century; Q: how many items are in this secret collection? A: 150,000 Q: Can anyone use this library? A: anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Q: what must be requested to view? A: unknown Q: what must be requested in person or by mail? A: Photocopies Q: of what books? A: only books published between 1801 and 1990 Q: What is the Vat the library of? A: the Holy See Q: How many books survived the Pre Lateran period? A: a handful of volumes Q: what is the point of the project started in 2014? A: digitising manuscripts
what will this allow?
{ "input_text": "them to be viewed online.", "answer_start": 868, "answer_end": 910 }
cnn
New York (CNN) -- More than 80 Michael Jackson collectibles -- including the late pop star's famous rhinestone-studded glove from a 1983 performance -- were auctioned off Saturday, reaping a total $2 million. Profits from the auction at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square crushed pre-sale expectations of only $120,000 in sales. The highly prized memorabilia, which included items spanning the many stages of Jackson's career, came from more than 30 fans, associates and family members, who contacted Julien's Auctions to sell their gifts and mementos of the singer. Jackson's flashy glove was the big-ticket item of the night, fetching $420,000 from a buyer in Hong Kong, China. Jackson wore the glove at a 1983 performance during "Motown 25," an NBC special where he debuted his revolutionary moonwalk. Fellow Motown star Walter "Clyde" Orange of the Commodores, who also performed in the special 26 years ago, said he asked for Jackson's autograph at the time, but Jackson gave him the glove instead. "The legacy that [Jackson] left behind is bigger than life for me," Orange said. "I hope that through that glove people can see what he was trying to say in his music and what he said in his music." Orange said he plans to give a portion of the proceeds to charity. Hoffman Ma, who bought the glove on behalf of Ponte 16 Resort in Macau, paid a 25 percent buyer's premium, which was tacked onto all final sales over $50,000. Winners of items less than $50,000 paid a 20 percent premium.
Where was the Auction held?
{ "input_text": "Hard Rock Cafe", "answer_start": 243, "answer_end": 284 }
cnn
New York (CNN) -- More than 80 Michael Jackson collectibles -- including the late pop star's famous rhinestone-studded glove from a 1983 performance -- were auctioned off Saturday, reaping a total $2 million. Profits from the auction at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square crushed pre-sale expectations of only $120,000 in sales. The highly prized memorabilia, which included items spanning the many stages of Jackson's career, came from more than 30 fans, associates and family members, who contacted Julien's Auctions to sell their gifts and mementos of the singer. Jackson's flashy glove was the big-ticket item of the night, fetching $420,000 from a buyer in Hong Kong, China. Jackson wore the glove at a 1983 performance during "Motown 25," an NBC special where he debuted his revolutionary moonwalk. Fellow Motown star Walter "Clyde" Orange of the Commodores, who also performed in the special 26 years ago, said he asked for Jackson's autograph at the time, but Jackson gave him the glove instead. "The legacy that [Jackson] left behind is bigger than life for me," Orange said. "I hope that through that glove people can see what he was trying to say in his music and what he said in his music." Orange said he plans to give a portion of the proceeds to charity. Hoffman Ma, who bought the glove on behalf of Ponte 16 Resort in Macau, paid a 25 percent buyer's premium, which was tacked onto all final sales over $50,000. Winners of items less than $50,000 paid a 20 percent premium. Q: Where was the Auction held? A: Hard Rock Cafe
How much did they make?
{ "input_text": "$2 million.", "answer_start": 180, "answer_end": 210 }
cnn
New York (CNN) -- More than 80 Michael Jackson collectibles -- including the late pop star's famous rhinestone-studded glove from a 1983 performance -- were auctioned off Saturday, reaping a total $2 million. Profits from the auction at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square crushed pre-sale expectations of only $120,000 in sales. The highly prized memorabilia, which included items spanning the many stages of Jackson's career, came from more than 30 fans, associates and family members, who contacted Julien's Auctions to sell their gifts and mementos of the singer. Jackson's flashy glove was the big-ticket item of the night, fetching $420,000 from a buyer in Hong Kong, China. Jackson wore the glove at a 1983 performance during "Motown 25," an NBC special where he debuted his revolutionary moonwalk. Fellow Motown star Walter "Clyde" Orange of the Commodores, who also performed in the special 26 years ago, said he asked for Jackson's autograph at the time, but Jackson gave him the glove instead. "The legacy that [Jackson] left behind is bigger than life for me," Orange said. "I hope that through that glove people can see what he was trying to say in his music and what he said in his music." Orange said he plans to give a portion of the proceeds to charity. Hoffman Ma, who bought the glove on behalf of Ponte 16 Resort in Macau, paid a 25 percent buyer's premium, which was tacked onto all final sales over $50,000. Winners of items less than $50,000 paid a 20 percent premium. Q: Where was the Auction held? A: Hard Rock Cafe Q: How much did they make? A: $2 million.
How much did they expected?
{ "input_text": "$120,000", "answer_start": 292, "answer_end": 342 }
cnn
New York (CNN) -- More than 80 Michael Jackson collectibles -- including the late pop star's famous rhinestone-studded glove from a 1983 performance -- were auctioned off Saturday, reaping a total $2 million. Profits from the auction at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square crushed pre-sale expectations of only $120,000 in sales. The highly prized memorabilia, which included items spanning the many stages of Jackson's career, came from more than 30 fans, associates and family members, who contacted Julien's Auctions to sell their gifts and mementos of the singer. Jackson's flashy glove was the big-ticket item of the night, fetching $420,000 from a buyer in Hong Kong, China. Jackson wore the glove at a 1983 performance during "Motown 25," an NBC special where he debuted his revolutionary moonwalk. Fellow Motown star Walter "Clyde" Orange of the Commodores, who also performed in the special 26 years ago, said he asked for Jackson's autograph at the time, but Jackson gave him the glove instead. "The legacy that [Jackson] left behind is bigger than life for me," Orange said. "I hope that through that glove people can see what he was trying to say in his music and what he said in his music." Orange said he plans to give a portion of the proceeds to charity. Hoffman Ma, who bought the glove on behalf of Ponte 16 Resort in Macau, paid a 25 percent buyer's premium, which was tacked onto all final sales over $50,000. Winners of items less than $50,000 paid a 20 percent premium. Q: Where was the Auction held? A: Hard Rock Cafe Q: How much did they make? A: $2 million. Q: How much did they expected? A: $120,000
WHo buy the Jackson Glove
{ "input_text": "Hoffman Ma", "answer_start": 1295, "answer_end": 1365 }
cnn
New York (CNN) -- More than 80 Michael Jackson collectibles -- including the late pop star's famous rhinestone-studded glove from a 1983 performance -- were auctioned off Saturday, reaping a total $2 million. Profits from the auction at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square crushed pre-sale expectations of only $120,000 in sales. The highly prized memorabilia, which included items spanning the many stages of Jackson's career, came from more than 30 fans, associates and family members, who contacted Julien's Auctions to sell their gifts and mementos of the singer. Jackson's flashy glove was the big-ticket item of the night, fetching $420,000 from a buyer in Hong Kong, China. Jackson wore the glove at a 1983 performance during "Motown 25," an NBC special where he debuted his revolutionary moonwalk. Fellow Motown star Walter "Clyde" Orange of the Commodores, who also performed in the special 26 years ago, said he asked for Jackson's autograph at the time, but Jackson gave him the glove instead. "The legacy that [Jackson] left behind is bigger than life for me," Orange said. "I hope that through that glove people can see what he was trying to say in his music and what he said in his music." Orange said he plans to give a portion of the proceeds to charity. Hoffman Ma, who bought the glove on behalf of Ponte 16 Resort in Macau, paid a 25 percent buyer's premium, which was tacked onto all final sales over $50,000. Winners of items less than $50,000 paid a 20 percent premium. Q: Where was the Auction held? A: Hard Rock Cafe Q: How much did they make? A: $2 million. Q: How much did they expected? A: $120,000 Q: WHo buy the Jackson Glove A: Hoffman Ma
Where was the buyer of the glove from?
{ "input_text": "Macau", "answer_start": 1331, "answer_end": 1366 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers.
What did Venters call Lassiter?
{ "input_text": "gun-man", "answer_start": 841, "answer_end": 880 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man
Who asked Lassiter to be their rider?
{ "input_text": "Jane", "answer_start": 43, "answer_end": 97 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane
Did he agree?
{ "input_text": "Yes", "answer_start": 99, "answer_end": 129 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes
Why did she ask him?
{ "input_text": "to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them", "answer_start": 199, "answer_end": 301 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them
Did she tell him as much?
{ "input_text": "No", "answer_start": 307, "answer_end": 360 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No
What was she willing to give up?
{ "input_text": "Whatever the price to be paid", "answer_start": 400, "answer_end": 429 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid
Where was Milly led to?
{ "input_text": "Cottonwoods", "answer_start": 509, "answer_end": 538 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods
Who took her there?
{ "input_text": "A man", "answer_start": 493, "answer_end": 538 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man
Whose name would Jane not speak?
{ "input_text": "this Mormon's name", "answer_start": 604, "answer_end": 622 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name
Did she allow herself to even think it?
{ "input_text": "No", "answer_start": 640, "answer_end": 666 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No
What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her?
{ "input_text": "a helper, of a friend, of a champion", "answer_start": 751, "answer_end": 798 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion
Who was oppressing her?
{ "input_text": "her churchmen", "answer_start": 991, "answer_end": 1047 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen
What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him?
{ "input_text": "shedding blood", "answer_start": 885, "answer_end": 928 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood
Who had shouted Lassiter's name?
{ "input_text": "Venters", "answer_start": 1108, "answer_end": 1140 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood Q: Who had shouted Lassiter's name? A: Venters
Who did that affect?
{ "input_text": "Tull and his men", "answer_start": 1071, "answer_end": 1140 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood Q: Who had shouted Lassiter's name? A: Venters Q: Who did that affect? A: Tull and his men
Did Jane think she could control Lassiter?
{ "input_text": "No", "answer_start": 1141, "answer_end": 1205 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood Q: Who had shouted Lassiter's name? A: Venters Q: Who did that affect? A: Tull and his men Q: Did Jane think she could control Lassiter? A: No
Who is Bells?
{ "input_text": "One of her safe racers", "answer_start": 1237, "answer_end": 1300 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood Q: Who had shouted Lassiter's name? A: Venters Q: Who did that affect? A: Tull and his men Q: Did Jane think she could control Lassiter? A: No Q: Who is Bells? A: One of her safe racers
How did he get his name?
{ "input_text": "because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones.", "answer_start": 1280, "answer_end": 1360 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood Q: Who had shouted Lassiter's name? A: Venters Q: Who did that affect? A: Tull and his men Q: Did Jane think she could control Lassiter? A: No Q: Who is Bells? A: One of her safe racers Q: How did he get his name? A: because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones.
Was Lassiter impressed with the horse?
{ "input_text": "Yes", "answer_start": 1360, "answer_end": 1450 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER VII. THE DAUGHTER OF WITHERSTEEN "Lassiter, will you be my rider?" Jane had asked him. "I reckon so," he had replied. Few as the words were, Jane knew how infinitely much they implied. She wanted him to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them if that were possible. Yet, though she could not have spoken aloud all she meant, she was perfectly honest with herself. Whatever the price to be paid, she must keep Lassiter close to her; she must shield from him the man who had led Milly Erne to Cottonwoods. In her fear she so controlled her mind that she did not whisper this Mormon's name to her own soul, she did not even think it. Besides, beyond this thing she regarded as a sacred obligation thrust upon her, was the need of a helper, of a friend, of a champion in this critical time. If she could rule this gun-man, as Venters had called him, if she could even keep him from shedding blood, what strategy to play his flame and his presence against the game of oppression her churchmen were waging against her? Never would she forget the effect on Tull and his men when Venters shouted Lassiter's name. If she could not wholly control Lassiter, then what she could do might put off the fatal day. One of her safe racers was a dark bay, and she called him Bells because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. When Jerd led out this slender, beautifully built horse Lassiter suddenly became all eyes. A rider's love of a thoroughbred shone in them. Round and round Bells he walked, plainly weakening all the time in his determination not to take one of Jane's favorite racers. Q: What did Venters call Lassiter? A: gun-man Q: Who asked Lassiter to be their rider? A: Jane Q: Did he agree? A: Yes Q: Why did she ask him? A: to take charge of her cattle and horse and ranges, and save them Q: Did she tell him as much? A: No Q: What was she willing to give up? A: Whatever the price to be paid Q: Where was Milly led to? A: Cottonwoods Q: Who took her there? A: A man Q: Whose name would Jane not speak? A: this Mormon's name Q: Did she allow herself to even think it? A: No Q: What was Jane hoping Lassiter would become to her? A: a helper, of a friend, of a champion Q: Who was oppressing her? A: her churchmen Q: What was she hoping she could keep from happening to him? A: shedding blood Q: Who had shouted Lassiter's name? A: Venters Q: Who did that affect? A: Tull and his men Q: Did Jane think she could control Lassiter? A: No Q: Who is Bells? A: One of her safe racers Q: How did he get his name? A: because of the way he struck his iron shoes on the stones. Q: Was Lassiter impressed with the horse? A: Yes
Did he want to take him for himself?
{ "input_text": "Yes", "answer_start": 1532, "answer_end": 1625 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films."
Who is Rudolph's father?
{ "input_text": "Donner", "answer_start": 500, "answer_end": 557 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner
Why does Rudolph run away?
{ "input_text": "he felt like an outcast", "answer_start": 604, "answer_end": 653 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast
What makes him different from the other reindeer?
{ "input_text": "his nose glows", "answer_start": 548, "answer_end": 602 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows
Who does he save during a snow storm?
{ "input_text": "his loved ones", "answer_start": 828, "answer_end": 970 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones
Does he save Christmas?
{ "input_text": "yes", "answer_start": 904, "answer_end": 970 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes
What Island does he travel to?
{ "input_text": "the Island of Misfit Toys", "answer_start": 756, "answer_end": 800 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys
Which company produced the movie?
{ "input_text": "Rankin-Bass", "answer_start": 303, "answer_end": 406 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass
When did it premiere?
{ "input_text": "December 6, 1964", "answer_start": 76, "answer_end": 149 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964
What methods were used in filming the movie?
{ "input_text": "Japanese puppets and stop motion", "answer_start": 303, "answer_end": 406 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion
Are all of the puppets still in existence?
{ "input_text": "no", "answer_start": 1122, "answer_end": 1196 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no
How many remain?
{ "input_text": "two", "answer_start": 1122, "answer_end": 1196 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two
Which?
{ "input_text": "Rudolph and Santa Claus", "answer_start": 1041, "answer_end": 1158 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus
Where had they been stored since their use in the show?
{ "input_text": "in a family attic", "answer_start": 1320, "answer_end": 1392 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic
When were they rediscovered?
{ "input_text": "In 2005", "answer_start": 1312, "answer_end": 1374 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic Q: When were they rediscovered? A: In 2005
When were they put on display?
{ "input_text": "In 2006", "answer_start": 972, "answer_end": 1042 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic Q: When were they rediscovered? A: In 2005 Q: When were they put on display? A: In 2006
Where?
{ "input_text": "the Center for Puppetry Arts", "answer_start": 972, "answer_end": 1120 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic Q: When were they rediscovered? A: In 2005 Q: When were they put on display? A: In 2006 Q: Where? A: the Center for Puppetry Arts
How much did they appraise for in 2005?
{ "input_text": "$8,000 to $10,000 for the pair", "answer_start": 1521, "answer_end": 1572 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic Q: When were they rediscovered? A: In 2005 Q: When were they put on display? A: In 2006 Q: Where? A: the Center for Puppetry Arts Q: How much did they appraise for in 2005? A: $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair
How much did they originally cost to produce?
{ "input_text": "about $5,000 each", "answer_start": 1482, "answer_end": 1512 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic Q: When were they rediscovered? A: In 2005 Q: When were they put on display? A: In 2006 Q: Where? A: the Center for Puppetry Arts Q: How much did they appraise for in 2005? A: $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair Q: How much did they originally cost to produce? A: about $5,000 each
What year were they made?
{ "input_text": "1964", "answer_start": 1483, "answer_end": 1520 }
cnn
(CNN) -- The longest-running holiday special still has a very shiny nose. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" premiered on television December 6, 1964, and is now one of the holiday season's perennial favorites. The story of the reindeer who saves Christmas is beloved among children and adults alike. The Rankin-Bass animated film production company used Japanese puppets and stop motion to tell the tale, bolstered by a soundtrack featuring Burl Ives' rendition of the theme song. In the story, Santa's reindeer Donner and his wife have a son, Rudolph, who has the distinction of a nose that glows. He runs away after being made to feel an outcast and links up with an elf who dreams of becoming a dentist and an adventurer seeking silver and gold. After ending up on the Island of Misfit Toys and wandering for a while, Rudolph goes on to save his loved ones from the Abominable Snow Monster and guides Santa through a blizzard that threatens to ruin Christmas. In 2006, the New York Times reported that fans drove for miles to see the Rudolph and Santa Claus puppets at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta. The pair were thought to be the last of the surviving production puppets. They had been taken home by a production company employee and given to her children after filming was completed. "In 2005, the nephew of the original rescuer found the puppets in a family attic and brought them to be appraised on the PBS series 'Antiques Roadshow,' " the Times said. "Created for about $5,000 each in 1964, they were valued at $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair. The family sold both figures to Kevin A. Kriess, the president of TimeandSpaceToys.com and a lifelong fan of the Rankin-Bass films." Q: Who is Rudolph's father? A: Donner Q: Why does Rudolph run away? A: he felt like an outcast Q: What makes him different from the other reindeer? A: his nose glows Q: Who does he save during a snow storm? A: his loved ones Q: Does he save Christmas? A: yes Q: What Island does he travel to? A: the Island of Misfit Toys Q: Which company produced the movie? A: Rankin-Bass Q: When did it premiere? A: December 6, 1964 Q: What methods were used in filming the movie? A: Japanese puppets and stop motion Q: Are all of the puppets still in existence? A: no Q: How many remain? A: two Q: Which? A: Rudolph and Santa Claus Q: Where had they been stored since their use in the show? A: in a family attic Q: When were they rediscovered? A: In 2005 Q: When were they put on display? A: In 2006 Q: Where? A: the Center for Puppetry Arts Q: How much did they appraise for in 2005? A: $8,000 to $10,000 for the pair Q: How much did they originally cost to produce? A: about $5,000 each Q: What year were they made? A: 1964
Who bought them?
{ "input_text": "Kevin A. Kriess", "answer_start": 1573, "answer_end": 1621 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano.
Who arrived at the church?
{ "input_text": "the garrison first", "answer_start": 254, "answer_end": 297 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first
Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black?
{ "input_text": "Fra. Domenico", "answer_start": 687, "answer_end": 853 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico
Who was crying?
{ "input_text": "Valentina", "answer_start": 459, "answer_end": 684 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina
Who noticed it?
{ "input_text": "her ladies", "answer_start": 592, "answer_end": 665 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina Q: Who noticed it? A: her ladies
Did any others arrive with her?
{ "input_text": "yes", "answer_start": 301, "answer_end": 386 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina Q: Who noticed it? A: her ladies Q: Did any others arrive with her? A: yes
What other group of people were in her group?
{ "input_text": "her pages", "answer_start": 311, "answer_end": 386 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina Q: Who noticed it? A: her ladies Q: Did any others arrive with her? A: yes Q: What other group of people were in her group? A: her pages
And who in the group was anxious?
{ "input_text": ", Peppe", "answer_start": 378, "answer_end": 460 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina Q: Who noticed it? A: her ladies Q: Did any others arrive with her? A: yes Q: What other group of people were in her group? A: her pages Q: And who in the group was anxious? A: , Peppe
Was she well-rested?
{ "input_text": "no", "answer_start": 490, "answer_end": 553 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina Q: Who noticed it? A: her ladies Q: Did any others arrive with her? A: yes Q: What other group of people were in her group? A: her pages Q: And who in the group was anxious? A: , Peppe Q: Was she well-rested? A: no
Who should be reinforced?
{ "input_text": "the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls.", "answer_start": 1221, "answer_end": 1307 }
gutenberg
CHAPTER XXIV. THE INTERRUPTED MASS The morning of that Wednesday of Corpus Christi, fateful to all concerned in this chronicle, dawned misty and grey, and the air was chilled by the wind that blew from the sea. The chapel bell tinkled out its summons, and the garrison trooped faithfully to Mass. Presently came Monna Valentina, followed by her ladies, her pages, and lastly, Peppe, wearing under his thin mask of piety an air of eager anxiety and unrest. Valentina was very pale, and round her eyes there were dark circles that told of sleeplessness, and as she bowed her head in prayer, her ladies observed that tears were falling on the illuminated Mass-book over which she bent. And now came Fra Domenico from the sacristy in the white chasuble that the Church ordains for the Corpus Christi feast, followed by a page in a clerkly gown of black, and the Mass commenced. There were absent only from the gathering Gonzaga and Fortemani, besides a sentry and the three prisoners. Francesco and his two followers. Gonzaga had presented himself to Valentina with the plausible tale that, as the events of which Fanfulla's letter had given them knowledge might lead Gian Maria at any moment to desperate measures, it might be well that he should reinforce the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls. Valentina, little recking now whether the castle held or fell, and still less such trifles as Gonzaga's attendance at Mass, had assented without heeding the import of what he said. And so, his face drawn and his body quivering with the excitement of what he was about to do, Gonzaga had repaired to the ramparts so soon as he had seen them all safely into chapel. The sentinel was that same clerkly youth Aventano, who had read to the soldiers that letter Gian Maria had sent Gonzaga. This the courtier accepted as a good omen. If a man there was among the soldiery at Roccaleone with whom he deemed that he had an account to settle, that man was Aventano. Q: Who arrived at the church? A: the garrison first Q: Who was followed by a clerk dressed in black? A: Fra. Domenico Q: Who was crying? A: Valentina Q: Who noticed it? A: her ladies Q: Did any others arrive with her? A: yes Q: What other group of people were in her group? A: her pages Q: And who in the group was anxious? A: , Peppe Q: Was she well-rested? A: no Q: Who should be reinforced? A: the single man-at-arms patrolling the walls.
Who thought these measures were required?
{ "input_text": "Gian Maria", "answer_start": 1172, "answer_end": 1304 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop.
Was Budapest always one city?
{ "input_text": "no", "answer_start": 127, "answer_end": 150 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no
How many was it?
{ "input_text": "two", "answer_start": 127, "answer_end": 150 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two
What was one called?
{ "input_text": "Buda", "answer_start": 156, "answer_end": 161 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda
Where was it located?
{ "input_text": "the west side of the river", "answer_start": 157, "answer_end": 191 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river
What was the other?
{ "input_text": "Danube and Pest", "answer_start": 192, "answer_end": 208 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest
Where was it located?
{ "input_text": "the east side", "answer_start": 210, "answer_end": 224 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side
When did they combine?
{ "input_text": "in 1872", "answer_start": 226, "answer_end": 258 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872
Is it an important city in it's country?
{ "input_text": "yes", "answer_start": 263, "answer_end": 327 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes
How many people live there?
{ "input_text": "The population of Budapest is about three million", "answer_start": 328, "answer_end": 377 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million
Do other people visit?
{ "input_text": "yes", "answer_start": 383, "answer_end": 428 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes
What do they do?
{ "input_text": "take boat rides", "answer_start": 430, "answer_end": 468 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides
Where?
{ "input_text": "along the Danube", "answer_start": 463, "answer_end": 479 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube
When do people like to go?
{ "input_text": "summer", "answer_start": 531, "answer_end": 564 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer
Why?
{ "input_text": "because it's very cold in winter", "answer_start": 565, "answer_end": 602 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer Q: Why? A: because it's very cold in winter
When was LA started?
{ "input_text": "1781", "answer_start": 616, "answer_end": 647 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer Q: Why? A: because it's very cold in winter Q: When was LA started? A: 1781
What is the climate like there?
{ "input_text": "dry and warm", "answer_start": 924, "answer_end": 937 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer Q: Why? A: because it's very cold in winter Q: When was LA started? A: 1781 Q: What is the climate like there? A: dry and warm
What is it close to?
{ "input_text": "Disneyland", "answer_start": 1083, "answer_end": 1102 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer Q: Why? A: because it's very cold in winter Q: When was LA started? A: 1781 Q: What is the climate like there? A: dry and warm Q: What is it close to? A: Disneyland
How many people live in Taipei?
{ "input_text": "2.3 million", "answer_start": 1198, "answer_end": 1210 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer Q: Why? A: because it's very cold in winter Q: When was LA started? A: 1781 Q: What is the climate like there? A: dry and warm Q: What is it close to? A: Disneyland Q: How many people live in Taipei? A: 2.3 million
Is it cheap to live there?
{ "input_text": "no", "answer_start": 1414, "answer_end": 1447 }
race
Have you ever been to some big cities in the world? The information below will be helpful to you. Budapest For many centuries, Budapest was two cities, with Buda on the west side of the river Danube and Pest on the east side. Budapest became one city in 1872, and it has been the capital city of Hungary for about eighty years. The population of Budapest is about three million, and the city is a very popular place for tourists. Visitors like to take boat rides along the Danube. Budapest is also known for its exciting nightlife. The best time to visit is summer since Budapest is very cold in winter. Los Angeles Los Angeles was founded in 1781. With 3.5 million people it is now the biggest city in California and the second largest city in the United States. It is famous for its modern highways, its movie stars, and its smog. When the city is really smoggy, you can't see the near-by Mountains. The weather is usually dry and warm. Visitors like to go to the film studios and to drive along Hollywood Street. There are many good beaches near the city, and Los Angeles is also close to Disneyland. Taipei Since the founding of Taipei in the 18th century, the city has grown to a population of 2.3 million. Taipei is an exciting city, but the weather is humid and not always pleasant. It's also a very busy city, and the streets are always full of people. There is an excellent museum that many people visit. Taipei is quite an expensive city, but not more expensive than some neighboring cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo. So more and more travelers go to Taipei to shop. Q: Was Budapest always one city? A: no Q: How many was it? A: two Q: What was one called? A: Buda Q: Where was it located? A: the west side of the river Q: What was the other? A: Danube and Pest Q: Where was it located? A: the east side Q: When did they combine? A: in 1872 Q: Is it an important city in it's country? A: yes Q: How many people live there? A: The population of Budapest is about three million Q: Do other people visit? A: yes Q: What do they do? A: take boat rides Q: Where? A: along the Danube Q: When do people like to go? A: summer Q: Why? A: because it's very cold in winter Q: When was LA started? A: 1781 Q: What is the climate like there? A: dry and warm Q: What is it close to? A: Disneyland Q: How many people live in Taipei? A: 2.3 million Q: Is it cheap to live there? A: no
Do people prefer to buy things in Hong Kong?
{ "input_text": "no", "answer_start": 1530, "answer_end": 1577 }
cnn
(CNN) -- A lawsuit filed by the family of Robert Champion, the Florida A&M University band member allegedly beaten to death in a hazing ritual, accuses the bus company involved in the deadly assault and the bus driver of negligence, their attorney said Monday. The suit alleges that Fabulous Coach Lines and its driver not only consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students, they knowingly participated in the planned hazing activity over several years. "This was a culture embraced by this bus company," Chris Chestnut said. According to court documents, Bus C, which is was the vehicle where the incident took place and the name of a specific hazing ritual, was parked in a dark corner, separate from the other buses provided by the company. The suit also alleges that the bus and its air conditioning system were running at the time Champion was beaten and that the bus driver was standing guard at the door to prevent anyone from entering or exiting the vehicle. When Champion stepped off the bus at one point to vomit, the bus driver told him "he would be alright as she forced him back onto the bus," the lawsuit claims. Despite a request for damages in excess of $15,000, Chestnut insisted the focus isn't money. It allows him to file subpoenas and take witness statements to further the investigation. "We figure out how this happened, we figure out how to fix it, and then we stop it from happening again," Chestnut said. Calls to the bus company and its attorneys, Wicker, Smith, O'Hara, McCoy, and Ford, PA, for comment have not been returned.
WHO IS FILING THE LAWSUIT?
{ "input_text": "The family of Robert Champion", "answer_start": 28, "answer_end": 57 }
cnn
(CNN) -- A lawsuit filed by the family of Robert Champion, the Florida A&M University band member allegedly beaten to death in a hazing ritual, accuses the bus company involved in the deadly assault and the bus driver of negligence, their attorney said Monday. The suit alleges that Fabulous Coach Lines and its driver not only consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students, they knowingly participated in the planned hazing activity over several years. "This was a culture embraced by this bus company," Chris Chestnut said. According to court documents, Bus C, which is was the vehicle where the incident took place and the name of a specific hazing ritual, was parked in a dark corner, separate from the other buses provided by the company. The suit also alleges that the bus and its air conditioning system were running at the time Champion was beaten and that the bus driver was standing guard at the door to prevent anyone from entering or exiting the vehicle. When Champion stepped off the bus at one point to vomit, the bus driver told him "he would be alright as she forced him back onto the bus," the lawsuit claims. Despite a request for damages in excess of $15,000, Chestnut insisted the focus isn't money. It allows him to file subpoenas and take witness statements to further the investigation. "We figure out how this happened, we figure out how to fix it, and then we stop it from happening again," Chestnut said. Calls to the bus company and its attorneys, Wicker, Smith, O'Hara, McCoy, and Ford, PA, for comment have not been returned. Q: WHO IS FILING THE LAWSUIT? A: The family of Robert Champion
AGAINST WHOM?
{ "input_text": "Fabulous Coach Lines", "answer_start": 285, "answer_end": 305 }
cnn
(CNN) -- A lawsuit filed by the family of Robert Champion, the Florida A&M University band member allegedly beaten to death in a hazing ritual, accuses the bus company involved in the deadly assault and the bus driver of negligence, their attorney said Monday. The suit alleges that Fabulous Coach Lines and its driver not only consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students, they knowingly participated in the planned hazing activity over several years. "This was a culture embraced by this bus company," Chris Chestnut said. According to court documents, Bus C, which is was the vehicle where the incident took place and the name of a specific hazing ritual, was parked in a dark corner, separate from the other buses provided by the company. The suit also alleges that the bus and its air conditioning system were running at the time Champion was beaten and that the bus driver was standing guard at the door to prevent anyone from entering or exiting the vehicle. When Champion stepped off the bus at one point to vomit, the bus driver told him "he would be alright as she forced him back onto the bus," the lawsuit claims. Despite a request for damages in excess of $15,000, Chestnut insisted the focus isn't money. It allows him to file subpoenas and take witness statements to further the investigation. "We figure out how this happened, we figure out how to fix it, and then we stop it from happening again," Chestnut said. Calls to the bus company and its attorneys, Wicker, Smith, O'Hara, McCoy, and Ford, PA, for comment have not been returned. Q: WHO IS FILING THE LAWSUIT? A: The family of Robert Champion Q: AGAINST WHOM? A: Fabulous Coach Lines
WHAT DOES THE FAMILY ACCUSE THE COMPANY OF?
{ "input_text": "The company consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students", "answer_start": 330, "answer_end": 460 }
cnn
(CNN) -- A lawsuit filed by the family of Robert Champion, the Florida A&M University band member allegedly beaten to death in a hazing ritual, accuses the bus company involved in the deadly assault and the bus driver of negligence, their attorney said Monday. The suit alleges that Fabulous Coach Lines and its driver not only consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students, they knowingly participated in the planned hazing activity over several years. "This was a culture embraced by this bus company," Chris Chestnut said. According to court documents, Bus C, which is was the vehicle where the incident took place and the name of a specific hazing ritual, was parked in a dark corner, separate from the other buses provided by the company. The suit also alleges that the bus and its air conditioning system were running at the time Champion was beaten and that the bus driver was standing guard at the door to prevent anyone from entering or exiting the vehicle. When Champion stepped off the bus at one point to vomit, the bus driver told him "he would be alright as she forced him back onto the bus," the lawsuit claims. Despite a request for damages in excess of $15,000, Chestnut insisted the focus isn't money. It allows him to file subpoenas and take witness statements to further the investigation. "We figure out how this happened, we figure out how to fix it, and then we stop it from happening again," Chestnut said. Calls to the bus company and its attorneys, Wicker, Smith, O'Hara, McCoy, and Ford, PA, for comment have not been returned. Q: WHO IS FILING THE LAWSUIT? A: The family of Robert Champion Q: AGAINST WHOM? A: Fabulous Coach Lines Q: WHAT DOES THE FAMILY ACCUSE THE COMPANY OF? A: The company consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students
WHAT HAPPENED TO ROBERT?
{ "input_text": "Beaten to death", "answer_start": 108, "answer_end": 123 }
cnn
(CNN) -- A lawsuit filed by the family of Robert Champion, the Florida A&M University band member allegedly beaten to death in a hazing ritual, accuses the bus company involved in the deadly assault and the bus driver of negligence, their attorney said Monday. The suit alleges that Fabulous Coach Lines and its driver not only consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students, they knowingly participated in the planned hazing activity over several years. "This was a culture embraced by this bus company," Chris Chestnut said. According to court documents, Bus C, which is was the vehicle where the incident took place and the name of a specific hazing ritual, was parked in a dark corner, separate from the other buses provided by the company. The suit also alleges that the bus and its air conditioning system were running at the time Champion was beaten and that the bus driver was standing guard at the door to prevent anyone from entering or exiting the vehicle. When Champion stepped off the bus at one point to vomit, the bus driver told him "he would be alright as she forced him back onto the bus," the lawsuit claims. Despite a request for damages in excess of $15,000, Chestnut insisted the focus isn't money. It allows him to file subpoenas and take witness statements to further the investigation. "We figure out how this happened, we figure out how to fix it, and then we stop it from happening again," Chestnut said. Calls to the bus company and its attorneys, Wicker, Smith, O'Hara, McCoy, and Ford, PA, for comment have not been returned. Q: WHO IS FILING THE LAWSUIT? A: The family of Robert Champion Q: AGAINST WHOM? A: Fabulous Coach Lines Q: WHAT DOES THE FAMILY ACCUSE THE COMPANY OF? A: The company consented to the illegal acts of hazing by students Q: WHAT HAPPENED TO ROBERT? A: Beaten to death
WHERE WAS HE KILLED?
{ "input_text": "In a bus.", "answer_start": 568, "answer_end": 573 }

No dataset card yet

Contribute a Dataset Card
Edit Dataset Tags

Models trained or fine-tuned on Zaid/coqa_expanded

None yet