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271
0
nearly midnight
true
85
87
I stood watching and listening . It was a calm , sweet April night ; there were no sounds but a few low notes of a nightingale , and nothing moved but the white clouds near the moon and a brown owl that flitted over the hedge . It made me think of the summer nights long ago , when I used to lie beside my mother in the green pleasant meadow at Farmer Grey 's . 26 How it Ended It must have been nearly midnight when I heard at a great distance the sound of a horse 's feet . Sometimes the sound died away , then it grew clearer again and nearer . The road to Earlshall led through woods that belonged to the earl ; the sound came in that direction , and I hoped it might be some one coming in search of us . As the sound came nearer and nearer I was almost sure I could distinguish Ginger 's step ; a little nearer still , and I could tell she was in the dog-cart .
271
1
one o'clock
true
97
99
He could not bear any careless loitering and waste of time ; and nothing was so near making him angry as to find people , who were always late , wanting a cab horse to be driven hard , to make up for their idleness . One day two wild-looking young men came out of a tavern close by the stand , and called Jerry . `` Here , cabby ! look sharp , we are rather late ; put on the steam , will you , and take us to the Victoria in time for the one o'clock train ? You shall have a shilling extra . '' `` I will take you at the regular pace , gentlemen ; shillings do n't pay for putting on the steam like that . '' Larry 's cab was standing next to ours ; he flung open the door , and said , `` I 'm your man , gentlemen !
271
12
twelve o'clock
true
92
94
He seemed much stunned , and as they led him into a shop he walked as if he were in great pain . Jerry of course came back to the stand , but in about ten minutes one of the shopmen called him , so we drew up to the pavement . `` Can you take me to the South-Eastern Railway ? '' said the young man ; `` this unlucky fall has made me late , I fear ; but it is of great importance that I should not lose the twelve o'clock train . I should be most thankful if you could get me there in time , and will gladly pay you an extra fare . '' `` I 'll do my very best , '' said Jerry heartily , `` if you think you are well enough , sir , '' for he looked dreadfully white and ill . `` I must go , '' he said earnestly , `` please to open the door , and let us lose no time . ''
271
11
eight minutes to twelve o'clock
true
121
126
This block-up can not last much longer , and your luggage is very heavy for you to carry , sir . '' Just then the cart in front of us began to move on , and then we had a good turn . In and out , in and out we went , as fast as horseflesh could do it , and for a wonder had a good clear time on London Bridge , for there was a whole train of cabs and carriages all going our way at a quick trot , perhaps wanting to catch that very train . At any rate , we whirled into the station with many more , just as the great clock pointed to eight minutes to twelve o'clock . `` Thank God ! we are in time , '' said the young man , `` and thank you , too , my friend , and your good horse . You have saved me more than money can ever pay for .
271
12
twelve o'clock
true
53
55
Take this extra half-crown . '' `` No , sir , no , thank you all the same ; so glad we hit the time , sir ; but do n't stay now , sir , the bell is ringing . Here , porter ! take this gentleman 's luggage -- Dover line twelve o'clock train -- that 's it , '' and without waiting for another word Jerry wheeled me round to make room for other cabs that were dashing up at the last minute , and drew up on one side till the crush was past . `` ` So glad ! ' he said , ` so glad ! ' Poor young fellow !
271
11
eleven o'clock
true
118
120
If a thing is right it can be done , and if it is wrong it can be done without ; and a good man will find a way . And that is as true for us cabmen as it is for the church-goers . '' 37 The Golden Rule Two or three weeks after this , as we came into the yard rather late in the evening , Polly came running across the road with the lantern -LRB- she always brought it to him if it was not very wet -RRB- . `` It has all come right , Jerry ; Mrs. Briggs sent her servant this afternoon to ask you to take her out to-morrow at eleven o'clock . I said , ` Yes , I thought so , but we supposed she employed some one else now . ' '' `` ` Well , ' said he , ` the real fact is , master was put out because Mr. Barker refused to come on Sundays , and he has been trying other cabs , but there 's something wrong with them all ; some drive too fast , and some too slow , and the mistress says there is not one of them so nice and clean as yours , and nothing will suit her but Mr. Barker 's cab again . ' '' Polly was almost out of breath , and Jerry broke out into a merry laugh .
271
10
ten o'clock
true
116
118
Away she went , and soon returned , saying that he could have the trap and welcome . `` All right , '' said he ; `` now put me up a bit of bread and cheese , and I 'll be back in the afternoon as soon as I can . '' `` And I 'll have the meat pie ready for an early tea instead of for dinner , '' said Polly ; and away she went , while he made his preparations to the tune of `` Polly 's the woman and no mistake '' , of which tune he was very fond . I was selected for the journey , and at ten o'clock we started , in a light , high-wheeled gig , which ran so easily that after the four-wheeled cab it seemed like nothing . It was a fine May day , and as soon as we were out of the town , the sweet air , the smell of the fresh grass , and the soft country roads were as pleasant as they used to be in the old times , and I soon began to feel quite fresh . Dinah 's family lived in a small farmhouse , up a green lane , close by a meadow with some fine shady trees ; there were two cows feeding in it . A young man asked Jerry to bring his trap into the meadow , and he would tie me up in the cowshed ; he wished he had a better stable to offer .
271
2
two o'clock in the morning
true
126
131
The horses all felt it very much . When it is a dry cold a couple of good thick rugs will keep the warmth in us ; but when it is soaking rain they soon get wet through and are no good . Some of the drivers had a waterproof cover to throw over , which was a fine thing ; but some of the men were so poor that they could not protect either themselves or their horses , and many of them suffered very much that winter . When we horses had worked half the day we went to our dry stables , and could rest , while they had to sit on their boxes , sometimes staying out as late as one or two o'clock in the morning if they had a party to wait for . When the streets were slippery with frost or snow that was the worst of all for us horses . One mile of such traveling , with a weight to draw and no firm footing , would take more out of us than four on a good road ; every nerve and muscle of our bodies is on the strain to keep our balance ; and , added to this , the fear of falling is more exhausting than anything else . If the roads are very bad indeed our shoes are roughed , but that makes us feel nervous at first .
271
9
nine o'clock
true
104
106
I had now most of the evening work , as I was well accustomed to standing , and Jerry was also more afraid of Hotspur taking cold . We had a great deal of late work in the Christmas week , and Jerry 's cough was bad ; but however late we were , Polly sat up for him , and came out with a lantern to meet him , looking anxious and troubled . On the evening of the New Year we had to take two gentlemen to a house in one of the West End Squares . We set them down at nine o'clock , and were told to come again at eleven , `` but , '' said one , `` as it is a card party , you may have to wait a few minutes , but do n't be late . '' As the clock struck eleven we were at the door , for Jerry was always punctual . The clock chimed the quarters , one , two , three , and then struck twelve , but the door did not open . The wind had been very changeable , with squalls of rain during the day , but now it came on sharp , driving sleet , which seemed to come all the way round ; it was very cold , and there was no shelter .
271
1
a quarter past one
true
80
84
Still the clock chimed the quarters , and no one came . At half-past twelve he rang the bell and asked the servant if he would be wanted that night . `` Oh , yes , you 'll be wanted safe enough , '' said the man ; `` you must not go , it will soon be over , '' and again Jerry sat down , but his voice was so hoarse I could hardly hear him . At a quarter past one the door opened , and the two gentlemen came out ; they got into the cab without a word , and told Jerry where to drive , that was nearly two miles . My legs were numb with cold , and I thought I should have stumbled . When the men got out they never said they were sorry to have kept us waiting so long , but were angry at the charge ; however , as Jerry never charged more than was his due , so he never took less , and they had to pay for the two hours and a quarter waiting ; but it was hard-earned money to Jerry . At last we got home ; he could hardly speak , and his cough was dreadful .
271
12
noon
true
56
57
It was late the next morning before any one came , and then it was only Harry . He cleaned us and fed us , and swept out the stalls , then he put the straw back again as if it was Sunday . He was very still , and neither whistled nor sang . At noon he came again and gave us our food and water ; this time Dolly came with him ; she was crying , and I could gather from what they said that Jerry was dangerously ill , and the doctor said it was a bad case . So two days passed , and there was great trouble indoors . We only saw Harry , and sometimes Dolly . I think she came for company , for Polly was always with Jerry , and he had to be kept very quiet .
271
12
noon
true
131
132
`` I have kept him short of corn , but he 's so full of spirit I do n't know what to do with him . '' `` Just so , '' said Grant . `` Now look here , will you tell your mother that if she is agreeable I will come for him every day till something is arranged , and take him for a good spell of work , and whatever he earns , I 'll bring your mother half of it , and that will help with the horses ' feed . Your father is in a good club , I know , but that wo n't keep the horses , and they 'll be eating their heads off all this time ; I 'll come at noon and hear what she says , '' and without waiting for Harry 's thanks he was gone . At noon I think he went and saw Polly , for he and Harry came to the stable together , harnessed Hotspur , and took him out . For a week or more he came for Hotspur , and when Harry thanked him or said anything about his kindness , he laughed it off , saying it was all good luck for him , for his horses were wanting a little rest which they would not otherwise have had . Jerry grew better steadily , but the doctor said that he must never go back to the cab work again if he wished to be an old man .
271
12
noon
true
124
125
`` Just so , '' said Grant . `` Now look here , will you tell your mother that if she is agreeable I will come for him every day till something is arranged , and take him for a good spell of work , and whatever he earns , I 'll bring your mother half of it , and that will help with the horses ' feed . Your father is in a good club , I know , but that wo n't keep the horses , and they 'll be eating their heads off all this time ; I 'll come at noon and hear what she says , '' and without waiting for Harry 's thanks he was gone . At noon I think he went and saw Polly , for he and Harry came to the stable together , harnessed Hotspur , and took him out . For a week or more he came for Hotspur , and when Harry thanked him or said anything about his kindness , he laughed it off , saying it was all good luck for him , for his horses were wanting a little rest which they would not otherwise have had . Jerry grew better steadily , but the doctor said that he must never go back to the cab work again if he wished to be an old man . The children had many consultations together about what father and mother would do , and how they could help to earn money .
271
8
eight in the morning
true
122
126
He had a cruel whip with something so sharp at the end that it sometimes drew blood , and he would even whip me under the belly , and flip the lash out at my head . Indignities like these took the heart out of me terribly , but still I did my best and never hung back ; for , as poor Ginger said , it was no use ; men are the strongest . My life was now so utterly wretched that I wished I might , like Ginger , drop down dead at my work and be out of my misery , and one day my wish very nearly came to pass . I went on the stand at eight in the morning , and had done a good share of work , when we had to take a fare to the railway . A long train was just expected in , so my driver pulled up at the back of some of the outside cabs to take the chance of a return fare . It was a very heavy train , and as all the cabs were soon engaged ours was called for . There was a party of four ; a noisy , blustering man with a lady , a little boy and a young girl , and a great deal of luggage .
19977
4
four o'clock
true
87
89
The pens were old , and had lain with the ink dry upon them ever since the outbreak of the Dutch War . The two men were half a minute in finding a couple that would write . Then Captain Runacles turned the hour-glass abruptly ; and for an hour there was no sound in the pavilion garden but the scratching of quills , the murmur of pigeons on the roof , and the creaking of the gilded vane above them . That same afternoon , at four o'clock , Captain Barker and Captain Runacles entered Harwich and advanced up the West Street side by side . Each had a bulky letter in his side-pocket , and the address upon each letter was the same . They talked but little . On the right-hand side of West Street , as you enter the town , and a hundred yards or more from the town gate , there stood at that time a two-storeyed house of more pretensions than its fellows -- from which it drew back somewhat .
19977
0
midnight
true
102
103
So they ordered up a dinner which they could not touch , but sat over in silence for two weary hours , drinking very much more burgundy than they were aware of . Captain Jemmy , taking up three bottles one after another and finding them all empty , ordered up three more , and drew his chair up to the hearth , where he sat kicking the oaken logs viciously with his long legs . The little hunchback stared out on the falling night , rang for candles , and began to pace the room like a caged beast . Before midnight Captain Runacles was drunk . Six fresh bottles stood on the table . The man was a cask . Even in the warm firelight his face was pale as a sheet , and his lips worked continually .
19977
2
two o'clock
true
34
36
`` She is dead , '' he announced , very gravely and simply . The hunchback shivered . Captain Runacles neither spoke nor stirred in his chair . `` A man-child was born at two o'clock . He is alive : his mother died two hours later . '' Captain Barker shivered again , plucked aimlessly at a rosette in the window-cushion , and stole a quick glance at his comrade 's back . Then , putting a finger to his lip , he slid down to the floor and lurched across to the Doctor .
19977
16
four in the afternoon
true
236
240
It was worked by means of a wheel , nine feet in diameter , with steps in its circumference like those of a treadmill , and so weighted that by walking upon it , as if up a flight of stairs , a person of eleven or twelve stone would draw up a bucket -- two buckets being so hung , at the ends of a rope surrounding the wheel , that while one ascended , full of water , the other , which was empty , sank down and was refilled . These buckets being too heavy for a man to overturn to pour out the water , he bored a hole in each , and contrived to plug the holes so that the weight of the bucket as it bumped upon the trough prepared for it at the well 's edge jogged out the plug and sent the water running down the trough into whatever pail or vessel stood ready to catch it . Nor is it astonishing that he lost his temper when , after these preparations , he found the well was not deep enough , and the water as much infected with brine as if he had gathered it from the surface of the marsh . It was on the day following this disappointment that , while walking to and fro the length of his turfed garden , between three and four in the afternoon -LRB- for his habits were methodical -RRB- , he heard a child 's voice lifted on the far side of the party hedge : `` Dad ! '' `` Eh ? What is it ? '' answered the voice of Captain Barker , from his new tulip-bed , across the garden .
19977
4
four o'clock
true
46
48
`` Tut , tut ! it was decided the moment you were born . '' `` I think , '' Mr. Finch interposed , `` it is time I gave Captain Runacles some necessary information about the boy 's inheritance . '' It was close upon four o'clock when the little blue door which , until that morning , had remained shut for over four years was opened a second time and Captain Runacles stepped through into Captain Barker 's domain . His wig was carefully brushed and he carried a gold-headed cane . Whatever emotion he may have felt was concealed by the upright carriage and solemn pace proper to a visit of state . Captain Barker , who stood at the lower end of the garden and stooped over his beloved tulips , started at the sound of footsteps , looked round , and hastily plucking his wig from the handle of a spade that stood upright in the mould by his elbow , arranged it upon his bald scalp and awaited the other 's advance .
19977
4
twenty minutes past four
true
125
129
The first of these arches , bearing the inscription _ God Save King William , Defender of our Faith and Liberty _ , was erected on the London road , a dozen paces beyond the Fish and Anchor Inn , Captain Barker having refused the landlord -- who desired to build the arch right in front of his inn-door -- permission to set up any pole or support against the privet hedge . In fact , he and Captain Runacles had sworn very heartily to sit indoors , pull down their blinds and withhold their countenances from the usurper . Nature , however , which regards neither the majesty of kings nor the indignation of their subjects , made frustrate this unamiable design . At twenty minutes past four that afternoon a hiveful of Captain Barker 's bees took it into their heads to swarm . It was a warm afternoon , and the little man sat in his library composing a letter to Mr. John Ray , of Cambridge University , whose forthcoming _ Historia Plantarum _ he believed himself to be enriching with one or two suggestions on hibernation . Narcissus Swiggs was down at the Fish and Anchor drinking King William 's health . Tristram , who was supposed to be at work clipping the privet hedge around the apiarium , was engaged in the summer-house , at the far end of it , upon business of his own .
19977
8
eight o'clock
true
48
50
Have him removed , and have the highroad cleared of these rebels ; for I see my escort down the road . '' And touching the sorrel with his heel , his Majesty cantered back to meet the approaching cavalcade . Night had fallen . It was past eight o'clock , and Captain John and Captain Jemmy sat facing each other , one on each side of the empty fireplace , in Captain John 's library . They were in complete darkness -- for the red glow of tobacco in the pipe which Captain Jemmy puffed dejectedly could hardly be called a light . For half an hour no word had been spoken , when somebody tapped at the door . `` What is it ? ''
19977
0
midnight
true
53
54
Remember the help I expect from you ; but we will talk that over in a day or two . Meanwhile , keep a parent 's eye upon your son -LRB- he 's called Tristram -RRB- , for through him your reward will be attained . Good night . '' It was past midnight when Captain Runacles left his friend 's pavilion and let himself through the little blue door to his own garden . The heavens were clear and starry , and he paused for a moment on the grass-plot , his hands clasped behind him , his head tilted back and his eyes fixed on the Great Bear that hung directly overhead . `` Poor Jack ! '' he muttered , shaking his head at the constellation , as if gently accusing Fate .
19977
9
nine o'clock
true
92
94
Captain Barker still sat and read in his book ; and as he read the tears coursed down his wrinkled cheeks . For it was the first of the famous green volumes . He looked up as his friend advanced ; and Captain Jemmy was forced to regard the weathercock on the roof for a minute or so to make sure of the quarter in which the wind lay . `` It 's due west , '' said Captain John , as he stared up ; `` and it 's ebb-tide till nine o'clock . They 'll sail early . '' `` H 'm ; I should n't wonder . You 're early out of bed . ''
19977
6
six in the morning
true
80
84
`` Well , but -- '' `` My dear Jack , I have reasons for wishing Tristram back . You need n't ask what they are , because I sha n't tell you ; but they 're at least as intelligible as all the reasons you can find in that volume . '' He caught it out of his friend 's hand , and read : '' _ June 12th . -- T. to-day refused his biscuit and milk at six in the morning , but took it an hour later . Peevish all night ; in part -LRB- I think -RRB- because not yet recovered of his weaning , and also because his teeth -LRB- second pair on lower jaw -RRB- are troubling him . Query : If the biscuit should be boiled in the milk , or milk merely poured over the biscuit _ -- '' Here he glanced up , and seeing the anguish on the hunchback 's face , handed back the book . `` I beg your pardon , Jack .
19977
2
two in the morning
true
154
158
This was true enough , and it struck the speaker as so pathetic that he managed even to squeeze up a tear . `` But come , '' he went on , with a sudden change to vivacity , `` tell me how you happened into this scrape ? '' And so , with the lantern between them casting long spokes of light on the ship 's timbers , the rafters and the two drunken sleepers in the corner , father and son sat and talked for the better part of an hour ; at the end of which time Captain Salt , who dexterously managed to do nine-tenths of the listening , was pretty well posted in the affairs of the Blue Pavilions and their inmates , and knew almost as much of Tristram 's past history as if he had spent a day with the thirty-seven green volumes . It was past two in the morning when he arose to return to his own ship . At parting he kissed Tristram on both cheeks . `` Farewell , dear lad ! '' he said , with a manner that was admirably paternal .
19977
12
noon
true
62
63
The _ Good Intent _ took another lurch forward , and a clammy sweat broke out on both sides of his forehead . `` If I have enemies so wicked , '' sighed he , `` may God forgive them ! '' And , uttering this Christian wish , he fell forward with his forehead against the boards . A little past noon the sentry brought him a fresh loaf , with a plate of fat bacon and another pannikin . The sea being choppy , by this time the vessel echoed from end to end with groans and lamentations . `` Is it a massacre ? '' Tristram asked , sitting up and regarding the man with wild eyes .
19977
0
midnight
true
91
92
Sir , '' he continued , addressing Tristram , `` you are discharged from my service , which , I must say , has not bettered your looks . Return to your guardians and , if they will allow you , cultivate some small amount of loyalty . '' `` I thank your Majesty very heartily , '' Tristram replied ingenuously , `` and I regret if the plant has , until now , found no place in our garden . '' `` The squadron will sail again for England at midnight , '' said William with a faint smile ; then , turning to the Earl of Marlborough , `` My lord , will you write out the order ? '' At this moment one of the pages entered with a note for the King . `` Let him come in , '' said William , after opening it and running his eye over the contents ; then , addressing Captain Salt , `` I fear this puts an end to our conversation for the time . If you will wait below , the necessary papers shall be brought to you .
19977
9
ten minutes after nine
true
28
32
`` Yes . '' `` And made all the arrangements ? '' `` Nothing is omitted . The guns will be fired twenty minutes too soon , at ten minutes after nine . As William knows nothing about the signal , and has made his dispositions for half-past nine , the poor fellows will have some fun for their pains , after all . '' `` Excellent ! '' said the Earl smiling .
19977
18
about six in the evening
true
88
93
The man in the stable-yard groomed away at the four horses , one after another , saddled them , led them back to the stable again , then composed himself to sleep on the stool outside the stable door , with a straw in his mouth and his hat-brim well over his eyes . The others still lounged in the sunshine before the inn door . He could hear the sound of their voices and occasional laughter , but not the words of their conversation . It was about six in the evening when the Captain was struck with an idea . At first it staggered him a little : then he thought it over and looked at it from several sides . Each time he reviewed the plan he got rid of a scruple or two , and by degrees began to like it exceedingly . His restlessness diminished , and in the end he became quite still .
19977
6
six o'clock
true
71
73
They slept on the hard bricks , pillowing their heads on each other 's legs , or lay awake and listened to their fellows ' moans . Two sentries with loaded muskets kept guard by the door , and looked in whenever a chain clanked or some unfortunate began to rave in his sleep . Before morning a third of the gang was sickening for rheumatic fever or typhus . At six o'clock the sergeant entered and examined them . Then he retired , and came back in another hour with a covered wagon , into which the sick were hoisted and packed like herrings . All who had power to move their legs were afterwards turned out and treated to a pound and a half of the `` King 's bread '' and a drink of water before starting . Tristram was one of these .
19977
16
About four in the afternoon
true
130
135
It proved to be the best meal that Tristram had swallowed since his misfortunes began , there being a pint of soup to each man in addition to the usual brown bread . After devouring it , Tristram sat with his back to the wall , wondering if the three ruffians would renew their attack ; but they appeared to have forgotten their resentment , and even his presence . Some of his fellow-miserables fell to chatting ; others to plaiting ropes out of the straw on which they lay ; while some occupied themselves in keeping a look out for the rats that swarmed everywhere and stole out in the dim light to gnaw the pieces of bread which the prisoners saved and hid away for future use . About four in the afternoon the great door was flung open again and the chief jailer appeared , with four turnkeys and the soldiers of the prison guard , all armed to the teeth with pistols , swords and bayonets . Their object , it turned out , was to examine the four walls and the floor very minutely , to see if the prisoners were making any holes or planning any attempt to escape . They spent a full half an hour in routing out the prisoners and searching high and low with their lanterns , using great roughness and the most abominable talk . Tristram watched their movements for some time , but at length curled himself up in his corner , which had already been explored .
19977
6
six o'clock
true
145
147
By night he was provided with a board , a foot and a half wide , on which to stretch himself ; and as he lay pretty far aft , was warned against scratching himself , lest the rattle of his chains should disturb the officers , whose quarters were divided from the slaves ' by the thinnest of wooden partitions . By day , indeed , these officers , as well as the chaplain , had the use of the Commodore 's room , a fairly spacious chamber in the stern , shaped on the outside like a big cradle , with bulging windows and a couple of lanterns on the taffrail above , that were lit when evening closed in . But at night , or in foul weather , M. de la Pailletine reserved this apartment for his own use . At six o'clock every morning the slaves were roused up and began their day with prayers , which the chaplain conducted , taking particular care that the Huguenots were hearty in their responses . The Turks -- or _ Vogue-avants _ as they were called -- were never molested on the score of religion ; but while Mass was being said were put out of the galley into a long-boat , where they diverted themselves by smoking and talking till the Christians were through with their exercises . When these were done the daily portion of biscuit -- pretty good , though coarse -- was doled out to each man , and at ten o'clock a porringer of soup . Also , on days when the galleys were taken for a cruise , each slave received something less than a pint of wine , morning and evening , to keep up his strength .
19977
10
ten o'clock
true
134
136
But at night , or in foul weather , M. de la Pailletine reserved this apartment for his own use . At six o'clock every morning the slaves were roused up and began their day with prayers , which the chaplain conducted , taking particular care that the Huguenots were hearty in their responses . The Turks -- or _ Vogue-avants _ as they were called -- were never molested on the score of religion ; but while Mass was being said were put out of the galley into a long-boat , where they diverted themselves by smoking and talking till the Christians were through with their exercises . When these were done the daily portion of biscuit -- pretty good , though coarse -- was doled out to each man , and at ten o'clock a porringer of soup . Also , on days when the galleys were taken for a cruise , each slave received something less than a pint of wine , morning and evening , to keep up his strength . But it must not be imagined from this that their work was light during the rest of the week . When the weather kept them in harbour , all such as knew any useful trade were taken off the galley to the town of Dunkirk , and there set to work under guard , some at the making of new clothes or the repairing of old ones ; others at carpentry , plumbing , or shoemaking ; others , again , at repairing the fortifications , and so on -- thus allowing room for the residue to scrub out the galley , wash down the benches and decks , and set all ship-shape and in order : of which residue Tristram was one , being versed in no trade but that of gardening , for which there seemed to be no demand .
19977
11
eleven o'clock
true
177
179
Thus it happened that , one fine morning in the middle of June , he was hanging out over the stern in his usual posture , and , having finished the letters _ L'HEU _ , took a look around on the brightness of the day before dipping his brush and starting again . The galley with her five consorts lay in the Royal Basin under the citadel , and a mile in from the open sea , towards which the long line of the pier extended , its tall forts dominating the sand-dunes that stretched away to right and left . The sands shone ; the sea was a silvery blue , edged with a dazzle where its breakers touched the shore ; a clear northerly breeze came sweeping inland and hummed in the galley 's rigging as it flew by . From the streets of Dunkirk sounded the cheerful bustle of the morning 's business ; and as Tristram glanced up at the glistening spire of the Jesuits ' church , its clock struck out eleven o'clock as merrily as if it played a tune . It was just at this moment , as he turned to dip his brush , that he caught sight of a small boat approaching across the basin . It was rowed by a waterman , and in the stern-sheets there sat a figure the sight of which caused Tristram 's heart to stop beating for a moment , and then to resume at a gallop . He caught hold of the rope by which he hung , and looked again .
19977
10
ten o'clock in the morning
true
104
109
Between May and September the armies marched and counter-marched , walked up to each other and withdrew with every expression of defiance . No important action was fought , though for some time less than a league divided their hostility . William , whose patience was worn out almost sooner than the shoe-leather of his subjects , left the command in Marlborough 's hands , and retired to his park at Loo , whence , in the beginning of July , he posted to The Hague to attend a meeting of the States-General . On the 17th day of that month , and at ten o'clock in the morning -- at which time the King was taking the air in his famous park on the outskirts of the town -- a couple of old gentlemen were advancing upon The Hague from the westward , along the old Scheveningen road . They walked slowly , by reason of their years , but with a certain solemnity of pace which indicated that , in their own opinion at least , they were bound upon an errand of importance . At intervals they paused to mop their faces ; and at every pause they regarded the landscape with contempt . One of these old gentlemen was thin and wiry , with a jaw that protruded like a bulldog 's .
19977
10
ten o'clock
true
47
49
`` His Majesty is just now at the House in the Wood . '' `` Where may that be ? '' `` Not two miles beyond the town . On fine days , such as the present , he gives audience every morning , between nine and ten o'clock , in the open air , walking up and down an alley , which is called for that reason the Promenade of Audience ; and again , if no other business prevents him , at five o'clock in the afternoon , when the day grows cool . '' He pulled out a stout watch and consulted it . `` By six o'clock I must be back there , for at that time my duty begins . But if you will let me accompany you and pass you through the park gates , I will gladly hasten my return , and start -- shall we say ?
19977
6
six o'clock
true
88
90
`` Not two miles beyond the town . On fine days , such as the present , he gives audience every morning , between nine and ten o'clock , in the open air , walking up and down an alley , which is called for that reason the Promenade of Audience ; and again , if no other business prevents him , at five o'clock in the afternoon , when the day grows cool . '' He pulled out a stout watch and consulted it . `` By six o'clock I must be back there , for at that time my duty begins . But if you will let me accompany you and pass you through the park gates , I will gladly hasten my return , and start -- shall we say ? -- at half-past four . '' He would take no denial , but rose and left them , waving his hand , smiling , and turning , after a dozen steps , to call back and assure them he would be punctual .
19977
16
about four in the afternoon
true
73
78
But perhaps their friend the ensign , from whom they parted affectionately at the foot of the avenue , was happier even than they . For not only did his heart rejoice at their good fortune , but his Majesty had failed to inquire whether the duel had been fought within or without the park gates . On the sixth day after his departure Captain Salt returned to Dunkirk unexpectedly . He arrived about four in the afternoon and was rowed at once to the Commodore 's galley . He climbed on deck and looked about him . The lieutenant stepped forward . Captain Salt shook hands and asked : `` Where is the Commodore ? ''
19977
6
six o'clock in the morning
true
102
107
`` Tut , tut , '' answered the Englishman , with an air of slight impatience ; `` I must trouble you to sit down , sir , and attend . Really , '' he continued , looking around , `` I must insist upon the attention of everyone , as I shall need your intelligent co-operation . My plan is this : I mean to make this a night attack . We should leave the harbour here in four days ' time -- that is to say , on the 23rd , if the weather holds , and not later than six o'clock in the morning . It may possibly be earlier , but that will depend to some extent on the wind . '' M. de la Pailletine by this time was white with passion . He began to comprehend that his guest would not dare to speak thus without some high authority to back him .
19977
17
about five in the evening
true
114
119
The broad lateen sails were spread , and the slaves sat quietly before their oars , ready to row , though for hour after hour there was no need of rowing . The six vessels kept within easy distance of each other , and Captain Salt , on the deck of _ L'Heureuse _ , directed their movements with a serenity that cheered even the poor men on the benches below him . As the awning shook and the masts creaked gently above them , they stretched their limbs , drew long breaths , and felt that after all it was good to live . So steady did the wind keep all day that about five in the evening they brought the English coast in sight . It was the opinion of all the captains that they should run up for Harwich at once ; but the Englishman had other views . `` It is too early , '' he told M. de la Pailletine . `` There are cruisers about , and if we are seen the game will be spoiled . ''
16704
12
about noon
true
95
97
But now a fresh anxiety arose . There were shapes among the trees which were visible to Moira , though I could not see them , which caused her such terror that I was obliged almost to carry her , and I sometimes thought by the chill of her body that she had died in my arms . With the dawn , however , the shapes disappeared , and Moira 's fears were dispelled . Daylight found us several miles on our way to the coast , which we made , as I reckoned , about noon , to the north of where I had first landed . The cliffs here were high and rocky , the waves breaking at the foot in fountains of spray . The sky was dull and overcast , which betokened a storm . A number of white birds with yellow crests , such as I had seen on my first landing , flew inland , and several fur-coated animals , with heads resembling deer , and powerful tails , hopped across the stubble to the shelter of the trees .
16704
12
midday
true
110
111
Moira had more than once told me that food had mysteriously disappeared from a cave in which she kept a store of meat for our use , and she showed me where the rocks in front of this cave had been scraped of seaweed and mussel-shells as though by the passage of some cumbersome body . But I gave no heed to her anxieties , and although she urged me to shift our camp I would not leave the beacon lest a ship might pass during my absence . Of the dreadful consequences which followed my selfishness it now only remains for me to tell . I was occupied one midday , as usual , scanning the horizon from the top of the cliff near the beacon in search of a passing vessel , when I noticed Moira urging her canoe toward the shore at a rapid pace . In the wake of the canoe a disturbance of the water betokened the presence of some denizen of the deep , and Moira 's action in making for the rocks at top speed betrayed her terror of whatever it was that followed her . Hastily descending the cliff I ran to her assistance , when I saw Moira spring on to a flat rock upon which she generally landed from her canoe . At the same moment a snaky tentacle rose out of the sea and caught her , while other tentacles quickly enveloped her .
16704
0
about midnight
true
128
130
Thus holding to the spar and swimming , sometimes with one hand and sometimes with the other , I kept my head above water until my feet touched ground , when I waded upon the shore of an island , where I fell down exhausted , and for the time lost consciousness . When I came to myself it was almost dark . I had fortunately been carried by a current upon the leeside of the island , so that I was protected from the wind and sea , but my limbs felt numb and cold , while the blood coursed feebly in my veins . I felt too weary to move , and presently I fell asleep , from which I awoke , as I judged , about midnight , much refreshed . I was now once more haunted by the thought of being marooned in a strange country , so that I remained awake , bemoaning my fate and blaming myself for not having taken better precautions against such a mishap . These reflections led me so far that I began to form a project against my life , but the dawn dissipated my gloomy ideas , when I made up my mind to trust to Providence , which had protected me through so many perils . I then mounted the high land to scan the horizon , but no sign of the ship could I see , so I knew myself to be again a castaway .
16704
12
midday
true
122
123
But Melannie showed no fear of him ; in , her delight at being with me upon the ocean away from the savages , among whom she had been reared , she seemed to have forgotten his presence . For the next week after leaving what had been once the Island of Gems , we experienced a spell of fine weather , with bright sun and cool breeze . The elements seemed kind to the exiled queen without a throne , who had trusted herself to the wind and the sea , and but for the anxiety which I felt for the future , the voyage would have been a pleasant one . In order to protect Melannie from the heat of midday , and to ensure her some measure of privacy , I constructed a temporary cabin for her , with some spare canvas which I found on board the boat , but at night she preferred to sleep in the open so that she might watch the stars , which shone with extraordinary brilliancy . It was then that I lowered the sails when our boat drifted upon the moonlit sea . Melannie would at such times creep into my arms , and with her head pillowed upon , my breast would listen to the wonders I had to tell of the world of white people to which I hoped I was taking her . `` Something warns me I shall never see that country , Peter , '' she said to me one night with a sigh , `` but I like to hear you speak of it .
16704
18
six o'clock in the evening
true
76
81
But though the barrels contained only six gallons each , and we put them on their shoulders , all the signs we could make to get them to carry them were useless . They stood like statues , without motion , grinning like so many monkeys . Having watered our vessel we once more put to sea . We were now , by our reckoning , somewhere in the vicinity of New Holland , and at six o'clock in the evening we shortened sail . We were then in twenty fathoms of water , when suddenly we again found ourselves in deep water , and believed all danger at an end . But in less than an hour , without warning , our ship struck on a rock , and remained immovable . Not being near to any shore we were well aware of the gravity of our position .
16704
11
about eleven o'clock
true
63
66
Not being near to any shore we were well aware of the gravity of our position . We feared we had struck a submerged coral reef , and all sails were immediately taken in , and the boats lowered . We had struck just before dark , and at daylight I observed land some eight miles distant . High tide was expected at about eleven o'clock , when it was hoped the vessel would float off , though we feared she would sink in deep water . At twenty minutes past ten the ship floated , but the leak she had sprung gained on the pumps , and there was now three feet nine inches of water in the hold . The men were wearied to death . Each could only pump a few minutes at a time , and then sink exhausted upon the deck .
16704
10
twenty minutes past ten
true
71
75
We feared we had struck a submerged coral reef , and all sails were immediately taken in , and the boats lowered . We had struck just before dark , and at daylight I observed land some eight miles distant . High tide was expected at about eleven o'clock , when it was hoped the vessel would float off , though we feared she would sink in deep water . At twenty minutes past ten the ship floated , but the leak she had sprung gained on the pumps , and there was now three feet nine inches of water in the hold . The men were wearied to death . Each could only pump a few minutes at a time , and then sink exhausted upon the deck . At first we despaired of saving the ship , but eventually we got a sail drawn over the leak , and anchored seven leagues from the shore .
16704
12
noon
true
82
83
I had intended dealing with this man myself , but it now occurred to me that his schooling would serve to rouse Hartog from his apathy . `` If you must know , then , '' I answered , `` it is Hoft Hugens to whom the men look as leader . '' The next minute Hartog was striding through the town , a native club in his hand , which he had taken from the Queen 's house . Although past noon , there were none to be seen outside the huts . All were asleep after their mid-day meal , upon which they had gorged themselves to repletion . At the sight of this defiance of discipline a deep flush overspread Hartog 's face , as though he felt shame for having allowed his authority to pass from him . Then he began to beat with his club upon the doors of the houses until the men came out , some in sleepy remonstrance , and others with curses in their mouths at having been disturbed from their siesta .
16704
15
three in the afternoon
true
95
99
The first group of islands we touched at after leaving the abandoned Spanish settlement at New Holland , appeared to be well wooded and fertile , and approaching one of the largest we cast anchor near the shore . On the following day we endeavoured to work to windward of this dangerous coast , but in spite of skilful seamanship it soon , became certain we were being drawn , probably by some strong current , closer to the land . The ship was so near to the rocks that escape appeared impossible . At three in the afternoon , however , the ship doubled the reefs , it may be said , almost by a miracle . This adventure set us thinking upon a record among the manuscripts we had brought with us of a remarkable phenomenon existing somewhere in these regions . In describing one of the larger islands the record says : `` By the coast of this country , toward the north , is the sea called the Dead Sea , the water whereof runneth into the earth , and if anyone falleth into that water he is never found more . And if shipmen go but a little way into it they are carried rapidly downward , and never return again .
16704
12
midday
true
135
136
When we came to the island we found no difficulty in landing , and were soon engaged with the picks and crow-bars we had brought with us , in the work of gold-getting . We found the report given by the Spanish sailors , who had been the first to land , to be somewhat exaggerated . Still , there was an abundance of gold between the crevices of the rock , and , what was more remarkable , we came upon what had evidently been vessels of beaten gold , thus proving beyond doubt that the island had formerly been inhabited . During the course of the morning we obtained as much gold mixed with quartz as the boats could conveniently carry , when we returned to the ship , intending , after our midday meal , to come back for a fresh supply of the precious metal , but on getting aboard we found Hartog much perturbed by the extraordinary behaviour of the compass , and the strange appearance of the sky . `` I do n't like the look of it , Peter , '' said Hartog , when we descended together to the cabin to discuss the situation . `` I never knew this to happen before but once , and I am not anxious to repeat the experience . Unless I am greatly mistaken , there 's something big coming . ''
16258
12
noons
true
155
156
He cared for neither political nor fashionable life ; and as soon as he came to his inheritance , married a handsome , sensible daleswoman with whom he had long been in love . Then he retired from a world which had nothing to give him comparable , in his eyes , with the simple , dignified pleasures incident to his position as Squire of Sandal-Side . For dearly he loved the old hall , with its sheltering sycamores and oaks , -- oaks which had been young trees when the knights lying in Furness Abbey led the Grasmere bowmen at Cr茅cy and Agincourt . Dearly he loved the large , low rooms , full of comfortable elegance ; and the sweet , old-fashioned , Dutch garden , so green through all the snows of winter , so cheerfully grave and fragrant in the summer twilights , so shady and cool even in the hottest noons . Thirty years ago he was coming through it one July evening . It had been a very hot day ; and the flowers were drooping , and the birds weary and silent . But Squire Sandal , though flushed and rumpled looking , had still the air of drippy mornings and hazy afternoons about him .
16258
2
two o'clock
true
71
73
`` Mr. Wordsworth speaks foolishness to a great many people besides Nancy Butterworth , '' said Sophia warmly ; `` but he is a great poet and a great seer to those who can understand him . '' `` Well , well , Mr. Wordsworth is neither here nor there in our affairs . We 'll go up to Latriggs in the afternoon , Charlotte . I 'll be ready at two o'clock . '' `` And I , also , father . '' Her face was flushed and thoughtful , and she had become suddenly quiet . The squire glanced at her , but without curiosity ; he only thought , `` What a pity she is a lass !
16258
9
nine o'clock in the morning
true
133
138
Go on , Charlotte . '' He kept on at this feckless work till late in the afternoon , and by that time he had filled both bags full with odd bits of stone . Joe said he had n't often had a harder darrack after sheep at clipping-time than he had after that old man , carrying his leather bags . But , however , they got back to our house , and mother gave the stranger some bread and milk ; and after he had taken it , and talked with father about sheep-farming and such like , he paid Joe his five shillings like a man , and told him he would give him another five shillings if he would bring his bags full of stones down to Ske脿l-Hill by nine o'clock in the morning . `` Are you sleepy Sophy ? '' `` Oh , dear , no ! Go on . ''
16258
4
four o'clock
true
121
123
`` That distinction , '' she said , `` ought to be reserved for the bride ; '' and among the maids in pink and blue and primrose , she stood a very lily of womanhood . Her diaphanous , floating robe of Dacca muslin ; her Indian veil of silver tissue , filmy as light ; her gleaming pearls and feathery fan , made her `` A sight to dream of , not to tell . '' The service was followed by the conventional wedding-breakfast ; the congratulations of friends , and the rattling away of the bridal-carriage to the `` hurrahing '' of the servants and the villagers ; and the _ tin-tin-tabula _ of the wedding-peals . Before four o'clock the last guest had departed , and the squire stood with his wife and Charlotte weary and disconsolate amid the remains of the feast and the dying flowers ; all of them distinctly sensitive to that mournful air which accomplished pleasures leave behind them . The squire could say nothing to dispel it . He took his rod as an excuse for solitude , and went off to the fells . Mrs. Sandal was crying with exhaustion , and was easily persuaded to go to her room , and sleep .
16258
9
nine o'clock
true
71
73
Rich food and wine are by no means conducive to cheerfulness . The squire sloomed and slept in his chair ; and finally , after a cup of tea , went to bed . The servants had a party in their own hall , and Mrs. Sandal and Charlotte were occupied an hour or two in its ordering . Then the mother was thoroughly weary ; and before it was quite nine o'clock , Harry and Charlotte were left alone by the parlor fire . Charlotte was a little dull also ; for Steve had found it impossible to get down the mountain during the storm , and she missed him , and was constantly inclined to fall into short silences . After one of them , she raised her eyes to Harry 's face , and was shocked by its expression . `` Harry , '' she said , leaning forward to take his hand , `` I am sure you are in trouble .
16258
12
noon
true
75
76
He made agonizing efforts to retain control over the surging wave of anguish , rising , rising , rising from his breast to his brain . And failing to do so , he fell with the mighty cry of one who , even in the death agony , protests against the victor . The news spread as if all the birds in the air carried it . There were a dozen physicians in Seat-Sandal before noon . There was a crowd of shepherds around it , waiting in silent groups for their verdict . All the afternoon the gentlemen of the Dales were coming and going with offers of help and sympathy ; and in the lonely parlor the rector was softly pacing up and down , muttering , as he walked , passages from the `` Order for the Visitation of the Sick '' : -- `` O Saviour of the world , who by thy cross and precious blood hast redeemed us , save us , and help us , we humbly beseech thee , O Lord . `` Spare us good Lord .
16258
12
noon
true
68
69
He strove to keep calm , to husband his strength , to devise some means of protecting his wife 's rights . `` I must send for Lawyer Moser : if there is any way out of this wrong , he will know the right way , '' he thought . But he had to rest a little ere he could give the necessary prompt instructions . Towards noon he revived , and asked eagerly for Stephen Latrigg . A messenger was at once sent to Up-Hill . He found Stephen in the barn , where the men were making the flails beat with a rhythm and regularity as exhilarating as music . Stephen left them at once ; but , when he told Ducie what word had been brought him , he was startled at her look and manner .
16258
4
About four o'clock
true
39
42
Charlotte only clung to her dream of hope , and refused to be wakened from it . She was sure her father had been worse many a time . She was almost cross at Ducie 's unusual visit . About four o'clock Steve had a long interview with the squire . Charlotte walked restlessly to and fro in the corridor ; she heard Steve 's voice , strong and kind and solemn , and she divined what promises he was making to the dying man for herself and for her mother . But even her love did not anticipate their parting words , -- `` Farewell , Stephen . Yet one word more .
16258
11
eleven o'clock
true
99
101
For the present master and mistress of Sandal were not people who cared for complaints . `` If you can do the work , Ann , you may stay , '' said Sophia to the dissatisfied cook ; `` if not , the squire will pay you your due wages . He has a friend in London whose cook would like a situation in the country . '' After which explanation Ann behaved herself admirably , and never found her work hard , though dinner was two hours later , and the supper dishes were not sent in until eleven o'clock . But , though Julius had succeeded in bringing his table so far within his own ideas of comfort , in other respects he felt his impotence to order events . Every meal-time brought him in contact with the widow Sandal and with Charlotte ; and neither Sophia , nor yet himself , had felt able to request the late mistress to resign her seat at the foot of the table . And Sophia soon began to think it unkind of her mother not to see the position , and voluntarily amend it .
16258
11
eleven o'clock
true
44
46
We shall not come back to Seat-Sandal again in this chapter of our eternity . '' And with a mocking laugh he turned away to make his own preparations . `` But why go in the night , Julius ? You said to-night at eleven o'clock . Why not wait until morning ? '' `` Because , beloved , I owe a great deal of money in the neighborhood . Stephen can pay it for me .
16703
12
noon
true
168
169
He had ended by being able to smile at his literary ambitions of twenty , cultivating his indolence as something choice and original , finding his destiny appropriate . He spent the time in interminable reveries , sitting with a volume before him , as often as not unopened , smoking incessantly , and looking out of the window . The habit amused himself at times ; it was so eminently symbolic of his destiny . Life , after all , had been to him nothing so much as that -- a long looking out of window , the impartial spectatorship of a crowd of persons and passions from which he had come at last to seem strangely detached , almost as much as from this chameleon river , which he had observed with such satisfaction in all its manifold gradations of character and colour ; its curious cold grayness in the beginning of an autumnal dawn ; the illusion of warmth and depth which it sustained at noon , bringing up its burden of leviathans on the top of the flood ; its sheen on moonless nights , when only little punctures , green and red and orange , and its audible stillness , reminded him that down in the obscurity the great polluted stream stole on wearily , monotonously , everlastingly to the sea . It was changeful and changeless . He thought he knew its effects by heart , but it had always new ones in reserve to surprise and delight him . He declared it at last to be inexhaustible .
16703
0
midnight
true
50
51
He turned to Oswyn , who had been hanging back to avoid any appearance of interest in the conversation , for corroboration . `` You will come back , of course ? '' `` Rather late , is n't it ? I think I had better catch some train before midnight , if there is one . '' `` Oh , there are plenty of trains , '' said Rainham vaguely . `` We can settle that matter later . I can give you a bed here , you know , or a berth , at any rate . ''
16703
12
morning about midday
true
58
61
`` Near here ? '' The girl mentioned a street which he sometimes passed through when economy of time induced him to make an otherwise undesirable short-cut to the railway station . `` Well , '' he said presently , `` I ca n't keep my friend here waiting , you know . Come and see me to-morrow morning about midday , and I will see if I can help you . Only you must promise me to go straight home now ! And '' -- here he dropped a coin quickly into her hand -- `` buy something for your child ; you both look as if you wanted it . '' The girl looked at him dumbly for a moment .
16703
3
three o'clock
true
31
33
Then , dismissing the subject somewhat brutally , `` Ah , well , it 's no business of mine ! Will you give me a light ? Thanks ! '' At three o'clock Lightmark dismissed his model -- an Italian , with a wonderfully fine torso and admirable capabilities for picturesque pose , whom he had easily persuaded to abandon his ice-cream barrow to sit for him two or three times a week , acting the part of studio servant in the intervals . `` That will do , Cesare , '' he said , '' _ aspetto persone _ ; besides , you 're shivering : I shall have you catching cold next , and I ca n't paint while you 're sneezing . Yes , you 're quite right , _ 猫 un freddo terribile _ , considering that it 's July . Off with you now , and come again at the same time on Friday .
16703
0
About midnight
true
46
48
`` But you must bear in mind , too , the circumstance that the laddie 's just sold a picture . '' `` Good business ! '' ejaculated Lightmark , as he reflected to himself that perhaps that despaired-of fiver would be repaid after all . About midnight most of the men left . Rainham remained , and Lightmark , who professed himself too lazy to move . Rainham lapsed into his familiar state of half-abstraction , while his friend cross-examined a young sculptor fresh from Rome . At the next table Oswyn was holding forth , with eager gesticulations and the excitement of the hour in his eyes , on the subject of a picture which he contemplated painting in oils for exhibition at the Salon next year .
16703
12
the midday sun
true
153
156
Would not a more rigorous inquiry , a little patient investigation into so curious a coincidence , have been the more seemly part , as much for his friend 's sake as for Eve 's , so that this haunting , intolerable doubt might have been for ever put away -- as surely it would have been ? The contrary issue was too horrible for supposition . And he ended by mocking at himself with a half-sigh for carrying fastidiousness so far , recognising the mundane fitness of the match , and that heroic lovers , such as his tenderness for the damsel would have had , are , after all , rare , perhaps hardly existing out of visions in a somewhat gross world , where the finest ore is not without its considerable alloy . Two days later , as he sat upon his wonted seat , in lazy enjoyment of the midday sun , a _ vetturino _ , heralded far down the road by the jingle of his horse 's bells , deposited a couple at the door whose faces were familiar . At _ table d'h么te _ , though he was separated from the new-comers by half a dozen covers , he had leisure to identify them as the Dollonds ; and by-and-by the roving , impartial gaze of the Academician 's wife encountering him , he could assure himself that the recognition was mutual . They came together at the end of _ d茅jeuner _ , and presently , at Mrs. Dollond 's instigation , started for a stroll through the olives towards the old town . `` Are you wintering here ? ''
16703
6
six o'clock before
true
35
38
Now tell me whom you saw . Charles Sylvester , of course ? But no , I am too sleepy now ; you shall tell me all about it after dinner . '' It was six o'clock before the Colonel was able to deposit his bulky , military person rather stiffly on a cushioned seat , and to remove his immaculate silk hat , with an expression of weary satisfaction . He had devoted all the sunny spring afternoon , -LRB- when he might have been at Hurlingham , or playing whist at the `` Rag '' -RRB- , to making his way , laboriously and apologetically , from room to room in search of friends and acquaintances , whom , when found , he would convoy strategically into the immediate vicinity of No. 37 in the First Room . `` My nephew 's picture , '' he explained ; `` nice thing ! I do n't know much about painting '' -LRB- he called it paintin ' -RRB- `` and art , and all that sort of thing , but I believe it 's about as good as they make them . ''
16703
0
midnight
true
51
52
Lady Garnett responded for her a little flippantly . `` Oh , Mary went nowhere this morning , Mr. Sylvester -- not even to the church parade . We were very late last night , at Lady Dulminster 's . London grows later and later ; we shall be dining at midnight soon . '' `` I should like to go to the Temple Church sometimes , '' said Mary , `` because of the singing , only it is so very far . '' Charles Sylvester bent forward with bland satisfaction ; he had it so obviously on the tip of his tongue that he would be charmed to be her escort , that the girl hastened to interrupt him . `` You were not at Lady Dulminster 's , Mr. Sylvester ?
16703
5
five o'clock
true
117
119
Later , when Mosenthal 's card of invitation for the Private View arrived , she noted the day upon her list of engagements . On the morning of Oswyn 's ordeal , Eve sent a message to her husband , who was engaged with a model in the studio , to notify to him her intention of taking the carriage into town later in the afternoon ; to which he had returned a gallant reply , expressing a hope that , if it would not bore her too much , she would pick him up somewhere and drive him home . Where and when could he meet her ? The reply , `` At Mosenthal 's at five o'clock , '' did not surprise him . He did not happen to have the vaguest idea as to what was the attraction of the day at that particular gallery . It might be Burmese landscapes , or portraits of parrots ; it was all one to him . It was extremely decorous in his wife to affect picture-galleries , and Mosenthal 's place was conveniently near to his favourite club .
12019
0
midnight
true
77
78
Now that she had come to a decision , the queen exhibited a joyous determination , and her mind recovered from its depression . She hastened to dispatch a courier to Malmaison to the Empress Josephine , now forgotten and neglected by all , to conjure her to leave for Novara at once . She then retired to her bedchamber to seek the rest she so much needed after so many hours of excitement . But at midnight she was aroused from her repose to a sad awakening . Her husband , with whom she had held no kind of intercourse since his return , had now , in the hour of danger , determined to assert his marital authority over his wife and children . He wrote the queen a letter , requiring her to leave Paris with her children , and follow the empress . Hortense replied with a decided refusal .
22480
3
A quarter to four
true
26
30
Louisa did not see why `` our Alfred '' should be spared . `` What time is it ? '' came the plaintive voice . `` A quarter to four . '' `` Oh ! '' wailed the old lady , `` he 'll be here in half an hour , and no dinner ready for him . '' `` Let me do it ? ''
22480
0
midnight
true
68
69
When he was half undressed the knowledge of his mother came upon him , and the suffering seized him in its grip like two hands , in agony . He lay on the bed screwed up tight . It lasted so long , and exhausted him so much , that he fell asleep , without having the energy to get up and finish undressing . He awoke after midnight to find himself stone cold . He undressed and got into bed , and was soon asleep again . At a quarter to six he woke , and instantly remembered . Having pulled on his trousers and lighted a candle , he went into his mother 's room .
22480
5
a quarter to six
true
51
55
It lasted so long , and exhausted him so much , that he fell asleep , without having the energy to get up and finish undressing . He awoke after midnight to find himself stone cold . He undressed and got into bed , and was soon asleep again . At a quarter to six he woke , and instantly remembered . Having pulled on his trousers and lighted a candle , he went into his mother 's room . He put his hand before the candle flame so that no light fell on the bed . `` Mother ! ''
22480
12
midday
true
26
27
She turned her cheek to him . He kissed her , then went away , in bitter despair . He went to work . XII By midday his mother was dead . The word met him at the pit-mouth . As he had known , inwardly , it was not a shock to him , and yet he trembled . He went home quite calmly , feeling only heavy in his breathing .
22480
8
eight in the morning
true
58
62
`` Yes , '' she replied , in a dead voice . But there was a thrill of pleasure in this death . The Shadow in the Rose Garden A rather small young man sat by the window of a pretty seaside cottage trying to persuade himself that he was reading the newspaper . It was about half-past eight in the morning . Outside , the glory roses hung in the morning sunshine like little bowls of fire tipped up . The young man looked at the table , then at the clock , then at his own big silver watch . An expression of stiff endurance came on to his face .
22480
9
nine o'clock
true
29
31
`` I 've been waiting long enough , '' he said . `` For me or for breakfast ? '' she said lightly . `` You know we said nine o'clock . I should have thought you could have slept after the journey . '' `` You know I 'm always up at five , and I could n't stop in bed after six . You might as well be in pit as in bed , on a morning like this . ''
22480
2
two o'clock in the morning
true
55
60
After a while she calmed herself , rose , and sponged her face . Then once more on that fatal night she prepared for rest . Instead , however , or retiring , she pulled a silk quilt from her disordered bed and wrapping it round her , sat miserably to think . It was two o'clock in the morning . IV The fire was sunk to cold ashes in the grate , and the grey morning was creeping through the half-opened curtains like a thing ashamed , when Lois awoke . It was painful to move her head : her neck was cramped . The girl awoke in full recollection .
22480
7
about seven o'clock
true
16
19
`` Nothing . Ca n't I get up ? '' she replied animatedly . It was about seven o'clock , scarcely light yet in the cold bedroom . Whiston lay still and looked at his wife . She was a pretty little thing , with her fleecy , short black hair all tousled . He watched her as she dressed quickly , flicking her small , delightful limbs , throwing her clothes about her .
22480
1
one o'clock
true
32
34
`` Are you enjoying yourself ? '' he asked . `` Ever so , '' she replied , with a fervent , yet detached tone . `` It 's going on for one o'clock , '' he said . `` Is it ? '' she answered . It meant nothing to her .
22480
5
half past five
true
55
58
He put before the fire his moleskin trousers , a clean singlet , or sleeveless vest of thick flannel , a pair of stockings and his pit boots , arranging them all to be warm and ready for morning . `` Now tha sees . That wants doin ' ivery night . '' Punctually at half past five he left her , without any form of leave-taking , going downstairs in his shirt . When he arrived home at four o'clock in the afternoon his dinner was ready to be dished up . She was startled when he came in , a short , sturdy figure , with a face indescribably black and streaked . She stood before the fire in her white blouse and white apron , a fair girl , the picture of beautiful cleanliness .
22480
16
four o'clock in the afternoon
true
39
44
`` Now tha sees . That wants doin ' ivery night . '' Punctually at half past five he left her , without any form of leave-taking , going downstairs in his shirt . When he arrived home at four o'clock in the afternoon his dinner was ready to be dished up . She was startled when he came in , a short , sturdy figure , with a face indescribably black and streaked . She stood before the fire in her white blouse and white apron , a fair girl , the picture of beautiful cleanliness . He `` clommaxed '' in , in his heavy boots .
22480
3
five minutes to four
true
69
73
I s 'll tell nobody . '' `` Oh , but if it does , whatever shall we do ? ... '' The Christening The mistress of the British School stepped down from her school gate , and instead of turning to the left as usual , she turned to the right . Two women who were hastening home to scramble their husbands ' dinners together -- it was five minutes to four -- stopped to look at her . They stood gazing after her for a moment ; then they glanced at each other with a woman 's little grimace . To be sure , the retreating figure was ridiculous : small and thin , with a black straw hat , and a rusty cashmere dress hanging full all round the skirt . For so small and frail and rusty a creature to sail with slow , deliberate stride was also absurd .
22480
4
a quarter to five
true
37
41
`` Why , mother , it 's hardly a bit dark yet . The lamp 's not lighted , and my father 's not home . '' `` No , he is n't . But it 's a quarter to five ! Did you see anything of him ? '' The child became serious . She looked at her mother with large , wistful blue eyes .
22480
5
Twenty minutes to six
true
27
31
Their eyes and their parted lips were wondering . The mother sat rocking in silence for some time . Then she looked at the clock . `` Twenty minutes to six ! '' In a tone of fine bitter carelessness she continued : `` Eh , he 'll not come now till they bring him . There he 'll stick ! But he need n't come rolling in here in his pit-dirt , for I wo n't wash him .
22480
9
nine o'clock
true
67
69
It was a few minutes past nine . She was startled by the rapid chuff of the winding-engine at the pit , and the sharp whirr of the brakes on the rope as it descended . Again she felt the painful sweep of her blood , and she put her hand to her side , saying aloud , `` Good gracious ! -- it 's only the nine o'clock deputy going down , '' rebuking herself . She sat still , listening . Half an hour of this , and she was wearied out . `` What am I working myself up like this for ? ''
22480
9
a quarter to ten
true
38
42
`` What am I working myself up like this for ? '' she said pitiably to herself , `` I s 'll only be doing myself some damage . '' She took out her sewing again . At a quarter to ten there were footsteps . One person ! She watched for the door to open . It was an elderly woman , in a black bonnet and a black woollen shawl -- his mother .
22480
10
Ten o'clock
true
40
42
She was shocked by this interruption , and seemed to wonder . `` What time is it ? '' -- the plaintive thin voice of the child , sinking back unhappily into sleep , asked this last question . `` Ten o'clock , '' answered the mother more softly . Then she must have bent down and kissed the children . Matthews beckoned to the men to come away . They put on their caps and took up the stretcher .
12015
12
noon
true
72
73
With a knife I tested the resistance of the mortar , breaking the point of the blade , yet detaching quite a chunk , and wrenching out one small stone . Beyond doubt the task might be accomplished -- but what was below ? How was I to get down those smoothly plastered walls -- and back again , if necessary ? I glanced at my watch ; it was already nearing noon , and at any moment food might be brought me . I must wait until after that ; then I should probably remain undisturbed for several hours . I shoved back the bed in such position its head-board completely concealed the slight excavation , and sat down upon it , planning anew how best to proceed . The time passed with no unusual sound reaching me from the hall without .
12015
9
nine o'clock
true
74
76
There was a muttered word or two to the sentry , the newcomer insisting angrily on seeing Beauregard ; then a woman 's voice suddenly broke in with an exclamation of surprise . `` You back again ! I am afraid you will have to wait to see the general unless your mission is of the utmost importance . He is lying down , and left orders he was not to be disturbed before nine o'clock . '' `` My mission is important enough , '' was the reply , `` but perhaps , it can be attended to without him . Where can , we be alone , Billie ? '' `` Right in here , '' stepping through the doorway into the deeper dusk of the dining-room .
12015
9
nine o'clock
true
88
90
He looked out over the hills , and then back into my face , his eyes narrowing , his lips setting firm over the white teeth . I little realized what was taking place in the fellow 's brain , what real motive influenced his decision , or the issues involved . `` I reckon I will , sah , providin ' de col ` nel says so . '' There was , of course , no difficulty in obtaining the consent of that officer , and by nine o'clock we were ready to depart , ten picked men , young , vigorous lads , though veterans in service , led by Miles , together with the negro Le Gaire and myself . Taking a lesson from the guerillas we were armed only with revolvers , intending to fight , if fight we must , at close quarters ; and the brass buttons , and all insignia of rank liable to attract attention had been removed from our blouses . Upon our heads we wore slouch hats . I had decided to make the attempt on foot , as we could thus advance in greater silence .
12015
9
9:10 A.M.
true
40
42
It was only as I read them a second time that I understood , and then I gazed helplessly into the faces about me , striving to grasp the full situation . `` HDQTS 9TH ILL. . CAV . `` 9:10 A.M. `` LIEUT. GALESWORTH : `` We advanced our centre and left at daylight , and have driven the enemy from intrenchments . Our right is under orders to advance up ravine and strike their rear . We move at once . I send this back by Ross , who will take twenty men with him to help you .
12016
8
eight o'clock
true
114
116
They were dragged in his stead , as prisoners of state and dangerous criminals , to headquarters at the New Market . The two other writers , whom the Austrians pursued with furious zeal , were the two newspaper editors , Kretschmer and Krause . These two had no idea of such pursuit ; indeed , they did not even know that the Austrians had penetrated into the city . In the safe hiding-place in which both of them had passed the night they had only learned that Berlin had surrendered to the Russians , and that General Tottleben had ordered the magistrates to receive him the next morning at the Kottbuss Gate at eight o'clock . It was intended that the reception should be a brilliant and solemn one , and that the general should be mollified and conciliated by humble subjection ; it was also determined to endeavor , by an offering of money made to him individually , to induce him to make the contribution laid on the town moderate and light . The news was like a thunder-clap to the two editors , for it compelled them to leave their safe hiding-place , and to venture out into the dangerous world . For these gentlemen , editors of such renowned journals , who prided themselves on giving their readers the most recent and important intelligence , would not dare to be absent at the reception of the Russian general .
12016
7
seven o'clock
true
66
68
`` This time , '' said he , `` at least , I have forestalled my rival , good Mr. Krause . To-morrow the _ Vossian Gazette _ will be the only one which will be able to report , from actual observation , on the formal entry of the Russian general . Oh , how vexed _ Spener 's _ will be ! There is seven o'clock striking . In an hour the ceremony will begin . _ Spener 's Journal _ still sleeps , while the _ Vossian Gazette _ wakes and works , and is alert to satisfy the curiosity of Berlin . '' Poor , benighted editor of the _ Vossian _ !
28357
11
eleven o鈥檆lock
true
89
91
Three days passed . Will still remained at the coast-guard station , and men still hovered near . Tom came over once and said that it had been decided among a number of the fishermen that no great harm should be done to Will when they got him , but that he should be thrashed within an inch of his life . On the third day the coxswain said to Will : `` I have a message this morning from the lieutenant , that he will be here by eleven o'clock . If you will write a line to your friend I will send it over by one of the men . '' Tom arrived breathless two minutes before the officer . `` My eye , I have had a run of it , '' he said .
28357
12
twelve o鈥檆lock
true
77
79
They ` fudge ' , as it is termed , the answer , and if they get it right are quite content without troubling themselves in any way with the principle involved . If you want to be a good navigator you must grasp the principle , and work the answer out for yourself . When you can do this you will have a right to call yourself a navigator . If you come to me at twelve o'clock to-morrow I will show you how to work a quadrant . The theory is easy . You have but to take the angle the sun makes with the horizon at its moment of highest ascension . In practice , however , this is far from easy , and you will be some time before you can hit upon the right moment .
28357
8
eight o鈥檆lock
true
102
104
`` There is one thing , Forster . If you did not put a sentry over the hatchway , neither did I , so I am just as much to blame for the disaster as you are . If I had had a man there they could hardly have cut away the woodwork without his hearing . I certainly wish you to state in your report that you took the watch over from me just as I left it , and that no sentry had been placed there , as ought certainly to have been done when I came on watch at eight o'clock . '' `` It is very kind of you , Gilmore , to wish to take the blame upon your own shoulders , but the responsibility is wholly mine . I ought to have reminded you to put a man there , there can be no question at all about that , but I never gave the matter a thought , and the blunder has cost us nine good seamen . I shall be lucky if I only escape with a tremendous wigging .
28357
12
twelve o鈥檆lock
true
119
121
`` Then they will bring you sugar-canes half as thick as your wrist , looking as innocent as may be ; both ends are sealed up with bits of the pith , and when you open one end you find that all the joints have been bored through , and the cane is full of rum . But mind , lads , you are fools if you touch it ; it is new and strong and rank , and a bottle of it would knock you silly . And that is not the worst of it , for fever catches hold of you , and fever out there ai n't no joke . You eats a good dinner at twelve o'clock , and you are buried in the palisades at six ; that 's called yellow jack . It is a country where you can enjoy yourselves reasonable with fruit , and perhaps a small sup of rum , but where you must beware of drinking ; if you do that you are all right . The islands are beautiful , downright beautiful ; there ai n't many places which I troubles myself to look at , but the West Indies are like gardens with feathery sorts of trees , and mountains , and everything that you can want in nature . '' `` It is very hot , is n't it , Bill ? ''
28357
12
twelve o鈥檆lock
true
89
91
`` She is probably steering for the rendezvous , so by following her we may at least get some important information . '' All day the chase continued , but there was no apparent change in the position of the two vessels . The _ Furious _ was kept on the same course through the night , and to the satisfaction of all on board they found , when morning broke , that they had certainly gained on the schooner , as her mainsails were now visible . At twelve o'clock a low bank of sand was sighted ahead , and the schooner had entered a channel in this two hours later . The _ Furious _ had to be hove-to outside the shoal . The sand extended a long distance , but there were several breaks in it , and from the masthead a net-work of channels could be made out . It was a great disappointment to the crew of the _ Furious _ to have to give up the chase and see the schooner only some four miles off on her way under easy sail .
28357
3
three in the morning
true
39
43
`` All right ! '' said the first lieutenant ; `` let him stow himself away in the bow till the fighting begins . '' Accordingly Tom curled himself up by the gun . It was between two and three in the morning when the trees of the central island were made out ; they were not more than five hundred yards away . Presently from a projecting point , where a heavy mass could be made out , a cannon was fired . The shot flew overhead , but the effect was instantaneous . Shouts were heard on shore and the sound of oars in rowlocks .
28357
6
six o鈥檆lock
true
55
57
These were soon dragged down to the yard . Then strong gangs set to work to square them , and the carpenters to cut them into planks . The first lieutenant remained with them , encouraging them at their work , while the junior officers and midshipmen were divided among the various gangs . By six o'clock , when the _ Furious _ signalled for all hands to come on board , they had indeed done a good day 's work . A pile of planks lay ready to be used as required . The carpenters had made some progress with a keel , which they were laboriously chopping out from the straight trunk of a large tree . By evening of the next day this was finished and placed in position .