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An error occurred while generating the dataset All the data files must have the same columns, but at some point there are 7 missing columns ({'question_property', 'formal_form', 'graph_id', 'query_type', 'reasoning', 'rung', 'story_id'}) This happened while the csv dataset builder was generating data using hf://datasets/causalnlp/CLadder/data/full_v1.csv (at revision fbddaed20b2531bc0f4b16d0d117d661140cf5f8) Please either edit the data files to have matching columns, or separate them into different configurations (see docs at https://hf.co/docs/hub/datasets-manual-configuration#multiple-configurations)
Error code:   UnexpectedError

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id
int64
prompt
string
label
string
reasoning
string
rung
int64
query_type
string
graph_id
string
story_id
string
question_property
string
formal_form
string
4
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 8%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 54%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 41%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 86%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 74%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 24%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2=v} P(V2=v|X=0)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V2=v) - P(Y=1|X=0, V2=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.08 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.54 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.41 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.86 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.74 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.24 0.74 * (0.86 - 0.41) + 0.24 * (0.54 - 0.08) = 0.32 0.32 > 0
3
nde
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
7
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 26%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 76%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.26 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.76 0.76 - 0.26 = 0.50 0.50 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
8
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. The overall probability of alarm set by husband is 77%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 26%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 76%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.77 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.26 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.76 0.77*0.76 - 0.23*0.26 = 0.64 0.64 > 0
1
marginal
mediation
alarm
easy
P(Y)
15
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 20%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 68%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.20 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.68 0.68 - 0.20 = 0.49 0.49 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
21
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 11%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 60%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 46%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 92%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 61%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 1%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.11 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.60 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.46 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.92 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.61 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.01 0.01 * (0.60 - 0.11)+ 0.61 * (0.92 - 0.46)= -0.29 -0.29 < 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
22
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 11%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 60%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 46%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 92%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 61%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 1%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.11 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.60 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.46 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.92 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.61 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.01 0.01 * (0.60 - 0.11)+ 0.61 * (0.92 - 0.46)= -0.29 -0.29 < 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
27
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 3%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 50%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 45%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 94%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 49%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 53%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.03 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.50 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.45 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.94 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.49 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.53 0.53 * (0.50 - 0.03)+ 0.49 * (0.94 - 0.45)= 0.02 0.02 > 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
28
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. The overall probability of alarm set by husband is 88%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 26%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 71%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.88 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.26 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.71 0.88*0.71 - 0.12*0.26 = 0.66 0.66 > 0
1
marginal
mediation
alarm
easy
P(Y)
30
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. Method 1: We look at how husband correlates with alarm clock case by case according to wife. Method 2: We look directly at how husband correlates with alarm clock in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
mediation
alarm
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
32
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 51%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 49%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.51 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.49 0.49 - 0.51 = -0.03 -0.03 < 0
3
ett
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
43
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 42%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 66%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.42 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.66 0.66 - 0.42 = 0.24 0.24 > 0
3
ett
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
45
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 11%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 63%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 49%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 99%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 59%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 35%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.11 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.63 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.49 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.99 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.59 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.35 0.35 * (0.63 - 0.11)+ 0.59 * (0.99 - 0.49)= -0.13 -0.13 < 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
60
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 44%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 75%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.44 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.75 0.75 - 0.44 = 0.30 0.30 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
62
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 8%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 51%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 49%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 92%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 85%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 60%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.08 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.51 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.49 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.92 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.85 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.60 0.60 * (0.51 - 0.08)+ 0.85 * (0.92 - 0.49)= -0.10 -0.10 < 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
66
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. Method 1: We look directly at how husband correlates with alarm clock in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to wife.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
mediation
alarm
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
69
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 9%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 55%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 42%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 86%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 90%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 30%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2=v} P(V2=v|X=0)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V2=v) - P(Y=1|X=0, V2=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.09 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.55 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.42 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.86 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.90 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.30 0.90 * (0.86 - 0.42) + 0.30 * (0.55 - 0.09) = 0.31 0.31 > 0
3
nde
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
72
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. Method 1: We look at how husband correlates with alarm clock case by case according to wife. Method 2: We look directly at how husband correlates with alarm clock in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
mediation
alarm
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
75
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. The overall probability of alarm set by husband is 71%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 39%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 62%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.71 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.39 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.62 0.71*0.62 - 0.29*0.39 = 0.55 0.55 > 0
1
marginal
mediation
alarm
easy
P(Y)
77
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. The overall probability of alarm set by husband is 78%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 56%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 66%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.78 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.56 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.66 0.78*0.66 - 0.22*0.56 = 0.64 0.64 > 0
1
marginal
mediation
alarm
easy
P(Y)
80
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. The overall probability of alarm set by husband is 81%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 21%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 86%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.81 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.21 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.86 0.81*0.86 - 0.19*0.21 = 0.74 0.74 > 0
1
marginal
mediation
alarm
easy
P(Y)
88
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 6%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 49%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 54%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 99%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 94%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 50%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2=v} P(V2=v|X=0)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V2=v) - P(Y=1|X=0, V2=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.06 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.49 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.54 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.99 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.94 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.50 0.94 * (0.99 - 0.54) + 0.50 * (0.49 - 0.06) = 0.50 0.50 > 0
3
nde
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
91
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. Method 1: We look directly at how husband correlates with alarm clock in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to wife.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
mediation
alarm
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
92
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 39%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 59%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.39 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.59 0.59 - 0.39 = 0.20 0.20 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
94
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. Method 1: We look at how husband correlates with alarm clock case by case according to wife. Method 2: We look directly at how husband correlates with alarm clock in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
mediation
alarm
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
99
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 38%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 60%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.38 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.60 0.60 - 0.38 = 0.22 0.22 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
100
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 0%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 48%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 36%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 80%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 79%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 54%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.00 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.48 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.36 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.80 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.79 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.54 0.54 * (0.48 - 0.00)+ 0.79 * (0.80 - 0.36)= -0.12 -0.12 < 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
101
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 0%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 48%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 36%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 80%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 79%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 54%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2=v} P(V2=v|X=0)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V2=v) - P(Y=1|X=0, V2=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.00 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.48 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.36 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.80 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.79 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.54 0.79 * (0.80 - 0.36) + 0.54 * (0.48 - 0.00) = 0.33 0.33 > 0
3
nde
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
102
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. The overall probability of alarm set by husband is 70%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 38%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 60%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.70 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.38 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.60 0.70*0.60 - 0.30*0.38 = 0.53 0.53 > 0
1
marginal
mediation
alarm
easy
P(Y)
113
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 8%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 50%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 39%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 86%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 85%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 29%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2=v} P(V2=v|X=0)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V2=v) - P(Y=1|X=0, V2=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.08 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.50 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.39 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.86 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.85 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.29 0.85 * (0.86 - 0.39) + 0.29 * (0.50 - 0.08) = 0.35 0.35 > 0
3
nde
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
118
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 1%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 43%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 47%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 92%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 50%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 74%.
yes
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.01 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.47 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.92 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.50 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 * (0.43 - 0.01)+ 0.50 * (0.92 - 0.47)= 0.10 0.10 > 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
119
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 1%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 43%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 47%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 92%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 50%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 74%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2=v} P(V2=v|X=0)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V2=v) - P(Y=1|X=0, V2=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.01 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.47 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.92 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.50 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.50 * (0.92 - 0.47) + 0.74 * (0.43 - 0.01) = 0.47 0.47 > 0
3
nde
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=1, V2=0} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
121
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 24%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 44%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.24 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.44 0.44 - 0.24 = 0.20 0.20 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
128
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 53%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 82%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.53 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.82 0.82 - 0.53 = 0.29 0.29 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
129
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 9%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 54%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 52%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 95%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 98%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 70%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.09 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.54 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.52 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.95 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.98 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.70 0.70 * (0.54 - 0.09)+ 0.98 * (0.95 - 0.52)= -0.13 -0.13 < 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
133
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 36%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 55%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.36 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.55 0.55 - 0.36 = 0.18 0.18 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
138
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. Method 1: We look at how husband correlates with alarm clock case by case according to wife. Method 2: We look directly at how husband correlates with alarm clock in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
mediation
alarm
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
143
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 32%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 45%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.32 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.45 0.45 - 0.32 = 0.14 0.14 > 0
2
ate
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
153
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: Husband has a direct effect on wife and alarm clock. Wife has a direct effect on alarm clock. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 3%. For husbands that don't set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 50%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that don't set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 50%. For husbands that set the alarm and wives that set the alarm, the probability of ringing alarm is 97%. For husbands that don't set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 63%. For husbands that set the alarm, the probability of alarm set by wife is 84%.
no
Let X = husband; V2 = wife; Y = alarm clock. X->V2,X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}] \sum_{V2 = v} P(Y=1|X =0,V2 = v)*[P(V2 = v | X = 1) βˆ’ P(V2 = v | X = 0)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=0) = 0.03 P(Y=1 | X=0, V2=1) = 0.50 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=0) = 0.50 P(Y=1 | X=1, V2=1) = 0.97 P(V2=1 | X=0) = 0.63 P(V2=1 | X=1) = 0.84 0.84 * (0.50 - 0.03)+ 0.63 * (0.97 - 0.50)= 0.10 0.10 > 0
3
nie
mediation
alarm
easy
E[Y_{X=0, V2=1} - Y_{X=0, V2=0}]
159
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 68%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 12%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 51%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.68 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.12 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.51 0.51/0.68 - 0.12/0.32 = 0.38 0.38 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
160
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 38%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.38 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 - 0.38 = 0.36 0.36 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
162
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 38%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.38 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 - 0.38 = 0.36 0.36 > 0
3
ett
fork
candle
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
166
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 44%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 75%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.44 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.75 0.75 - 0.44 = 0.31 0.31 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
173
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 56%. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 55%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 89%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.56 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.55 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.89 0.56*0.89 - 0.44*0.55 = 0.74 0.74 > 0
1
marginal
fork
candle
easy
P(Y)
175
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 39%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 72%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.39 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.72 0.72 - 0.39 = 0.33 0.33 > 0
3
ett
fork
candle
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
176
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 43%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 22%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 31%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.43 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.22 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.31 0.31/0.43 - 0.22/0.57 = 0.33 0.33 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
178
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look at how the man in the room correlates with room case by case according to the candle. Method 2: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
180
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 31%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 66%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.31 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.66 0.66 - 0.31 = 0.34 0.34 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
184
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to the candle.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
194
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 31%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 21%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 19%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.31 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.21 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.19 0.19/0.31 - 0.21/0.69 = 0.31 0.31 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
197
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 38%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 72%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.38 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.72 0.72 - 0.38 = 0.34 0.34 > 0
3
ett
fork
candle
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
199
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 29%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 27%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 21%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.29 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.27 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.21 0.21/0.29 - 0.27/0.71 = 0.34 0.34 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
201
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 48%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 79%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.48 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.79 0.79 - 0.48 = 0.32 0.32 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
203
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 50%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 24%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 40%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.50 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.24 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.40 0.40/0.50 - 0.24/0.50 = 0.32 0.32 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
204
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to the candle.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
207
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 51%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 93%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.51 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.93 0.93 - 0.51 = 0.42 0.42 > 0
3
ett
fork
candle
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
213
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 38%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 73%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.38 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.73 0.73 - 0.38 = 0.35 0.35 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
216
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 30%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 63%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.30 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.63 0.63 - 0.30 = 0.33 0.33 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
218
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 65%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 10%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 41%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.65 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.10 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.41 0.41/0.65 - 0.10/0.35 = 0.33 0.33 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
224
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 23%. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 23%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 58%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.23 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.23 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.58 0.23*0.58 - 0.77*0.23 = 0.31 0.31 > 0
1
marginal
fork
candle
easy
P(Y)
229
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 43%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 - 0.43 = 0.31 0.31 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
230
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 53%. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 43%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.53 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.53*0.74 - 0.47*0.43 = 0.59 0.59 > 0
1
marginal
fork
candle
easy
P(Y)
232
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look at how the man in the room correlates with room case by case according to the candle. Method 2: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
236
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 41%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.41 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 - 0.41 = 0.32 0.32 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
237
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 41%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] P(Y=1|X=1) - P(Y=1|X=0) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.41 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 - 0.41 = 0.32 0.32 > 0
3
ett
fork
candle
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
240
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 43%. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 48%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 80%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.48 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.80 0.43*0.80 - 0.57*0.48 = 0.61 0.61 > 0
1
marginal
fork
candle
easy
P(Y)
241
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 41%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 74%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.41 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.74 0.74 - 0.41 = 0.33 0.33 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
247
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look at how the man in the room correlates with room case by case according to the candle. Method 2: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
249
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 56%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 90%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.56 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.90 0.90 - 0.56 = 0.34 0.34 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
254
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look at how the man in the room correlates with room case by case according to the candle. Method 2: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
255
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to the candle.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
265
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. The overall probability of blowing out the candle is 26%. The probability of not blowing out the candle and dark room is 41%. The probability of blowing out the candle and dark room is 22%.
yes
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.26 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.41 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.22 0.22/0.26 - 0.41/0.74 = 0.31 0.31 > 0
1
correlation
fork
candle
easy
P(Y | X)
269
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. For people not blowing out candles, the probability of dark room is 33%. For people who blow out candles, the probability of dark room is 68%.
no
Let V2 = the candle; X = the man in the room; Y = room. X->Y,V2->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] P(Y|X) P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.33 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.68 0.68 - 0.33 = 0.35 0.35 > 0
2
ate
fork
candle
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
273
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: The man in the room has a direct effect on room. The candle has a direct effect on room. Method 1: We look directly at how the man in the room correlates with room in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to the candle.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
fork
candle
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
275
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 86%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 31%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 70%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.86 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.31 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.70 0.86*0.70 - 0.14*0.31 = 0.65 0.65 > 0
1
marginal
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y)
276
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 86%. The probability of manager not signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 4%. The probability of manager signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 60%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.86 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.04 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.60 0.60/0.86 - 0.04/0.14 = 0.39 0.39 > 0
1
correlation
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y | X)
278
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 9%. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 54%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 46%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 90%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 17%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 27%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] \sum_{V3=v} P(V3=v|X=1)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V3=v) - P(Y=1|X=0,V3=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=0) = 0.09 P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=1) = 0.54 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=0) = 0.46 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=1) = 0.90 P(V3=1 | X=0) = 0.17 P(V3=1 | X=1) = 0.27 0.27 * (0.90 - 0.46) + 0.17 * (0.54 - 0.09) = 0.37 0.37 > 0
3
ett
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
279
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 40%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 16%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 58%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.40 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.16 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.58 0.40*0.58 - 0.60*0.16 = 0.33 0.33 > 0
1
marginal
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y)
281
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 40%. The probability of manager not signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 10%. The probability of manager signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 23%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.40 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.10 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.23 0.23/0.40 - 0.10/0.60 = 0.42 0.42 > 0
1
correlation
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y | X)
282
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. Method 1: We look directly at how manager correlates with employee in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to director.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
284
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 13%. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 51%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 46%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 83%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 53%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 60%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] \sum_{V3=v} P(V3=v|X=1)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V3=v) - P(Y=1|X=0,V3=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=0) = 0.13 P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=1) = 0.51 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=0) = 0.46 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=1) = 0.83 P(V3=1 | X=0) = 0.53 P(V3=1 | X=1) = 0.60 0.60 * (0.83 - 0.46) + 0.53 * (0.51 - 0.13) = 0.33 0.33 > 0
3
ett
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
286
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 23%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 57%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 43%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 79%. The overall probability of CEO's decision to fire the employee is 17%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] \sum_{V1=v} P(V1=v)*[P(Y=1|V1=v,X=1) - P(Y=1|V1=v, X=0)] P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=0) = 0.23 P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=1) = 0.57 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=0) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=1) = 0.79 P(V1=1) = 0.17 0.83 * (0.57 - 0.23) 0.17 * (0.79 - 0.43) = 0.35 0.35 > 0
2
ate
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
287
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 23%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 57%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 43%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 79%. The overall probability of CEO's decision to fire the employee is 17%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] \sum_{V1=v} P(V1=v)*[P(Y=1|V1=v,X=1) - P(Y=1|V1=v, X=0)] P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=0) = 0.23 P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=1) = 0.57 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=0) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=1) = 0.79 P(V1=1) = 0.17 0.83 * (0.57 - 0.23) 0.17 * (0.79 - 0.43) = 0.35 0.35 > 0
2
ate
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
289
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 32%. The probability of manager not signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 16%. The probability of manager signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 21%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.32 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.16 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.21 0.21/0.32 - 0.16/0.68 = 0.42 0.42 > 0
1
correlation
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y | X)
290
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 49%. The probability of manager not signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 14%. The probability of manager signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 37%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.49 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.14 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.37 0.37/0.49 - 0.14/0.51 = 0.48 0.48 > 0
1
correlation
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y | X)
291
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 16%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 52%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 37%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 71%. The overall probability of CEO's decision to fire the employee is 13%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] \sum_{V1=v} P(V1=v)*[P(Y=1|V1=v,X=1) - P(Y=1|V1=v, X=0)] P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=0) = 0.16 P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=1) = 0.52 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=0) = 0.37 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=1) = 0.71 P(V1=1) = 0.13 0.87 * (0.52 - 0.16) 0.13 * (0.71 - 0.37) = 0.36 0.36 > 0
2
ate
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
292
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 10%. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 52%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 47%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 84%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 19%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 26%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] \sum_{V3=v} P(V3=v|X=1)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V3=v) - P(Y=1|X=0,V3=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=0) = 0.10 P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=1) = 0.52 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=0) = 0.47 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=1) = 0.84 P(V3=1 | X=0) = 0.19 P(V3=1 | X=1) = 0.26 0.26 * (0.84 - 0.47) + 0.19 * (0.52 - 0.10) = 0.36 0.36 > 0
3
ett
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
293
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 30%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 18%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 57%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.30 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.18 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.57 0.30*0.57 - 0.70*0.18 = 0.30 0.30 > 0
1
marginal
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y)
294
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 30%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 18%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 57%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.30 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.18 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.57 0.30*0.57 - 0.70*0.18 = 0.30 0.30 > 0
1
marginal
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y)
295
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 30%. The probability of manager not signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 13%. The probability of manager signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 17%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.30 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.13 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.17 0.17/0.30 - 0.13/0.70 = 0.39 0.39 > 0
1
correlation
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y | X)
297
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 6%. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 44%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 48%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 89%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 33%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 44%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] \sum_{V3=v} P(V3=v|X=1)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V3=v) - P(Y=1|X=0,V3=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=0) = 0.06 P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=1) = 0.44 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=0) = 0.48 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=1) = 0.89 P(V3=1 | X=0) = 0.33 P(V3=1 | X=1) = 0.44 0.44 * (0.89 - 0.48) + 0.33 * (0.44 - 0.06) = 0.44 0.44 > 0
3
ett
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
300
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 12%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 45%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 47%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 88%. The overall probability of CEO's decision to fire the employee is 30%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] \sum_{V1=v} P(V1=v)*[P(Y=1|V1=v,X=1) - P(Y=1|V1=v, X=0)] P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=0) = 0.12 P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=1) = 0.45 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=0) = 0.47 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=1) = 0.88 P(V1=1) = 0.30 0.70 * (0.45 - 0.12) 0.30 * (0.88 - 0.47) = 0.36 0.36 > 0
2
ate
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
302
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. Method 1: We look directly at how manager correlates with employee in general. Method 2: We look at this correlation case by case according to director.
no
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
304
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 31%. The probability of manager not signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 21%. The probability of manager signing the termination letter and employee being fired is 24%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y | X) P(X = 1, Y = 1)/P(X = 1) - P(X = 0, Y = 1)/P(X = 0) P(X=1=1) = 0.31 P(Y=1, X=0=1) = 0.21 P(Y=1, X=1=1) = 0.24 0.24/0.31 - 0.21/0.69 = 0.47 0.47 > 0
1
correlation
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y | X)
307
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 22%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 61%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 44%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 82%. The overall probability of CEO's decision to fire the employee is 22%.
yes
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] \sum_{V1=v} P(V1=v)*[P(Y=1|V1=v,X=1) - P(Y=1|V1=v, X=0)] P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=0) = 0.22 P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=1) = 0.61 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=0) = 0.44 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=1) = 0.82 P(V1=1) = 0.22 0.78 * (0.61 - 0.22) 0.22 * (0.82 - 0.44) = 0.39 0.39 > 0
2
ate
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
308
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 17%. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 52%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 56%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 90%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 23%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 38%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] \sum_{V3=v} P(V3=v|X=1)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V3=v) - P(Y=1|X=0,V3=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=0) = 0.17 P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=1) = 0.52 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=0) = 0.56 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=1) = 0.90 P(V3=1 | X=0) = 0.23 P(V3=1 | X=1) = 0.38 0.38 * (0.90 - 0.56) + 0.23 * (0.52 - 0.17) = 0.39 0.39 > 0
3
ett
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
309
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 40%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 25%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 69%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.40 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.25 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.69 0.40*0.69 - 0.60*0.25 = 0.42 0.42 > 0
1
marginal
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y)
312
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 43%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 81%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 63%. For CEOs who fire employees and managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 98%. The overall probability of CEO's decision to fire the employee is 26%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)] \sum_{V1=v} P(V1=v)*[P(Y=1|V1=v,X=1) - P(Y=1|V1=v, X=0)] P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=0) = 0.43 P(Y=1 | V1=0, X=1) = 0.81 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=0) = 0.63 P(Y=1 | V1=1, X=1) = 0.98 P(V1=1) = 0.26 0.74 * (0.81 - 0.43) 0.26 * (0.98 - 0.63) = 0.38 0.38 > 0
2
ate
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y | do(X = 1)] - E[Y | do(X = 0)]
313
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 21%. For managers who don't sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 64%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 63%. For managers who sign termination letters and directors who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 99%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 60%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of director signing the termination letter is 64%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1] \sum_{V3=v} P(V3=v|X=1)*[P(Y=1|X=1,V3=v) - P(Y=1|X=0,V3=v)] P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=0) = 0.21 P(Y=1 | X=0, V3=1) = 0.64 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=0) = 0.63 P(Y=1 | X=1, V3=1) = 0.99 P(V3=1 | X=0) = 0.60 P(V3=1 | X=1) = 0.64 0.64 * (0.99 - 0.63) + 0.60 * (0.64 - 0.21) = 0.38 0.38 > 0
3
ett
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
E[Y_{X = 1} - Y_{X = 0} | X = 1]
315
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. Method 1: We look at how manager correlates with employee case by case according to director. Method 2: We look directly at how manager correlates with employee in general.
yes
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
2
backadj
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
[backdoor adjustment set for Y given X]
318
Imagine a self-contained, hypothetical world with only the following conditions, and without any unmentioned factors or causal relationships: CEO has a direct effect on director and manager. Manager has a direct effect on employee. Director has a direct effect on employee. The overall probability of manager signing the termination letter is 61%. For managers who don't sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 31%. For managers who sign termination letters, the probability of employee being fired is 67%.
no
Let V1 = CEO; V3 = director; X = manager; Y = employee. V1->V3,V1->X,X->Y,V3->Y P(Y) P(Y | X=1)*P(X=1) + P(Y | X=0)*P(X=0) P(X=1) = 0.61 P(Y=1 | X=0) = 0.31 P(Y=1 | X=1) = 0.67 0.61*0.67 - 0.39*0.31 = 0.53 0.53 > 0
1
marginal
diamondcut
firing_employee
easy
P(Y)
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