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Task Categories: text-classification
Languages: en
Multilinguality: monolingual
Size Categories: 100K<n<1M
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Annotations Creators: crowdsourced
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guten_id (string)hour_reference (string)time_phrase (string)is_ambiguous (json)time_pos_start (int)time_pos_end (int)tok_context (string)
4447
5
five o'clock
true
145
147
I crossed the ground she had traversed , noting every feature surrounding it , the curving wheel-track , the thin prickly sand-herbage , the wave - mounds , the sparse wet shells and pebbles , the gleaming flatness of the water , and the vast horizon-boundary of pale flat land level with shore , looking like a dead sister of the sea . By a careful examination of my watch and the sun 's altitude , I was able to calculate what would , in all likelihood , have been his height above yonder waves when her chair was turned toward the city , at a point I reached in the track . But of the matter then simultaneously occupying my mind , to recover which was the second supreme task I proposed to myself-of what . I also was thinking upon the stroke of five o'clock , I could recollect nothing . I could not even recollect whether I happened to be looking on sun and waves when she must have had them full and glorious in her face . With the heartiest consent I could give , and a blank cheque , my father returned to England to hire forthwith a commodious yacht , fitted and manned . Before going he discoursed of prudence in our expenditure ; though not for the sake of the mere money in hand , which was a trifle , barely more than the half of my future income ; but that the squire , should he by and by bethink him of inspecting our affairs , might perceive we were not spendthrifts .
4447
12
the fall of the winter noon
true
68
74
So profoundly penetrated with thoughtfulness was the tone of his voice that I could not take umbrage . The attempt to analyze his signification cost me an aching forehead , perhaps because I knew it too acutely . She was on horseback ; I on foot , Schwartz for sole witness , and a wide space of rolling silent white country around us . We had met in the fall of the winter noon by accident . ` You like my Professor ? ' said Ottilia . ` I do : I respect him for his learning . '
28999
12
midday
true
46
47
And here is Hendon , and it is time for us to dress . '' Daisy got up and kissed her aunt with a quick , trembling caress . `` I think you are a perfect darling , '' she said . The Dover boat , midday service , was on the point of starting from the quay at Calais , and luggage was being swung on to it in square trucks , the passengers having already embarked . The day before a midsummer storm had vexed the soul of the silver streak , which had turned to a grey pewter streak of a peculiarly streaky nature , with white tops to the waves that slung themselves over the head of the pier . Cabin-boys and stewards were making horrible dispositions of tinware , and the head steward was on the verge of distraction , since the whole world seemed to have chosen this particular day to return to England , and the whole world , with an eye on the Channel , desired private cabins , which were numerically less than the demand . At the moment he was trying to keep calm before the infuriated questions of a Frenchwoman who believed herself to be speaking English .
28999
12
midday
true
133
134
Sorrows and trials she had had in plenty in her life , but these the sweetness of her nature had transformed , so that from being things difficult to bear , she had built up with them her own character . Sorrow had increased her own power of sympathy ; out of trials she had learnt patience ; and failure and the gradual sinking of one she had loved into the bottomless slough of evil habit had but left her with an added dower of pity and tolerance . So the past had no sting left , and if iron had ever entered into her soul it now but served to make it strong . She was still young , too ; it was not near sunset with her yet , nor even midday , and the future that , humanly speaking , she counted to be hers was almost dazzling in its brightness . For love had dawned for her again , and no uncertain love , wrapped in the mists of memory , but one that had ripened through liking and friendship and intimacy into the authentic glory . He was in England , too ; she was going back to him . And before very long she would never go away from him again .
28999
0
midnight
true
43
44
Jeannie joined her friend in the window-seat . `` Yes , just the same , '' she said . There was silence for a little while . An hour had passed since they began to talk , but it was still short of midnight , and the hansoms and motors still swept about the square like a throng of sonorous fireflies . Just opposite a big house flared with lit windows , and the sound of the band came loudly across the open space , a little mellowed by the distance , but with the rhythm of its music intact . `` Oh , I could get into a ball-dress and go and dance now for lightness of heart , '' said Jeannie . `` But I wo n't ; I will do something much nicer , and that is I will hear from you the news of your year .
28999
5
five o'clock
true
51
53
It looks so welcoming . Books , too ; everybody likes a book or two in his room . It 's so easy to do little things like that , and people appreciate it enormously . There 's the whole of the afternoon before us ; nobody will arrive till the five o'clock train . '' `` But I thought you said you expected him -- '' began Gladys . `` Darling , pray do n't criticize my last remark but three . Every remark becomes obsolete as soon as another remark is made . ''
28999
4
four o'clock
true
124
126
Yet some little spirit of companionship had escaped her again , when she quoted the line , `` In the darkness thick and hot . '' And then , after that , she had walked back to the house , made him play billiards with Daisy , and had gone upstairs at the earliest possible opportunity . Nobody with the slightest prospect of winning his case could have accused Tom Lindfield of being sensitive in his perceptions , but nobody without the certainty of losing it could have accused him of not being fairly sound in his conclusions . What had happened to Mrs. Halton to make her so different to him -LRB- and , for that matter , to everybody else -RRB- since four o'clock that afternoon he did not try to decide , since he had no means of knowing . But what he did know was that this was a woman of enchanting moods . At one time she was good comrade , then she was friend , then for some reason she was some sort of shadow of these excellent things . They were there , but they were obscured by something else .
28999
10
a quarter to eleven
true
52
56
`` I am I , and I am yours . Never doubt that . '' All that day there was no possible cause for his doubting it . The conspirator-plan succeeded to admiration , and Lord Lindfield and Daisy , with a somewhat faint-intentioned Gladys , had waited in the hall till a quarter to eleven . Then it was discovered that Jeannie had not been seen in the house since ten , and Gladys , victorious over her faint intentions , had stopped at home , while Daisy and Lord Lindfield walked rapidly to church , arriving there in the middle of the psalms . Jeannie had been gaily apologetic afterwards . She had not heard at breakfast that anybody except herself and Mr. Braithwaite meant to go to church , and , coming home , she paired herself off with Daisy .
28999
8
ten minutes past eight
true
56
60
Lord Lindfield , indeed , alone supported Jeannie . `` I want ten minutes , '' he said ; `` neither more nor less . Jim , it 's time for you to go , else you will keep us waiting for dinner . I see that Mrs. Halton and I will be left alone at ten minutes past eight , and I at a quarter past . '' Jeannie heard this perfectly , but she turned quickly to Lady Nottingham . `` Alice , is it true that you have a post out after dinner ? '' she said .
28999
5
five o'clock
true
52
54
It might have been by Gad , but it was by Worth . Four shades of grey , and pearls . Mrs. Beaumont distinctly thought that this was not the sort of dress to dash into the faces of a quiet country party . It was like letting off rockets at a five o'clock tea . Only a woman could dissect the enormity of it ; men just stared . `` I know I am not more than one minute late , '' she said . `` Lord Lindfield , Alice has told me to lead you to your doom , which is to take me in .
19398
8
eight o'clock
true
131
133
At last the day came when everything was complete , the water casks filled , and the last packet and bale stored away in the hold ; and even Reuben Hawkshaw admitted that there was nothing else that he could think of , requisite either for the safety or navigation of the ship , or the provisioning or health of the crew . The order was passed round for all the old hands to be aboard before sunset , that evening , together with those who had been openly engaged to fill up the vacancies . As for the rest , the twelve recruiters each received private orders . Three of them were to bring down the men they had engaged to the wharf , abreast of the Swan , at eight o'clock ; and to go off in the boat which would be awaiting them there , under charge of Master Standing . Three others were to come half an hour later . The other six were to bring down their men at daybreak -- so that all would get on board unnoticed . The last meal at Master Diggory 's was but a dull one .
19398
0
midnight
true
157
158
You have only yielded to my solicitations , and if we go to our death it is our choosing , and none of thine . '' `` Should the Swan come back without you , Reuben -- as may possibly be , for if there be any danger you are sure to expose yourself in the front of it -- Roger shall be as a son to me ; and shall either in time have a ship to command , and a share in her , as thou hast ; and he shall come in our business , when he has had enough of adventure at sea , and is willing to settle down on land . '' Reuben wrung his cousin 's hand silently , and then said : `` Let us take one more glass of strong water , Diggory , and then get a few hours ' sleep before morning . It is past midnight now , and I must be up by four ; for at that hour the boat must go off for the first batch of our new hands . '' Day broke , just as the last batch of men were brought on board . As soon as these had gone below the whistle was sounded , the old crew came up on deck , and the preparations for making sail commenced . The anchor was hove short , the lashings of the sails were loosened , the flags run up to the mast heads , the last casks and bales lowered into the hold , the hatches put on , and the decks washed down .
19398
12
midday
true
106
107
In a cabin underneath this , the three petty officers and twenty of the sailors lived together , the main body of the crew occupying the raised forecastle and the cabin underneath it . The galley was forward , built up against the forecastle , and thus sheltered from heavy seas which might sweep the waist of the vessel . Four small cannon were mounted on the poop , two on the forecastle , the six larger guns were in the waist -- three on either side . The breeze freshened as the Swan drew out from under the shelter of the land , and by midday the shore had faded from the sight . The crew had by this time settled down in their places , and sat in groups on deck , some overhauling the contents of their sea bags , looking over their clothes , and setting to , with needle and thread , to make such repairs as were needed . Some of the new hands were leaning over the side , wishing heartily that they were on shore again . Those who had made voyages were talking to their companions about the various ports at which they might touch , and the sights they would behold .
19398
12
midday
true
78
79
A day 's march through the mountains brought them into a lofty plateau , some seven thousand feet above the sea . Here were wide-spreading forests of trees , which Roger recognized as large oaks and cypress . Around the villages were clearings , and whereas in the plains below maize was chiefly cultivated , the largest proportion of the fields , here , were devoted to plantations of the aloe or maguey . Here , even at midday , the temperature was not too hot to be pleasant ; while at night the cold was great , and Roger was glad to pile the thick quilted rugs over him . After traversing this plateau for some distance , they came upon another range of hills , far loftier than those they had before crossed , and vastly higher than anything Roger had ever before beheld in his travels . These mountains were , the merchant told him , the Cordilleras ; they extended from unknown regions in the north through Anahuac to the south . The snow never melted upon the summits , and several of the highest of these were terrible volcanoes , whose eruptions were dreaded by the whole nation .
19398
12
noon
true
106
107
Seen through the clear mountain air it seemed but three or four miles away , and Roger had difficulty in believing the merchants , when they assured him that it was fully twenty . This was Tepeaca . The slaves , wearied as they were , quickened in their pace ; and in two hours they emerged from the mountain gorges onto the temperate plateau . Here they halted for some hours near a post house , a courier being sent on to Tepeaca , to inform the king 's envoys that they had arrived thus far ; and to ask whether they should proceed at noon , when the slaves had rested , or make their entry into the town in the morning . In a little over four hours the answer was received . The merchants were directed to wait where they were until three hours after noon , then to move forward until they arrived within eight miles of the town , and then to halt for the night , and to start again at sunrise next morning . Roger was as glad as were the slaves that he had not another fifteen miles ' march before him , for the journey had been a most fatiguing one .
19398
15
three hours after noon
true
108
112
The slaves , wearied as they were , quickened in their pace ; and in two hours they emerged from the mountain gorges onto the temperate plateau . Here they halted for some hours near a post house , a courier being sent on to Tepeaca , to inform the king 's envoys that they had arrived thus far ; and to ask whether they should proceed at noon , when the slaves had rested , or make their entry into the town in the morning . In a little over four hours the answer was received . The merchants were directed to wait where they were until three hours after noon , then to move forward until they arrived within eight miles of the town , and then to halt for the night , and to start again at sunrise next morning . Roger was as glad as were the slaves that he had not another fifteen miles ' march before him , for the journey had been a most fatiguing one . He thought that the absolute distance traversed did not exceed thirty miles , but owing to the difficulties of the road , and the care that had to be taken in traversing it at night , even with the assistance of the torches carried by the soldiers of the caravan , it had taken them twenty hours , including occasional halts , to perform the journey . An abundance of food was brought in by the neighboring villagers , and the merchants issued an extra supply of cocoa to the slaves ; and when the march was resumed , late in the afternoon , the latter had completely recovered from their fatigue .
19398
12
noon
true
63
64
A strong force at once landed on the mainland , and threw up a fortified camp . The Mexicans came in , in crowds , with fruit , vegetables , flowers , and other articles , which they bartered with the Spaniards . They brought news that the Mexican governor of the province intended to visit them , the next day . Before noon , he arrived with his numerous suite . A banquet was served to them , and then , in answer to the cazique 's inquiries as to the objects of their visit , he was informed by Cortez that he was the subject of a great monarch beyond the seas , who ruled over a vast empire ; and that , hearing of the greatness of the Mexican Emperor , he had sent him as an envoy , with a present in token of his goodwill , and a message which he must deliver in person . The cazique said that he would send couriers with the royal gift to Montezuma ; and that , as soon as he had learned his will , he would communicate it . He then presented ten slave loads of fine cottons , mantles of rich feather work , and a basket filled with gold ornaments to Cortez ; who then handed over the presents intended for Montezuma .
19398
12
noon
true
105
106
Roger at once fell back into the crowd , and soon took an opportunity to extricate himself from it , and to go down a side street . He and Bathalda then ascended to the top of the wall , where they were likely to be undisturbed , and waited there for an hour . They then went back to the palace . The square in the front of it was almost deserted now ; for the Spaniards had retired , half an hour before , and were not likely to appear again until the evening ; especially as it was known that , at noon , there was to be a great council held in the palace . Ten minutes later Malinche appeared at the entrance . As soon as her eyes fell on Roger she raised her hand and , leaving Bathalda , he at once went up to her . The two sentinels looked with some surprise at this tall native , but as they saw that he was known to Malinche , they offered no opposition to his entering the palace with her .
19398
0
midnight
true
122
123
He would trust the caziques , for men of rank in whatever country are faithful to their word , and do not pretend friendship when they mean hostility . Were Montezuma guided by them , there would be no fear of treachery ; but as he has given himself to the priests , and they can , by means of the oracles , persuade him to almost anything , Cortez feels that the danger is great . '' `` Well now , we had better to rest , '' Cacama said , rising . `` You are to start with the first streak of light , so as to be back before the sun is high , and it is long past midnight now . `` Cuitcatl , it would , I think , be well for you to accompany our friend . A rumor may have got abroad that he is again our guest , and those who longed for his blood , before , may long for it again . I would not that he should cross the lake unattended . ''
19398
10
ten o'clock
true
36
38
`` I will be going . Roger Hawkshaw will help you , '' Cuitcatl said . `` It will take some time for Bathalda to get the litters and the men . `` It is now ten o'clock . In three hours the litters shall be outside the little gate of the garden , and I will bring six porters to the private door at the foot of the stairs . '' `` That will be enough , '' the queen said . `` Two will be ample for our garments , and you and Roger Hawkshaw can take the jewels ; which , when we start , can go in the litters with us . ''
19398
2
two o'clock
true
47
49
He found the boatmen asleep in their canoe . As soon as he aroused them , they seized their paddles and , on his taking his seat , pushed off . `` There is no occasion for speed , '' he said . `` It is but two o'clock now , and it is of no use our reaching Mexico until daybreak ; for the gates of the palace will be closed , and there will be no getting in , dressed as I am , until sunrise . '' They therefore paddled quietly across the lake , often resting for a considerable time , and so arranging that they approached the city at the same time as a number of market boats , from the villages on the lake . `` Well , '' Malinche asked with a smile , as he met her in one of the courts , as he entered , `` and where is your lady love ? '' `` I have not brought her here , '' he said , rather indignantly .
19398
0
midnight
true
119
120
A portable bridge had been prepared for crossing the canals which intersected the causeway ; the intention being that it should be laid across a canal , that the army should pass over it , and that it should then be carried forward to the next gap in the causeway . This was a most faulty arrangement , necessitating frequent and long delays , and entailing almost certain disaster . Had three such portable bridges been constructed , the column could have crossed the causeway with comparatively little risk ; and there was no reason why these bridges should not have been constructed , as they could have been carried , without difficulty , by the Tlascalans . At midnight the troops were in readiness for the march . Mass was performed by Father Olmedo ; and at one o'clock on July 1st , 1520 , the Spaniards sallied out from the fortress that they had so stoutly defended . Silence reigned in the city . As noiselessly as possible , the troops made their way down the broad street , expecting every moment to be attacked ; but even the tramping of the horses , and the rumbling of the baggage wagons and artillery did not awake the sleeping Mexicans , and the head of the column arrived at the head of the causeway before they were discovered .
19398
1
one o'clock on July 1st, 1520
true
87
94
This was a most faulty arrangement , necessitating frequent and long delays , and entailing almost certain disaster . Had three such portable bridges been constructed , the column could have crossed the causeway with comparatively little risk ; and there was no reason why these bridges should not have been constructed , as they could have been carried , without difficulty , by the Tlascalans . At midnight the troops were in readiness for the march . Mass was performed by Father Olmedo ; and at one o'clock on July 1st , 1520 , the Spaniards sallied out from the fortress that they had so stoutly defended . Silence reigned in the city . As noiselessly as possible , the troops made their way down the broad street , expecting every moment to be attacked ; but even the tramping of the horses , and the rumbling of the baggage wagons and artillery did not awake the sleeping Mexicans , and the head of the column arrived at the head of the causeway before they were discovered . Then , as the advanced guard were preparing to lay the portable bridge across the first opening , some Aztec sentinels gave the alarm .
19398
0
midnight
true
149
150
Impossible as it seems , the Spaniards may yet extricate themselves from the toils ; in which case I should join them . If not , and I find my escape by the coast cut off , by the rising of the tribes there , the only thing that I can see is to take to the mountains ; and to live there , as I did with Bathalda , on the proceeds of the chase . I might then , perhaps , in time make my way to people in the far north , who have not such reason as they have here for hating a man with a white skin ; or I might wait until the Spaniards send another expedition , to carry out what Cortez has failed to accomplish . '' Leaving their fires burning , the remains of the Spanish army marched , at midnight , from the temple where they had enjoyed rest , and had recruited their strength and spirits . The sick and wounded were placed in the center , and carried on litters , or on the backs of the porters ; while others , who were strong enough to sit upright , rode on the horses behind the mounted soldiers . All night the march continued without disturbance ; but in the morning , large parties of natives were seen moving about . Tlacopan lay on the most westerly point of the lake , and the most direct route of the Spaniards would have been to keep along by its margin ; but had they done so , they would have been liable to attack from the capital ; as the troops could have poured out across the causeway to Tepejacac , and headed them there .
19398
20
eight o'clock in the evening
true
85
90
The latter rose to his feet and , with the aid of the native , unfastened the cords that bound his ankles together . For half an hour he paced up and down the chamber , to restore the circulation to his feet . Then the guard replaced the cords , but did it in such a way that , though they seemed as tight and secure as before , they would at a slight effort fall off , and leave him free . At eight o'clock in the evening the guard was relieved . He had told Roger that he was to listen for the cry of an owl outside , twice repeated ; and that upon hearing this , he would know that his friends were without . Roger listened anxiously for the password from his new guard ; but as it did not come , he concluded that Cuitcatl had not been able to bribe him , and that he must himself overpower the man . The Aztec placed himself at the loophole , and stood looking out ; turning , from time to time , to see by the light of the torch , which was fixed close to where Roger was lying , that he was making no attempt to release himself from his bonds .
19398
0
nearly midnight
true
130
132
He had told Roger that he was to listen for the cry of an owl outside , twice repeated ; and that upon hearing this , he would know that his friends were without . Roger listened anxiously for the password from his new guard ; but as it did not come , he concluded that Cuitcatl had not been able to bribe him , and that he must himself overpower the man . The Aztec placed himself at the loophole , and stood looking out ; turning , from time to time , to see by the light of the torch , which was fixed close to where Roger was lying , that he was making no attempt to release himself from his bonds . It was not until nearly midnight that Roger heard the expected signal . No sooner was the second call given , than he pulled the knot which kept the cords together , raised himself noiselessly to his feet , and sprang upon the Aztec . Taken by surprise , the man was no more than a child in Roger 's strong grasp . In a moment he was thrown down , his cloth was twisted round his mouth , so as to prevent any cry from escaping him , and his arms were bound behind him with Roger 's rope .
19398
0
midnight
true
45
46
I trust that you may live , and be happy , yet . '' `` Let us not stand here talking , '' the young cazique said . `` It is not as it was before . Then you might walk through the city at midnight , without meeting with a single person . We sleep no longer now , but make nightly attacks on the Spaniards ; and at any moment bodies of troops may come along . '' The little party moved forward , and in a minute descended the steps . Bathalda took his place in a small canoe lying there .
19398
9
nine o'clock
true
57
59
`` The cazique has sent off a messenger for a party of his people to meet you . A boat will be in readiness to take you across the lake , at sunset . You will be carried in litters from the landing place to his palace . '' This programme was carried out and , by nine o'clock that evening , Roger and Amenche were both settled in luxurious apartments in the cazique 's palace . Cortez , now recovered from his wounds , prepared for a fresh advance ; which was this time to be conducted in a different manner . Against so stubborn and active a foe the advance must be irresistible , steady , and continued . In future , no step backward was to be taken .
5980
0
Midnight
true
70
71
Given a character or two and a situation , the beginning of one of those romances is , or was , pretty likely to be something like this : `` It was a black night . Heavy clouds had obscured the setting sun and now , as the clock in the great stone tower boomed twelve , the darkness was pitchy . '' That is a good safe beginning . Midnight , a stone tower , a booming clock , and darkness make an appeal to the imagination . On a night like that almost anything may happen . A reader of one of my romances -- and readers there must be , for the things did , and still do , sell to some extent -- might be fairly certain that something WOULD happen before the end of the second page . After that the somethings continued to happen as fast as I could invent them .
5980
6
six o'clock
true
52
54
`` Yes , '' drily ; `` and we saw Sothern and Marlowe and had dinner at the Holland . The rest of the time we talked shop . That was the first visit . The second was more exciting still ; we talked shop ALL the time and you took the six o'clock train home again . '' `` You 're wrong there . I saw the new loan collections at the Metropolitan and heard Ysaye play at Carnegie Hall . I did n't start for home until the next day . ''
5980
11
a quarter to twelve
true
68
72
It was not much of a story , and , as I read it , I kept thinking that I could write as good a one . I had had such ideas before , but nothing had come of them . This time , however , I determined to try . In half an hour I had evolved a plot , such as it was , and at a quarter to twelve that night the story was finished . A highwayman was its hero and its scene the great North Road in England . My conceptions of highwaymen and the North Road -- of England , too , for that matter -- were derived from something I had read at some time or other , I suppose ; they must have been . At any rate , I finished that story , addressed the envelope to the editor of the magazine and dropped the envelope and its inclosure in the corner mail-box before I went to bed .
5980
3
three o'clock
true
62
64
It seems to me that we did nothing else . I bought what I needed the very first day , clothes , hat , steamer coat and traveling cap included . It did not take me long ; fortunately I am of the average height and shape and the salesmen found me easy to please . My shopping tour was ended by three o'clock and I spent the remainder of the afternoon at a bookseller 's . There was a set of `` Early English Poets '' there , nineteen little , fat , chunky volumes , not new and shiny and grand , but middle-aged and shabby and comfortable , which appealed to me . The price , however , was high ; I had the uneasy feeling that I ought not to afford it . Then the bookseller himself , who also was fat and comfortably shabby , and who had beguiled from me the information that I was about to travel , suggested that the `` Poets '' would make very pleasant reading en route .
5980
5
five o'clock
true
80
82
she sniffed , `` that 's the first time I ever knew you to give in that there WAS a Little Frank . All right , I sha 'n' t say any more , but I hope the foreign poorhouses are more comfortable than ours , that 's all . If you make me keep on this way , I 'll fetch up in one before the first month 's over . '' We left for New York on the five o'clock train . Packing those `` Early English Poets '' was a confounded nuisance . They had to be stuffed here , there and everywhere amid my wearing apparel and Hephzibah prophesied evil to come . `` Books are the worse things goin ' to make creases , '' she declared .
5980
12
twelve o'clock
true
42
44
`` Holland is pretty wet , so they say , but we should be able to find some dry spots . '' She did not laugh . `` You know what I mean , '' she observed . `` To-morrow night at twelve o'clock we shall be far out on the vasty deep . '' `` We shall be on the ` Princess Eulalie , ' '' I answered . `` Go to sleep . '' Neither of us spoke the truth .
5980
12
Twelve o'clock
true
14
16
`` What ? '' he queried . `` The ` Princess Eulalie ' ? Twelve o'clock , I believe , I 'm not sure . '' `` You 're not sure ! And it is after nine now . It strikes me that -- '' `` Never mind what strikes you .
5980
12
noon
true
21
22
`` Lunch together ! '' gasped Hephzy . `` Why , Mr. Campbell ! the ` Princess Eulalie ' sails at noon . You said so yourself ! '' Jim smiled . `` I know I did , '' he replied , `` but that is immaterial .
5980
1
one o'clock
true
47
49
Jim smiled . `` I know I did , '' he replied , `` but that is immaterial . You are not concerned with the ` Princess Eulalie . ' Your passages are booked on the ` Plutonia ' and she does n't leave her dock until one o'clock to-morrow morning . We will meet here for lunch at twelve-thirty . Come , Kent . '' I did n't attempt an answer .
5980
16
four in the afternoon
true
73
77
`` Bring me tea , '' she said to our table steward on the third morning . `` I 've tried most every kind of coffee and lived through it , but I 'm gettin ' too old to keep on experimentin ' with my health . Bring me tea and I 'll try to forget what time it is . '' We had tea at breakfast , therefore , and tea at four in the afternoon . Hephzibah and I learned to take it with the rest . She watched her fellow-passengers , however , and as usual had something to say concerning their behavior . `` Did you hear that , Hosy ? ''
5980
0
about midnight
true
24
26
`` Yes . But we did have extraordinarily good weather for that . '' `` Why , not particularly good . We slowed down about midnight . There was a real fog then and the glass was low . The second officer told me it dropped very suddenly and there was a heavy sea running . For an hour between twelve and one we were making not much more than half our usual speed . ''
5980
12
noon
true
51
52
And you think our run will be better than five hundred and eighty ? '' `` It should be , unless there is a remarkable change . This ship makes over six hundred , day after day , in good weather . She should do at least six hundred by to-morrow noon , unless there is a sudden change , as I said . '' `` But six hundred would be -- it would be the high field , by Jove ! '' `` Anything over five hundred and ninety-four would be that . The numbers are very low to-night .
5980
11
nearly eleven o'clock
true
58
61
I sha 'n' t be surprised at anything anymore . I 'm in England and on my way to London ; that 's surprise enough . NOTHIN ' could be more wonderful than that . '' In Which We Are Received at Bancroft 's Hotel and I Receive a Letter It was late when we reached London , nearly eleven o'clock . The long train journey was a delight . During the few hours of daylight and dusk we peered through the car windows at the scenery flying past ; at the villages , the green fields , the hedges , the neat , trim farms . `` Everything looks as if it has been swept and dusted , '' declared Hephzy .
5980
9
a quarter after nine
true
47
51
I could not eat , either , but I made the pretence of doing so . The next morning , at breakfast in the sitting-room , we were a silent pair . I do n't know what George , the waiter , thought of us . At a quarter after nine I turned away from the window through which I had been moodily regarding the donkey cart of a flower huckster in the street below . `` You 'd better get on your things , '' I said . `` It is time for us to go . '' Hephzy donned her hat and wrap .
5980
10
ten in the morning
true
50
54
Pity and charity and all the rest of it I would not consider . Right was right , and justice was justice . I would end a disagreeable business as quickly as I could . Mrs. Briggs ' lodging-house , viewed from the outside , was no more inviting at ten in the morning than it had been at four in the afternoon . I expected Hephzy to make some comment upon the dirty steps and the still dirtier front door . She did neither . We stood together upon the steps and I rang the bell .
5980
6
six o'clock
true
28
30
I did not sleep at all that night , nor did I forget . God help me ! I was realizing that I never could forget . At six o'clock I came downstairs , made a pretence at eating some biscuits and cheese which I found on the sideboard , scribbled a brief note to Hephzy stating that I had gone for a walk and should not be back to breakfast , and started out . The walk developed into a long one and I did not return to the rectory until nearly eleven in the forenoon . By that time I was in a better mood , more reconciled to the inevitable -- or I thought I was . I believed I could play the man , could even see her married to Herbert Bayliss and still behave like a man .
5980
5
five o'clock
true
68
70
We tried to trace her , of course . That is , I tried and Hephzy did not dissuade me , although she realized , I am sure , the hopelessness of the quest . Frances had left the rectory very early in the morning . The hostler at the inn had been much surprised to find her awaiting him when he came down to the yard at five o'clock . She was obliged to go to London , she said , and must take the very first train : Would he drive her to Haddington on Hill at once ? He did so -- probably she had offered him a great deal more than the regular fare -- and she had taken the train . Questioning the hostler , who was a surly , uncommunicative lout , resulted in my learning very little in addition to this .
5980
11
eleven o'clock
true
85
87
The little sleep I had was filled with dreams , dreams from which I awoke to toss restlessly . I rose and walked the floor , calling myself a fool , a silly old fool , over and over again . But when morning came my plan , a ridiculous , wild plan from which , even if it succeeded -- which was most unlikely -- nothing but added trouble and despair could possibly come , my plan was nearer its ultimate formation . At eleven o'clock that forenoon I walked up the marble steps of the Manor House and rang the bell . The butler , an exalted personage in livery , answered my ring . Mr. Heathcroft ? No , sir .
5980
0
nearly midnight before
true
51
54
I 'll ask Hepton to give me an itinerary of the trip and I will wire when and where I will join you . You must go , Hephzy ; I insist upon it . '' In spite of my insisting Hephzy still declared she should not go . It was nearly midnight before she gave in . `` And if you DO N'T come in three days at the longest , '' she said , `` you 'll find me back here huntin ' you up . I mean that , Hosy , so you 'd better understand it . And now , '' rising from her chair , `` I 'm goin ' to see about the things you 're to wear while we 're separated .
5980
10
a quarter to eleven
true
60
64
Would I wish to send up my name now ? Again I declined , to the polite astonishment of the concierge , who evidently considered me a queer sort of a friend . He was called to his desk by a guest , who wished to ask questions , of course , and I waited where I was . At a quarter to eleven Herbert Bayliss emerged from the elevator . His appearance almost shocked me . Out late the night before ! He looked as if he had been out all night for many nights .
5980
0
Midnight
true
93
94
At ten-thirty , as my cab buzzed into the square and pulled up at the curb , the electric signs were blazing , the sidewalks were , if not yet crowded , at least well filled , and the sounds of music from the open windows of The Dead Rat and the other cafes with the cheerful names were mingling with noises of the street . Monsieur Louis had given me my sailing orders , so to speak . He had told me that arriving at L'Abbaye before ten-thirty was quite useless . Midnight was the accepted hour , he said ; prior to that I would find it rather dull , triste . But after that -- Ah , Monsieur would , at least , be entertained . `` But of course Monsieur does not expect to find the young lady of whom he is in search there , '' he said . `` A relative is she not ? ''
5980
2
nearly two o'clock
true
57
60
I did not join in `` the cheer Americain , '' but I did burst out laughing , a proceeding which caused the young lady at my left to pat my arm and nod delighted approval . She evidently thought I was becoming gay and lighthearted at last . She was never more mistaken . It was nearly two o'clock and I had had quite enough of L'Abbaye . I had not enjoyed myself -- had not expected to , so far as that went . I hope I am not a prig , and , whatever I am or am not , priggishness had no part in my feelings then . Under ordinary circumstances I should not have enjoyed myself in a place like that .
5980
0
midnight
true
39
40
So Jim wrote , professing to find material gain in the affair . `` Great stuff , '' he wrote . `` Two chapters at least . The hero , pursuing the villain through the streets of Paris at midnight , is run down by an auto driven by said villain . ` Ah ha ! ' says the villain : ` Now will you be good ? ' or words to that effect .
5980
0
midnight
true
50
51
Hurry back ! Do hurry back , for my sake . And I hope -- Oh , I do hope you 'll bring no bad news . '' L'Abbaye , at eight-thirty in the evening was a deserted place compared to what it had been when I visited it at midnight . The waiters and attendants were there , of course , and a few early bird patrons , but not many . The bearded proprietors , or managers , were flying about , and I caught one of them in the middle of a flight . He did not recognize me at first , but when I stated my errand , he did .
5980
6
six o'clock
true
80
82
I had not seen him for a fortnight , for his calls had ceased even before Frances ' last visit . Hephzy had said that , in her opinion , his meals must be disagreeing with him . Judging by his appearance his digestion was still very much impaired . He was in evening dress , of course ; being an English gentleman he would have dressed for his own execution , if it was scheduled to take place after six o'clock . But his tie was carelessly arranged , his shirt bosom was slightly crumpled and there was a general `` do n't care '' look about his raiment which was , for him , most unusual . And he was very solemn . I decided at once , whatever might have happened , it was not what I surmised .
5980
12
noon
true
23
24
She 's not in . '' She asked if we would leave cards . Hephzy said no . `` It 's ` most noon , '' she said . `` They 'll be back pretty soon . We 'll wait . No , we wo n't come in .
5980
1
one o'clock
true
40
42
Also I shall play the optimist at our next directors ' meeting ; I see signs of a boom in the literature factory . Go to it , my son . You have my blessing . '' We took the one o'clock train for Boston , remained there over night , and left on the early morning `` accommodation '' -- so called , I think , because it accommodates the train hands -- for Cape Cod . As we neared Buzzard 's Bay my spirits , which had been at topnotch , began to sink . When the sand dunes of Barnstable harbor hove in sight they sank lower and lower . It was October , the summer people , most of them , had gone , the station platforms were almost deserted , the more pretentious cottages were closed .
5981
12
Noon
true
88
89
Not one but had lost someone dear to him . They scattered with a will when Warren and Ivan told them about the two children , but the boys who had been nearest the Professor 's house , all said that they had not seen the little girls at all . There were no troops moving about that part while the boys were talking and planning , and they were not molested in any way when they scattered and began to search every foot of the neighborhood . Noon found Warren , Ivan , Jack and a couple of others near a wrecked and deserted bakeshop . There was no one to ask and none to object when they scrambled over the heaps of stone and plaster and wood , and tried the doors of the great ovens . Sure enough , there they found , well cooked and safe , a supply of bread and meat and sweets . Warren and Jack were broken-hearted at the absence of the slightest clue to Elinor , but they made a manly effort and managed to eat a good and nourishing meal , because they knew that they must keep up every bit of strength they had .
5981
3
three o'clock
true
100
102
There was no one to ask and none to object when they scrambled over the heaps of stone and plaster and wood , and tried the doors of the great ovens . Sure enough , there they found , well cooked and safe , a supply of bread and meat and sweets . Warren and Jack were broken-hearted at the absence of the slightest clue to Elinor , but they made a manly effort and managed to eat a good and nourishing meal , because they knew that they must keep up every bit of strength they had . At three o'clock by agreement they all met at the Professor 's house . Not one had secured a single clue . They had searched every empty and ruined building and had asked every person that they had seen . No one had been able to tell them anything that sounded at all helpful .
5981
7
7 o'clock
true
134
136
They reached the house after a hard walk , and were soon feeling some sense of bodily comfort after all the hardships of the day . They decided to act as nearly as possible as though they were but little disturbed by the past events , and to assume the position of foreigners who felt themselves under the protection of their own government . Naturally , all their thoughts were of Elinor , but night had fallen black and stormy , and in all the confusion and lawlessness there was nothing to be done but wait as best they could for morning . In spite of his anxiety , Warren slept heavily and did not awaken until his sister shook him , and he opened his eyes to find that it was seven , 7 o'clock . `` No news , Warren dear , '' said Evelyn . `` Only that that poor little baby is certainly better . Oh , Warren , it is so cunning !
5981
12
noon
true
76
77
Thinking rapidly , he resolved to wait until the men again left the place , when he would rap at the door , and try to get in on whatever excuse he might need to invent when the moment arrived . He crossed the street , and entered an abandoned building . For two hours he waited in biding , never suspecting the anxious scrutiny he himself was undergoing . His wrist watch told him that noon was past . There was no sign of life in the street . Remembering the loads of provisions that the men had carried , he decided that they did not intend to come out of their hiding place until nightfall . That would give him time to return , report to the anxious watchers at home , and consult with Ivan and the other Boy Scouts .
5987
14
about two in the afternoon
true
102
107
Towards the end of the week , and notably on a Saturday , every passer-by is an unshorn brigand capable of the darkest deeds of villany , while twenty-four hours later the land will be found to be peopled by as clean and honest and smart , and withal as handsome , a race of men as any on earth . Before long all habitations were left behind , and the horses climbed from rock to rock like cats . There was no suggestion of pathway or landmark , and Concepçion paused once or twice to take his bearings . It was about two in the afternoon when , after descending the bed of a stream long since dried up , Concepçion called a halt , and proposed to rest the horses while he dined . As on the previous day , the guide 's manner was that of a gentleman , conferring a high honour with becoming modesty when he sat down beside Conyngham and untied his small sack of provisions . These consisted of dried figs and bread , which he offered to his companion before beginning to eat . Conyngham shared his own stock of food with his guide , and subsequently smoked a cigarette which that gentleman offered him .
5987
12
midday
true
115
116
The people are half Moorish still , and from the barred windows look out deep almond eyes and patient faces that have no European feature . The narrow streets were empty as the travellers entered the town , and the clatter of the mules slipping and stumbling on the cobble stones brought but few to the doors of the low-built houses . To enter Ronda from the south the traveller must traverse the Moorish town , which is divided from the Spanish quarter by a cleft in the great rock that renders the town impregnable to all attack . Having crossed the bridge spanning the great gorge into which the sun never penetrates even at midday , the party emerged into the broader streets of the more modern town , and , turning to the right through a high gateway , found themselves in a barrack yard of the Guardias Civiles . ` Le plus grand art d'un habile homme est celui de savoir cacher son habileté . ' WHEN Conyngham awoke after a night conscientiously spent in that profound slumber which waits on an excellent digestion and a careless heart , he found the prison attendant at his bedside . A less easy-going mind would perhaps have leapt to some nervous conclusion at the sight of this fierce-visaged janitor , who , however , carried nothing more deadly in his hand than a card .
5987
6
six o’clock
true
38
40
` And the other man ? Seemed a nice enough fellow ... ' inquired Conyngham . The General raised one gloved hand as if to fend off some approaching calamity . ` He died this morning -- at six o'clock . ' Conyngham looked down at this gentle soldier with a dawning light of comprehension . This might after all be the General Vincente whom he had been led to look upon as the fiercest of the Spanish Queen 's adherents . ` Of the same complaint ? '
5987
5
nearly five o’clock
true
48
51
` When shall I start for Madrid ? ' he asked . ` Oh , to-morrow morning will be time enough , ' was the reply , uttered in an easy-going , indolent tone , ` if you are early astir . You see , it is now nearly five o'clock , and you could scarcely be in saddle before sunset . ' ` No , ' laughed Conyngham , ` scarcely , considering that I have not yet bought the saddle or the horse . ' The General led the way into the house , and Conyngham thought of the letter in his pocket . He had not yet read the address .
5987
6
Six o’clock
true
32
34
` Then there is nothing more to be said ? ' inquired Conyngham with a good-natured laugh . ` Nothing , except the hour at which your Excellency starts . ' ` Six o'clock , ' put in General Vincente quietly . ` Let me see , your name is Concepçion Vara . ' ` Yes , Excellency -- of Algeciras . ' ` It is well .
5987
10
ten in the morning
true
54
58
With great care and a multitude of oaths he lifted Conyngham on to his cart and proceeded with him to Madrid . ` God help me ! I know nothing -- can but pray . ' IT was Father Concha 's custom to attend , at his church between the hours of nine and ten in the morning , to such wants spiritual or temporal as individual members of his flock chose to bring to him . Thus it usually happened that the faithful found the old priest at nine o'clock sunning himself at the front door of the sacred edifice , smoking a reflective cigarette and exchanging the time of day with passers-by or such as had leisure to pause a moment . ` Whether it is body or soul that is in trouble -- come to me , ' he would say . ` For the body I can do a little -- a very little .
5987
9
nine o’clock
true
67
69
` God help me ! I know nothing -- can but pray . ' IT was Father Concha 's custom to attend , at his church between the hours of nine and ten in the morning , to such wants spiritual or temporal as individual members of his flock chose to bring to him . Thus it usually happened that the faithful found the old priest at nine o'clock sunning himself at the front door of the sacred edifice , smoking a reflective cigarette and exchanging the time of day with passers-by or such as had leisure to pause a moment . ` Whether it is body or soul that is in trouble -- come to me , ' he would say . ` For the body I can do a little -- a very little . I have twenty pounds a year , and it is not always paid to me , but I sometimes have a trifle for charity .
5987
10
ten o’clock
true
139
141
But to Father Concha the sum represented five hundred cups of black coffee denied to himself in the evening at the café -- five hundred packets of cigarettes , so-called of Havana , unsmoked -- two new cassocks in the course of twenty years -- a hundred little gastronomic delights sternly resisted season after season . ` Not enough , your hundred pesetas , reverendo , not enough , ' laughed the man . And Concha , who could drive as keen a bargain as any market-woman of Ronda , knew by the manner of saying it that Sebastian only spoke the truth when he said that he had other offers . ` See , reverendo , ' the man went on , leaning across the table and banging a dirty fist upon it , ` come to-night at ten o'clock . There are others coming at the same hour to buy my letter in the pink envelope . We will have an auction , a little auction , and the letter goes to the highest bidder . But what does your reverence want with a love letter , eh ? '
5987
10
about ten o’clock
true
116
119
Sir John took a certain cold interest in his surroundings , and in due course was recommended to spend an evening at the Café des Ambassadeurs , as it styled itself , for the habit of preferring French to Spanish designations for places of refreshment had come in since the great revolution . Sir John went , therefore , to the café , and with characteristic scorn of elemental disturbance chose to resort thither on the evening of the great gale . The few other occupants of the gorgeous room eyed his half-bottle of claret with a grave and decorous wonder , but made no attempt to converse with this chill-looking Englishman . At length , about ten o'clock or a few minutes later , entered one who bowed to Sir John with an air full of affable promise . This was Larralde , who called a waiter and bade him fetch a coat-brush . ` Would you believe it , sir ? ' he said , addressing Sir John in broken English , ` but I have just escaped a terrible death . '
5987
0
midnight
true
77
78
He was not deceived by the picturesque manner of Julia 's lover , but knew exactly how much was assumed of that air of simple vanity to which Larralde usually treated strangers . He probably gauged at one glance the depth of the man 's power for good or ill , his sincerity , his possible usefulness . In the hands of Sir John Pleydell , Larralde was the merest tool . They sat until long after midnight , and before they parted Sir John Pleydell handed to his companion a roll of notes , which he counted carefully and Larralde accepted with a grand air of condescension and indifference . ` You know my address , ' said Sir John , with a slight suggestion of masterfulness which had not been noticeable before the money changed hands . ` I shall remain at the same hotel . ' Larralde nodded his head .
5987
12
midday
true
99
100
Day after day the sun glared down from a cloudless sky , and all Castile was burnt brown as a desert . In the streets of Madrid there arose a hot dust and the subtle odour of warm earth that rarely meets the nostrils in England . It savoured of India and other sun-steeped lands where water is too precious to throw upon the roads . Those who could , remained indoors or in their shady patios until the heat of the day was past ; and such as worked in the open lay unchallenged in the shade from midday till three o'clock . During those days military operations were almost suspended , although the heads of departments were busy enough in their offices . The confusion of war , it seemed , was past , and the sore-needed peace was immediately turned to good account . The army of the Queen Regent was indeed in an almost wrecked condition , and among the field officers jealousy and backbiting , which had smouldered through the war-time , broke out openly .
5987
8
eight o’clock
true
47
49
` And yet , ' he said gaily , ` it is the best game of all -- is it not so ? ' The troopers shrugged their shoulders . One may have too much of even the best game . ` The carriage is ordered for eight o'clock , ' continued the practical Concepçion , rolling a cigarette , which he placed behind his ear where a clerk would carry his pen . ` Those who take the road when the night-birds come abroad have something to hide . We will see what they have in their carriage , eh ? The horses are hired for the journey to Galvez , where a relay is doubtless ordered .
5987
9
nine o’clock
true
47
49
said the nervous soldier , and his hand shook on the bridle . His companion smiled at the recollection of former fights passed through together . It is well , in love and war , to beware of him who says he is afraid . Shortly after nine o'clock the silence of that deserted plain was broken by a distant murmur , which presently shaped itself into the beat of horses ' feet . To this was added soon the rumble of wheels . The elder soldier put a whole cigarette into his mouth and chewed it . The younger man made no movement now .
5987
0
midnight
true
27
28
` I will sing . In Andalusia we can all sing . The pigs sing better there than the men of Castile . ' It was after midnight when the party rode past the Church of the Cristo de la Vega , and faced the long hill that leads to the gate Del Cambron . Above them towered the city of Toledo -- silent and dreamlike . Concepçion had ceased singing now , and the hard breathing of the horses alone broke the silence . The Tagus , emerging here from rocky fastness , flowed noiselessly away to the west -- a gleaming ribbon laid across the breast of the night .
5987
0
midnight
true
79
80
He always remains in the background . ' In the tents of Kedar men sleep as sound as those who lie on soft pillows , and Conyngham was late astir the next morning . Sir John Pleydell was , it transpired , already at his breakfast , and had ordered his carriage for an early hour to take the road to Talavera . It was thus evident that Sir John knew nothing of the arrival of his fellow-countryman at midnight . The cold face of the great lawyer wore a look of satisfaction as he sat at a small table in the patio of the hotel and drank his coffee . Conyngham watched him for a moment from the balcony of the courtyard , himself unseen , while Concepçion stood within his master 's bedroom , and rubbed his brown hands together in anticipation of a dramatic moment . Conyngham passed down the stone steps and crossed the patio with a gay smile .
5987
9
nine o’clock
true
113
115
Nearly half of Spain was for Don Carlos . The Church sided with him , and the best soldiers were those who , unpaid , unfed , and half clad , fought on the southern slopes of the Pyrenees for a man who dared not lead them . Sir John Pleydell had intended crossing the frontier into Portugal , following the carriage conveying his prisoner to the seaport of Lisbon , where he anticipated no difficulty in finding a ship captain who would be willing to carry Conyngham to England . All this , however , had been frustrated by so unimportant a person as Concepçion Vara , and the carriage ordered for nine o'clock to proceed to Talavera now stood in the courtyard of the hotel , while the Baronet in his lonely apartment sat and wondered what he should do next . He had dealt with justice all his life , and had ensued it not from love , but as a matter of convenience and a means of livelihood . From the mere habit , he now desired to do justice to Conyngham . ` See if you can find out for me the whereabouts of General Vincente at the moment , and let the carriage wait , ' he said to his servant , a valet-courier of taciturn habit .
5987
12
midday
true
79
80
he muttered , ` with your jokes about my wife . Now you may make a false journey for all the help you receive from me . ' And a few minutes later Concepçion rode across the Bridge of Alcantara , some paces behind Conyngham , who deemed it wise to return to his duties at Madrid without delay . Despite the great heat on the plains , which , indeed , made it almost dangerous to travel at midday , the streets of Toledo were cool and shady enough , as Sir John Pleydell traversed them in search of the Palazzo Barenna . The Contessa was in , and the Englishman was ushered into a vast room , which even the taste of the day could not entirely deprive of its mediæval grandeur . Sir John explained to the servant in halting Spanish that his name was unknown to the Señora Barenna , but that -- a stranger in some slight difficulty -- he had been recommended to seek her assistance . Sir John was an imposing-looking man , with that grand air which enables some men not only to look , but to get over a wall while an insignificant wight may not so much as approach the gate .
5987
20
about eight o’clock in the evening
true
78
84
` There is doubtless something astir , ' said the waiter , who , in the intervals of a casual attendance on Sir John , spoke of these things , cigarette in mouth . ` There is doubtless something astir , since General Vincente is on the road . They call him the Stormy Petrel , for when he appears abroad there usually follows a disturbance . ' Sir John sent his servant to the General 's apartment about eight o'clock in the evening asking permission to present himself . In reply , the General himself came to Sir John 's room . ` My dear sir , ' he cried , taking both the Englishman 's hands in an affectionate grasp , ` to think that you were in the hotel and that we did not dine together . Come , yes , come to our poor apartment , where Estella awaits the pleasure of renewing your acquaintance . '
5987
12
midday
true
171
172
With Concha he was as simple , as direct , and as unsophisticated as the old priest himself , and now took his leave without attempting to disguise the fact that he had accomplished a foreset purpose . Without difficulty he found the small stationer 's shop next to the synagogue in the Calle de Madrid , and bade the stationer -- a spectacled individual with upright hair and the air of seeking something in the world which is not usually behind a counter -- take his card to Señor Larralde . At first the stationer pretended ignorance of the name , but on discovering that Sir John had not sufficient Spanish to conduct a conversation of intrigue , disappeared into a back room , whence emanated a villanous smell of cooking . While Sir John waited in the little shop , Father Concha walked to the Plazuela de l'Iglesia Vieja , which small square , overhanging the Tagus and within reach of its murmuring voice , is deserted except at midday , when the boys play at bull-fighting and a few workmen engage in a grave game of bowls . Concha sat , book in hand , opened honestly at the office of the day and hour , and read no word . Instead , he stared across the gorge at the brown bank of land which commands the city and renders it useless as a fortress in the days of modern artillery . He sat and stared grimly , and thought perhaps of those secret springs within the human heart that make one man successful and unhappy , while another , possessing brains and ability and energy , fails in life , yet is perhaps the happier of the two .
5987
12
midday
true
102
103
Larralde gave a little nod of self-confidence and satisfaction , as one who , having conceived and built up a great scheme , is pleased to see each component part of it act independently , and slip into its place . The General 's first thought was for Estella 's comfort , and he utilised the long hill which they had to ascend on leaving the town to make such arrangements as space would allow for their common ease . ` You must sleep , my child , ' he said . ` We can not hope to reach Ciudad Real before midday to-morrow , and it is as likely as not that we shall have but a few hours ' rest there . ' And Estella , who had travelled vast distances over vile roads so long as her memory went back , who had never known what it is to live in a country that is at peace , leant back in her corner and closed her eyes . Had she really been disposed to sleep , however , she could scarcely have done it , for the General 's solicitude manifested itself by a hundred little devices for her greater repose . For her comfort he made Concha move .
5987
12
midday
true
53
54
And the horses will be forthcoming , no doubt . ' ` They will be forthcoming , ' said the man . ` And the Excellency 's carriage is ready . ' In the early morning light they drove on , now descending towards the great valley of the Guadiana , and at midday , as Vincente had foreseen , gained a sight of the ancient city of Ciudad Real lying amid trees below them . Ciudad Real is less interesting than its name , and there is little that is royal about its dirty streets and ill-kept houses . No one gave great heed to the travelling-carriage , for this is a great centre where travellers journeying east or west , north or south , must needs pause for a change of horses . At the inn there were vacant rooms , and that hasty welcome accorded to the traveller at wayside houses where none stay longer than they can help .
5987
4
about four o’clock
true
100
103
Even while General Vincente , that unrivalled strategist , detailed his plans , she kept harking back to the question that puzzled her , and but half listened to his instructions . Those desirous of travelling without attracting attention in Spain are wise to time their arrival and departure for the afternoon . At this time , while the sun is yet hot , all shutters are closed , and the business of life , the haggling in the market-place , the bustle of the barrack yard , the leisurely labour of the fields , are suspended . It was about four o'clock -- indeed , the city clocks were striking that hour -- when the two carriages in the inn yard at Ciudad Real were made ready for the road . Father Concha , who never took an active part in passing incidents while his old friend and comrade was near , sat in a shady corner of the patio and smoked a cigarette . An affable ostler had in vain endeavoured to engage him in conversation . Two small children had begged of him , and now he was left in meditative solitude .
5987
10
about ten o’clock
true
89
92
The travellers took their places in the carriage , and again the monotony of the road , the steady trot of the horses , the sing-song words of encouragement of their driver , monopolised the thoughts of sleepy minds . It seemed to Estella that life was all journeys , and that she had been on the road for years . The swing of the carriage , the little varieties of the road , but served to add to her somnolence . She only half woke up when , about ten o'clock , a halt was made to change horses , and the General quitted the carriage for a few minutes to talk earnestly with two horsemen , who were apparently awaiting their arrival . No time was lost here , and the carriage went forward with an increased escort . The two new-comers rode by the carriage , one on either side . When Estella woke up , the moon had risen and the carriage was making slow progress up a long hill .
5987
0
nearly midnight
true
64
66
The General , leaning out of the carriage window , was also looking back anxiously . ` They have sent a messenger to Madrid , Excellency , with the news that the Queen is on the road to Toledo , ' said Concepçion . ` It is well , ' answered Vincente , with a laugh . As they journeyed , although it was nearly midnight , there appeared from time to time , and for the most part in the neighbourhood of a village , one who seemed to have been awaiting their passage , and immediately set out on foot or horseback by one of the shorter bridle-paths that abound in Spain . No one of these spies escaped the notice of Concepçion , whose training amid the mountains of Andalusia had sharpened his eyesight and added keenness to every sense . ` It is like a cat walking down an alley full of dogs , ' he muttered . At last the lights of Toledo hove in sight , and across the river came the sound of the city clocks tolling the hour .
5987
0
Midnight
true
73
74
No one of these spies escaped the notice of Concepçion , whose training amid the mountains of Andalusia had sharpened his eyesight and added keenness to every sense . ` It is like a cat walking down an alley full of dogs , ' he muttered . At last the lights of Toledo hove in sight , and across the river came the sound of the city clocks tolling the hour . ` Midnight , ' said Concha . ` And all respectable folk are in their beds . At night all cats are grey . ' No one heeded him .
5987
0
midnight
true
77
78
` As quiet as a watching cat , ' replied Vincente . ` What lot is mine Whose foresight preaches peace , my heart so slow To feel it ! ' THROUGH these quiet streets the party clattered noisily enough , for the rain had left the rounded stones slippery , and the horses were too tired for a sure step . There were no lights at the street corners , for all had been extinguished at midnight , and the only glimmer of a lamp that relieved the darkness was shining through the stained-glass windows of the Cathedral , where the sacred oil burnt night and day . The Queen was evidently expected at the Casa del Ayuntamiento , for at the approach of the carriage the great doors were thrown open and a number of servants appeared in the patio , which was but dimly lighted . By the General 's orders the small body-guard passed through the doors , which were then closed , instead of continuing their way to the barracks in the Alcazar . This Casa del Ayuntamiento stands , as many travellers know , in the Plaza of the same name , and faces the Cathedral , which is without doubt the oldest , as it assuredly is the most beautiful , church in the world .
32484
12
noon
true
58
59
The sooner the better . '' `` Oh , and about the Russians , '' said Captain Robb , smiling . `` There 's been nothing but a steady stream of ` no comment ' out of the Kremlin since we landed here . '' `` Right now , '' said Hamston , `` it 's probably high noon for every scientist behind the iron curtain . '' `` I wonder how they plan to talk their way out of this one ? '' asked Farnsworth . `` Gentlemen , I 'd like to go on talking about the welcome we 're going to receive , but I think we 'd better take first things first .
22267
0
midnight
true
49
50
`` SENATOR 'S DAUGHTER RUNS FOR MAYOR . '' `` MEN TO BE LAID ON THE POLITICAL SHELF . '' `` SENATOR VAN DEUSEN WILL TURN IN HIS GRAVE IF DAUGHTER ACCEPTS NOMINATION . '' were some of the head-lines which Roma editors had produced by late use of midnight oil , and the articles that followed them were incredulous , mildly tolerant , openly snobbish or given over to ridicule , according to the policy of their several papers . One of them read : `` It is both a disgrace and a menace to this fair city that city politics have sunk to such a level that our best men will have nothing to do with them , and that no one with the ideals of good government , other than a handful of women , will undertake the improvement of our municipal government . With all deference to the ladies , -- and who knows their many charming qualities better than we ? -- it is inevitable that , ` trained to keep silence in the churches ' -- -LRB- and the City Hall as well -RRB- -- our women are without the large-minded grasp of affairs , -- the broad and liberal judgment , necessary to cope with these affairs .
22267
10
ten o'clock
true
87
89
But it seems to some of us sufficient reason for going down on our knees with thankfulness that a good and an able woman will consent to serve her city in such capacity . And we owe it to her , to ourselves as men , and to our city as voters and citizens , that we shall go out and work for her . Has anyone a definite plan of action ? '' Nearly every man in the room spoke in the same strain and before ten o'clock their campaign was planned . Then the newspapers were called up and reporters began to appear . The next morning Roma had its second sensation . A leading editorial ran thus : `` Last night at the residence of the late Senator Van Deusen , a number of the most prominent men and women of this town met and organized the City Reform Club , and incidentally endorsed the candidacy of Miss Gertrude Van Deusen for mayor .
22267
12
noon
true
75
76
And having read it , she placed it on the glowing coals , smiling softly to herself the while . A Political Trick The campaign was a furious one after that . The women , instead of leaving the management of things to men , were stirred to wonderful activity . They worked , not only among the men of their own acquaintance , but among the working-people ; they held meetings in factories at noon , or in school-rooms or cheap halls at night in the districts where the factory-hands lived . They spoke at mass-meetings and rallies , and if they did not appear in torchlight processions , they saw that many banners were carried in them , bearing the women 's motto and legend . It was a hard fight , but a good one , and the cause of womanhood as well as of good government was advanced by it . When Sam Watts , for instance , with his pockets well-lined , went down into the district where lived the employees of the Roma Ice Company , he did not find it so easy to disburse that money as he had expected .
22267
7
a quarter to eight
true
59
63
At half-past seven her maid came up from the door : `` They 've sent for you , '' she announced . `` An automobile is at the door . '' `` Why , I did n't know the committee was going to send for me , '' said Miss Van Deusen . `` I ordered the carriage for a quarter to eight . Go down and ask the chauffeur -- no , never mind . It 's all right , no doubt . I 'll go with him .
22267
0
midnight
true
99
100
The hall had been closed an hour before and the disappointed audience , after listening impatiently to the extempore speakers who had tried to fill the time until the principals in the joint debate should appear , had gone home doubtful of the morrow . The auto stopped outside the gate in front of Van Deusen Hall and one of the chauffeurs , still muffled to the eyes , helped Gertrude to the ground . John Allingham had stepped out first . But before he could remonstrate with them for leaving a lady on the street alone and past midnight , in fact , just as he was beginning to ask angrily , why they did not drive in , the man slammed the door , jumped to his seat , and the cab glided away . `` And we have n't the faintest idea who they are ? '' said Miss Van Deusen . `` They did n't have any number -- '' `` If it was n't left with the wreck , '' answered Allingham , `` and they were , doubtless , too sharp for that .
22267
8
eight o'clock
true
66
68
I wonder how we would have met if I had never gone into politics . I wonder if he would have liked me then , really ? '' Modern Journalism The `` Progressive Workers '' has been especially busy in arranging for the joint debate between their own and the Republican candidates , and they were in full force and early at the meeting . When eight o'clock came and Gertrude Van Deusen had not appeared , they felt no anxiety , but as the moments passed and she did not come , they began to be surprised and then alarmed . `` Gertrude is always prompt , '' said Mrs. Bateman , as they waited in the ante-room . `` I can not imagine what is keeping her . Telephone over to her house , Anna , and see if she has left , wo n't you ?
22267
7
half past seven
true
55
58
Telephone over to her house , Anna , and see if she has left , wo n't you ? I have to attend to things here . '' Mrs. Stillman hurried to the telephone , coming back later with a puzzled expression on her aristocratic features . `` Her cousin says she left there at half past seven in an automobile , '' she said . `` It is half past eight now . '' `` An automobile ? '' said Mrs. Bateman .
22267
8
half past eight
true
50
53
I have to attend to things here . '' Mrs. Stillman hurried to the telephone , coming back later with a puzzled expression on her aristocratic features . `` Her cousin says she left there at half past seven in an automobile , '' she said . `` It is half past eight now . '' `` An automobile ? '' said Mrs. Bateman . `` Did anybody send for her , I wonder ? ''
22267
11
eleven o'clock
true
121
123
After a hurried consultation with the representatives from Allingham 's committee , the meeting was opened and the speaking began . But although those who addressed the audience were eloquent enough , they were unprepared , and moreover , were conscious that their listeners were keeping one eye upon the door ; in short , everybody present desired only to hear the two appointed speakers ; so that the affair was most perfunctory . The minutes grew into hours , and these did not arrive . Mrs. Mason , Mrs. Bateman , even Mary Snow , were sent out to the platform to represent the woman 's side , and although they were well received , the meeting broke up at eleven o'clock with a distinct sense of disappointment , not to say failure . The audience dispersed with but one question : `` Where are they ? and why have they not come ? '' A little after two , Gertrude called up Mrs. Bateman and told her of the events which had transpired since she had started out for the joint debate ; but it was too late to send explanations to any other member of the committee .
22267
1
one o'clock in the morning
true
106
111
Thus doth fate pursue the over - ambitious and wreck their plans . `` When the chauffeurs returned from the farmhouse whence they had gone for help in extricating their machines , Allingham , the aristocrat , lay prone on the ground with his head in the lap of her who had been his whilom opponent for the mayor 's chair . A sight fit for the gods , truly -- and also for the voters of Roma . `` The couple , erstwhile at swords ' points , but now tucked cosily together in one electric cab , were later brought back to Roma at one o'clock in the morning -- she none the worse for her skillful evasion of the platform contest , and he with a slight scalp wound only , to show that he had been worsted . `` It remains now for the voters of Roma to consider whether such candidates as these are to be considered fit to be trusted with the affairs of our enterprising young city -- and to vote accordingly . '' Election Day Election day dawned bright and clear and all Roma was up early , actively interested for once in the outcome of the day 's work . The polling places were lively at seven o'clock and from that hour they grew more and more crowded , as men and women of all parties swarmed to deposit their ballots according to the Australian system .
22267
7
seven o'clock
true
136
138
`` The couple , erstwhile at swords ' points , but now tucked cosily together in one electric cab , were later brought back to Roma at one o'clock in the morning -- she none the worse for her skillful evasion of the platform contest , and he with a slight scalp wound only , to show that he had been worsted . `` It remains now for the voters of Roma to consider whether such candidates as these are to be considered fit to be trusted with the affairs of our enterprising young city -- and to vote accordingly . '' Election Day Election day dawned bright and clear and all Roma was up early , actively interested for once in the outcome of the day 's work . The polling places were lively at seven o'clock and from that hour they grew more and more crowded , as men and women of all parties swarmed to deposit their ballots according to the Australian system . Never before in the history of the town had so many voters been out on the day of a municipal election . The women had opened coffee-rooms for the day close by all the important voting booths , and wives and daughters of the most prominent men in town served the steaming beverage by turns throughout the election hours free to all who might come . Moreover , they saw to it that no voter who mustered under the City Reform Club banner , was neglected .
22267
6
six o'clock
true
49
51
`` But we shall never learn the truth . The trick was done so well that the perpetrators know how to cover their tracks . '' But a bevy of voters coming in , the conversation ended and Gertrude did not see her opponent again that day . At six o'clock that evening , she lay on the couch in her own room , weary with the day 's experiences . For all she had considered herself well posted in political methods , this day had been a revelation to her . `` Well , Jessica , '' she told her cousin , `` I suppose we shall know before we go to bed how I stand . But at this moment , after all I 've seen today and realizing the state our city affairs are in , I will own to you in confidence that I hope -- honestly and earnestly , -- that I am defeated .
22267
10
ten o'clock
true
66
68
With them were many of the `` Progressive Workers , '' eager for news . The Union Club , the hotels and Burke 's headquarters were crowded , while John Allingham and his trusted lieutenants were gathered at the Municipal League rooms . Returns came in slowly and the crowds on the street clamored for news faster than the bulletins could be given out . At ten o'clock John Allingham was obliged to retreat and go home , physically worn out . The accident of the previous evening , combined with the excitement of the day , had proved too much for him . He was already in bed when the final returns reached him by telephone . Then he shut and locked his door , refusing to speak to another soul that night , -- not even to his mother when she came up to see if he had taken the doctor 's medicine .
22267
0
midnight
true
122
123
It leaked out , too , that there were two men with the cab which carried John Allingham , lest , -- the people said , -- he should try to break the plate glass front and jump from his moving prison . But that the plot was a well-matured one was proven by the fact that outside locks had been placed on the doors to both cabs , so that they could not be forced open from the inside . No definite clue , however , could be obtained to the perpetrators of the kidnaping scheme , although both sufferers from it had put private detectives at work upon the affair . But , like many startling public events , the midnight ride of the two candidates was a `` nine days ' wonder '' and then the public interest centered around the newly elected mayor . Gertrude had need not only of public sympathy , but of all the courage and clear-sightedness which she had inherited . This she realized more fully than ever , when the excitement of campaigning was over . If she had chosen to spend her time and strength and money on automobiles or fine clothes , people would have passed upon her choice as the natural thing , and envied her way of living ; but now that she had elected to work hard and to give herself freely to fighting for principle and establishing good government in her city , her friends of different tastes whispered among themselves , `` How strange ! ''
End of preview (truncated to 100 rows)

Dataset Card for the Gutenberg Time dataset

Dataset Summary

A clean data resource containing all explicit time references in a dataset of 52,183 novels whose full text is available via Project Gutenberg.

Supported Tasks and Leaderboards

[More Information Needed]

Languages

Time-of-the-day classification from excerpts.

Dataset Structure

Data Instances

{
    "guten_id": 28999,
    "hour_reference": 12,
    "time_phrase": "midday",
    "is_ambiguous": False,
    "time_pos_start": 133,
    "time_pos_end": 134,
    "tok_context": "Sorrows and trials she had had in plenty in her life , but these the sweetness of her nature had transformed , so that from being things difficult to bear , she had built up with them her own character . Sorrow had increased her own power of sympathy ; out of trials she had learnt patience ; and failure and the gradual sinking of one she had loved into the bottomless slough of evil habit had but left her with an added dower of pity and tolerance . So the past had no sting left , and if iron had ever entered into her soul it now but served to make it strong . She was still young , too ; it was not near sunset with her yet , nor even midday , and the future that , humanly speaking , she counted to be hers was almost dazzling in its brightness . For love had dawned for her again , and no uncertain love , wrapped in the mists of memory , but one that had ripened through liking and friendship and intimacy into the authentic glory . He was in England , too ; she was going back to him . And before very long she would never go away from him again ."
}

Data Fields

    guten_id - Gutenberg ID number
    hour_reference - hour from 0 to 23
    time_phrase - the phrase corresponding to the referenced hour
    is_ambiguous - boolean whether it is clear whether time is AM or PM
    time_pos_start - token position where time_phrase begins
    time_pos_end - token position where time_phrase ends (exclusive)
    tok_context - context in which time_phrase appears as space-separated tokens

Data Splits

No data splits.

Dataset Creation

Curation Rationale

The flow of time is an indispensable guide for our actions, and provides a framework in which to see a logical progression of events. Just as in real life,the clock provides the background against which literary works play out: when characters wake, eat,and act. In most works of fiction, the events of the story take place during recognizable time periods over the course of the day. Recognizing a story’s flow through time is essential to understanding the text.In this paper, we try to capture the flow of time through novels by attempting to recognize what time of day each event in the story takes place at.

Source Data

Initial Data Collection and Normalization

[More Information Needed]

Who are the source language producers?

Novel authors.

Annotations

Annotation process

Manually annotated.

Who are the annotators?

Two of the authors.

Personal and Sensitive Information

No Personal or sensitive information.

Considerations for Using the Data

Social Impact of Dataset

[More Information Needed]

Discussion of Biases

[More Information Needed]

Other Known Limitations

[More Information Needed]

Additional Information

Dataset Curators

Allen Kim, Charuta Pethe and Steven Skiena, Stony Brook University

Licensing Information

[More Information Needed]

Citation Information

@misc{kim2020time,
      title={What time is it? Temporal Analysis of Novels}, 
      author={Allen Kim and Charuta Pethe and Steven Skiena},
      year={2020},
      eprint={2011.04124},
      archivePrefix={arXiv},
      primaryClass={cs.CL}
}

Contributions

Thanks to @TevenLeScao for adding this dataset.