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(CNN)Yachts slicing through water are difficult to capture in a single image. There is the speed, the dynamism, the turns, the spray, the reflections and ever-changing lighting. So professional sailing photographers choose to focus on different elements -- the patterns in the sky, the facial expressions of the crew, or the wind filling the sails.Nothing shows this more than the selection of photographs from this year's Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image. The annual contest picks the top 80 sailing photographs from sailing regattas that year. Then, with the help of an international jury and a online public vote, these images are whittled down to a shortlist of 20, and finally to a single winner.Photographer Eugenia Bakunova captures the speed of the Volvo Ocean Race.Russian photographer Eugenia Bakunova specialises in speed. "I love the challenges of shooting sailing dynamics," she says. "That is why whenever it is possible I try to catch the speed with my camera."Chinese photographer Bo Wang tries to capture the moments of calm when the wind drops during a race. "Yacht racing is not only fierce confrontation, but also quiet and beautiful," he says.Read MoreAndras Kollman, from Hungary, has a different approach. He explains that he thinks less about the action of the race and more about capturing "magic, poetic moments." In this year's contest, his photo shows a bird racing on the water towards a group of yachts. Andras Kollmann focuses on the bird rather than the boats during the Kékszalag Regatta in Hungary."Birds and sailors operate in the same way," Kollman says. "They both trim lightweight streamlined structures to create lift; there are many physical features working together, but the sails have the key role."Evolving technology is giving more opportunities for photographers to capture new angles. Since last year -- when Sören Hese won with an extraordinary drone shot from the German 505 class championships -- jury members have seen an increase in photographers using drones to show bird's eye views of the yachts. Sören Hese won in 2017 with this photo taken from a drone during the German 505 championships.The contest is open to professional photographers from all over the world -- this year, images were submitted from photographers spanning 25 countries. It includes shots from Olympic sailing events, the Volvo Ocean Race, the Extreme Sailing Series and many more. Nicolas Mirabaud, a member of Mirabaud's executive committee and the international jury, was impressed by the high caliber of photos. "Once again this year, the submitted pictures show the complexity and beauty of the sport of sailing," he says.
5sport
Story highlightsDutch midfielder Wes Sneijder in contract dispute with Inter MilanCash-strapped Italian club asking the 28-year-old to take a pay cutHe has not played since September 26 and will not be considered for selectionSneijder has been one of Inter's key players since moving to the San Siro in 2009Wesley Sneijder's future at Inter Milan is in doubt after the Italian club confirmed on Saturday that the Dutch playmaker will not be considered for selection until he agrees to take a pay cut.The 28-year-old is one of football's highest-paid players, but he has struggled to regain the heights of 2010 when he helped the Netherlands reach the World Cup final after a treble-winning season with Inter.He has not played for the cash-strapped Serie A side since September 26, at least partially due to injuries, but now Inter technical director Marco Branca says he will stay on the sidelines until he accepts a "contract adjustment.""The situation with Wes, who is part of the history of this club and a player we all care about, is that we've been discussing a possible -- and for us necessary -- adjustment to his contract for a while," Branca said in quotes reported by Inter's website. "We want to give the player and his entourage all the time they need to consider the terms of our proposal carefully, so the coach and the club have decided not to use the player in this period until things are clearer. This also allows our coach to give more playing time to the other players." Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's view Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewRising from the ashes – Over the weekend third-tier Spanish club Real Oviedo were saved from extinction after receiving a huge injection of cash from the world's richest man Carlos Slim.Hide Caption 1 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewHard times – Oviedo fans show their support for the club in the Estadio Carlos Tartiere with a banner reading "For the future of Real Oviedo". The Spanish club had needed to raise €1.9 million ($2.4 million) by November 17 or go bust.Hide Caption 2 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewGlobal concern – Earlier in November Oviedo's board announced a share issue to attract investment and save the club. Remarkably the scheme took off as fans from all over the world bought the €11 ($13) shares after Oviedo's precarious position was highlighted on the social media website Twitter.Hide Caption 3 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's view"Extraordinary" gesture. – Slim was so impressed by the interest of fans in Oviedo from across the world -- he described their support as "extraordinary" -- that the Mexican tycoon pumped in a further $2.5 million to become Oviedo's majority shareholder. According to Forbes magazine, Slim has a net worth of $69 billion, having made his fortune in the telecommunications industry.Hide Caption 4 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewOviedo solidarity – The Oviedo players huddle on the pitch before the match. Just over a decade ago Oviedo were playing in La Liga alongside Real Madrid and Barcelona, but mismanagement from the club's directors took the Asturian team to the brink of bankruptcy in recent years.Hide Caption 5 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewSoccer synergy – In September, Slim bought 30% stakes in two Mexican football teams, Pachuca and Leon, and he plans to use Oviedo "to create synergies and exchanges between Spanish, Mexican and Latin American football.''Hide Caption 6 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewDepth of feeling – Oviedo fans display a banner in the Estadio Carlos Tartiere reading: "Happen what may, Oviedistas until death." Of Slim's intervention, an Oviedo statement said: "This challenge and ambition is strictly a sports investment and one that looks to benefit the club and its fans. The investment will try to support Oviedo's players so they can reach their goals and the club can reach the division that corresponds to its history and values.''Hide Caption 7 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewLowe down – Spanish football expert and long-time Oviedo supporter Sid Lowe has been a key figure in publicizing the club's plight. "Naturally, I have reservations, doubts & concerns," tweeted Lowe last weekend. "But with c. €2m of shares bought by 13,000+ ppl round world & Slim buying €2m Oviedo safe."Hide Caption 8 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewProud tradition – World Cup winner Juan Mata is one of the stars produced by Oviedo's youth system. He now plays for England's European champions Chelsea.Hide Caption 9 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewPremier support – Michu was a Real Oviedo player for four years and has been campaigning on Twitter to save the club. He now plays in the English Premier League with Welsh club Swansea.Hide Caption 10 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewCazorla concern – Arsenal's midfield maestro Santi Cazorla is another big-name player from Oviedo's academy who helped save his former club.Hide Caption 11 of 12 Photos: Real Oviedo - A fan's viewSlim's sporting interests – Mexican tycoon Slim is pictured at the 2012 Homeless World Cup in October. His widespread interests include providing financial backing for Mexican Formula One driver Sergio Perez.Hide Caption 12 of 12 Photos: Match-fixing in football Photos: Match-fixing in footballIn-play betting – The Secret Footballer says in the early days of in-play betting players used to make money by manipulating elements of the match such as who would win the first throw in.Hide Caption 1 of 4 Photos: Match-fixing in footballLundekvam speaks out – Former Southampton man Claus Lundekvam has insisted that whilst he and the other players knew what they were doing at the time was illegal, it was never considered more than a bit of fun. Players, he claims, would bet on anything from who would get carded to the recipient of the first throw-in. En route to away matches everything was fair game for a flutter, he says, except for the score.Hide Caption 2 of 4 Photos: Match-fixing in footballBohinen's concern – Lars Bohinen enjoyed eight successful years in the Premier League, and played alongside Lundekvam at international level for Norway. He explains that whilst he heard talk of spot-fixing, he never fully bought into the idea. It is only now, years after his retirement, that he considers that gambling talk between the players was more than a harmless joke. He also believes that there is far more addiction amongst top-flight players than people see. "You could sense it from the way they gambled", he says.Hide Caption 3 of 4 Photos: Match-fixing in footballAdams' addiction – For former Arsenal and England captain Tony Adams holds the matter of addiction amongst professioanl footballers much more seriously. After overcoming drug and alcohol problems he fouded the Sporting Chance Clinic, dedicated to help other sportsmen and women do the same. The Professional Footballers' Association and ex-Gunner Paul Merson are also patrons.Hide Caption 4 of 4 Photos: Dortmund's training pays dividends Photos: Dortmund's training pays dividendsThe final frontier? – The "Footbonaut" -- is a robotic cage which footballers can use to improve passing, spatial awareness and control. The machine is being used by German champions Borussia Dortmund.Hide Caption 1 of 5 Photos: Dortmund's training pays dividendsA giant leap for soccer training? – Once inside the "Footbonaut", a player is fed balls by eight different machines and then has deliver the ball to one of the 72 panels - - which is indciated by a flashing green light -- that make up the space-age contraption before they receive another ball. This picture shows Dortmund's German star Mario Gotze testing himself against the machine.Hide Caption 2 of 5 Photos: Dortmund's training pays dividendsHigh-klass Klopp – German coach Jurgen Klopp has overseen Dortmund's recent domination of German football. Dortmund have won the Bundesliga in each of the last two seasons, winning plaudits for the adventurous style of play. Klopp's team also currently sit top of a European Champions League group containing Real Madrid, Manchester City and Ajax.Hide Caption 3 of 5 Photos: Dortmund's training pays dividendsPolish power – Dortmund's rise to prominence has forced their attractive young squad into the limelight. None more so than Polish striker Robert Lewandowski, who was strongly linked with a move to Manchester United earlier this year.Hide Caption 4 of 5 Photos: Dortmund's training pays dividendsBorussia's best – One player who did swap Dortmund for Manchester was Shinji Kagawa. The Japanese playmaker had made a promising start to his Old Trafford career before being sidelined with a knee injury last month. Another player developed by Dortmund was Nuri Sahin, the Turkish midfielder who signed for Real Madrid in 2011 before joining Liverpool on a season-long loan deal in August.Hide Caption 5 of 5In the same interview, Branca revealed that Inter coach Andrea Stramaccioni will not have any funds to bolster his second-placed team's title charge during the January transfer window."As things stand, the current economic situation -- both generally speaking and in our specific case -- doesn't allow us to budget for any sort of outlay," Branca said.When asked if Inter could afford to sign highly-rated Brazil midfielder Paulinho, Branca replied: "If there's a 'costs' we can't do it at the moment."The announcement is likely to spark a January bidding war for former Real Madrid star Sneijder, who has been linked with a move to the English Premier League for the past two years.Inter's financial problems mirror those of city rivals AC Milan, who have sold several top names since winning the Italian title in 2011.Branca said Inter would not be rushing Sneijder, who moved to the San Siro in 2009 and has more than two and a half years left on his contract. "It's a very serious matter. We're patient precisely because we have a certain sort of relationship with Wes, and I'm sure it's the same for him. We're patient and calm as we wait for the situation to evolve."Stramaccioni's team travel to Parma on Monday, facing the possibility that champions Juventus' four-point lead will be even greater following Sunday's trip to struggling Milan.In Saturday's only Serie A game, seventh-placed Catania lost 3-1 at Palermo.Slovenia midfielder Josep Ilicic scored twice in the second half to lift the Sicilian team up to 14th place.
5sport
(CNN)The data didn't make sense.Five years ago, University of Maryland researcher Alisa Morss Clyne was studying pulmonary hypertension -- a type of high blood pressure that affects the arteries in the lungs -- in human cells she had cultured in her lab. But the results she was seeing just didn't stack up."We had these huge error bars. It didn't make any sense," she said. "And we said, OK, let's just graph it by male versus female, and what we found was really interesting." The blood vessels in the lungs of people with pulmonary hypertension take up more glucose, and she found the female cells metabolized the glucose in way that changed a protein that was critical to blood vessel function. In other words, the sex of the cells became an important variable that affected the outcome of the research. Read More"Because we were grouping our sexes together, we were missing the difference. We were getting the average with a big deviation," said Clyne, an associate professor at the University of Maryland's Fischell Department of Bioengineering and the director of the Vascular Kinetics Laboratory."I was shocked when we saw the cells themselves were different based on sex." Concern has been growing in recent years that ignoring or downplaying differences in sex as a biological variable -- whether in cells under a microscope or in lab animals -- is undermining biomedical research at the earliest stages. This matters because many diseases -- including Covid-19 -- affect men and women differently, and missing sex-based differences can make misdiagnosis and mistreatment more likely. "When researchers don't consider sex as a biological variable, that means we have incomplete data. And if we have incomplete data, we run the risk of making judgments that are incorrect. And incomplete data and erroneous conclusions in preclinical research, ultimately, can have an impact on the health of all of us, the health of women and men," said Chyren Hunter, associate director for basic and translational research at the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, which is holding a conference on sex as a biological variable this week. The default lab rat is maleWhile it's often unclear what sex the cells used in lab research are, and to what degree female cells are underrepresented, the default lab rat has long been male. One study from 2011 found that in neuroscience research, male animals were used six times more often than females, and figures from a more recent analysis in 2017 suggest they have only improved marginally. Women have been routinely included in clinical trials since the 1990s, but "integrating female animals into basic and preclinical research -- which is the key building block for studies in humans -- has been much slower," said Hunter. Women are more likely to be misdiagnosed than men when it comes to a wide range of conditions, including heart attacks and ADHD. And women typically experience more -- and more intense -- side effects from pharmacological drugs.Some drugs are more effective in men than women, including common over the counter ones such as ibuprofen and naproxen -- both forms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). And it goes both ways: Alosetron, a drug approved to treat severe irritable bowel syndrome, is only approved for treatment in women as it is largely ineffective in men. "We're saying here that not all researchers need to study sex differences. But all researchers really should consider how biological sex can impact the questions that they're studying," Hunter said. In the case of research into Covid-19, it's not clear that sex as a biological variable is consistently being taken into account even though men are three times more likely than women to be admitted to the ICU. What's being doneMajor funders of scientific research -- including the US National Institutes of Health, which handles 80,000 grants a year -- have required the research they fund to take account of sex as a biological variable. Since 2016, NIH grant applications are required to include male and female animals or cells in both designing the research and in analyzing the results or provide strong justification for studying only one sex.Hunter said that there have been signs of progress, but a five-year report card called for greater action.The NIH doesn't have any mechanism to ensure the funded research adheres to what was set out in the grant application, and some feel the efforts made in grant applications are only lip service."It's been nearly six years, and we haven't seen the needle move in any considerable direction in terms of even understanding what the sex differences are at baseline level in between males and females," said Aditi Bhargava, a professor in the Department of Ob/Gyn and the Center for Reproductive Sciences at the University of California San Francisco. Bhargava, who is the author of a new scientific statement on sex as a biological variable for the Endocrine Society, and others said that high-profile scientific journals -- like those published by Nature and Science -- need to do more to ensure the papers they publish take sex as a biological variable into account. "It's up to the journal and the scientists who (peer) review for the journals to start holding people accountable and say this doesn't deserve to be a high profile paper because it only studied males. It can't be that impactful if we don't know the answer to the science question in females," said Rebecca Shansky, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Northeastern University in Boston. Shansky wrote in Nature Neuroscience in March that considering sex as a biological variable "will require a global shift in science culture."Many journals ask authors to adhere to SAGER guidelines on sex and gender equity in research, but that doesn't mean that researchers have to comply with them. "We are not currently monitoring compliance with SAGER guidance, but we may in the future ask authors to provide a clear disclosure as to whether the study adhered to SAGER guidance," said Sowmya Swaminathan, head of Editorial Policy and Research Integrity, Nature Portfolio. She said Nature does require researchers to fill in a detailed reporting summary that includes the sex of lab animals. An independent study published in 2019 in the journal BMJ Open Science, which evaluated the effectiveness of these reporting summaries, found 52% of a sample of Nature journal papers published after the reporting summary was implemented reported the sex of experimental animals, compared to 36% in a sample of articles on similar topics published by journals from other publishers.Not just hormonesFor a long time, female lab animals were thought too hormonal and messy for science, said Shansky, and one of the main reasons given for not using female mice was that they made data more "variable" as a result of the female reproductive cycle. But this is a myth, she said. Hormones aren't a uniquely female problem. The testosterone levels of male mice can also vary widely. The push for greater awareness of sex as a research variable is not just about using more female lab rats. It's also important not to take the behavior of male mice as the baseline for research, Shansky said. In her lab, she has been studying fear behavior in mice, and the typical fear response in mice has long been thought to be freezing. However, she found that female mice will often exhibit an escape response."They try to escape the boxes. They are afraid. They are just showing it differently. So say if we were looking for drugs that reduce fear, say to treat PTSD, and you were looking for a freezing response when the breathing goes down, you wouldn't be looking for the right response," she explained."If you based your interpretations in the behavior of male mice, you might misinterpret the behavior of female mice." This could throw off the results of research, she said. We are still learning about differences between the sexes in both animals and humans -- but they go beyond hormones and the reproductive system.A study published last year in the journal Science found that over 13,000 genes are expressed differently between the sexes; the researchers also identified sex-biased patterns of gene regulation that were linked to over 50 bodily traits and functions.These differences don't always matter and shouldn't be exaggerated. For example, the popular sleep medication zolpidem, better known as Ambien, lingers longer in the blood of women than of men, causing drowsiness, cognitive impairment and increased traffic accidents. For these reasons, the FDA in 2013 halved the recommended dosage prescribed to women. One subsequent study into the drug after the FDA changed its recommendations suggested that it was body weight, not sex, that was the key biological variable.However, many researchers agree it should be taken into account.Bhargava said disease should be thought of as a destination, and researchers needed to pay more attention to the journey at the biochemical and cellular level. "I want to come to London. If I'm coming from San Francisco, I could take a nonstop flight, or I could come via Washington DC and Paris," she said. "The outcome is that we've all reached London, but the paths were divergent. "Men and women can take different paths, and they may cross and intersect, to reach the same destination -- or in this case, in disease -- but that doesn't mean that they started off in a same way, or that every single step that they took to reach that destination was identical."ChallengesFor Clyne at the University of Maryland, the realization that the cells she worked on differed by sex has completely reshaped how she and her lab work. "I had never thought about the sex of my cells before," she said. "I just thought you take cells out of a person, and you get rid of the physical and biochemical differences that happen in the blood vessels of men and women, and we should all be the same." Information on where the cells comes from isn't routinely available, and she now spends time tracking down the details. She also has twice as many samples in each experiment, which adds up in terms of cost and time. Plus, it can be hard to confident about the sex effects in experiments. "We have been asked how many cell donors we need to be sure that an effect is sex rather than donor related. We don't yet know the answer to that question," Clyne saidBut even with these challenges, she thinks the effort is crucial. "People think that if you take the cells out of the living being and put them in a dish, there's no difference anymore. A lot of thoughts about male and female differences are based around estrogen and sex hormones, but it's more fundamental than that."
2health
Story highlightsFive police officers in Dallas were killed Thursday, 11 shot (CNN)Five Dallas police officers were killed in the deadliest incident for law enforcement in the United States since 9/11, according to statistics from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.A total of 11 officers were shot at a protest that took place Thursday against police brutality.The names of all five deceased officers have not yet been released, but they served in the Dallas Police Department and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit agency. DART tweeted that it was grieving the death of Officer Brent Thompson, 43, who joined the agency in 2009. DART grieving the loss of Ofc Brent Thompson, 43, killed during Thurs protest. First DART officer killed in line of duty. Joined DART 2009.— dartmedia (@dartmedia) July 8, 2016 "To say our police officers put their lives on the line everyday is not a hyperbole, it's a reality," said Mayor Mike Rawlings in a press conference early Friday morning. Dallas Police Chief David Brown said that he was proud of the officers and saw "the courage and professionalism and their grit to stay on scene to search for the suspects while we're vulnerable."Read MoreIn 2015, 41 law enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty, according to FBI statistics. The number of police killed in the line of duty had been on the decline, having fallen from 51 in 2014. Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice respond after shots were fired in downtown Dallas on Thursday, July 7. Five police officers were fatally shot during a protest over recent police shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. Seven other officers were injured in the ambush, as were two civilians.Hide Caption 1 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestEmergency responders administer CPR to an unknown patient near the receiving area of the Baylor University Medical Center.Hide Caption 2 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestA police officer with Dallas Area Rapid Transit is comforted at the emergency room entrance of the hospital.Hide Caption 3 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestA police helicopter flies over the scene in downtown Dallas. One suspect was killed by police after a standoff that lasted for hours.Hide Caption 4 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestA man raises his hands as he walks near a law enforcement officer in Dallas.Hide Caption 5 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestProtesters gather as police officers arrest someone in the aftermath of the shootings.Hide Caption 6 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestA Dallas police officer takes a moment as she guards an intersection in the early morning hours.Hide Caption 7 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestDallas police respond to the scene of the shootings.Hide Caption 8 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice officers shield bystanders after shots were fired at the protest.Hide Caption 9 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice officers take cover as shots are fired. Hide Caption 10 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice get in position after gunshots rang out.Hide Caption 11 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestTwo officers crouch behind barriers.Hide Caption 12 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestDallas police order people away from the area after the shootings.Hide Caption 13 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice and others gather at the emergency entrance to the Baylor University Medical Center.Hide Caption 14 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice stop a driver in downtown Dallas.Hide Caption 15 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestA view of downtown Dallas after the shootings. Kent Giles captured the image and told CNN he "heard multiple shots being fired. Probably more than 20 rounds. This is the intersection of Main and Griffin looking towards the west."Hide Caption 16 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestDallas police check a car after detaining a driver.Hide Caption 17 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestDallas police stand watch after the shootings.Hide Caption 18 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestOnlookers stand near police barricades after the shootings. Hide Caption 19 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestPolice attempt to calm the crowd after an arrest.Hide Caption 20 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestA clerk looks at broken windows that were shot out at a store in downtown Dallas.Hide Caption 21 of 22 Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protestLaw enforcement officials wait outside the emergency room entrance of the Baylor University Medical Center.Hide Caption 22 of 22Here's a look at the deadliest incidents on law enforcement officers: November 29, 2009Four police officers from the Lakewood Police Department in Washington were killed at a coffee shop. The four slain officers were: Lt. Mark Renninger, Officer Ronald Owens, Officer Tina Griswold and Officer Greg Richards.They were killed in an ambush-style shooting. The suspect in that attack, Maurice Clemmons, was shot and killed by police after a two-day manhunt. Police said he intentionally targeted the officers after a series of run-ins with authorities. In 1989, Clemmons had been given a 95-year prison sentence in Arkansas for a host of charges, including robbery, burglary, theft and bringing a gun to school, but his sentence was commuted in 2000.March 21, 2009Four police officers from the Oakland Police Department in California were killed in two incidents on the same day. The gunman, Lovelle Mixon, 26, allegedly shot two Oakland patrol officers and fled to a nearby apartment building. Mixon then allegedly shot and killed two SWAT officers who burst into the apartment before police fatally shot him. A fifth officer was injured. The four slain officers were: Sgt. Ervin Romans, Sgt. Daniel Sakai, Sgt. Mark Dunakin and John Hege.September 11, 2001The terror attack is the deadliest day in U.S. law enforcement history, killing 72 officers, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a group that tracks law enforcement deaths.The officers came from several different agencies, including the Port Authority, New Jersey Police Department, New York City Police Department, New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, New York State Office of Court Administration, New York City Fire Department, the FBI and the U.S. Secret Service. A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officer died in the crash of Flight 93, which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. April 19, 1995Emergency workers sift through the rubble of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, OK.Eight federal law enforcement officers were killed in the Oklahoma City bombing. The officers came from the U.S. Secret Service, U.S. Customs Service, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Drug Enforcement Administration, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.The eight slain officers were: Assistant Special Agent in Charge Alan Whicher, Special Agents Cynthia Brown, Donald Leonard, Mickey Maroney, Senior Special Agents Paul Ice, Claude Medearis, Special Agents Paul Broxterman and Special Agent Kenneth McCullough. Timothy McVeigh, who was convicted in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, was executed in June 2001. February 28, 1993The Branch Davidians, a religious sect led by David Koresh, clashed with federal agents in 1993 in Waco, Texas.Four Special Agents of the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms were killed trying to serve a search-and-arrest warrant for illegal weapons at the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Texas. Instead, a gun battle ensued with four ATF agents killed. The four slain agents were: Conway LeBleu, Todd McKeehan, Robert J. Williams and Steven Willis.The incident led to a seven-week stalemate, leading to the deaths of 82 Davidians, who followed their leader leader, David Koresh.
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Story highlightsCristiano scores hat-trick in Real's 5-1 win over DeportivoNapoli move level with Juventus at top of Serie AMarseille's six-match winning streak comes to an endAston Villa held at home by West Bromwich AlbionIt's arguably the biggest game in world football -- and Real Madrid warmed up for next Sunday's El Clasico with a five-star showing led by their talisman Cristiano Ronaldo.Ronaldo fired his 17th career hat-trick to signal his intentions ahead of next weekend's clash with arch-rivals and league leaders Barcelona and his showdown with Lionel Messi.Brazilian great Ronaldo plumps for Messi ahead of Cristiano as world's best playerThe 27-year-old had stated he was feeling sad about life in the Spanish capital but this latest display would have put a smile on his face.Jose Mourinho's men are eight points adrift of the Catalan side going into the game at the Santiago Bernabeu.While Barca will provide far stiffer opposition than Deportivo La Coruna, this was still a scintillating showing from Ronaldo and Real.JUST WATCHEDReal Madrid coach in World Sport specialReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHReal Madrid coach in World Sport special 00:57JUST WATCHEDCristiano Ronaldo: I'm better than MessiReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCristiano Ronaldo: I'm better than Messi 01:50JUST WATCHEDFrench football club spends bigReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHFrench football club spends big 02:45Deportivo had lost on its previous six visits to the Bernabeu but took a shock lead through former Real man Riki after 16 minutes.But that was as good as it got for the visitors as Ronaldo fired his first treble since April.The former Manchester United man equalized from the penalty spot before Angel Di Maria put the home side ahead.Ronaldo grabbed his second after Sergio Ramos' effort was only parried by the goalkeeper and Pepe added a fourth with his first goal in ten months.Ronaldo completed his hat-trick six minutes from time from the penalty spot after a handball by Evaldo Santos.Atletico Madrid claimed a 1-0 win at Espanyol to go second in La Liga with Raul Garcia's goal enough to secure the points.Villa on target as Barcelona snatch last-gasp win at Sevilla Real Valladolid came from behind to smash six past Rayo Vallecano.Alejandro Dominguez gave the visitors a fifth minute lead before Valladolid roared back in sensational style.Alberto Bueno and Manucho soon had the home side ahead following a two-goal burst inside three minutes.Oscar Gonzalez made it 3-1 before Antonio Rukavina extended Valladolid's lead once more.Oscar slotted home his second and his side's fourth ten minutes after the break and Manucho completed the rout to seal an emphatic win.Osasuna scored three goals in the last eight minutes to claim a 4-0 win over Levante.Emilian Armenteros gave the home side a 10th minute lead but they were made to wait to seal the win.Roland Lamah's doubled his side's advantage after 82 minutes with a David Timor penalty and Nino's injury-time strike helping Osasuna to its first win of the season. Photos: The best (and worst) of Zinedine Zidane Photos: The best (and worst) of Zinedine ZidaneZizou's bronze butt – The moment French football superstar Zinedine Zidane headbutted Italy's Marco Materazzi in the 2006 World Cup final has been immortalized in a five meter bronze statue. The statue, positioned outside of Paris' Pompidou Museum, is the work of Algerian-born artist Adel Abdessemed.Hide Caption 1 of 5 Photos: The best (and worst) of Zinedine ZidaneOut with a bang – The headbutt, which occured in the second half of extra-time, stunned the football world. Zidane scored from the penalty spot to give France a 1-0 lead, before Materazzi equalized. After 120 minutes of play and with the scores still level, the match went to penalties. Italy prevailed to win a third World Cup. The assault was the last action of Zidane's incredible career.Hide Caption 2 of 5 Photos: The best (and worst) of Zinedine ZidaneBrilliant brace – Eight years earlier, Zidane had an altogether different World Cup experience. With an expectant French crowd looking on at the Stade de France, Zidane scored two first-half headers as France beat Brazil 3-0 in the 1998 final.Hide Caption 3 of 5 Photos: The best (and worst) of Zinedine ZidaneAllez Les Bleus! – Zidane and his teammates, including Thierry Henry and Marcel Desailly, ensured France were crowned world champions for the first time.Hide Caption 4 of 5 Photos: The best (and worst) of Zinedine ZidaneHammer at Hampden – Four years later, Zidane painted his masterpiece at Hampden Park in Glasgow. With the scores level at 1-1 between Zidane's Real Madrid and Germany's Bayer Leverkusen in the 2002 European Champions League final, the Frenchman expertly dispatched a Roberto Carlos cross with a stunning volley from the edge of the penalty area. The sumptuous strike was enough to secure Real a ninth European crown. Hide Caption 5 of 5JUST WATCHEDCollymore on John Terry quitting ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCollymore on John Terry quitting 03:07Granada grabbed its first league win of the season courtesy of a 2-1 victory over Celta Vigo.Guilherme Siqueira's 11th minute penalty and a Gabriel Torje effort secured the points for the hosts.Cavani hat-trick moves Napoli level with Serie A leaders JuventusEdinson Cavani netted his fifth goal in six games as Napoli kept up its Serie A ambitions with a win over Sampdoria.With both teams unbeaten going into the clash, it took a second-half penalty from Cavani to separate the sides.Marek Hamsik weaved his way into the Sampdoria penalty area only to be brought down by Daniele Gastaldello.The Sampdoria man was shown a red card and Cavani smashed home the spot kick to leave Napoli level on points with league leaders Juventus.Inter Milan picked up a 2-1 win over Fiorentina courtesy of goals from Diego Milito and Antonio Cassano in Sunday's late game.Palermo grabbed its first win of the season as Fabrizio Miccoli scored a hat-trick to seal a 4-1 win over Chievo.Miccoli fired home a stunning 13th minute free-kick only for Chievo to hit back through Marco Rigoni.Palermo looked unlikely to hang on for a point after Franco Brienza was sent off after picking up two yellow cards.But Miccoli shocked Chievo just minutes later as he fired home his hat-trick and Palermo's third.Luigi Giorgi fired home a fourth late on to seal the win and lift Palermo off the bottom of Serie A.Bologna claimed its second win of the season after cruising to a 4-0 win against Catania.Tiberio Guarente fired home a 19th minute opener before Alberto Gilardino doubled Bologna's lead.Gilardino scored his second just after the hour mark before Panagionis Kone sealed the win after Alessandro Diamanti's effort had been saved.Torino produced a five-star showing as it thrashed Atalanta 5-1.German Denis gave the home side the lead before Torino roared back in some style.Rolando Bianchi converted from the penalty spot to equalise before Alessandro Gazzi headed Torino into the lead.Alen Stevanovic's spectacular volley made it 3-1 befpre Danilo D'Ambrosio and another Bianchi effort wrapped up the win.UEFA to take action against LazioLazio bounced back from its midweek defeat against Napoli with a 2-1 win over Siena.Honorato Ederson and Cristian Ledesma scored for the hosts with Massimo Paci scoring a late consolation for Siena.Cagliari slumped to the bottom of Serie A after suffering a 2-1 home defeat against Pescara.Christian Terlizzi and Vladimir Weiss got the goals for Pescara as they recorded a second victory in five days.Mauricio Pinilla scored from the penalty spot with eight minutes remaining, while the hosts were also reduced to ten men when Luca Rossettini was sent off.JUST WATCHEDCan AC Milan rebuild this season? ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCan AC Milan rebuild this season? 02:54 Photos: Real Madrid stun Man City Photos: Real Madrid stun Man CityDeadly Dzeko – Edin Dzeko came off the bench to give Manchester City the lead against Real Madrid in their European Champions League encounter in the Spanish capital.Hide Caption 1 of 6 Photos: Real Madrid stun Man CityMourinho has the last laugh – But it was Jose Mourinho's Real who edged a pulsating tie, Cristiano Ronaldo scoring a last-minute winner to give the Spanish champions a 3-2 win. As the ball struck the net, Mourinho slid on his knees across the touchline.Hide Caption 2 of 6 Photos: Real Madrid stun Man CityZero for Zenit – Big-spending Zenit St Petersburg, who recruited Hulk (pictured) and Axel Witsel from Portuguese football during the recent transfer window, were stunned by Spanish Champions League debutants Malaga.Hide Caption 3 of 6 Photos: Real Madrid stun Man CityMalaga march on – Despite being in financial turmoil, Malaga continued their fine start to the season with a 3-0 triumph. Isco (pictured) scored either side of a strike from Argentine striker Javier Saviola.Hide Caption 4 of 6 Photos: Real Madrid stun Man CityMilan's misery – It has been a turbulent few months for AC Milan, who lost star duo Zlatan Ibrahimovic and Thiago Silva to Paris-Saint German during the offseason. Massimiliano Allegri's team have made a stuttering start to the Italian season, which carried over into the Champions League on Tuesday with a 0-0 draw against Anderlecht.Hide Caption 5 of 6 Photos: Real Madrid stun Man CitySilva lining – While his former club were struggling, Silva was enjoying a dream debut for PSG. The Brazilian defender scored the second of four goals, with PSG running out 4-1 winners against Dinamo Kiev.Hide Caption 6 of 6 Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubs Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubsManchester's money machine – Manchester United is the most valuable brand in football according to a report by independent consultancy Brand Finance. The global appeal and on-field success of the 19-time English champions has helped establish a brand worth an estimated $853 million.Hide Caption 1 of 6 Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubsSilver lining – Bayern Munich's players and fans were distraught after losing Saturday's European Champions League to Chelsea, but the German team's brand was second on the list, valued at $786 million.Hide Caption 2 of 6 Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubsCuts for 'El Clasico' – Real Madrid recently pipped Barcelona to the Spanish title, but both clubs have suffered setbacks financially. Both brands decreased, by 7% and 8% respectively, as a result of the eurozone crisis and its impact on the Spanish economy.Hide Caption 3 of 6 Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubsChampions cash in – Chelsea's brand value was significantly boosted by the European triumph. The west London club, backed by Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich, is ranked fifth on the list valued at $398 million.Hide Caption 4 of 6 Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubsCity slickers – Manchester City's dramatic Premier League title win has increased the value of the Abu Dhabi-owned English club's brand, putting it eighth on the list, worth an estimated $302 million.Hide Caption 5 of 6 Photos: Brand power: Football's most valuable clubsA major league? – The 2011 Major League Soccer champions Los Angeles Galaxy had the honor of meeting President Barack Obama earlier this month. Galaxy, 50th on the list, still struggle to attract commercial rights deals which compare to the club's European counterparts.Hide Caption 6 of 6Udinese's disappointing start to the season continued after they were held to a goalless draw by Genoa.Bayern maintain perfect start with win over Werder BremenIn Germany, Eintracht Frankfurt continued their impressive start to the season with a 2-1 win over Freiburg.Alexander Meir scored twice to earn Frankfurt a fifth win in six games to leave them just two points off league leaders Bayern Munich.Karim Guede made matters worse for the visitors when he was sent off late on.Wolfsburg suffered yet another home defeat after going down 2-0 to Mainz 05.Junior Diaz's first goal for the club and Adam Szalai's effort secured all three points for the visitors.Schalke held as Lille crash to defeatIn France, Marseille suffered a shock 4-1 defeat at Valenciennes as its six-match winning streak came to a dramatic end.Gael Danic and former Liverpool man Anthony Le Tallec gave the home side a two-goal lead, before an inexplicable mistake by Marseille keeper Steve Mandanda allowed Foued Kadir to make it 3-0.Le Tallec grabbed his second after the interval with Jordan Ayew netting a late consolation for the visitors.Saint Etienne was held to a goalless draw at home by Stade de Reims.Torres and Mata fire Chelsea to win over Arsenal In the Premier League, Aston Villa came from behind to secure a 1-1 draw against West Bromwich Albion.Darren Bent came off the bench to equalize for Villa after the visitors had taken the lead through Shane Long.
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Story highlightsRussian-based federation says Vladimir Putin gets eighth-degree belt in Kyokushin-kan disciplinePutin, 62, is quite the sportsman and already has highest rank in taekwondoNo protective gear is worn in Kyokushin-kan That Vladimir Putin, he's a baaad man.The muscle-bound Russian President rides horses while shirtless. He catches massive fish and gives them a kiss. He tranquilizes tigers. He also is apparently pretty good on the mat. Putin, 62, has been awarded a karate black belt, the Russian Kyokushin-kan Karate-do Federation said Friday.In a letter to Putin, the federation said the Kyokushin-kan International Honbu decided to award him an eighth-dan, or eighth-degree, black belt for his "contribution in promoting Kyokushin-kan karate in Russia."Putin, known also for his judo skills, had already been awarded a fifth-degree black belt in 2001, according to the federation. Kyokushin-kan is a full contact form of karate in which no protective gear is worn and in which striking an opponent in the head with hands is not permitted. Putin in 2013 also received the highest rank in taekwondo, the ninth-dan ranking, giving him honorary grandmaster status, according to Russian state news agency Itar-Tass.
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(CNN)After the RBC Canadian Open in June 2019, Collin Morikawa was ranked 1039th in the world having finished tied for 14th. A little over a year later, in August 2020, he was golf's fifth highest-ranked player.His shock victory that month at the PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco -- finishing two shots ahead of Dustin Johnson and Paul Casey in only his second major outing -- catapulted him to the top of the game and into mainstream recognition.Morikawa, who admits the victory at the PGA was "very life-changing," is adamant the fame that has come with it won't "change who I am.""A lot of opportunities are given to you, a lot more sponsorships, people being aware of who you are," he told CNN's Living Golf's Shane O'Donoghue.Read MoreMorikawa reacts as the lid to the Wanamaker Trophy falls off during the trophy presentation for the 2020 PGA Championship."I feel like I'm still the same 23-year-old kid that you guys call me. I've got a smile on my face, and I love food, and I hope that's me for the rest of my life."While many players might have been sated by that victory, that is not the case for Morikawa."It didn't feel like I checked that box off of winning a major championship and I'm satisfied with the rest of my career. It just made me want more," he said. "Now, whether I'm at a major championship or a regular event, European Tour event, whatever it might be, I want that winning feeling because when you win, it's just a feeling that you can't describe, especially in golf, with us really losing more than we win."READ: How Dustin Johnson's speedy approach could help golf's pace of playMorikawa plays his shot from the eighth tee during the first round of the Sony Open in Hawaii.A global playerHaving initially broken onto the scene in the US with victories on the PGA Tour, Morikawa is now looking to take his game around the globe. "If you look at the history of golf, there's a lot of global players and those are the ones that are well-known," he explained. "It speaks a lot to their personalities as a person, but it also speaks a lot about their games. They're able to adjust. That's all about golf, adjusting to what we're given ahead of us."On the European Tour, Morikawa finished fifth in the 2020 Race to Dubai and will be traveling back to the emirate this month as one of the headliners for the OMEGA Dubai Desert Classic, which is set to start on January 28.Taking to the course alongside 2017 winner Sergio Garcia and European Ryder Cup heroes Tommy Fleetwood, Justin Rose and Tyrrell Hatton, the Californian's skills will be put to the test at the Emirates Golf Club. Morikawa plays a shot during day two of the DP World Tour Championship.Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, features, and videos"My entire life, it's always been about consistency. I've said that since day one, I believed in myself that I could do it, but I've only tested myself out really in the US on the PGA Tour," he said. "And what better way to come out here on the European Tour, the Race to Dubai, and really make a statement for myself to show that my game travels. At the end of my career, I want to look back and be able to say that it does."
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(CNN)Dr. Nelson Atehortua, an assistant professor at Jackson State University's school of public health, drove two hours to get a coveted shot of Covid-19 vaccine because demand was so high, he couldn't find an appointment locally.But on a recent day at a mass Covid-19 vaccination site at the university in Jackson, Mississippi, getting a shot was a snap. People wanting to be vaccinated just trickled in, and the staff at the site sat bored in the meantime."Today it's quiet, but it hasn't been like that all the time," Atehortua said. Many evangelicals say they won't be vaccinated against Covid-19. Some experts say distrust and misinformation have played a roleAt a drive-thru site in Jackson that can handle up to 1,200 appointments in a day, only 275 people had signed up Thursday -- and some of those didn't bother to show up, workers there said. Experts worry the drop-off suggests a lot of people don't want the vaccine and fear what's happening here could jeopardize reaching herd immunity, which doctors say won't be achieved until at least 70% of population is vaccinated. Read MorePublic health officials fight misinformationCampaigns encouraging vaccination are being overwhelmed by disinformation on social media and elsewhere now that most people who needed and wanted the vaccine have been immunized, public health officials said."Miscommunication has been constant since the pandemic started, and that has created distrust in the population," Atehortua said. "So unfortunately -- and this is a reflection that I have made with some colleagues in public health -- we are losing the battle of communication."Students hope vaccine mandate will bring life back to collegeJSU, a historically Black university, has an enrollment of close to 7,000 students and 1,100 faculty and staff members. Close to 700 of them have been vaccinated on campus.False information is what caused JSU student Halle Coleman to delay getting her shots, she told CNN."It just felt like everywhere I looked, I was seeing somebody with a new conspiracy theory or just a reason not to get the vaccine," she said. Some of the conspiracy theories she heard included that the vaccine "was a way for the government to track us, it was a way for the government to inject a new illness into us to make us more sick, to have control over us," Coleman said.Mississippi was one of the first states to open Covid-19 vaccinations to everyone 16 and older, but the state is far from having vaccinated everyone who is eligible. About 30% of Mississippians have had their first vaccine dose, while the national average is closer to 40%. And it's not just Mississippi that's lagging. Southern states from South Carolina to Louisiana -- excluding Florida -- have vaccinated fewer than 59 per 100 people in the states.And it's not just the Southern states were vaccination rates are slowing. While the US this week reached the milestone of 200 million doses administered since the first shots were given in December, vaccinations reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have slowed from the peak earlier this month of almost 3.4 million shots reported on one day.GOP Sen. Ron Johnson downplays urgency of getting Covid-19 vaccineThis week, on Thursday and Friday, vaccinations were fewer than 3 million for two days in a row, and the seven-day average of new Covid-19 doses reported administered continued to fall. It now is at 2,862,758.In Mercer County, Ohio, demand for vaccinations has dropped so much that the health district decided to end mass vaccination clinics for first doses and instead, transition to smaller clinics that require fewer resources and volunteers.Other vaccine providers in the area are reporting the same pattern, according to Kristy Fryman, the emergency response coordinator and public information officer for the Mercer County Health District.Reaching the 'hard audiences'Pharmacies in one part of Louisiana say Covid-19 vaccine demand has "completely fallen off." Georgia officials announced recently they were shutting down a mass vaccination site due to low demand. Tennessee leaders said late last month they were opening eligibility following low numbers of vaccinations in rural areas. Parts of Texas have also seen declining demand."We're reaching the point where we're getting to the hard audiences," said Lori Tremmel Freeman, CEO of the National Association of County and City Health Officials. "The ones that either are unsure or on the fence about the vaccine, don't have enough information or are just plain outright ... not interested in the vaccine for other reasons."CDC, FDA lift pause on using J&J's coronavirus vaccine, add safety warningPart of the problem has been the uncertainty surrounding Johnson & Johnson's one-shot vaccine. The CDC and the Food and Drug Administration on April 13 recommended pausing use of the vaccine while they investigated the risk of rare, severe blood clots. Data from the Mississippi Department of Health shows a decrease in vaccinations since late March, and the steepest decline has occurred in the last two weeks. More than 74,000 Covid-19 vaccine appointments remain vacant across the state through mid-May. On Friday, members of the CDC's Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices agreed the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks from rare blood clots linked with the vaccine and voted to recommend resuming its use. Felicia Kent, director of revenue at Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center, said when the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused, about 80% of people who were scheduled for their second doses showed up at a vaccine site, but "we only had a handful that came out for their first dose.""Getting individuals out for the first dose has now become a challenge," Kent said, so public health officials are reaching out for help from community members."What we're doing now is working with churches, working with community organizations, also working with local barber shops, grocery stores," to get the word out that the vaccines are safe and that everyone needs to get one.Dr. Samuel Jones, the director of student health services at JSU, says he gets questions about whether the vaccines will interfere with people's DNA, and "perhaps am I going to grow an extra toe or finger in the future?"Jones likes to call it vaccine "inquisitiveness" instead of hesitancy."As we as persons who inquire, if we have the right information, perhaps they will, a person will, be armed to make a better decision," he said.Many of those people asking him those questions went on to be vaccinated, Jones said.CNN's Christina Maxouris contributed to this report.
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(CNN)Five Italian top-flight soccer games have been postponed this weekend due to concerns over the coronavirus outbreak. Initially, the matches were scheduled to be played behind closed doors but following an increase in cases, the Serie A league called them off. Among the matches canceled is the top of the table clash between title holders Juventus and Inter Milan in Turin. The other games that are postponed include AC Milan's game at home against Genoa, SPAL's trip to Parma, Sassuolo's match against Brescia and Udinese's game against Fiorentina. The fixtures have all been rescheduled for Wednesday, May 13. As a result, the final of the Coppa Italia will be played a week later, on Wednesday, May 20.Read MoreFour other games -- Lazio vs. Bologna, Napoli vs. Torino, Lecce vs. Atalanta and Cagliari vs. Roma -- will still go ahead this weekend as planned with spectators.A decision on Sampdoria vs. Hellas Verona (due to be played on Monday) has yet to be made.The San Siro stadium is empty after closing to the public as a precaution against coronavirus.Victory for Lazio against Bologna would lift the team above Juventus and to the top of the table, two points above the Turin team.In a statement, Serie A said the decision was made "considering the various and urgent rules issued by the government to respond to this extraordinary health protection emergency."In Europe, the largest number of coronavirus cases have been recorded in Italy -- 821 cases and 21 deaths so far. Whole cities and towns have been placed in lockdown as a preventative measure against the spread of the disease. This follows on from four fixtures being postponed last weekend as a precaution. Inter Milan played its round of 32 Europa League game against Ludogorets in Milan in an empty stadium.The Bulgarian side arrived in Milan on Wednesday wearing protective masks.The Italian side qualified for the next round in an eerie atmosphere, with goals from Romelu Lukaku and Cristiano Biraghi helping the hosts progress. READ: How the coronavirus is impacting sportLudogorets players wore face mask as a safety measure.Euro 2020 fearsThere are fears that the outbreak could impact Euro 2020, with the tournament set to kick off in Rome on June 12, though European football's governing body, UEFA, said that "for the moment there is no need to change anything in the planned timetable.""UEFA is in touch with the relevant international and local authorities regarding the coronavirus and its development," read UEFA's statement."The issue will be kept under constant scrutiny."
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(CNN)It's been a dizzying week of gossip and speculation for Meghan Markle's father days before one of the most anticipated weddings of the year. The American actress will wed Prince Harry on Saturday at St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle in a ceremony watched by millions around the world. But while she's largely stayed out of the spotlight in the days leading up to the wedding, the father of the bride has been busy making headlines worldwide with one theme -- will he be there or won't he?Thomas Markle has given multiple interviews to celebrity news site TMZ on whether he'll walk his famous daughter down the aisle -- saying in the latest that he won't.At first, the former Hollywood lighting director was expected to play a key role on his daughter's big day, but it emerged Tuesday that he could miss the wedding because of heart surgery.Read MoreThe announcement marked the latest twist after accusations that he posed for wedding preparation photos for a paparazzi agency. After the revelation, he pulled out of the wedding, reportedly saying he doesn't want to embarrass the royal family or his daughter. Thomas Markle drops off flowers at his ex-wife Doria Ragland's home days before the wedding. Close ties despite divorce Whether or not he attends the wedding, the father and daughter share a close relationship by all accounts. Meghan is said to be upset about the staged photos, but still wants her father to walk her down the aisle.Markle divorced Meghan's mother, Doria Ragland, in the 1980s but has remained part of his daughter's life. In a 2016 message titled "Happy Father's Day" posted on her now-deleted Instagram account, Meghan Markle paid tribute to him.More on Meghan MarkleThe reason Thomas Markle is being vilified Meghan's father ay not attend wedding due to surgeryMeghan, Harry ask for privacy for father Meghan is rewriting the princess storyHow Meghan will use her royal voice"Thanks for my work ethic, my love of Busby Berkeley films & club sandwiches, for teaching me the importance of handwritten thank you notes, and for giving me that signature Markle nose. I love you," she reportedly posted. Meghan has said she spent most of her childhood hanging out at her father's job after school."Every day after school for 10 years, I was on the set of 'Married ... with Children,' which is a really funny and perverse place for a little girl in a Catholic school uniform to grow up," she told Esquire in 2013. "There were a lot of times my dad would say, 'Meg, why don't you go and help with the craft services room over there? This is just a little off-color for your 11-year-old eyes.' " Thomas Markle is being vilified for one reason: he's AmericanThose days on the set with her father shaped her career. In the interview, she said he'd call and offer her advice on lighting while she was on television show "Suits." "... [M]y dad will be the first person to call me and say like, 'Why aren't you using this sort of lighting gel?' The crew guys know that it's where I grew up," she said. Meghan said in the 2013 interview that her father had retired about six years earlier. She recalled watching the credits at the end of "Married .. with Children" episodes and giving the screen a kiss when she saw his name go by. 'Draw your own box'Long before she turned into a Hollywood star, Meghan struggled with her biracial identity. She's said her father helped her realize she doesn't need to pick one race over the other. When she was in seventh grade, her English teacher asked her to check the ethnicity box for Caucasian on a census, which made her feel like she was choosing one parent over anotherWhen she told her father about the incident, he was angry. '"If that happens again, you draw your own box," she said he told her, according to Elle UK. The issue of race would be a confusing thread throughout Meghan's early years. When she was 7, she wanted a doll set that came in either an all-white or all-black family. Her father took apart the doll packages and mixed a black mom doll, a white dad doll and two children of both races, and gave them to her as a Christmas gift."My dad had taken the sets apart and customized my family," she wrote. He lives in Mexico Thomas Markle lives in the Mexican beach city of Rosarito, where he was photographed by a paparazzo in the apparently staged photos over the past few weeks.Her half-sister Samantha Markle has added to the controversy by leaking details on their father even as Kensington Palace has requested that journalists respect his privacy. The estranged sibling has said their father suffered a heart attack after reports emerged that Thomas Markle may not attend the royal wedding on Saturday. Samantha Markle says her father staged the photographs to improve his image. While Samantha Markle has reportedly not spoken to her sister for several years, she has not been shy about making media rounds. She did not specify the timing of her father's heart attack, but told the "Good Morning Britain" program that while she's concerned for his health, she did not want him to miss out on the big day."I wanted to see him go. I didn't want him deprived of that. But clearly the propriety should be whether or not it is safe for him to do that," Markle added.Samantha Markle has previously said she was the one who had encouraged their father to stage the photos in an ill-fated bid to improve his image. He was to meet with the royal familyBoth of Meghan's parents were due to fly into the UK in the days before the wedding. Once there, they are expected to spend time with the British royal family, including Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh. Prince Harry has yet to meet his fiancée's father.CNN's Laura Said-Moorhouse contributed to this report.
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Story highlightsMan Utd confirms Jose Mourinho as bossPortuguese coach succeeds Louis van GaalVan Gaal was fired despite FA Cup win (CNN)Life in the English Premier League just got a whole lot more interesting.Manchester United has hired Jose Mourinho as its new manager, with his old La Liga rival Pep Guardiola having already been appointed by neighbor Manchester City.Follow @cnnsport Mourinho and Guardiola had a volatile relationship during their time in charge of Real Madrid and Barcelona respectively -- and now they will renew that rivalry next season.Read: Man Utd sacks Louis van GaalThe Portuguese, whose appointment was confirmed by United on Friday, succeeds Louis van Gaal at Old Trafford.Read More"To become Manchester United manager is a special honor in the game," Mourinho said in a statement. "It is a club known and admired throughout the world. There is a mystique and a romance about it which no other club can match."Dutchman Van Gaal was dismissed Monday, only two days after his team had won the FA Cup final at Wembley to lift United's first major trophy since Sir Alex Ferguson left in 2013. But he failed to secure qualification for next season's Champions League as the club finished fifth in the Premier League.JUST WATCHEDPremier League: Chelsea has fired star managerReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHPremier League: Chelsea has fired star manager 01:39Former Porto, Chelsea, Inter Milan and Madrid manager Mourinho had been linked heavily with taking over at United in recent months.The Red Devils had reportedly been tracking the 53-year-old since he left Chelsea in December, with speculation of a managerial change growing as Van Gaal's side struggled for form and results.Glory days to return?He now tackles the challenge of restoring United to its former glories.The club has struggled for success since Ferguson, who spent 27 years at Old Trafford, winning 13 Premier League titles and the Champions League twice, retired."José is quite simply the best manager in the game today," said United executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward."He has won trophies and inspired players in countries across Europe and, of course, he knows the Premier League very well, having won three titles here."I'd like to take this opportunity to welcome him to Manchester United. His track record of success is ideal to take the club forward."Mourinho -- also linked with the manager's job at Paris Saint-Germain -- is likely to be given a large transfer budget as he attempts to put United back on top.PSG striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic and Everton defender John Stones are among the big-name players linked with moves to the club.Mourinho, who has often spoken of his admiration for United, will be keen to make amends for the way in which his second spell at Chelsea came to an end after the Blues, then defending Premier League champion, slumped to nine defeats in its first 16 games.Despite that dismal run of results, he possesses one of the most impressive CVs in football management.JUST WATCHEDLooking back on Mourinho's Chelsea reign ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHLooking back on Mourinho's Chelsea reign 02:36He guided unfancied Porto to a shock Champions League win in 2004 and then took Chelsea to a first title triumph in 50 years in 2005.At Inter, he won the Champions League, Italian league and Italian Cup treble in 2010 before moving to Madrid. There, he lifted the 2012 Spanish title before returning to Chelsea a year later and leading the London club to another Premier League crown in 2015.Mou's controversiesMourinho has often been at the center of controversies during his career.Fellow managers Arsene Wenger, Rafael Benitez and Manuel Pellegrini, as well as Guardiola, have all had run-ins with him.Mourinho often tried to goad Guardiola, who would frequently refuse to respond to his remarks.Their rivalry erupted a few months later when Mourinho poked Guardiola's then assistant manager, Tito Vilanova, in the eye during a pitchside scuffle as Real and Barcelona faced each other.During the first game of the 2015-16 Premier League season, Mourinho was criticised for his treatment of Chelsea club doctor Eva Carneiro.Next month, he is due to appear at an employment tribunal into her departure from Stamford Bridge. Photos: Louis van Gaal sacked Photos: Louis van Gaal sackedLouis van Gaal has been sacked as manager of Manchester United.Hide Caption 1 of 5 Photos: Louis van Gaal sackedFormer Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho is reportedly set to take over from the Dutchman.Hide Caption 2 of 5 Photos: Louis van Gaal sackedVan Gaal guided United to fourth place and qualification for the Champions League in his first season in charge, but results and performances have fluctuated n recent months.Hide Caption 3 of 5 Photos: Louis van Gaal sackedOne of the 64-year-old's lowest moments came in February as United lost 2-1 to Danish minnows Midtjylland in the Europa League.Hide Caption 4 of 5 Photos: Louis van Gaal sackedHowever, he did finish his tenure on a high by guiding Manchester United to its first trophy in the post-Sir Alex Ferguson era.Hide Caption 5 of 5
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Story highlightsWarrior's on pace to break Chicago Bulls' 72-win recordStephen Curry has already shattered 3-point recordCurry shooting better from 30 feet than normal 3-point distanceSan Antonio can still challenge for title, says Steve Smith (CNN)As the Golden State Warriors plow through their history-making season, superstar point guard Stephen Curry is having the time of his life -- and there's nothing wrong with that, says CNN's lead NBA analyst Steve Smith. "It is business, and he's making it look fun," says Smith, who earned a championship ring with the 2003 San Antonio Spurs and played against the 1996 Chicago Bulls, whose 72-10 record Golden State is chasing.Follow @cnnsport "In the old school days, everything was about business, where you had to have this stern look and this focus. You can't say (Curry) is not focused because of the numbers he's putting up, and his team is winning," adds Smith, who calls Curry the greatest shooter in NBA history. "He plays the game with a smile, and a lot of unorthodox shots. He's taking shots at half court and making it look easy."What he's doing right now is more entertainment than basketball."Read MoreSmith isn't kidding. Curry has recently taken to spinning around after shooting three-pointers, gauging whether the shot has dropped in by the reaction of the crowd (46% of the time, it does). It's a borderline-cocky move reminiscent of vintage Larry Bird. @stephencurry30 ignites Oracle. #SlateNight on @csnauthentic. A video posted by Golden State Warriors (@warriors) on Mar 12, 2016 at 9:30pm PST But the great 1986 Boston Celtics team, which went 40-1 at home on the way to winning a championship, never had this much fun. In fact, no championship-contending squad in memory has exuded this much playfulness (the 1985 Showtime-era Lakers were close, but featured brooding Kareem Abdul-Jabbar as Finals MVP.)Part of the reason why Curry has enjoyed this much success beyond the arc is because of the way the game has changed, says Smith, a former All-Star known for his defensive prowess. "In our day you could hand check; I could grab him, I could foul him hard, and all that I would get was a personal foul. Now...you would probably be ejected from the game," he says."There is a misconception that old legends are criticizing Stephen Curry's game. I don't think that's it," Smith says about recent statements made by Oscar Robertson and Isiah Thomas. "Most of the legends are talking about the defenses, the way it's played, the rules have changed a lot. They are basically saying, in our era, we would not have allowed this to happen. No one is saying Stephen Curry is not a great player."On the contrary, says Smith: "He became the best player in the NBA last season, and this season I think he'll win MVP as well."JUST WATCHEDNBA great Steve Smith on Warriors' history chaseReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHNBA great Steve Smith on Warriors' history chase 05:24But would this season's Warriors beat Michael Jordan's record-breaking Bulls? It's a question that's been asked countless times this season. "If the Golden State Warriors were playing in that era, it would be much harder," says the 6-foot 8-inch former guard tasked with stopping Michael Jordan. "I give the advantage to the (1996) Chicago Bulls. But the Bulls playing Golden State in this era? It would go down to a Game 7 series, down to the last shot -- either between Michael or Stephen Curry." Smith points out that Curry has worked tirelessly on his game since he entered the league. Curry's practice routine is the stuff of legend (once this season he made 77 three-pointers in a row, according to Sports Illustrated), but it's his dramatic improvement in ball-handling that has been the difference-maker. On this date in 1985, Larry Bird dropped 60 points against the Hawks. It's still a Celtics record. [Credit: Scott Maguire/AP Photo/1992] A photo posted by espn (@espn) on Mar 12, 2016 at 7:52am PST "He's worked on his ball handling so much, he's able to create a lot of separation," says Smith. "He's a phenomenal worker. "He came into the game as a great shooter, now he's an elite shooter. He came into the league as a great ball handler, now he's elite. You start to look at the work ethic; he's making everything to perfection almost." Watching Curry play is one thing, marveling at his stats is another. Smith notes that the former Davidson College standout set the league record for made three-pointers with 286 last season, and has already made 325 this season with 16 games remaining before the playoffs. The only other person with more than 200 threes is teammate Klay Thompson. Curry leads the NBA in scoring with 30.5 per game, while shooting a blistering 48% from a distance of 30 feet or more. Curry's success in shooting from more than six feet away from the three-point arc could be down to the fact he isn't tightly guarded from that range. After all, no other player has ever taken shots from that distance with regularity."Half his shots from an unbelievable distance are basically going in," Smith marvels. "We've had guys put up astronomical numbers, but their teams weren't winning. He's doing both right now." If the Warriors are to face a challenge on the way to back-to-back titles, Smith thinks it will come from the Spurs, led by his former coach Gregg Popovich and teammate Tim Duncan, as well as rising superstar Kawhi Leonard. The @warriors defeat the @orlandomagic 119-113 on @stephencurry30's 41p & 13r! #phantomcam A video posted by NBA (@nba) on Mar 7, 2016 at 10:04pm PST "This (San Antonio) team matches up pretty well against the Golden State Warriors," says Smith, who also happens to have teamed with Warriors' coach Steve Kerr on the 2003 Spurs. "They haven't lost a game at home either."In case the cross-references aren't dizzying enough, Kerr was, of course, also a member of the 1996 Bulls. Back then Jordan was so serious about making history that he and Kerr engaged in a now-legendary bust-up during practice -- a notion that seems far-fetched on this tight-knit Warriors team. So what does Kerr think of the Warriors' hypothetical matchup against the reigning greatest team ever? "The only thing I know for sure is I had no chance to guard Steph," Kerr told ESPN early in the season. "So I would say, we would probably have had to put a combination of Scottie (Pippen) and Harp (Ron Harper) on Steph." (Harper, for the record, has said his Bulls would have swept this Warriors team.) Back to the here and now, Smith says the Warriors are likely to complete their mission to become one of the greatest teams in NBA history: "I say they get the record, and I also say they win the championship."For Curry and the Warriors to still be smiling in June, it will all come down to execution, as Kerr might say. Photos: Basketball's big bucksLeBron James and Kevin Love are smiling all the way to the bank, as two of the highest-paid players in the NBA this season. The NBA boasts the highest average salary of any team sport in the world, at $4.7 million. Here are the top 20 earners in the league, ranked in ascending order (source: basketball-reference.com). **Note: Anthony Davis, who is not yet in the top 20, has the largest guaranteed contract at $126.6 million for six years. Hide Caption 1 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 20: Kawhi Leonard, $16.5 million – Leonard was named MVP of the 2014 finals for the San Antonio Spurs when he was tasked with guarding LeBron James, while averaging 17.8 points on 11-19 3-point shooting. Still only 24, Leonard will anchor the Spurs long after the "Big Three" of Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili have retired. Hide Caption 2 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 19: Russell Westbrook, $16.7 million – Without injured running mate Kevin Durant, Westbrook was only a game away from single-handedly willing Oklahoma City to the 2014-15 playoffs after a stellar season featuring 11 triple-doubles. A leading MVP candidate for 2016, Westbrook's contract escalates to $17.8 million next season, his last under contract. Look for him to benefit from a new collective bargaining agreement in 2017. Hide Caption 3 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 18: Paul George, $17.1 million – The versatile Indiana Pacers small forward (#24) was a budding superstar until breaking his leg before last season. He came back to play six games but it was too early to tell whether George will live up to the $55 million the Pacers guaranteed him after his breakout 2014 campaign (21.7 ppg, 6.8 rpg). Hide Caption 4 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 17: Blake Griffin, $18.9 million – For all his skills and physical prowess, Griffin shies away from the big shot in the fourth quarter, which is partially what doomed the Clippers in the playoffs last year. But as long as he is a Clipper, a spectacular dunk is just a moment away, keeping the Hollywood glitterati packing the Staples Center. Hide Caption 5 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 16: Paul Millsap, $19 million – Without averaging more than 18 points or nine rebounds in any season, Millsap (#4 of the Atlanta Hawks) is the least-known player in the top 20. But he was a leader for the 60-win Hawks, who were intent on keeping the team intact; hence, the $60 million, three-year deal for the 30-year-old power forward. Hide Caption 6 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 15: Kevin Love, $19.5 million – Love was always going to get paid, the question was -- who was going to write the checks? After an an up-and-down first season in Cleveland capped by a separated shoulder that kept him out the Cavs' playoffs run, speculators had Love bolting to his native West Coast. But the sharp-shooting power forward wisely committed to Cleveland and, more importantly, teaming with LeBron James for five years and $113 million in total. Hide Caption 7 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo.14: DeAndre Jordan $19.5 million – The second Clipper on the list, Jordan is a beast under the basket, but is plagued by terrible foul shooting (39.7% last season) that kept him out of big chunks of fourth quarters, especially in the playoffs. In a league favoring small-ball, the standoff between Dallas and LA to sign Jordan was a curious one. After committing to Dallas in July and then changing his mind, the center signed with the Clippers for $88 million over four seasons. Hide Caption 8 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 13: LaMarcus Aldridge $19.5 million – After nine seasons with Portland, the four-time All-Star power forward brings his 23.4 points and 10.2 rebounds per game to San Antonio, who ponied up for an $80 million deal to 2019. Hide Caption 9 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 12: Marc Gasol $19.7 million – Like Kevin Love, Gasol was one of the most coveted free agents during the offseason, but opted to remain with his team. The Spaniard -- whose time in Memphis stretches back to high school when he accompanied his older brother Pau to the U.S. -- re-signed for five years and $110 million. With those kind of numbers, the Grizz are hoping for championship payback. Hide Caption 10 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 11: Brook Lopez, $20 million – Lopez (#11 of the Brooklyn Nets) came off an average season for a starting center (17.2 ppg, 7.4 rpg) but the big-spending Nets re-signed him to a three-year, $63 million contract. The 7-foot Lopez also sat out half of the last four seasons with injuries. Sometimes it pays to be tall, literally. Hide Caption 11 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo.10: Dwyane Wade, $20 million – The NBA has a culture of paying for past performance. Entering his 13th season, the 33-year-old Wade hasn't played in 70 regular season games since 2011. When healthy, however, he's still one of the best guards in the league, averaging 24.3 points, 5.5 assists and 1.3 steals in 2015. He was signed to a one-year, $20 million deal by Miami in the offseason. Hide Caption 12 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 9: Derrick Rose, $20.1 million – Rose signed a $94 million extension with the Bulls halfway through his 2011 MVP campaign. Unfortunately, due to a variety of injuries, he's only played in 61 regular-season games in the three years since then. Because of situations like this, NBA owners will be pushing for non-guaranteed contracts in the next collective bargaining agreement, set to be in place by 2017.Hide Caption 13 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 8 Kevin Durant, $20.2 million – Durant was an MVP two seasons ago, then promptly had foot surgery to rule him out of most of last season (sound familiar?). He's on the last year of his Oklahoma contract, so has plenty of incentive to impress on the court. Hide Caption 14 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 7 Chris Paul, $21.5 million – The third Clipper in the top 20, Paul is the undisputed leader of the perennial playoff team. He has three more seasons under an escalating contract, with an option to terminate his 2018 salary of $24.3 million and test the open market at age 33. Hide Caption 15 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 6 Chris Bosh, $22.2 million – The Miami Heat's starting center on the 2012 and 2013 NBA championship runs was diagnosed with career-threatening blood clots in his lungs that sat him out for the entire second half of last season. Thankfully, Bosh made a full recovery -- but had he been forced to retire, the Heat would have been on the hook for the remaining $98 million on his contract. Hide Caption 16 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 5 Dwight Howard, $22.6 million – Once thought of as a franchise player, Howard sat out half of last season with knee problems, having previously had back surgery. Worrying trends for the Rockets, who are on the hook for $45.6 million if "Superman" decides to come back to Houston next season. Sadly, like DeAndre Jordan, his Kryptonite is free-throw shooting (career 57.3%). Hide Caption 17 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 4: Carmelo Anthony, $22.9 million – 'Melo missed half of the 2014-15 campaign with left knee surgery, which gave him a front-row seat to watch the Knicks sink to their worst season in franchise history. Since signing with the Knicks in 2011 for three years and $65 million, the team has won one playoff series. Anthony recently re-signed for three years and a guaranteed $73 million, with a team option for a fourth year at $28 million. Hide Caption 18 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 3: LeBron James, $22.98 million – It's tough to argue that anyone making $23 million is underpaid -- except when it comes to James. The self-anointed best basketball player in the world (agreed on by nearly everyone) was worth $162 million to the economy of Northeast Ohio when he returned from Miami last year, as forecast by LeRoy Brooks of John Carroll University. He is set to make another $24 million next season, his last under contract before the new collective bargaining agreement kicks in. Cavs owner Dan Gilbert's negotiating skills will be put to the test in 2017. Hide Caption 19 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 2: Joe Johnson $24.9 million – Johnson was thought as of as a potential NBA superstar when Atlanta signed him to a six-year, $123.7 million deal in 2010, coming off a 21.3-point, 4.9-assist, 4.6-rebound season. Unfortunately, that was his peak. At least Johnson has stayed healthy and productive for the Nets, who picked up his crippling contract in 2012, though last season's 14.4 points, 3.7 assists and 4.8 rebounds was nothing to write home about. Hide Caption 20 of 21 Photos: Basketball's big bucksNo. 1: Kobe Bryant, $25 million – The 17-time All-Star and five-time NBA champion is not only top of this list, but after this season (which he says will be his last) he will have accumulated the most salary money in NBA history at $303.24 million. Only Bryant and his rival/mentor Michael Jordan have ever notched paychecks of over $30 million in a season (Jordan received $33.14 million in 1998 and $30.14 million in 1997 -- but received only $90.24 million for his career).Hide Caption 21 of 21
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Story highlightsPalace source tells CNN that Kate feels "fulfilled" by her achievements over the past 12 monthsWilliam and other royals have helped smooth her transition into the monarchy, source saysWilliam phoned Kate from the Falklands to coach her for her first public addressKate intervened to prevent her new puppy Lupo becoming a public relations eventThe Duchess of Cambridge has successfully graduated as a "fully fledged member" of Britain's monarchy after fulfilling all her objectives one year on from her marriage to Prince William, a senior royal source has told CNN.St. James's Palace, which represents her, William and his brother Harry, now regards Kate's "induction" as complete and the duchess herself feels "fulfilled" by the achievements of the past 12 months, the source said.Confirmation of her smooth transition into the ranks of royalty will help dispel fears voiced ahead of last year's wedding that commoner-born Kate would struggle with the pressure of being thrust into the public eye.But, thanks to guidance from her husband, Kate feels she has settled into her new life, CNN has learned."She would never judge her achievements but she has succeeded in doing what she set out to do in her first year," the source said. "She has achieved her objectives."JUST WATCHEDKate, Duchess of Cambridge: Part 1ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHKate, Duchess of Cambridge: Part 1 08:21Kate's other mentor has been her father-in-law, Prince Charles, with whom she has become close. "They spend a lot of time together. They go on visits to the opera and art galleries. They share passions that neither of the princes share. They get on very well."JUST WATCHEDKate, Duchess of Cambridge: Part 2ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHKate, Duchess of Cambridge: Part 2 06:59Gallery: Photographer's year with duchessJUST WATCHEDKate, Duchess of Cambridge: Part 3ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHKate, Duchess of Cambridge: Part 3 09:03The source was speaking to CNN for a new documentary: The Royals; Kate, Duchess of Cambridge airing on May 4. In it, CNN explores how the whole royal family has thrown its support behind their newest member as she finds her feet. Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchess Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessRoyal Wedding – Getty Images photographer Chris Jackson talks to CNN about key images of Kate Middleton: "I was lucky enough to be positioned right outside the front of Westminster Abbey. I was seriously nervous. I had to get this picture. As they came out the front door, the crowd roared and I was just shooting away and you literally only had a matter of minutes, if that."Hide Caption 1 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessPippa Middleton – Jackson on THAT photo of Pippa Middleton: "You never know exactly what's going to happen afterwards, what the media are going to talk about but I did really feel that this was a strong image. I mean how often do you take a picture where you haven't got someone facing you, you can't see their face? I didn't realise it would be quite such a big deal."Hide Caption 2 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessKate meets Reese Witherspoon – Kate meets Reese Witherspoon in Los Angeles: "I think the thing for me, which really struck me about this moment was having a chat with Reese [Witherspoon] before, she seemed so excited about meeting Catherine. This is someone who mixes with Hollywood royalty every day. But meeting actual royalty was just an incredible thing for her." Hide Caption 3 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessThe 'pregnancy' false alarm – On the photo that stirred false pregnancy rumors: "I'm not sure if someone made a joke or Prince William said something to her but she just sort of laughed a bit and held her hands there and obviously it's a fortunate or unfortunate picture, depending on how you're looking. The picture has winged its way around the world onto numerous front pages."Hide Caption 4 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessKate arrives in Wales – On Kate's official apperance after her engagement to Prince William: "From the point of view of pictures and moving images, I think Catherine always looks very confident. Even from her first appearance, I remember up in north Wales, she stepped out of the car with a huge smile on her face."Hide Caption 5 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessKate's handbag 'security blanket' – Jackson: "She's developed a few mannerisms. Photographing her on a regular basis, I notice. You know, there's a laugh where she comes back and she laughs and looks at the camera. She often uses her handbag almost like a security blanket. It all looks great, it doesn't look bad at all."Hide Caption 6 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessKate enjoys chatting to people – Jackson: "She always enjoys chatting to people and she gives people a great deal of time. Quite often you'll see Prince William has walked off ahead but she is left chatting with someone because she wants to keep talking to them."Hide Caption 7 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessKate hugs a young girl – Jackson: "This was one of her solo engagements which she made while William was in the Falklands flying rescue helicopters. It just really shows that she gets stuck in and she's got the common touch and a real affinity with the children."Hide Caption 8 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchessKate's unusual hockey kit – Jackson: "Some of the fashionistas were getting very excited about Kate's jeans. She looked amazing, again. I think she was a little bit nervous when she arrived. But she knocked the ball around for a bit and I think the nerves evaporated slightly. It's great seeing her get stuck in and she doesn't hold back." Hide Caption 9 of 10 Photos: Royal photographer's year with a duchess'Clothes look really good on her' – Jackson: "She looks great in pictures. There's much talk about her weight. The fact is she's slightly slimmer. I think she looks healthy. It means that clothes look really good on her."Hide Caption 10 of 10"The queen has made a lot of time for the duchess. [Kate] gets on very well with the queen. They have a warm relationship as was evidenced in Leicester," says the source, referring to a visit last March when the pair were seen chatting and smiling.It has been a whirlwind year for Kate. Her wedding last April, one the biggest media events in history, was followed by a triumphant tour of Canada, which she regards as the highlight of her official year, and a trip to the United States.Watch: The Royals: Kate, Duchess of CambridgeWhen the duchess returned to Britain, she began shaping her own identity within the royal family.In January, she announced her support for four charities and began her first solo engagements. Last month she made her inaugural speech with the help of William who, CNN has learned, coached her via phone from the Falklands where he was on military service.By delivering her first speech, Kate completed the full range of official duties expected of a working royal.A small palace team has provided what training it can for the duchess, but they accept that the best insight comes from William and Charles.However, Kate has also proved to be a natural."For her, the public engagements are a joy," the royal source said. "She enjoys it. Not much fazes her. She is confident enough to handle it. She is strong-willed. She knows her mind. She is professional."Kate's hands-on approach came to light when the media was bombarding the palace with calls demanding to know the name of her new puppy.The duchess was unwilling to let her puppy become a public relations event, CNN understands. Instead she revealed it naturally during a visit to a school when a student asked her.In case you missed it, the newest member of the royal family is called Lupo.
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Story highlightsMillions have been displaced by upheaval in their native countries and are drawn to hope of better lifeTurkey: President says the Western world must wake up to its role in the crisisHungary: A chaotic way station on the way to hopes of a better life in Germany (CNN)To read the headlines, one could conclude that Europe is a mess.Its response to the historic wave of people now migrating from the Middle East and North Africa has been muddled and incoherent. There is a patchwork of different policies. Train stations in Budapest, Hungary, sell tickets, then close down, then reopen.Migrant crisis in Europe: How you can helpBorders that normally are just road signs along the highway are suddenly patrolled again. Some countries welcome migrants. Others build walls to keep them out. Yet there's reason for this unprecedented human migration. A significant part of the Middle East is in flames. In Europe, there is peace. Read MoreHere's a look at the latest country-by-country developments in the refugee and migrant crisis unfolding across much of Europe:Turkey: 2-year-old's death captures world's attention JUST WATCHEDErdogan: 'Western world to be blamed' for migrant crisisReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHErdogan: 'Western world to be blamed' for migrant crisis 03:12Four Syrian citizens were taken into custody Thursday, suspected of human trafficking in connection with the deaths of a toddler whose body was photographed on the Turkish shore and nine others, according to Turkey's semiofficial Anadolu news agency. The image of 2-year-old Aylan Kurdi's body, face down in the surf of a Turkish beach, rocketed around the world. He died along with his 4-year-old brother and mom -- three of several thousand refugees and migrants who have perished while trying to find safety in Europe.Photographer describes 'scream' of migrant boy's 'silent body'The boy's father, Abdullah Kurdi, was in mourning Thursday."I don't want anything else from this world," he told CNN. "Everything I was dreaming of is gone. I want to bury my children and sit beside them until I die."Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, meanwhile, told CNN's Becky Anderson that the image shocked him, too."When I saw that picture, it was in a family setting, unfortunately, and my children and my grandchildren, they saw the picture at the same time as me," Erdogan said."To be honest, the whole Western world is to be blamed in my opinion on this issue," he said. "When we saw it, we were devastated and we asked the question of ourselves: Where is humanity? Where is the conscience of humanity that a (2-year-old) child -- and it's not the first time this is happening. ... Many children, mothers, fathers unfortunately have been drowned in the rough waters of the Mediterranean."Hungary: A chaotic transit stopJUST WATCHEDTake a look inside a migrant train near BudapestReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHTake a look inside a migrant train near Budapest 03:19Trains packed with refugees left a station in Budapest on Thursday but stopped suddenly at a station outside the capital. Police gathered at the side of the track in Bicske. A CNN crew on one of the trains said the families there, who boarded hoping to travel to Austria or ultimately Germany, were refusing to get off despite suffocating heat and limited food and water. Tents and desks had been set up near the station in what the migrants feared was a relocation camp to transfer them to a nearby refugee center.Meanwhile, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban met in Brussels, Belgium, with other EU leaders to discuss the crisis. His nation, a transit point for migrants trying to make their way north, has responded by erecting a fence along its border with Serbia."The problem is not a European problem; the problem is a German problem," he said. Germany's government said last month it expected up to 800,000 asylum seekers to come this year -- four times more than in 2014. But, Orban said, German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said that they must be registered before leaving Hungary."All of them would like to go to Germany; our job is only to register them," Orban said.France: 'Welcome those who are pushed out'JUST WATCHEDAugust: A Syrian refugee's journey across EuropeReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHAugust: A Syrian refugee's journey across Europe 02:54French President Francois Hollande said Thursday that it's "time to act" to prevent more tragedies such as the death of Aylan Kurdi, the refugee toddler whose body was photographed after it washed up on a Turkish beach -- called upon Europe's conscience. "An image goes around the world and brings out emotion. It is shared," he said."Europe is a group of principles, of values which oblige us to welcome those who are pushed out and look for refuge because they are persecuted." He said some of the 4 million displaced people in Syria have been "welcomed by neighboring countries that are themselves suffering."Hollande said he had spoken to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan about the crisis.Czech Republic: Removed from trains, marked in inkWe have to question them. It's our legal obligation.-- Katerina Rendlova, Czech immigration officialCzech authorities said this week that they've started to remove migrants traveling without documentation from trains.In some instances, Czech police have been marking and numbering the migrants with washable ink. "We cannot let people without any documents and identification travel through the Czech territory. We have to question them. It's our legal obligation," said Katerina Rendlova, a Czech immigration official. "I know other states are not doing it, letting them pass freely to the next country, but we have laws that don't allow us to do it."Italy: Border controls with Austria reinstatedJUST WATCHEDLast week: 51 found dead in one boatReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHLast week: 51 found dead in one boat 01:45Foreign Ministers Paolo Gentiloni of Italy, Frank-Walter Steinmeier of Germany and Laurent Fabius of France have presented the European Union with a joint document calling for a revision of asylum rules and a fairer distribution of refugees, according to the Italian Foreign Ministry.Italian authorities on Wednesday said they were temporarily reinstating border controls at the Italian-Austrian line in the Alto Adige region. This is after Bavarian authorities in Germany requested them to do so because they are "overwhelmed" by the influx of migrants, according to a statement by Italy's Bolzano prefecture.Bavaria has had a great number of refugees arriving mainly from the Balkan route, and the situation is getting difficult to handle, the Italian statement said.United Kingdom: Pressure on to take more refugees Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photos Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA woman cries after being rescued in the Mediterranean Sea about 15 miles north of Sabratha, Libya, on July 25, 2017. More than 6,600 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in January 2018, according to the UN migration agency, and more than 240 people died on the Mediterranean Sea during that month.Hide Caption 1 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosRefugees and migrants get off a fishing boat at the Greek island of Lesbos after crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey in October 2015.Hide Caption 2 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosHide Caption 3 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosMigrants step over dead bodies while being rescued in the Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Libya in October 2016. Agence France-Presse photographer Aris Messinis was on a Spanish rescue boat that encountered several crowded migrant boats. Messinis said the rescuers counted 29 dead bodies -- 10 men and 19 women, all between 20 and 30 years old. "I've (seen) in my career a lot of death," he said. "I cover war zones, conflict and everything. I see a lot of death and suffering, but this is something different. Completely different."Hide Caption 4 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosAuthorities stand near the body of 2-year-old Alan Kurdi on the shore of Bodrum, Turkey, in September 2015. Alan, his brother and their mother drowned while fleeing Syria. This photo was shared around the world, often with a Turkish hashtag that means "Flotsam of Humanity."Hide Caption 5 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosMigrants board a train at Keleti station in Budapest, Hungary, after the station was reopened in September 2015.Hide Caption 6 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosChildren cry as migrants in Greece try to break through a police cordon to cross into Macedonia in August 2015. Thousands of migrants -- most of them fleeing Syria's bitter conflict -- were stranded in a no-man's land on the border.Hide Caption 7 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosThe Kusadasi Ilgun, a sunken 20-foot boat, lies in waters off the Greek island of Samos in November 2016. Hide Caption 8 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosMigrants bathe outside near a makeshift shelter in an abandoned warehouse in Subotica, Serbia, in January 2017.Hide Caption 9 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA police officer in Calais, France, tries to prevent migrants from heading for the Channel Tunnel to England in June 2015.Hide Caption 10 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA migrant walks past a burning shack in the southern part of the "Jungle" migrant camp in Calais, France, in March 2016. Part of the camp was being demolished -- and the inhabitants relocated -- in response to unsanitary conditions at the site.Hide Caption 11 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosMigrants stumble as they cross a river north of Idomeni, Greece, attempting to reach Macedonia on a route that would bypass the border-control fence in March 2016.Hide Caption 12 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosIn September 2015, an excavator dumps life vests that were previously used by migrants on the Greek island of Lesbos.Hide Caption 13 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosThe Turkish coast guard helps refugees near Aydin, Turkey, after their boat toppled en route to Greece in January 2016.Hide Caption 14 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA woman sits with children around a fire at the northern Greek border point of Idomeni in March 2016.Hide Caption 15 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA column of migrants moves along a path between farm fields in Rigonce, Slovenia, in October 2015.Hide Caption 16 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA ship crowded with migrants flips onto its side in May 2016 as an Italian navy ship approaches off the coach of Libya. Passengers had rushed to the port side, a shift in weight that proved too much. Five people died and more than 500 were rescued.Hide Caption 17 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosRefugees break through a barbed-wire fence on the Greece-Macedonia border in February 2016, as tensions boiled over regarding new travel restrictions into Europe.Hide Caption 18 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosPolicemen try to disperse hundreds of migrants by spraying them with fire extinguishers during a registration procedure in Kos, Greece, in August 2015.Hide Caption 19 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA member of the humanitarian organization Sea-Watch holds a migrant baby who drowned following the capsizing of a boat off Libya in May 2016.Hide Caption 20 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosA migrant in Gevgelija, Macedonia, tries to sneak onto a train bound for Serbia in August 2015.Hide Caption 21 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosMigrants, most of them from Eritrea, jump into the Mediterranean from a crowded wooden boat during a rescue operation about 13 miles north of Sabratha, Libya, in August 2016.Hide Caption 22 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosRefugees rescued off the Libyan coast get their first sight of Sardinia as they sail in the Mediterranean Sea toward Cagliari, Italy, in September 2015.Hide Caption 23 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosLocal residents and rescue workers help migrants from the sea after a boat carrying them sank off the island of Rhodes, Greece, in April 2015.Hide Caption 24 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosInvestigators in Burgenland, Austria, inspect an abandoned truck that contained the bodies of refugees who died of suffocation in August 2015. The 71 victims -- most likely fleeing war-ravaged Syria -- were 60 men, eight women and three children.Hide Caption 25 of 26 Photos: Europe's migration crisis in 25 photosSyrian refugees sleep on the floor of a train car taking them from Macedonia to the Serbian border in August 2015. How to help the ongoing migrant crisisHide Caption 26 of 26Prime Minister David Cameron has come under new pressure to offer shelter to more refugees from the Middle East after saying the best policy was to focus on bringing peace to the region.The Council of Europe commissioner for human rights, Nils Muiznieks, said that Cameron's position "seriously concerned" him."The truth is that at the moment the UK is doing much less than other European countries, like Germany or Sweden, which give refuge to thousands of Syrians," Muiznieks said in a statement.An online petition calling for the UK Parliament to accept more asylum seekers has passed the 100,000 mark required to ensure debate."We can't allow refugees who have risked their lives to escape horrendous conflict and violence to be left living in dire, unsafe and inhumane conditions in Europe. We must help," the petition states.CNN's Laura Smith-Spark and Ashley Fantz contributed to this report.
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(CNN)The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is rethinking the addition of a popular film category to the Oscars after the idea proved to be largely unpopular."There has been a wide range of reactions to the introduction of a new award, and we recognize the need for further discussion with our members," said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson in a statement Thursday. "We have made changes to the Oscars over the years -- including this year -- and we will continue to evolve while also respecting the incredible legacy of the last 90 years." The Academy announced in August that it intended to add a category for achievement in popular film, in hopes it would open the door to movies that might otherwise be overlooked in the best picture category. In announcing the move, the Academy left key questions unaddressed, however. Particularly, how a movie would earn the distinction of being a so-called popular film and whether a movie could be nominated in both the popular film and best picture categories. Everyone from prominent film critics to celebrities like Rob Lowe criticized the move. Read More"The film business passed away today with the announcement of the 'popular' film Oscar," Lowe wrote on Twitter. "It had been in poor health for a number of years. It is survived by sequels, tent-poles, and vertical integration."At the time, the Academy did not clarify when the category would be added, but the body's announcement that the measure "merits further study" indicates it had been on track for addition in the upcoming Oscars cycle. The Academy's decision to extend honors to so-called popular films was largely considered a play for more viewers. The most-watched telecast in Oscars history was in 1998 when "Titanic" won.Last year's telecast hit an all-time low in ratings with just 26.5 million viewers, a drop of 20% from the previous year.The 91st Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 24, 2019.
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London (CNN)If lawmakers don't take their final chance to vote for British Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal on Tuesday, then -- in the words of European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker -- the United Kingdom might never leave the European Union. In Strasbourg late last night, Juncker referred to the first defeat of May's plans back in January and warned: "In politics sometimes you get a second chance, it's what you do with the second chance that counts, because there will be no third chance ... it is this deal or Brexit might not happen at all."Whether rebellious Brexiteer Conservatives believe him is another thing entirely. They have, after all, spent months forcing the Prime Minister to go back and forth to Brussels and Strasbourg to make the changes they demanded.If they don't, May's position as Prime Minister is in serious danger -- and Britain will inch towards a no-deal Brexit or, at least, face a delay to the entire process.JUST WATCHEDWhat a fish can tell you about BrexitReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWhat a fish can tell you about Brexit 03:45Later on Tuesday, May will appeal to lawmakers in the House of Commons to back her deal -- which, she claims, is now enforced with "legally binding" changes designed to assuage concerns about the UK being locked into permanent arrangements with the EU and undermine Brexit.Read MoreSpeaking alongside Juncker, after more than two hours of talks in Strasbourg last night, May insisted the changes to her deal would allow the UK to break free of the backstop -- the insurance policy mechanism in the original agreement to prevent a hard border in Northern Ireland by keeping customs arrangements between the UK and Ireland aligned. Yet pro-Brexit Conservative lawmakers are deeply skeptical that the changes go far enough in protecting Brexit. Critics pointed to the phrase "reduce the risk" of the UK being locked in a permanent backstop, rather than a cast iron guarantee. There is also no fixed time limit, causing more concern among anti-EU Tory lawmakers.On Tuesday, they will push for the government's most senior law chief, Geoffrey Cox, to publish his legal advice on whether the changes May has secured really are "legally binding." They are also likely to seek their own legal opinion on the new documents.JUST WATCHEDSeaside town struggles during wait for BrexitReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSeaside town struggles during wait for Brexit 02:38The Northern Irish DUP party, on whose votes May normally relies to give her government a working majority in Parliament, will be decisive. If they oppose the new plans, May's Brexit deal will fail altogether -- but they could also swing many Tories against the government.If May's plan fails, there will be subsequent votes later this week on whether the Commons wants to block a no deal and whether Brexit should be delayed. In fact, the new documents published last night suggest Brexit could be delayed until May, before the European elections at the end of that month -- a short extension to the timetable but one which will nevertheless infuriate Euroskeptics. At that point, the Prime Minister's position will become increasingly untenable.Her own minister and de facto deputy David Lidington told the Commons last night that lawmakers faced a "fundamental choice -- to vote for the improved deal or to plunge this country into a political crisis." And it would, indeed, be a full-blown political crisis. While May is protected until the end of the year from a leadership challenge, she may find herself with little choice but to resign if her deal fails yet again.May has faced many crucial weeks since striking the original deal with the EU back in November. She has been defeated in Parliament over Brexit many times. But Tuesday is a genuine moment of truth on whether she has done enough to secure the votes she needs. Juncker's warning of "no third chance" was a message designed not only for Conservative rebels but the Prime Minister herself.
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(CNN)Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas, Bryson DeChambeau -- these former major winners used the second day of the Masters to make their move up the leaderboard. A winner at Augusta, Spieth -- following his first PGA Tour victory since 2017 last week -- hit a 4-under round to finish 5-under, while his friend Thomas hit a 5-under round to finish 4-under. And after looking completely out of sorts on Thursday, 2020 US Open winner DeChambeau had a 5-under round of 67 to finish 1-under and make the cut. READ: Moe Norman: The 'Rain Man of golf' who amazed even the greats of the sport Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentHideki Matsuyama celebrates with the green jacket after winning the Masters golf tournament on Sunday, April 11. He finished one shot ahead of Will Zalatoris.Hide Caption 1 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMatsuyama celebrates with his caddie, Shota Hayafuji, on the 18th green Sunday.Hide Caption 2 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMatsuyama lines up a putt on the 18th green Sunday.Hide Caption 3 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentXander Schauffele bites his club on the 16th hole Sunday. He hit the ball in the water there, effectively ending his hopes of winning the tournament.Hide Caption 4 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentKevin Na plays a shot from a bunker on Sunday.Hide Caption 5 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMatsuyama plays a shot from a bunker.Hide Caption 6 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentSchauffele hits a tee shot on Sunday.Hide Caption 7 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentAn attendant adjusts scores from behind a leaderboard on Saturday.Hide Caption 8 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMatsuyama finished with a 7-under 65 on Saturday to take a four-shot lead into Sunday's final round.Hide Caption 9 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentSpectators walk to cover on Saturday after play was temporarily suspended because of inclement weather.Hide Caption 10 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMatt Jones reacts on the 13th hole as a warning horn was sounded to suspend play on Saturday.Hide Caption 11 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentJustin Thomas hits a tee shot on Saturday.Hide Caption 12 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentJustin Rose eyes a par putt on the first hole Friday. Rose held a one-shot lead heading into the weekend.Hide Caption 13 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentPeople spread out from one another as they watch Tommy Fleetwood putt on the 16th green on Friday.Hide Caption 14 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentBryson DeChambeau, last year's US Open champion, plays a shot on the 13th hole Friday.Hide Caption 15 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentFormer US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, left, watches the action along with fellow Augusta National member Heidi Ueberroth on Friday.Hide Caption 16 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentFormer Masters champion Jordan Spieth walks past the azaleas on the sixth fairway Friday.Hide Caption 17 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentLee Elder acknowledges applause as he joins Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus as honorary starters on Thursday. In 1975, Elder became the first African American to play in the Masters.Hide Caption 18 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentDustin Johnson, last year's Masters champion, plays a shot on the second hole on Thursday.Hide Caption 19 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentRose hits out of a bunker on the second hole on Thursday. He shot a 7-under 65 to take a four-shot lead after the first round.Hide Caption 20 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentThis was the first time in two years that the Masters had allowed spectators on the course.Hide Caption 21 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentSpieth hits a tee shot on Thursday.Hide Caption 22 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentFour-time major winner Brooks Koepka had knee surgery less than a month ago, but he was on the course for the first round.Hide Caption 23 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentRory McIlroy hits out of the rough on the sixth hole Thursday.Hide Caption 24 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentTwo-time Masters champ Bubba Watson hits out of a bunker on the first hole Thursday.Hide Caption 25 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentFans watch some of the first-round play.Hide Caption 26 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMax Homa walks down the 18th fairway on Thursday.Hide Caption 27 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentJoaquin Niemann looks for his ball on the 10th hole Thursday.Hide Caption 28 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentDuring a practice round on Wednesday, Ian Poulter takes a Hogan Bridge selfie with his playing partners and their caddies.Hide Caption 29 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentMcIlroy and Thomas walk across the Sarazen Bridge during a practice round on Tuesday.Hide Caption 30 of 31 Photos: The 2021 Masters golf tournamentAzaleas frame the 16th green on Monday.Hide Caption 31 of 31However, despite all their hard work, they remain a few shots off the brilliant Justin Rose after the first two rounds. Read MoreRose, after a tough front nine which included four bogeys, battled back to recover an even round and retain his lead atop the standing. The Englishman had a brilliant Thursday while others struggled, and stressed the magnitude of playing at the Masters can bring added pressure while playing on the storied course. "I think it was just a classic day at Augusta National when you're just slightly off," Rose told the media. "You can be a foot or two out on certain occasions and you end up struggling. Bryson DeChambeau hits out of the pine straw on the seventh hole during the second round of the Masters."I think maybe off the back of yesterday, it starts to feel pretty different pretty quickly. But again, I kind of told myself going up the 8th hole, you're leading the Masters, your frame of reference is a little bit different to yesterday. Four ahead is something, but you're still leading so like just enjoy it and keep going. "I was able to do that. I felt like the turning point for me, a good two-putt on No. 9 just to stop the rot and just to feel like could then just walk onto the back nine and try to build something fresh and something new. Actually started to play pretty well from that point onwards."And Rose will be glad he recovered on the back nine with Spieth looking to be somewhere near his best. Justin Rose hits out of a bunker on the seventh hole during the second round of the Masters.Although he admitted afterward he wasn't 100% as confident as when he won the Masters twice, elements of his unerring consistency have crept back in, which will have his components quaking. Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, features, and videos"I came in thinking that (I could win the Masters)," Spieth told the media in his post-round press conference. "I'm in position now to think that for sure, but at the halfway point, I would have been pleased with being two back, if that's where I'm at, especially after last week. For me, I think less is more and rest is key, but certainly, I'm happy that the golf course has the opportunity to play more and more difficult over the weekend."I think that personally I'm looking forward to that kind of challenge, and I think that could be an advantage to me if I'm in control of the ball."With just two days left in the tournament, Rose will have to be at his calmest best with those big names breathing down his neck.Jordan Spieth tees off on the seventh hole during the second round of the Masters.It wasn't so plain sailing for some of the other big names in the draw.Defending champion Dustin Johnson, who set a record score of 20-under to win last year's tournament, carded a second-round 75 to close on 5-over and miss the cut. Three bogeys on the last four holes cost Johnson, who was bidding to become the fourth player to win back-to-back Masters titles.He was joined in an early exit by Rory McIlroy, who missed the cut at Augusta for the first time since 2010, as well as major winners Sergio Garcia, Brooks Koepka and Jason Day.
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Brussels, Belgium (CNN)What can the UK achieve in three weeks that it couldn't in three years?The most obvious answer to this is, worryingly for some, not very much.While the European Union offered Prime Minister Theresa May -- and her vision for Brexit -- a final lifeline this week, it did so with caveats and, crucially, harder deadlines than before.It's these deadlines that European leaders hope will focus the minds of British lawmakers as they return to the House of Commons to try and find a way out of the Brexit deadlock.About last night...Read MoreThe UK essentially now has three options, and each comes with increasingly urgent logic.Option one: Approve the Withdrawal Agreement. The UK will then leave the EU on May 22 and enter the transition period. More on that later. If MPs vote the deal down, then they have a decision to make by April 11: stand in the EU parliamentary elections or don't.Option two: Don't stand in the elections, held between May 23-26, and leave the EU before then. It is unlikely that any substantial new deal could be struck by this point. What the EU would do at this point is unclear.Option three: Stand in the elections and request a long extension. This makes softer Brexit all but inevitable and undoing Brexit a lot more likely.Meaningful Vote ThreeAt some point next week, May will bring her Withdrawal Agreement back to the Commons. She needs to flip 75 MPs if she's to win by a margin of one. Given she dedicated some of this week to accusing them of betraying the nation, it's hard to see them feeling charitable. All the PM can hope for is that the EU has bought a new level of focus to London.Why should MPs who hate the deal back it suddenly? There are arguments to be made either way. Ultimately, all the Withdrawal Agreement does is place the UK into a transition period, allowing for future negotiations about where all this ends up. If your biggest fear is remaining in the EU, then this is the case for holding your nose.Taking back controlIf May fails, as is widely expected, then it's likely that MPs will do everything in their power to take control of Brexit away from the PM. On Monday, MPs will vote on an amendable motion. This means that the Commons votes on a question put forward by the government, which MPs can amend to suit their needs. It is highly likely that an amendment will be made demanding that the PM allows the Commons to hold a series of indicative votes so MPs can finally say what they are for, not just what they are against.And if parliament *actually* says what it wants?You had to ask, didn't you? It's very likely that any consensus that could be reached across the Commons would be a softer Brexit than the one May is currently pursuing. That, I am afraid, is still a fairly open-ended answer. It might mean the need to renegotiate, which would mean a longer extension, which would mean being in the EU elections, which could mean a second referendum, ultimately. The key point here is that cross-party consensus might sound nice, but on an issue as divisive as Brexit, it's as likely as anything to blow up both main parties. While things are far from rosy and three weeks is not enough time to sort much, it's worth noting that while Brexit might not be going terribly well, the last three years have been a huge learning curve for the entire UK. We know more now than we did. So while the next bit of the Brexit process might look crunchy, the decisions made in the coming days will not be made lightly.
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(CNN)What's in a name?Well, quite a lot it would seem if you're a racing driver named Max.Maximilian Günther made Formula E history on a sweltering afternoon in Santiago, Chile, becoming at age 22 the youngest driver to ever win a race in the series.His achievement parallels that of a fellow driver named Max. In 2016, then 18-year-old Max Verstappen became the youngest driver to win a Formula One race.Günther was involved in an enthralling wheel-to-wheel battle with the vastly more experienced Antonio Felix da Costa, who must have thought he'd secured the ePrix win after controversially bashing his way past the youngster on the penultimate lap.Read MoreMaximilian Günther celebrates victory in the Santiago E-Prix.But the German driver impressively kept his cool and fought back to retake the lead on the final lap and give BMW just its third win in Formula E.Da Costa left BMW in the summer to join last season's championship-winning outfit DS Techeetah and was today critical of the team, claiming a miscommunication about battery temperature cost him the race win.READ: Formula E boss hopes racing series will 'accelerate' adoption of electric vehiclesJaguar's Mitch Evans completed the podium in third place but will be ruing a missed opportunity after an impressive drive in qualifying put him in pole position."It was a nice fight until the end and I'm super happy with my first victory in Formula E," Günther said after the race. "It became quite challenging ... it was an amazing race, fighting so much side-by-side with the cars for the win -- it's super cool."'The body and brain is the limit, not the car': How it feels to drive the world's quickest PorscheLast year's race in Santiago was affected by the record-breaking 42-degree Celsius (107.6-degree Fahrenheit) temperature, which caused parts of the track to melt under the drivers' wheels.To avoid a repeat this year, organizers enlisted the help of a company that usually lays the tarmac for airport runways and the track remained in fine fettle throughout.Santiago's circuit, situated in the Chilean capital's central O'Higgins Park, provides one of the most thrilling stops on the Formula E calendar, offering drivers more opportunities than usual to overtake — though one tricky hairpin has been the bane of several drivers' races in recent years.Permission to rename Santiago as 'overtake city' #SantiagoEPrix pic.twitter.com/Mu2F2gppTV— ABB Formula E (@FIAFormulaE) January 18, 2020 The win completes a remarkable comeback for Günther, a former Formula 2 driver, after indifferent results saw him dropped from his seat at GEOX Dragon last season.Victory and the full 25 points pushes Günther into fourth in the overall standings, 13 points behind leader Stoffel Vandoorne who overtakes Alexander Sims at the top thanks to his sixth-place finish in Santiago.
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Paris (CNN)The US women's national soccer team will "fight until the end" in its battle for equality, says one of the team's co-captains Megan Rapinoe. With the Women's World Cup just months away, 28 players in the US squad last week filed a federal class-action lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation, stating "institutionalized gender discrimination," which the reigning world champions say has existed for years. Follow @cnnsport The suit, filed in a federal court in Los Angeles on March 8 -- International Women's Day -- intensified the team's long-running dispute with the federation over pay equity and working conditions, stating that "female players have been consistently paid less money than their male counterparts." Rapinoe, a World Cup winner in 2015, told CNN Sport she was confident the team would be successful, adding that the USWNT was happy to "clear the path as much as we can" for other countries in the fight for gender equality. Alex Morgan #13 and Megan Rapinoe #15 of USA celebrate after a goal against Mexico in October 2018.READ: France 2019 -- What you need to knowRead MoreREAD: From 'whirlwind year' to seeking World Cup glory "To even bring about a lawsuit to the forefront you better be sure as hell that your claims are solid," said the 33-year-old Rapinoe, who was speaking in Paris at the launch of the USWNT's World Cup kit."I've been on this team a long time and we're extremely organized and united and feel that this is the right time for it and that we have a very strong case. We feel good about it. "For us, it's just another step forward. It's obviously not something we're going to drop ever. We're going to fight to the very end and this was just the next step that we needed to take."World Cup favoritesThe dominant power in the women's game, the USWNT is the world's top-ranked team and favorites to win this summer's Women's World Cup in France, which would bring about a fourth title in eight tournaments. The country's men, by comparison, are currently 25th in the world rankings and failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. US Soccer has yet to comment on the legal action which also seeks compensation for any player who has appeared for the US since February 2015. Rapinoe was one of five high-profile players who filed a complained with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 2016 alleging wage discrimination. The men's national team, the athletes said, unjustly earned far more than they did. Megan Rapinoe #15 kneels during the National Anthem prior to the match between the US and the Netherlands in September 2016.The players and their federation eventually agreed a settlement in 2017. Though the terms of the deal, which runs through to 2021, were not released, it reportedly included increases in base pay and match bonuses, better per diem allowances, enhanced travel benefits and increased financial support for players who are pregnant. However, the US women soccer players argue that they still receive less pay from their employers even though they are required to play more games than the men's team and win more matches. Frustrated by a lack of progress on their wage discrimination complaint, the EEOC granted the players a right-to-sue letter. "We tried to go through the EEOC process and tried to get the federation to come to the table, not really in negotiation but in mediation," said Rapinoe. "They were not really into doing that. "At this time, this is the best step we can take to put us in the strongest position to continue this fight."The first white professional athlete to kneel during the US national anthem in support of Colin Kaepernick, Rapinoe said the team did not make the decision lightly with the World Cup on the horizon."It's not something that we were willing to give up or just let float out into the ether," the Californian said."We felt as well that it's far enough out that we can manage the distraction now and be done with that and fully focus on the World Cup, and obviously with litigation it takes a million years to do anything in the court [so] it's not as if anything is happening very quickly. "No one understands better than us the power and the importance of winning and pushing the needle forward so this team has always had distractions of some kind. "We're used to this and we have a very experienced veteran group that can guide the younger players and by the time the World Cup comes around it's not something we're going to be talking about every day."Rapinoe added that the USWNT stars were also motivated by the feeling that they weren't just fighting for themselves. "We have a very visceral understanding of our place within the bigger fight. We feel any time we win, other teams win as well and other players can really piggyback off the success. We're happy to be the ones out charging in front and try to clear the path as much as we can for anyone else."JUST WATCHEDHope Solo does not back North America's 2026 bidReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHHope Solo does not back North America's 2026 bid 01:55Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, features and videosAlex Morgan, a World Cup winner and Olympic gold medalist, said achieving equal pay would be as great as anything she has achieved on the pitch. "I had a dream to play soccer and to make it at the highest level, but when I'm retired and older what I'll look back on is the legacy that I'll leave and feeling proud of the mark that I've made on the sport," Morgan, who along with Rapinoe filed the 2016 complaint against US Soccer, told CNN Sport. "At some point we need to take a stand and realize that we do deserve true equality."Once we all made the decision together it was a really easy one because it's the right thing to do, it's the next step forward."
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Story highlights22 demonstrators are arrested28 are hurt, 2 of them policeSome 6,000 protesters gathered outside Spain's congressional building in MadridThe demonstrators are against the government and the oppositionThousands of protesters fed up with the country's austerity measures demonstrated here Tuesday outside the congressional building.Clashes between police and demonstrators in central Madrid's Neptuno Square resulted in 28 people being hurt, two of them police officers, a police spokesman said.The spokesman said 22 people among the estimated crowd of 6,000 had been arrested.Read more: Spain to reveal pain on its booksDemonstrators said police were shooting into the crowd with rubber bullets; the police would not comment."We have you surrounded," some demonstrators sang. "We have no fear."JUST WATCHEDSpaniards protest austerity plansReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSpaniards protest austerity plans 02:49JUST WATCHEDSpain's hairdressers fear tax, not cutsReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSpain's hairdressers fear tax, not cuts 02:42JUST WATCHEDSpain's olive oil crisisReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSpain's olive oil crisis 02:45At one point, Spanish police charged demonstrators with batons to prevent them from approaching the parliament, which was in session.Spain is facing an economic crisis with unemployment near 25%, and the protesters accused the government and the opposition alike of trying to solve the country's financial woes on the backs of the people.Video from the scene showed police charging groups of protesters with their clubs, but such clashes were isolated.Protesters' demands include a reduction in the size of the government, state-run broadcaster TVE reported.Some protesters threw bottles and rocks at the police officers, who fought back, TVE reported.
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Story highlightsLindsey Vonn in tears at memory of late grandfather at news conferenceThe American is bidding for second Olympic gold after 2010 triumphVonn is most successful female ski racer ever (CNN)She was moved to tears over the memory of her late grandfather, but Lindsey Vonn vowed to win gold in honor of the man she calls her ski racing inspiration at PyeongChang 2018.Follow @cnnsport The 33-year-old is among the favorites to add a second downhill gold to her 2010 title from Vancouver, but she cried as the emotion of losing her grandfather, Don Kildow, at the age of 88 in November came flooding back in her first Winter Olympics news conference Friday.READ: Vonn set for "full charge" at Winter Olympics CNN's Coy Wire asked the American how memories of her grandfather resonated with her now she was in South Korea preparing for the Games."Ah, it's really hard," replied Vonn, the most successful female ski racer of all time.Read More"I wish you wouldn't have said that. It's really hard for me not to cry."She paused before adding: "Yeah, I just want so badly to do well for him and... I miss him so much."Vonn teared up as she continued: "He's been such a big part of my life. "And I really hoped he'd be alive to see me but I know he's watching and I know that he's going to help me. And... I'm going to win for him."JUST WATCHEDLindsey Vonn overcomes grief to reach OlympicsReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHLindsey Vonn overcomes grief to reach Olympics 01:15READ: Vonn -- 'I won't be representing US president at Olympics''Huge loss'Vonn missed the Sochi Olympics because of a knee injury, and struggled for much of last season after breaking her arm and suffering nerve damage in her hand.Walking in my last opening ceremonies with my teammates tonight was incredible.🙏🏻🇺🇸 So honored to be a part of this team! Sports has the power to unite the world, and watching N & S Korea walk together tonight is what it's all about. 🌏❤️— lindsey vonn (@lindseyvonn) February 9, 2018 But she has won four World Cup races this season, including back-to-back downhills coming into the Games, to close to within five victories of the all-time record held by Sweden's Ingemar Stenmark. She also won super-G bronze at Vancouver 2010.Vonn says without her grandfather's influence she may never have taken up the sport."If it wasn't for my grandfather I wouldn't be racing," Vonn told CNN's Alpine Edge in St Moritz, Switzerland in December.JUST WATCHEDVonn: I won't represent Trump at Winter GamesReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHVonn: I won't represent Trump at Winter Games 01:11"My grandfather taught my father how to ski. It's because of him that it is in our family. It was a huge loss to me and my family. I think about him all the time, especially when I'm racing. And I feel closer to him when I'm skiing."
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Story highlights A lip reader tells the court what John Terry said, including two extremely obscene wordsFerdinand says he did not hear the alleged racist abuse, but would have been hurt Terry, one of England's biggest stars, faces a potential fine of about $3,900 if convictedEnglish soccer officials are struggling to stamp racism out of the sportOne of England's biggest soccer stars went on trial Monday, accused of hurling racist abuse at another player during a match last year.The normally staid chambers of Westminster Magistrates' Court in London got an earful of shockingly foul language as lawyers and witnesses detailed what Chelsea captain John Terry said to Queens Park Rangers defender Anton Ferdinand in the match.A lip reader watching a video of the incident told the court what Terry said, including two extremely obscene words.Terry did not deny directing a barrage of foul language at Ferdinand and referring to him as "black," but he denied engaging in racist abuse.The highly unusual criminal prosecution over words uttered on a soccer field comes as English soccer officials fight to stamp racism out of the sport, with mixed results.Liverpool player Luis Suarez was banned for eight matches when the Football Association, the English sport's governing body, found he had racially abused Manchester United defender Patrice Evra.The chanting of racist abuse by fans also remains a sporadic problem in soccer across Europe.JUST WATCHEDSoccer star arrives for race abuse trialReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSoccer star arrives for race abuse trial 01:02JUST WATCHEDFootballer John Terry accused of racismReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHFootballer John Terry accused of racism 02:02The Crown Prosecution Service is pressing charges against Terry for a "racially aggravated public order offense" because of the comments during an October 23 match between Chelsea and Queens Park Rangers.Prosecutors played a video of the incident, without sound, as the case opened Monday morning.The alleged abuse came after Ferdinand knocked Terry down during the game, the jury heard.When he got up, Terry made a gesture as if Ferdinand's breath smelled, and he called Ferdinand a "c---," prosecutor Duncan Penny told the court.Ferdinand responded with the same word, saying it described Terry, not him, because Terry had had sex with a teammate's wife, the prosecutor said.Ferdinand also made an obscene gesture related to sex as Terry ran back into position, Penny said.Ferdinand testified that he did not hear the comments Terry made at him, but that he would have been "hurt and disappointed" if he had heard Terry call him a "black c---""When someone brings your color into it, it takes it to another level and it's very hurtful," Ferdinand said.Terry maintains that Ferdinand knocked him down before the incident and that the two then exchanged "normal football verbals."He told Football Association officials that he then repeated to Ferdinand words he thought the opposing player had said to him, Penny told the court Monday.The maximum penalty for the offense is £2,500 (about $3,900). That would be a drop in the bucket for a player worth millions, but a criminal conviction could lead to action against him by his team or England's Football Association.Terry was captain of England's national team at the time of the incident but was stripped of his captaincy after a preliminary court hearing on the racism charge in February.He remained captain of Chelsea, which went on to win the prestigious Europe-wide Champions League this year.The trial could last up to five days, court officials say.
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Story highlights"Boyhood" wins best film at BAFTAsScientist Stephen Hawking draws cheers as he presents onstageThe ceremony is often seen as a prediction for the Oscars (CNN)"Boyhood" won big at Sunday's BAFTA ceremony, netting prizes for best film, best director and best supporting actress.Director Richard Linklater filmed the critically acclaimed coming-of-age movie with the same cast over 12 years.The EE British Academy Film Awards, known as the BAFTAs, are the most anticipated event for the British film industry. And with the Oscars only two weeks away, the ceremony is often seen as an indicator of who is in the running for an Academy Award.Patricia Arquette won best supporting actress Sunday for her role as a mother in "Boyhood." She also won a Screen Actors Guild Award last month for her performance.Congratulations to @PattyArquette on her Supporting Actress award! #EEBAFTAs pic.twitter.com/KcmqhaZtWl— BAFTA (@BAFTA) February 8, 2015 Held at the Royal Opera House in London and presented by comedian Stephen Fry, "The Grand Budapest Hotel" was at the top of the leader board going into the awards with 11 nominations. The film won five awards for best costume design, best production design, best makeup and hair, best original music and best original screenplay. Read MoreJUST WATCHED'Boyhood' wins big at BAFTAsReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCH'Boyhood' wins big at BAFTAs 00:10Eddie Redmayne won best leading actor for his portrayal of physicist Stephen Hawking in "The Theory of Everything," paying tribute to the Hawking family in an emotional acceptance speech.Redmayne was not only a favorite of the BAFTA judges, but also with hundreds of fans who lined up -- some since Friday -- to watch him walk on the red carpet and chant his name as he went by.But it was Hawking himself who got some of the biggest cheers of the night, drawing a standing ovation when he took the stage with actress Felicity Jones to present the award for best special digital effects.And here's Eddie Redmayne with Stephen Hawking! #EEBAFTAs pic.twitter.com/tU5XARRVDb— BAFTA (@BAFTA) February 8, 2015 "I'm particularly pleased to be presenting with the only person on the planet more intelligent than Stephen Fry," Jones said."Yes, and better looking," Hawking quipped.READ: The BAFTAs: How the numbers stack upJulianne Moore won best leading actress for her role as a professor battling Alzheimer's in "Still Alice."J.K. Simmons won best supporting actor for his role in "Whiplash." The film also won awards for best editing and best sound."Birdman," which started the night with 10 nominations, walked away with the award for best cinematography. The light-hearted "Lego Movie" won best animated film.Formed on April 16, 1947, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts is a charity that rewards, develops and promotes excellence in film, television and games. British rock band Kasabian opened the show.Some stars posed for photographs on the red carpet with David Beckham, who presented the first award for the evening: outstanding British film, which went to "The Theory of Everything."Who else won the night? See the full list here. CNN's Kellie Morgan and Sara Mazloumsaki contributed to this report.
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Story highlightsSuspect arrested is from UzbekistanIstanbul governor says shooting was 'based on ISIS' (CNN)A man from Uzbekistan arrested in Turkey has confessed to carrying out the deadly New Year's gun attack at Istanbul's Reina nightclub, the city's governor has said, dubbing the shooting an ISIS-influenced terrorist attack. Abdulgadir Masharipov, seen after his arrest, is the alleged gunman in a deadly attack at Istanbul's Reina nightclub.Abdulgadir Masharipov allegedly opened fire in the early hours of New Year's Day in an attack that left 39 people dead and dozens injured, in a gruesome beginning to the new year following multiple acts of terror in 2016."The terrorist actually said that he did it," Istanbul Governor Vasip Sahin told journalists Tuesday.Nightclub attack: Read moreWhy Turkey is such a target for terrorVictims from 14 countriesHorrifying scene inside massacre nightclubIstanbul club was a hot spot for celebritiesMasharipov was born in 1983 and was educated in Afghanistan, Sahin said. He came to Turkey in January 2016 and went by the code name Abu Mohammed Khorasani Abdulkavi.The attack was "based on ISIS," Sahin said.Read MoreHe added that 168 foreigners were handed over to related authorities on suspicion of being terrorists and that one Iraqi man and three women from different places, including Egypt, were detained alongside Masharipov. "During this operation we have gone through 152 addresses, and in these operations, we detained 50 people."ISIS declaration of war on Turkey?ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack -- the militant Islamist group typically refrains from claiming responsibility for attacks in Turkey to create "an environment of suspicion in Turkish politics," analyst Soner Cagaptay wrote for CNN in 2016. The claim could be seen as a "a declaration of war on Turkey," CNN intelligence and security analyst Bob Baer said. Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubThis still photo, taken from surveillance footage and released on Monday, January 2, is believed to show the gunman responsible for carrying out a New Year's Day attack on the Reina nightclub in Istanbul. The popular nightclub was attacked shortly after midnight on Sunday, January 1. At least 39 people were killed and 69 were wounded, Turkey's Interior Minister said. Authorities are still searching for the attacker.Hide Caption 1 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA Turkish special forces officer stands near the Reina nightclub on January 2. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 2 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA friend of someone killed in the attack reacts near victims' pictures outside the nightclub on January 2.Hide Caption 3 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA police officer inspects cars near the scene on January 2.Hide Caption 4 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubPeople carry the coffin of Yunus Gormek, a victim of the attack, during a funeral ceremony in Istanbul on January 2.Hide Caption 5 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubPeople mourn outside the Forensic Medical Center in Istanbul on January 1.Hide Caption 6 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubRelatives of Ayhan Arik, one of the victims of the attack, cry during a funeral ceremony in Istanbul on January 1.Hide Caption 7 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubAn ambulance rushes from the scene of the attack on January 1.Hide Caption 8 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA woman is consoled at the site of the attack.Hide Caption 9 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubMedics wheel a stretcher at the scene.Hide Caption 10 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubPolice officers stand guard.Hide Caption 11 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubPeople leave the scene of the attack.Hide Caption 12 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA medic reacts near the scene of the attack.Hide Caption 13 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubHide Caption 14 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA wounded victim is rushed from the scene.Hide Caption 15 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubMedics and security officials work at the scene of the attack.Hide Caption 16 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubA wounded person is put into an ambulance.Hide Caption 17 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubPeople walk in the rain near the scene of the attack.Hide Caption 18 of 19 Photos: Attack at Istanbul nightclubAn ambulance transports those wounded in the attack.Hide Caption 19 of 19The nightclub was a glittering waterside venue frequented by Turkey's wealthy secular millennials and international celebrities. Ortakoy, where Reina is located, is a vibrant seaside neighborhood that caters to a wide range of people, from the uber-rich who party at clubs like Reina to students who buy stuffed baked potatoes from vendors along the Bosphorus shore.Around 1:15 am on New Year's Day, the gunman shot and killed a police officer who was guarding the front gate, then rushed inside, spraying gunfire. Revelers jumped into the freezing waters of the Bosphorus to escape the chaos.The nightclub's owner, Memet Korcarslan, told CNN he felt "an immense wave of relief rush through me" upon hearing news of arrests.Relatives of one of the victims of the Reina nightclub attack mourn at his funeral on January 1."I think a huge weight has been lifted off the shoulders of all the victims and their families just knowing that this man is no longer walking free," he said. "The Turkish police and Turkish intelligence have carried out a very successful operation by catching him alive. I hope they will find anyone else who was involved with this heinous attack."CNN's Emanuella Grinberg contributed to this report.
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(CNN)She's one of the globe's best players but the world won't be able to watch Ada Hegerberg this summer for what is being described as the mother of all women's tournaments."I don't mean to beat a dead horse (what a weird saying) but why exactly is Hegerberg not playing with Norway? If Messi or Ronaldo opted to not play in a World Cup the world would know why not with clarity," asked Heather O'Reilly, who plays for North Carolina Courage, in a tweet which received 1, 200 likes after Norway's squad was announced for the forthcoming Women's World Cup with Hegerberg absent from the list. "I would like to know as well," replied Alex Morgan, the American who is as ruthless in front of goal as her fellow striker Hegerberg and who, last month, was named in Time magazine's list of the world's 100 most influential people. Follow @cnnsport I don't mean to beat a dead horse (what a weird saying) but why exactly is Hegerberg not playing with Norway? If Messi or Ronaldo opted to not play in a World Cup the world would know why not with clarity— Heather O'Reilly (@HeatherOReilly) May 2, 2019 The 23-yera-old Hegerberg used to play for Norway, but she doesn't anymore. The gifted striker, who is a Ballon d'Or winner and owner of multiple Champions League titles, may never represent her country again. Though even her contemporaries want to know her reasons for giving up the chance of playing on the biggest stage of all, Hegerberg has been unwilling to give a blow-by-blow account of why she is at odds with her country's federationRead More"If I start saying ... things are going to blow up everywhere," Hegerberg, who last played for her country in 2017, tells CNN Sport as way of explaining why she has never divulged the specific reasons for sacrificing her international career. It is not about money, she says, revealing that she respects elite male players for the oodles they earn, but ensuring the young girls following her path have the same opportunities as aspiring young male footballers. READ: The world's best player won't be at the Women's World CupREAD: Overshadowed by 'twerking' controversy but not silencedHegerberg is the first woman to win the Ballon d'Or. "I was really honest with the national team representative what I felt wasn't good enough. What my experience had been since youth with the national team," she says, speaking at her club's training ground in Lyon. "I wanted it to be a relationship between me and them, so they could take the feedback and do something with it."I have no thoughts about giving that to all the people. I think it's a good way to deal with things, to be honest -- honesty is the right way for development. Now I've done my feedback, it's up to them to do what they want to do with it. "I've never been trying to control the starting 11, or something internal to the group. This is a feeling that's based on my whole experience with the national team. It's not even up to me anymore. I've moved on in my career and my life. I was sharp in what I meant with them, I don't really have a reason to share that with anyone else.JUST WATCHEDThe secret of this women's football powerhouseReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHThe secret of this women's football powerhouse 03:16"I've always respected men's footballers for what they earn. The gap is enormous, but at the same time you need to give young women and girls the same opportunity as the men. That's where we need to do the change. "There are federations, there are clubs, there are men in high positions who have that responsibility to put the women in the right place and that's where I think, I feel, and I know, we have a long way to go."The Norwegian Football Association didn't immediately respond to CNN's request for comment, but in 2017 the organization and Norway's players' association signed an agreement on equal pay in a deal thought to be the first of its kind in international football.Outstanding talentIt was the weeks leading up to her decision to ultimately quit the national team which were the most difficult, Hegerberg explains. "When I took the decision it was like a weight off my shoulders," she says. "I've done what I can do to make an impact and do the best to make things better. When that doesn't work you have to take a choice. Life is full of difficult choices to make. "I'm quite clear in who I am and where I want to go and, in the end, it was a decision I was confident with."Hegerberg is an outstanding talent. This weekend she and her Olympique Lyonnais Feminin team will aim to win a fourth successive Champions League title. Should they beat Barcelona in Budapest on Saturday, they will become the first team, male or female, to achieve such a feat. Last season she scored 53 goals in 33 games, including a record-breaking number in a single Champions League campaign.On the back of such prolific form, Hegerberg became the first female recipient of the Ballon d'Or last December -- a historic event which was, for that week at least, overshadowed by one of the co-hosts asking the Norwegian whether she could twerk. But despite the controversy, talking about winning such a prestigious award gives the player "goosebumps."Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, features and videosHegerberg holds aloft her Balon d'Or, received in Paris last December. Though goals have not been as plentiful this season, she has still found the back of the net 26 times in a season where her club has continued its domination of French football. The Norwegian moved to France in 2014, joining a club she describes as the model for how others should be organized. The team won its fifth league title this month, and the Women's French Cup. Since 2004, Lyonnais Feminin has secured 12 league titles and the Champions League five times. Arguably, this is the greatest women's team ever assembled. Hegerberg (L) with Lyon's French President Jean-Michel Aulas. 'Good atmosphere'Hegerberg credits the club's president, Jean-Michel Aulas, for investing heavily in the women's team, bringing in world talents such as Hegerberg and Germany captain Dzsenifer Marozsan, to name but two."You can have as much good players as you want but, at the end of the day, you have to work hard," she explains. "It's a mix of everything. The fact of keeping a lot of players together for a lot of years so we get to know each other -- and know each other well on the pitch which is really important. We have the conditions to be the best, we have equality here because of one man basically, the president."I was [made to feel] welcome from day one when I came to Lyon. People think there are so many tough environments in this club but it's the opposite and you need that good atmosphere to succeed. "We're so well integrated into the men's club, it's our club now -- men's and women's team. I'm really good friends with a lot of people who work in the club, outside the team, so just the fact that you eat together with the groundsman, the security man, the chef, for me is pleasant."It's something you should appreciate, and I appreciate a lot. That's what makes me feel so at home here as well."Lyon has the perfect model of how you should run a modern club. That didn't come by one year, investment in something good takes time. Give the women and the girls the same opportunity to do their sports is the best way to succeed. That's what I've been saying for a lot of years now, but it won't change by itself, you need to push for it."Hegerberg (R) heads the ball in a Champions League quarterfinal match against Wolfsberg. EqualityHegerberg grew up in rural Norway to parents who loved football so much that she jokes of being discouraged to take up handball and pushed towards the beautiful game instead.Her mother, whom she describes as an "idol," and father made sure their three children, a son and two daughters, knew equality was important. They would discuss the subject at home. "There was never a question in our family, you play football whether you're a girl or a boy," she says."Just by coming from a family who talks a lot about that subject gave me the regard to look upon things. It's important to be conscious about these things, especially the youth so the future knows this is what it's all about." JUST WATCHEDAda Hegerberg incident is 'a little bit sad'ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHAda Hegerberg incident is 'a little bit sad' 03:33Her elder sister, Andrine, whom Hegerberg also describes as a hero for forcing her to practice even when staying indoors was more appealing, plays in midfield for Paris Saint-Germain and will also not be playing for Norway in France next summer. "We live in a world where equality is the most important thing. We're in 2019. Women must have their spots, and that's in society," says Hegerberg."That's why, even though there are changes, that's why you need to push for those changes every single day, never stop demanding for equality and development. That's why our position is important. Every player needs to use their voice to shake up things."JUST WATCHEDAda Hegerberg: Surprised talk wasn't footballReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHAda Hegerberg: Surprised talk wasn't football 03:24'Tricky'Hegerberg's willingness to sacrifice her own career in the hope that it will benefit future generations helps to partly explain how she has managed to maintain unprecedented levels of success, both individually and with Lyon.It is, she says, "tricky" to stay hungry and motivated. But staying in her comfort zone, she says, would not only be detrimental to her game, but to women's football in general. "I always look at what we can do better, what can the players do better, and that is obviously to train, train hard enough, stay out of the comfort zone and always increase the level. But, at some point, you need help to develop the product in the form of an investment," she says. Working with a mental coach in Norway after every season, analyzing her campaign with her family and fiancé has also helped Hegerberg remain focused. "It's important to think about what you've done and what needs to be done," she explains. "That's a clear plan I've had from youth. I always analyze myself."As the world's best female players gather in France next month for the 2019 World Cup, when Hegerberg reflects on another season full of goals and trophies, and potentially more history-making feats, she will have no regrets. "That's part of the consequence," she says of missing a tournament where the semifinals and finals are being held in a city she now calls home. "I knew about the choice like this, but it doesn't stop me from making that choice because I believe in it so passionately because I want the best for the sport, I want the best for the youth, the ones who comes after. It sounds like a cliche but that's the truth."
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(CNN)The Salvation Army is getting an early start on its holiday fundraising campaign due to the unprecedented demands of the coronavirus pandemic. "It would be no exaggeration to say that since the pandemic began in mid-March, the Salvation Army has seen a tsunami of human need," said Kenneth Hodder, Salvation Army's National Commander.Since March, Salvation Army USA has provided more than 100 million meals, 1.5 million nights of safe shelter, plus emotional and spiritual support to over 800,000 people across the US. They expect those numbers to grow, bracing for a 155% increase in the need for their services heading into the holiday season. Those services include putting food on the table, paying bills, providing shelter, and even helping place gifts under the tree."We will go from our average of about 2.6 million people every year to more than 6.6 million people."'Rescue Christmas'Read MoreThe new campaign is called "Rescue Christmas," and it kicked off on September 14 -- 100 days before Christmas.A Salvation Army bell ringer in action outside a Chcago store in 2003. "Our traditional red kettle campaign, a symbol of Christmas and Americans caring for one another, is going to be increasingly difficult this year," Hodder told CNN."We believe that Christmas for millions of Americans is at risk," the commander said. "The need that we see at Christmas will last far beyond the holidays." Last year, the Salvation Army raised $126 million with its Red Kettle campaign; they expect to only bring in half that much this year."That would be disastrous for our ability to meet the needs of people," Hodder said. "So, for us, the Christmas Kettle Campaign not only is a symbol, but it is a means of acquiring the vital resources that we need."Red Kettle goes virtualAlthough this year's campaign got an early start, you won't be seeing as many kettles this season as you have in Christmas past. A man in a Santa suit publicizes a free Christmas dinner organized by the Salvation Army in New York, circa 1910. "Most people are carrying less cash than they have in the past. We have less foot traffic at some stores, and as unemployment has risen, so many people who have given to the army in the past are in fact, coming to us for help."In response, the organization shifted focus to online donations and launched the "Rescue Christmas" donation page. "People can go to that website today, and they can provide a one-time donation, find volunteer opportunities and also enlist in the army and make a $25 monthly sustaining gift," added Hodden.Local donations will continue to stay in the communities from which those funds are given. The Salvation Army assures that .82 cents of each dollar donated goes directly to helping those in need."We want to make sure everyone who comes to the Salvation Army will get what they need, not only for Christmas but to know that there's hope and that there's a bright future ahead."You can donate online here.
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(CNN)Polish teenager Iga Swiatek says support from a sports psychologist was a key factor in helping her to win the French Open final on Saturday. The 19-year-old became the first player from Poland to win a grand slam singles title after beating No. 4 seed Sofia Kenin, 6-4 6-1. Swiatek was unseeded at Roland Garros and, despite feeling confident ahead of the season, hadn't been playing her best in the build up to the tournament.However, she showed nerves of steel in storming to victory, becoming the first female to win the French Open without dropping a set since Justine Henin in 2007. It was a turnaround in fortunes she partly credits to working with sports psychologist Daria Abramowicz, who watched the final from the player's box. Read MoreThe pair have worked together for almost two years and Swiatek has been open about working hard on her mental game."It's a long process," Swiatek told CNN Sport. "It helped me during the whole tournament especially after coming back from Covid break."We did great work the last few weeks to lower my expectations and come back to basics and just focus on having fun on court."She helped me a lot during that process but also she's helping me develop as a person and as a player."READ: Nadal beats Djokovic at French Open for record tying 20th majorIga Swiatek celebrates winning the French Open in Paris.'Couldn't believe it'Abramowicz travels to major tournaments with the teenager but also works with elite athletes from many of Poland's national teams. Speaking to the WTA in September, she said the younger generation of sports stars appear more comfortable when talking about their mental health."With Iga [Swiatek] I really appreciate that she's so aware at this younger age," said Abramowicz. "I do appreciate that a lot and I respect it a lot as well."Swiatek served up the perfect birthday present for her mind mentor on Saturday, with Abramowicz tweeting her congratulations after the match. "It's simply the best birthday gift of my life," she wrote on Twitter.Despite boasting an impressive junior career -- Swiatek won the 2018 Wimbledon juniors -- victory in Paris was certainly not expected at this stage of her career. Her expression after winning championship point showed just how surprised she was. "I just couldn't believe it," she said. "Playing good tennis, winning grand slams seemed so distant to me, so achieving that is kind of a weird feeling and I just couldn't believe it."Swiatek pinpointed her fourth-round victory over Simona Halep as a key turning point for the Pole at the French Open. Halep was in great form and was fully expected to progress past her teenage opponent but Swiatek brushed the Romanian aside in little over an hour. "Before I had a problem with playing under pressure because I felt great in practices and then, in a match, suddenly my tennis was a little bit worse," said Swiatek."But in this tournament, I finally realized that I can do it and I just need to be mentally prepared and have a proper mindset. "I never really felt that I was really going to win the tournament because I knew, in the final, I was going to play against a great champion."When I realized that I was thinking about winning the tournament I tried to push those thoughts away and just focus on working because I think it would stress me."READ: Tennis players complain about new balls at French Open View this post on Instagram Speechless... #teamSwiatek #rolandgarros #polandgarros A post shared by Daria Abramowicz (@abramowiczdaria) on Oct 10, 2020 at 12:50pm PDT 'She inspired me'Swiatek says she struggled to sleep the night after lifting the trophy and has been overwhelmed by the messages of support she has received. Beaten men's finalist Novak Djokovic and Polish soccer star Robert Lewandowski are now two of her most high-profile fans, while Noami Osaka was tweeting her support throughout the finalThe pair have become close on tour and Swiatek says the two-time grand slam champion has been a constant source of inspiration during her fledgling career. "She inspired me even before we met because she was one of the girls that won a grand slam when she was an underdog," she said."I'm really glad we're texting sometimes because it's really nice to have someone who's so experienced and someone who can really help prepare you."READ: Serena Williams withdraws from French Open with Achilles injuryNaomi Osaka has become friends with Swiatek on tour. Father's influenceSport runs through Swiatek's family, with her father representing Poland in rowing at the 1988 Seoul Olympics.He was in Paris to watch his daughter lift the trophy and the pair celebrated with the rest of the family in the player's box moments after victory was sealed. "I think we're always focused on work because of him because he had high expectations that we were going to get good grades and we were going to have good practices," she said, speaking of her father's influence. "Sometimes these expectations are not a good thing because they are pressure for a child but in my case, I think it really helped me because I learned how to be professional."My sister got injured when she was 15 and she stopped playing tennis but she has a great brain and she is studying really well so I think we're both going to be successful."Even after winning the French Open, Swiatek hasn't entirely forgotten her studies either.The teenager has taken a gap year out from her academic pursuits but says she hasn't ruled out heading to university at some point in the future. "I think I have a lot to learn about certain aspects of life," she said. "At some point my brain is going to need something other than tennis. But I know being a tennis player means I'll be busy."
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(CNN)An Australian swimmer has died following a suspected stingray attack, according to reports. The 42-year-old man was attended to by emergency services at Lauderdale Beach in Tasmania after suffering "a puncture wound to his lower abdomen," according to a police statement.The man, who was swimming alone at the time of the attack, was dragged to shore by friends before emergency services arrived. He died after attempts to resuscitate him were unsuccessful."Initial indications are that the wound was possibly inflicted by a marine animal although the incident is not shark related," the statement said. News reports later suggested that the injury was caused by a stingray. The man was identified by Australia's national broadcaster ABC as Nicolas Ricketts, a plumber who had previously served in the Australian Navy. Read MoreThe beach, about 10 miles from the Tasmanian capital of Hobart, is a popular swimming spot but also known for stingrays and skates.Stingray attacks on humans are extremely rare, according to marine biologist Peter Last, who was quoted in the ABC report. Steve Irwin, the TV personality known as the Crocodile Hunter, poses with a three foot long alligator at the San Francisco Zoo in June 2002.One of the most famous attacks happened in 2006, when Steve Irwin, the TV presenter known as the "Crocodile Hunter," died after a stingray barb went through his chest, in a marine accident off Australia's north coast.
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Story highlightsInvestigators believe Andreas Lubitz deliberately crashed Germanwings Flight 9525, killing himself and 149 othersLubitz suffered from anxiety and depression symptoms dating back to 2009, French newspaper reportedDoctor: It's 'rare for depression to cause people to kill other people' (CNN)Barring a revelation from his parents or girlfriend, we may never know what was going through the mind of Andreas Lubitz in the moments leading up to the crash of Germanwings Flight 9525.What we now know is that all indications point to Lubitz as the perpetrator of the crash, locking the pilot out of the cockpit and setting the aircraft on a fatal trajectory into a remote mountain range in the French Alps.Every day, more details come to light, as the world struggles to make sense of why a 27-year-old German man would apparently choose to deliberately crash a plane with 150 people on board, including himself -- and remain so calm while doing it.'Unfit to work'When investigators searched Lubitz's home in Dusseldorf, they found medical leave notes "slashed," suggesting Lubitz was hiding an illness or illnesses from his employers.Read MoreThe dates for which Lubitz was excused from work included the day of the crash, though investigators have not yet revealed the reason he was excused, if any reason was written on the notes by his doctor.We do know, from a German aviation source, that Lubitz passed his annual pilot recertification examination last summer.An official with Lufthansa, the parent company of the budget airline Germanwings, said that the exam only tests physical health, not psychological health."He was 100% fit to fly without restrictions," Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr told reporters at press conference last week. "His flight performance was perfect. There was nothing to worry about."Spohr added that Lubitz had "interrupted" his training, which he began in 2008. That break lasted several months, he said, but that such an interruption isn't uncommon.Lubitz suffered from "generalized anxiety disorder," with severe depression symptoms dating back to 2009, according to French newspaper Le Parisien.While the main medical clinic in Dusseldorf denies it was treating Lubitz for depression, German investigators found antidepressant medications in Lubitz's apartment, according to published reports that CNN has not yet been able to independently confirm.Die Welt, a German newspaper, over the weekend cited an unidentified senior investigator, who said Lubitz suffered from "severe subjective burnout syndrome" and severe depression.More on the medications"Someone who has a significant depressive episode or depressive disorder will oftentimes get an antidepressant alone, and many times will have a good resolution of those symptoms," CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta told Poppy Harlow Sunday on "CNN Newsroom." "People who relapse or develop more of what is called a psychotic depression in addition may have symptoms of psychosis. Maybe they could be having delusions or hallucinations, but the idea is having breaks with reality."One of the medications Lubitz was prescribed is said to be Agomelatine (an antidepressant medication), according to Le Perisien.Antidepressants can sometimes make people suicidal, especially those suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Other times, they can make patients manic or psychotic.The drug's list of warnings and precautions include metabolic changes -- such as weight gain -- and the potential for cognitive and motor impairment. "Has potential to impair judgment, thinking and motor skills; use caution when operating machinery."In 2010, Lubitz received Olanzpine injections (an antipsychotic medication) "to treat OCD," according to Le Perisien. Doctors advised Lubitz to be more active, practice a new sport and regain self-confidence."This is a powerful medication," said Gupta. "If this is true, it sort of reads into the severity of just how bad the psychosis was, at least at one point in his life."There are other things besides psychosis for which the drug may be administered, but that's the most common use. One of the side effects is blurred vision.Citing two officials with knowledge of the investigation, The New York Times Saturday reported that Lubitz sought treatment for vision problems that might have put his career at risk.If he was prescribed this medication as an injectable five years ago, was now taking it as an oral antipsychotic and wasn't taking it because of it was causing these detrimental side effects, "that could be very concerning, as well," said Gupta.Authorities have not ruled out that Lubitz's vision problem could have been psychosomatic.Can experts explain his behavior?Many people have been asking how likely it is that depression could result in this sort of horrific action.In a word: "Unlikely," says Dr. Charles Raison, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Arizona."Most people would just kill themselves," he says. "It's very, very rare for depression to cause people to kill other people. This leads me to believe there's something else going on, like a personality character flaw."Forensic psychologist Jeff Gardere agrees."It has to be a very severe depression to the point that there's a psychosis that's a result of that depression," he says. "That's different than the schizophrenia part of psychosis. With this kind of depression, it's so deep that you actually break with reality."Remember, Lubitz was in his late 20s -- and the odds of mental illness presenting at this age are much higher for someone in their 20s or 30s."Sometimes people lose touch with reality slowly. Other times, they lose touch really quickly," says Raison. "Bipolar psychotic states can develop in as little as a day or two. I'm most curious what was going on in this guy's life the week before this happened. Did anyone see any changes with his behavior? Did he stop sleeping? There's a pretty good chance something would come up in speaking with the people in his life.""If a story doesn't make sense, it means you don't have the real story," says Raison. "Even people who are psychotic will tell you a crazy story. It's crazy, but it makes sense."More details are needed on Lubitz's story.'Robotic and calm'Perhaps the most chilling revelation so far is that Lubitz not only decided to do what he did, but that he ignored the pilot's pleas to think about the lives on board and change his mind."It tells you he's at peace with what he's doing," says Raison. "If you were uncertain or anxious, you might still open the cabin door (when the pilot was banging on the door and yelling to be let in). Calm determination to do this tells you he really believed in what he was doing.""If you look at school shooters, they go into a dissociative state," says Gardere. "They've been planning for quite some time. They go into this personality where they can calmly go into murder mode -- robotic and calm. Even when they're shooting or doing something rageful, they behave in a calm manner. (Lubitz) knew when he got onto that plane that he wasn't coming back."World weighs inOn Monday, Britain's most senior psychiatrist told CNN's Christiane Amanpour that when a pilot is "acutely depressed or suffering from... any mental illness" that impairs his or her ability to fly, he or she cannot fly an aircraft."We don't let pilots fly with depression, not because we're worried that they're going to murder everybody on board. That's such an extraordinary possibility that -- that's not depression -- but because they're impaired in concentration, memory and attention, which isn't good for a pilot," said Sir Simon Wessely, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and an adviser to the British army.Wessely added that the Germanwings plane crash might open a discussion on "relaxing the laws of (doctor-patient) confidentiality in different countries," though in the United Kingdom, as well as in many other countries, a doctor is obliged to go to the authorities if he or she believes that people are genuinely being put at risk by one of their patients.CNN's John Bonifield contributed to this report.
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Story highlightsFrench stuntman performs tricks with horsesThe 47-year-old has trained horses since 11Appeared at London's Olympia in December (CNN)If there is such a thing as animal magnetism, then Jean-Francois Pignon has it in spades. With a mere flick of his hand, the Frenchman gets his horses to perform the most amazing tricks. From instructing them to stand elegantly on their hind legs to riding bareback on not one, but two horses at the same time, it's little wonder that Pignon's shows have become a hit with audiences worldwide.The veteran performer, who appeared in the London International Horse Show at Olympia in December, has been training horses since when he was a boy."I started really young with (my first horse) Gazelle," Pignon told CNN. "I was 11 years old and she was a year and a half. My first goal was not to do a show, but to communicate with my horse and play with them.Bring on the dancing horses: Equestrian artist creates stunning horse showRead More"And then I had the opportunity to perform in a small village to do my first show and I immediately liked it. I was very shy but I felt on this day that I really liked this job."More than three decades later, the 47-year-old -- who lives in Calvission in the South of France -- still puts in hours of training, although he is ever mindful of his horses' welfare. "The most difficult moves are when the horses are tired, which is rare, and also when the horses are excited," he explained. "My role is to be the maestro in the middle, and to use them a little bit more, a little bit less, depending on their mood."Audiences are amazed when they see Pignon, says Jo Peck, who manages the marketing and communications for the annual Olympia event where the Frenchman has appeared four times."He can get horses to do things that other people just can't get them to do," Peck told CNN."He has this almost telepathic conversation that goes on ... it's almost like a communication with his horses. The way he asks them to do things is very different from the way a show jumper would ask his or her horse to do something," she added."It's not just one horse, he controls several horse at the same time. The skill is just incredible."Extreme horsepower: Love and carriage hits London
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Story highlights The memorial is by turns emotional and humorous Dan Wheldon's teammates recall practical jokes He is remembered as a devoted family manThe two-time Indy 500 winner died October 16 after a crash in Las Vegas The racing sanctioning body IndyCar held a public memorial service, punctuated by laughter and tears, Sunday to celebrate the life of two-time Indianapolis 500 champ Dan Wheldon. Those at the memorial, held at Conseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis, recalled Wheldon not only as a successful driver, but remembered his winning charm, his sense of humor, and his devotion to his family and his fans. Wheldon, 33, was near the back of a 34-car field at the Las Vegas Indy 300 on October 16 when he got mixed up in a crash that saw several cars spin out of control and burst into flames, spewing smoke and debris. He died of head injuries. "The victories and the accolades, they didn't define him," said IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard. "His strong character, his enthusiastic approach to life, and the love of family, friends and fans did. "There was a reason he was a fan favorite," Bernard said. "I'd see him go out of his way to shake a serviceman's hand, or sign a young man's autograph, or do that extra interview, or just joke around with the drivers. Dan loved life and it always showed."Featured on stage beside the speakers Sunday was a car Bernard said Wheldon had been testing. It had "cutting-edge enhancements that promised to move the sport of racing and automotive engineering forward." It also had additional safety features, testament to Wheldon's commitment to improving the sport and increasing safety for drivers, he said."He would want the drivers and the teams and the series to unite and to work together," Bernard said. "He'd want us to strive to make our sport safer."The memorial featured music from country artists Reba McEntire and The Band Perry. Wheldon's family was in attendance."It was a privilege for us to witness a young, carefree racer blossom into a true champion and a devoted family man," said one of Wheldon's managers, Mickey Ryan.JUST WATCHEDWheldon, wife got tattoos before crashReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWheldon, wife got tattoos before crash 00:51JUST WATCHEDMax Mosley talks IndyCar safetyReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHMax Mosley talks IndyCar safety 03:53He recalled Wheldon partying all night after his first Indianapolis 500 win in 2005, then falling asleep while on hold waiting for an early morning radio interview. After his second win in 2011, he pledged to take his children to a Disney park, and dedicated the win to his mother, who was battling Alzheimer's disease, Ryan and manager Adrian Sussman said. The two issued a message of gratitude from Wheldon's family."They'd like you to know how much they appreciate the amazing outpouring of sympathy, flowers, gifts and notes of condolences," Sussman said. "It's been a great comfort for them to know that there are so many others that share in their grief."Despite the somber event, speakers recalled many humorous moments, recalling Wheldon's penchant for practical jokes, his compulsive neatness and his liking for tight racing suits.Drivers Brian Herta, Tony Kanaan and Dario Franchitti -- Wheldon's former teammates -- recalled messing Wheldon's locker up on purpose once and then waiting for him before a run, as he could not come out and drive unless the locker was straightened."He made us look like pigs," Herta said. They also recalled entering Wheldon's hotel room in Japan once, stealing one of each of his shoes and sending them back to America, along with taking his television and some of his hair products. Herta said he was not saying goodbye to Wheldon. "Goodbye is final," he said. "Our friendship won't end."On Saturday, hundreds gathered in St. Petersburg, Florida, for Wheldon's funeral. Born in Emberton, England, Wheldon had settled in the west Florida city with his wife and two young sons. Susie Wheldon spoke to her late husband through a letter read aloud by family friend Michael Johnson at the First Presbyterian Church. Audio from that message, and other parts of Saturday's otherwise private ceremony, were recorded and released by CNN affiliate WTSP."I am so scared. Scared I'm going to forget things as time goes by: the way you smell, the sound of your voice, the touch of your hand," she wrote.Country singer Wynonna Judd -- whose half-sister, actress Ashley Judd, is married to Franchitti, one of Wheldon's pallbearers -- sang at the funeral. Besides those inside, dozens of people stood nearby the church to pay their respects. NASCAR said it will provide teams at the Talladega Superspeedway this weekend with a decal in honor of Wheldon.The decal features an image of a knight and the word "Lionheart." Wheldon likened himself to Richard the Lionheart, the 12th-century British warrior king, and often wore the image on the back of his helmets."When I first started racing, a lot of the guys said that I raced with a lot of heart, occasionally not my head, but always with a lot of heart, like the way that Richard the Lionheart fought in battle," Wheldon wrote on a sponsor's blog in 2010.
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(CNN)Former US goalkeeper Hope Solo and husband Jerramy Stevens have welcomed twins into the world, the soccer star announced on Thursday. Former US Women's National Team goalkeeper and two-time Olympic gold medalist Solo announced the birth of her twins -- named Vittorio Genghis Stevens and Lozen Orianna Judith Stevens -- by posting an image on social media."What have we been doing during our time in quarantine? Well, as you can see, we've been incredibly busy," she said in a video posted to the Instagram account of the Uninterrupted athletic brand. View this post on Instagram Vittorio Genghis Stevens Lozen Orianna Judith Stevens 3/4/2020 A post shared by Hope Solo (@hopesolo) on Apr 23, 2020 at 2:34pm PDT The soccer star said the twins -- the couple's first children -- were born on March 4, coming into the world "in the middle of a pandemic," adding that the experience had been "incredibly stressful times for us."Men and women footballers experiencing 'glaring' rise in mental health issues during lockdownThe athlete added that the babies had required a stay in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and took the opportunity to thank healthcare workers tackling the coronavirus pandemic. Read More"We would like to thank all of the incredible nurses and the doctors who helped take care of our babies during our time in the NICU and we'd also like to thank all the health care workers who've been on the frontlines fighting this pandemic, day in and day out," she said. Solo, the first goalkeeper to achieve 100 clean sheets in international football, announced that she and her husband, a former NFL player, were expecting twins in December.
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Story highlightsFerrari drops idea of challenging the Brazilian Grand Prix resultItalian team had questioned whether Sebastian Vettel had illegally overtaken Jean-Eric Vergne's Toro Rosso"Ferrari duly takes note of the reply sent by the FIA and considers the matter now closed"Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo wants to "revamp our organization and our working methods"It's official: Sebastian Vettel is a three-time world champion after Ferrari dropped the idea of challenging the result of the Brazilian Grand Prix.The Italian team has written to the governing body the FIA requesting clarification as to whether Red Bull racer Vettel had illegally overtaken Jean-Eric Vergne's Toro Rosso during Sunday's race at Interlagos.If that had been the case, Vettel would have incurred a 20 seconds penalty, demoting the German driver to eighth place and ensuring Ferari's Fernando Alonso would have won the drivers' title by one point.Read: Victorious Vettel makes historyJUST WATCHEDCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day OneReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day One 01:14JUST WATCHEDCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day TwoReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day Two 01:02JUST WATCHEDCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day ThreeReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day Three 01:09"The request for a clarification from the FIA, regarding Vettel's passing move on Vergne, came about through the need to shed light on the circumstances of the move, which came out on the Internet only a few days after the race," said a Ferrari statement on Friday."The letter to the FIA was in no way intended to undermine the legality of the race result. "We received tens of thousands of queries relating to this matter from all over the world and it was incumbent on us to take the matter further, asking the Federation to look into an incident that could have cast a shadow over the championship in the eyes of all Formula 1 enthusiasts, not just Ferrari fans. "Ferrari duly takes note of the reply sent by the FIA this morning and therefore considers the matter now closed."Read: Just how good is Sebastian VettelOn Sunday, Vettel recovered from a nightmare start to become the youngest ever triple Formula One champion as Jenson Button won the Brazilian Grand Prix.The 25-year-old German was hit on the fourth turn of the opening lap and suffered damage to the left side of his car which could not be fixed.But Vettel roared back through the field to finish sixth and deny title rival Alonso by three points.JUST WATCHEDCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day FourReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day Four 01:14JUST WATCHEDCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day FiveReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHCNN Greatest F1 Driver: Day Five 01:21Having decided against challenging the result of the race, Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo has turned his attention to "revamping" the Italian team ahead of the 2013 season."Now is the time to look ahead to next year," said Di Montezemolo. "I want us to start with a car that is immediately capable of fighting for the win and it has to be our first task."That was a reference to Red Bull's engineering dominance over the last three seasons thanks to the input of design guru Adrian Newey."In order to achieve that, each one of us must improve in our own roles by at least a millimetre," Di Montezemolo."We must revamp our organization and our working methods to try and be at the same level as the best, right from the first race, which for too many years now we have failed to do."
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(CNN)Although seals are known to clap their flippers in captivity, a gray seal has been filmed doing it in the wild for the very first time, researchers say. Ben Burville, a marine biologist at Newcastle University in the UK, filmed a seal clapping its flippers together underwater near the Farne Islands, a group of islands off the northeast coast of England. The seal's clapping produced a distinctive "crack" sound.Seals have been taught to sing the 'Star Wars' theme tuneBurville spent 17 years attempting to capture the behavior on film before finally succeeding in October 2017.Scientists believe bull seals make the noise underwater to deter competitors during the mating season, with the loud high-frequency sound sending a strong message to other males in the vicinity. Read MoreThe sound was previously thought to be made vocally, but the new video footage shows a gray seal clapping its flippers to create the noise. Burville said in a statement that diving with seals was his passion and that he believes he has spent "more time underwater with grey seals than anyone in the world." Stranded seals swarm a small Canadian town, unable to steer their way back to seaHe added that this previously unseen behavior made him think about "how much there still is to learn" about the species. The footage Burville captured is part of an international study led by Monash University in Australia, which is published on Monday in the journal Marine Mammal Science. David Hocking, the lead author of the study and a research fellow at Monash, said noise pollution from humans interferes with whale song and other marine-mammal communication. "Clapping appears to be an important social behaviour for grey seals," he added, "so anything that disturbed it could impact breeding success and survival for this species."
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Story highlightsJaguars kicker playing in fourth NFL seasonIs a former US Under-17 goalkeeperWas signed to Dallas MLS club London (CNN)Josh Lambo is not your typical NFL placekicker. The 27-year-old from Lansing, Michigan began his athletic career as a goalkeeping prodigy for the US Under-17 national team, even garnering interest from English Premier League club Everton. Follow @cnnsport But when his MLS career with FC Dallas stalled, Lambo turned to college football and earned a spot with the Texas A&M Aggies. Like any kicker worth his weight in cleats, the four-year veteran with the Jacksonville Jaguars has a knack for pressure situations. Last November, Lambo nailed game-tying and overtime field goals for the Jags to sink his former team, the LA Chargers, who cut him in the preseason. Read MoreHe was also a key part of the team's stellar playoff run, kicking a field goal in the final two minutes in a wild win at Pittsburgh to secure Jacksonville's spot in the AFC title game. In his first taste of the playoffs Lambo was perfect, hitting all nine of his extra point attempts and all four field goals. CNN caught up with Lambo ahead of the Jaguar's London game against the Philadelphia Eagles on October 28, where he discussed handling big pressure moments, befriending other kickers and exactly what he thinks of "icing" kickers. Josh Lambo poses with MLS Commissioner Don Garber, after being selected eighth by FC Dallas in the MLS Super Draft in January, 2008.CNN: What are the similarities between playing in goal and being a placekicker? Lambo: "You really only have one shot to do your job. You don't get a redo to miss a save really, the ball goes in the back of the net. You don't get a redo if the kick goes outside the uprights, so you have to be on your game all the time. "I have really been able to adopt the mentality of being one-for-one on every kick."There is a sense that fans remember the mistakes of both goalkeepers and placekickers instead of their great plays. Does that ring true? "They can for sure, just hopefully you don't have very many of them. You got to give them a lot more good things to remember than bad."Both positions invite a level of isolation from the other guys on the team. Can you describe the type of personality it takes to do those jobs?"You need to be able to be alone with yourself a little bit, because you're not in the position meetings with all the other guys in football. "And being a goalkeeper, you're often in goalkeeper training. It's much easier to be integrated as a goalkeeper, especially because you have a smaller team, usually 24 guys in the locker room."Now with football, going into camp we have 90 (eventually whittled down to 53) and we only have a couple of specialists, so you become really good friends with other specialists." After breaking his jaw at FC Dallas, Lambo (#49) turned to American football and landed a spot as a placekicker with the Texas A&M Aggies.It seems NFL kickers prefer to be left alone before pressure kicks -- and other players avoid speaking to them. Why is that? "Yes, just because that's how the routine is for every other kicker. You know, if you're going through a penalty kick in the middle of the game, you don't get a pep talk by your coach."In the middle of the game, if it's a 27-yard field goal, five minutes up in the second quarter, guys aren't coming up to you pumping you up saying 'Hey we need this,' so I like to keep everything the same."I like to keep people away from me. I'll have our media guys form a little barrier around me if it's a game winner to keep people away, because I don't want to change anything. When you change things, that's when mistakes happen."Do you have any superstitions when it comes to kicking? "No, I trust my process, I believe in my skill, and I'm going to let that take over. I'm not going to let anything outside of myself take control."Can you describe your process and pregame rituals?"I'm not really a big ritual guy. I do believe in a routine. Saturday nights, I have different things I do to try and get my body and my mind right. "Sunday before the game, for warmups, I'll go out and do a visualization session, seeing myself making field goals and seeing myself hit perfect kickoffs. "My process throughout the week and why I am not superstitious is because superstition is leaving power up to something that is not yourself, and I don't believe in that. If I am going to make the kick, it has nothing to do with what sock I am wearing or what shoe I put on my foot first. It is about me doing my job, and I can control it. "External factors will not control the outcome of something that I do." Do you meditate or do yoga?"I have been doing a lot of Pilates, which has really helped me, obviously physically, but also mentally. I am a big fan of yoga. I think it has physical benefits as well as mental and spiritual benefits. "I have definitely been studying mindfulness, and meditation is a part of that. Just being able to stay in the present moment and not let any situation get too big. You never let get your highs get too high, your lows be too low, and just be very much in the moment. I think that helped me a lot last year." Is there anything you do to combat anxiety in pressure situations?"Yes. Part of the mindfulness that I have read about is really being present in that exact moment. Let's say I'm trotting out for a kick and some thought process washes over me that is either positive or negative. I will try to acknowledge that I had that thought and then just let it pass. "I do not live in it. If I am anxious, I am not saying to myself, 'Oh no, I'm anxious!' If I am anxious, I will acknowledge that I am feeling anxiousness. That is OK. I take a deep breath. I let it pass, and I rely on my muscle memory and my technique."Lambo celebrated after kicking a crucial field goal against the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC Divisional Playoff game in January, 2918.How does icing the kicker impact you? What do you think if you see the ball go through the uprights, only to hear a timeout has been called before your kick?"I think icing is really stupid. All you're doing is giving the kicker another chance. You are not messing with him. "If I miss it, OK great, I know how to make that correction. If I make it, I know exactly what I need to do again. If they will give me five stabs at it, I don't care. I will make them all."Many goalies appear to have a special bond in soccer leagues; is it the same in with NFL kickers?"There is a good little group of guys that are all kind of connected and encourage each other. I talk to (Tampa Bay Buccaneers kicker) Chandler Catanzaro and (New Orleans Saints kicker) Wil Lutz quite a lot. (Carolina Panthers kicker) Graham Gano and I text fairly frequently. "I love the fact that I am in the same division as (Indianapolis Colts 23-year veteran kicker) Adam Vinatieri because I get to see him face to face twice a year, which is just incredible. If you are going to learn from anybody, you want to learn from the best. He is, if not the best, probably top three. "I kind of pick his brain sometimes about football stuff, but he is just a good man, a good person. I enjoy being around him. I enjoy his demeanor, so that is the stuff that I think will make you successful on and off the field."Given that you played for Team USA in the Under-17 World Cup against Belgium, and got the man of the match by keeping a clean sheet against Eden Hazard and Christian Benteke, did you watch this year's World Cup and wonder about how you could have been there?"Unfortunately, this year the US wasn't in it. But, yeah, you watch guys like Eden Hazard and you realize that you played against them and beat them. We won 2-0 against Belgium in the Under-17s, and the next game we played against Toni Kroos with the German team."And my first ever youth international was against Theo Walcott and England. So watching some of those guys in the Premier League, it's fun to look back and (know) that I did that or (wonder) what could have been, but I'm pretty happy with the way life turned out for me so far."Though he prefers to be left alone before kicks, Lambo celebrates with teammates afterwards. He also maintains close friendships with other NFL kickers. What was missing for you as an MLS goalie? And what went right as a placekicker?"My height for sure as a goalkeeper (laughs, Lambo is 6-foot tall), but seven minutes into my first reserve game I broke my jaw, so that didn't help either."And then the coach that brought me in got fired, that definitely didn't help."And the successes as a placekicker I think came really from the failures as a goalie, in terms of just dealing with the adversity and not giving up, and just realizing that there are good ways to be a pro and there are some mistakes you need to avoid. "So I took everything I learned being a goalkeeper and transferred it to being a placekicker."Jags owner Shaheed Khan also owns Fulham FC. Are you tempted to try out in goal? You could be the Bo Jackson of the NFL and English Football.(Laughs) "I don't know if Shad would be too happy if I tried to go back to soccer -- but if they need me I'm available."JUST WATCHEDNFL: Jurrell Casey to protest, pay fineReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHNFL: Jurrell Casey to protest, pay fine 01:13
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(CNN)Imagine a world entirely free of fossil fuels. That's no longer such an abstract concept, as most of the everyday things we do can be powered by electricity -- driving a car, heating a home, charging a phone or computer -- and all that energy could come from sources like the wind, the sun and the natural movement of water. For industries that need more oomph than solar or wind can offer -- like aviation, steel and concrete -- there's hydrogen. And it's everywhere. There's a lot of buzz and billions of dollars being poured into the hydrogen industry, but not all types of hydrogen are created equal. Hydrogen is the most abundant element on the planet, but it needs to be isolated from its source, and that in itself takes energy. At the moment, it's mostly derived from fossil fuels -- natural gas, coal and oil -- in what's called "gray" hydrogen. If the carbon-dioxide (CO2) emitted during production is captured, you get "blue" hydrogen.As governments around the world devise new energy strategies to rapidly remove the carbon from their economies, major fossil fuel companies are lobbying hard to keep blue hydrogen in the mix. In doing so, energy and climate experts say, they are locking in the global use of natural gas, a planet-warming fossil fuel, potentially for decades to come. The most promising hydrogen for the climate is really the "green" sort, which is derived from water and is processed using 100% renewable energy, making it a potential zero-emissions power source. Green hydrogen is seen as a game-changing solution to emissions in the heaviest of industries, but it has a long way to go -- less than 1% of the world's hydrogen today is green, according to Fitch Ratings. The rest comes from fossil fuels.Read MoreAn analysis provided to CNN from the independent climate think tank InfluenceMap, which uses data to track the influence of business and finance on climate policy, found that several major fossil fuel companies are using the hydrogen hype to keep natural gas on the playing field, and that's having an impact on a crucial upcoming decision in the European Union. The EU's 27 countries are so divided on the future role of natural gas that the bloc's executive arm, the European Commission, has for months failed to deliver what should be a simple list of energy sources that it considers sustainable. After several delays, the decision was again postponed on this week, as countries squabbled over whether gas -- as well as nuclear power -- should make the list, and whether they should be called "green" or "transitional" forms of energy. Earlier draft versions of the list -- known as the Sustainable Finance Taxonomy -- made no mention of gas or nuclear, a source close to the talks told CNN, and now EU officials are publicly saying they will almost certainly be included. That could allow natural gas operations to carry on with a green stamp of approval and unleash a wave of private investment and green recovery public funds to new projects. Nuclear energy scares people. The climate crisis is giving it another chanceIn an opinion piece for the website Euractiv, Greta Thunberg and follow climate activists described the list as "fake climate action." Using a database of more than 350 of the world's largest companies, InfluenceMap identified a number of major fossil fuel companies that have been active in lobbying the EU on the sustainable fuels decision, as well as two other policies on gas and hydrogen. The three most active companies were Equinor, TotalEnergies and BP, the analysis concludes. Gas industry associations representing some of the biggest fossil fuel companies operating in Europe are also arguing that natural gas in new projects could be blended with hydrogen -- including blue hydrogen -- to make it "cleaner." Vivek Parekh, an InfluenceMap analyst, described this lobbying to CNN as a "slow creep" of natural gas back into EU energy policy. "The positions put out initially by the European Commission looked to push fossil gas infrastructure down the back road, and try to avoid it as much as possible," Parekh said. "But it looks like the gas industry -- after such a long fight -- has managed to weaken the sustainability criteria in its favor. And that essentially secures the role of fossil gas and its long-term energy future. This is in the European Union, which is supposed to be a policy leader when it comes to climate." Exhaust emerges from the smokestack of a natural gas-fired power plant in Berlin, Germany.The EU has one of the most ambitious climate plans in the world, with a goal enshrined in law to reduce emissions by 55% by 2030, from levels in 1990. Its policies tends to influence those in other parts of the world, making this decision particularly consequential. Pascal Canfin, the EU lawmaker who chairs the bloc's powerful environment committee, said he was hopeful of a compromise to break the impasse. One proposal put forward, Canfin told CNN, is to include gas but impose a limit to how much carbon dioxide (CO2) new projects should be allowed to emit. Another could be to only allow new gas projects when they replace coal, and a "sunset clause" ending any new gas infrastructure as of December 31, 2030. "So here are three key conditions under which you can define your design, the space where gas can be considered as useful for the transition, even if it's fossil," he said. Equinor and TotalEnergies were among companies that campaigned against the proposed CO2 limit, according to InfluenceMap. Equinor -- which is investing in green hydrogen but also continues to drill for more oil and gas -- confirmed to CNN it had been engaging with the EU on the policy and said it would support the CO2 limit in electricity and heat projects, but that it would not in other circumstances, for example, new gas projects to help a region transition from coal. As gas prices soar, people are mulling alternatives to heating their homes. Here's what to know"Like many member state governments we see natural gas as key to the EU's decarbonization efforts," the company said in a statement to CNN. It emphasized that natural gas can be "decarbonized" through carbon capture and storage. But no technology that exists today can remove 100% of the CO2 from natural gas, and a landmark study on blue hydrogen from Cornell University in August showed that blue hydrogen, at the moment, emits 20% more than natural gas in the first place. That's partly because the greenhouse gas methane tends to leak in the carbon capture process.French company TotalEnergies did not comment on its position on the emissions limit, but said it was investing in both blue and green hydrogen. It argued natural gas is currently "the best option for providing the world with the energy it needs while combating global warming," and is even "a champion of energy transition." BP did not reply to CNN's request for comment. A growing gas addiction Despite its clean-sounding name, natural gas is a major contributor to the climate crisis. It is made mostly of methane, a greenhouse gas more than 80 times more potent than carbon-dioxide in the short term. It surged in use in the '70s and took off in the '90s, when it was sold as a "bridge fuel" -- a cleaner alternative to coal and one that would eventually be dropped when renewable energy took off. The Heizkraftwerk Lichterfelde natural gas-fired power and heating plant stands illuminated on November 03, 2021 in Berlin, Germany. Natural gas prices have risen dramatically in Europe and Germany over recent months, leading to a corresponding sharp rise in electricity prices.But the world has become somewhat addicted to gas, and that "bridge" has become so long, governments are realizing they don't really know when and where it ends. Global use of natural gas is at an all-time high, according to the International Energy Agency. In the EU, it's come down slightly since a 2010 peak, but not that much, and is still higher than levels in the '90s. The scale of growth in the EU is a clear sign that, even in Europe, gas isn't going anywhere soon. Data from Global Energy Monitor (GEM) shows that at the end of 2020, there were around 17,000 kilometres (around 1,500 miles) of gas pipeline in development in the EU. That's 65 projects across 23 nations worth 72.6 billion euros ($81.8 billion). There were another 15.5 billion euros-worth of projects for liquified natural gas. 'We really don't have a plan': Biden's climate promises are sunk without Build Back Better, experts sayAnd, depending on how they are built, new natural gas projects tend to stick around for some time. Greig Aitken, who manages GEM's Europe Gas Tracker, said that pipelines and the gas plants they serve typically have lifetimes of 30 to 40 years, warning that any new gas infrastructure will either lock in the fossil fuel and undermine the bloc's climate goals or force the projects to be abandoned. "A tipping point has been reached, and there really should be no new commissioning of gas infrastructure from now given the timelines involved, unless companies and their financial backers actually welcome the idea of having stranded assets on their books," Aitken said. So where does that leave green hydrogen? The industry needs a windfall in funding to build more electrolyzers -- the machines needed to extract hydrogen from water -- as well as a huge increase in renewable energy sources. A decision like the EU's on taxonomy could potentially mean money that could be going to green hydrogen is diverted to blue. Green hydrogen could be the fuel of the future. But there is huge momentum. A new green hydrogen project appears to pop up somewhere in the world on a weekly basis, and even fossil fuel companies promoting blue hydrogen are beginning to look at green as well. The International Renewable Energy Agency says that green hydrogen could become cheaper than blue hydrogen by 2030 if -- and it's a big if -- the industry gets enough buy-in. "Green hydrogen proves that the world has a clean, practical, implementable way out of global warming," said Andrew Forrest, whose company Fortescue Future Industries is investing heavily in green hydrogen. Forrest, an Australian who made his fortune from mining with the Fortescue Metals Group, is betting big on green hydrogen to not only decarbonize his company's entire mining operation, but also to transform Fortescue into a global renewables giant. To Forrest, all this talk about blending blue hydrogen into natural gas is a distraction. The energy transformation has to happen now, and not lock in yet another "bridge" fuel, he said. "Fossil fuel companies trying to tell the world that natural gas, blue hydrogen or gray hydrogen are a solution to climate change are lying," Forrest said. "Blue hydrogen, gray hydrogen, any type of hydrogen that is not green is dirty and uses fossil fuels to make it. It is like clean coal or cancer-free tobacco."
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(CNN)Eddie Howe has been named Newcastle United's new Head Coach on a two-and-a-half-year deal until the summer of 2024, the English Premier League club announced in a statement on Monday.Howe is the first manager to be appointed by the club's new owners following last month's Saudi Arabia-backed takeover of the Geordie team.The Englishman replaces Steve Bruce who was sacked by mutual consent in October having failed to win a game this season."It is a great honour to become head coach of a club with the stature and history of Newcastle United," Howe said in the statement. "It is a very proud day for me and my family."This is a wonderful opportunity, but there is also a lot of work ahead of us and I am eager to get onto the training ground to start working with the players.Read More"I would like to thank the club's owners for this opportunity and thank the club's supporters for the incredible welcome they have already given me. I am very excited to begin our journey together," Howe added.Howe's first game in charge will be on November 20 when Newcastle host newly-promoted Brentford at St. James' Park.It's the 43-year-old's first managerial job since August 2020 when he left Bournemouth following the club's relegation from the English Premier League.Howe spent 11 years as a player at Bournemouth before taking over the managerial reins of the club.He managed Bournemouth across two spells guiding the club from the fourth tier of English football all the way to the Premier League, where they remained for five seasons.Howe is only one of a handful of managers ever to lead their team through all three divisions to Premier League promotion.'He is a great fit for what we are trying to build here'Newcastle United co-owner Amanda Stavely said: "We have been incredibly impressed by Eddie through what has been a rigorous recruitment process."As well as his obvious achievements with AFC Bournemouth, where he had a transformational impact, he is a passionate and dynamic coach who has clear ideas about taking this team and club forward."He is a great fit for what we are trying to build here. We are delighted to welcome Eddie and his staff to St. James' Park and very much look forward to working together towards our collective ambitions."The Englishman is familiar with Newcastle players Callum Wilson, Ryan Fraser and Matt Ritchie having worked with them during his time at Bournemouth.Howe takes over a Newcastle side who find themselves in the relegation zone and are the only team not to win a Premier League game this season.The club sit 19th in the table on five points -- six off of safety.
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Bill McGowan is the founder and CEO of Clarity Media Group, a global communications coaching firm based in New York. He is the author of "Pitch Perfect: How to Say It Right the First Time, Every Time." Follow him on Twitter @BillMcGowan22. Juliana Silva is a strategic communications adviser at Clarity. The views expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. View more opinion articles on CNN. (CNN)The fact that Tuesday night's debate in Cleveland was more of a crash than a clash will no doubt dominate the media coverage and people's memory of the event. No matter how much we would like to wipe the image of that disgraceful spectacle from our consciousness, the indelible stain of a President of the United States behaving like a juvenile delinquent initiating a food fight will be tough to erase. But what may get overlooked amid the pandemonium that erupted at the first of three showdowns between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Donald Trump was the stark contrast in the two candidates' body language. Bill McGowanJuliana SilvaFrom the opening bell, Biden strode to the lectern with a sense of purpose. Ironically, Trump was the one who seemed sleepy and slow, lumbering onto the stage with all the enthusiasm and excitement of a root canal patient entering the dentist's office. The candidates' facial expressiveness also rested on opposite ends of the spectrum. Trump redefined "RBF" (Resting Bully Face) while listening to both Biden and the moderator, Fox's Chris Wallace. For most of the night, Trump looked like he was smelling rancid milk. It was a judgmental, imperious expression that played right into Biden's "Scranton vs Park Avenue" comparison, teeing Biden up to cast Trump as a gold-plated elitist. "This guy and his friends look down their nose on people like Irish Catholics like me who grew up in Scranton," Biden said. Read MoreTrump's default demeanor came off as angry, hostile and disdainful of the entire process. In fact, when Chris Wallace finally chastised Trump for breaking the very debate rules that his campaign agreed to, his facial contortions resembled a petulant child being scolded. Biden, by contrast, frequently maintained an approachable and empathetic look that underscores one of his biggest advantages over his opponent: likability. When under attack, Biden pulled an oldie but goodie from his greatest hits bag: the incredulous smile, shake of the head and chuckle that was as close to a real-time fact check on Trump as you can get. It was a nonverbal version of Ronald Reagan's legendary line to Jimmy Carter, "there you go again." It's a tactic that served Biden well in his 2012 vice presidential debate against Paul Ryan. Debate coach: Why this debate went terribly wrong But perhaps the most dramatic difference between Biden and Trump's onstage presence was their eye contact. Research studies have shown that making meaningful eye contact with those with whom you are communicating, boosts your credibility, your trustworthiness, your empathy and perhaps most importantly, your likability. According to doctor Atsushi Senju, a cognitive neuroscientist who studies the biological and cultural aspects of eye contact at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development at Birkbeck, University of London, eye contact makes us seem more socially aware and empathetic. Conversely, his studies show that avoiding eye contact can undermine one's perception of your sociability and emotional intelligence -- it discredits you. Over the course of the chaotic 90 minutes, Trump looked the American people in the eye (by looking straight into the camera), a grand total of zero times. For Trump, that runs the risk of cementing his image as someone who cares only about himself and lacks empathy. Biden frequently spoke directly to the American people, perhaps most effectively when Trump was hammering away on the reputation of Biden's sons. The former vice president looked directly into the camera and said, "This is not about my family or his family, this is about your family -- the American people. He doesn't want to talk about what you need." If you were sitting at home watching the debate, only one candidate looked you square in the eye. Biden has framed the entire election as a battle for the soul of America. He needed that good guy versus bully contrast to be on display for the debate audience, and boy, was it ever! Trump, trailing in the national polling, was in desperate need of a knockout punch. Clearly the strategy going in was to throw as many haymakers at Biden as possible. None squarely landed on him.Get our free weekly newsletterSign up for CNN Opinion's new newsletter.Join us on Twitter and Facebook For the most part, their respective nonverbal communication skills spoke every bit as loud as the shouting match that ensued. And they contributed to Biden's win on the debate stage.
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Story highlightsAlgeria 1-2 Tunisia African Player of the Year Mahrez fails to inspire Fennec Foxes (CNN)The likes of Algeria and Tunisia have endured something of a dry spell in recent years, with no team from north of the Sahara reaching the Africa Cup of Nations semifinal since Egypt lifted the trophy in 2010. On the evidence of Thursday's North African Derby -- billed as must-win for both sides -- that barren run doesn't look any closer to ending for Algeria. Follow @cnnsport Few in this tournament can boast star names on the level of Yacine Brahimi, Islam Slimani and CAF African Player of the Year Riyad Mahrez, but it has now been almost three decades since the Desert Warriors' solitary AFCON title back in 1990 on home soil. This is Algeria's seventeenth AFCON appearance, the same as three-time winner Nigeria, but coach Georges Leeken's men are in danger of becoming known as one of this competition's perennial underachievers. The Ugandan 'Cranes' that touched the stars and pleased a murderous dictatorFootball has never been played on paper and, despite a promising start from the Fennec Foxes, it was Tunisia that took the lead on a humid afternoon in Franceville.Read MoreAfter intricate play down the left, Youssef Msakni's cross deflected agonizingly off the foot of Ramy Bensebaini and looped over Malik Asselah in the Algeria goal. There was nothing the stand-in keeper could do and Algeria might have felt justifiably aggrieved, having shaded an end-to-end first half. READ: Host Gabon on verge of exit, heartbreak for Guinea-BissauAymen Mathlouthi was certainly the busier of the two goalkeepers throughout proceedings, and the Tunisia captain had to be at his best to deny Slimani after just five minutes, stopping a powerful header at point-blank range. With Premier League quality abounding in the Algerian ranks, Adlène Guédioura of Watford also saw a fierce swerving drive beaten away by the Tunisian goalkeeper.And yet it for all the mounting pressure, Algeria failed to break the deadlock. READ: Egypt goalkeeper, 44, breaks tournament record The Fennec Foxes had scored 25 in just six games during qualification for the tournament but, just as a porous defense let them down against unfancied Zimbabwe on matchday one, the frailties again began to surface here. Dealing with an innocuous ball over the top, left-back Faouzi Ghoulam of Napoli attempted a looping header back to his goalkeeper from all of 50 yards, unaware of the approaching Wahbi Khazri.FULL TIME: Algeria 🇩🇿 1-2 Tunisia 🇹🇳Despite a late charge, Algeria 🇩🇿 is now on the brink of an early exit from #AFCON2017. pic.twitter.com/ddcOpykP5r— CNN Football (@CNNFC) January 19, 2017 Tunisia's chief threat here and in the defeat to Senegal, Khazri was alert to the opportunity, and looked set to test Asselah as he broke through on goal.That was until Ghoulam attempted to rectify his mistake, chasing back and clumsily bringing down his opponent for a Tunisia penalty. A yellow card was generous from the referee given Ghoulam had denied a clear goalscoring opportunity, but Naïm Sliti dished out further punishment by coolly stroking home the spot kick. STATS | Check out the full-time stats! Which team had the better overall performance? #CAN2017 #ALGTUN pic.twitter.com/9USItzaZUS— CAF (@CAF_Online) January 19, 2017 If Tunisia's first goal had more than a hint of good fortune, the Algeria players now had a mountain to climb of their own making. Leekens, taking on the side he led to the quarterfinal stage two years ago, attempted to bridge the gap by introducing attacker Sofiane Hanni of Anderlecht in place of an unhappy Brahimi. Hanni did make the scoreline respectable with a fine sweeping finish in added time after Mathlouthi had been forced off injured, but it was ultimately too little too late. Algeria's attacking triumvirate would walk into almost any side in the competition, but defeat today means their 2017 AFCON future is no longer in their own hands. The drought goes on. Senegal's year?In Group B's later fixture, Senegal became the first nation to book a place in this year's quarterfinals after easily getting the better of Zimbabwe. The Lions of Teranga had looked impressive in Sunday's convincing 2-0 win against Tunisia and overcame Zimbabwe in similar fashion in Franceville, ending any semblance of a contest with two early goals. Liverpool star Sadio Mane was once again on song, poking a teasing ball from the mercurial Keita Balde into an empty net with less than ten minutes played, after good work from wideman Henri Saivet down the left.Have your say on the CNN Goal of the Week:— CNN Football (@CNNFC) January 18, 2017 Zimbabwe -- ranked 110th in the world -- had been hoping to pull off an upset after matchday one's unexpected 2-2 draw against Algeria, but the gulf in quality quickly began to show. The imposing central midfield pairing of Cheikhou Kouyaté and Idrissa Gueye -- the latter the Premier League's top tackler this season (71) -- weren't allowing Zimbabwe an outlet in attack. And, still collecting themselves after Mane's goal, it wasn't long before 'the Warriors' were dealt a knockout blow. Placing the ball down around 25 yards from goal, Saivet stepped up having only scored one goal in the past calendar year. FULL TIME: Senegal 🇸🇳 2-0 Zimbabwe 🇿🇼A comfortable win sees Senegal become the first team to qualify for the quarterfinals.#AFCON2017 pic.twitter.com/1C3lFrUb95— CNN Football (@CNNFC) January 19, 2017 A former standout player for France U21s, he had once been touted as one of European football's next big stars, but seen a promising career stall having left boyhood club Bordeaux. Now a full international for his country of birth, it was some way for the 26-year-old to score his first Senegal goal, whipping a free-kick of real quality over the wall and into Tatenda Mukuruva's top-right corner. The valiant Zimbabwe players, to their credit, refused to crumble. African Champions League winner Khama Billiat tested Abdoulaye Diallo in the Senegal goal, as Zimbabwe looked to get back into the game. But in a match decided within the opening quarter of an hour, Senegal never relinquished control. Who will win the Africa Cup of Nations? Have your say on our Facebook page. Aliou Cisse, a former Senegal player, praised the humility of his squad in the build-up, admitting they had "perhaps been overconfident in previous campaigns." Long regarded as one of African football's powerhouses after a 2002 World Cup quarterfinal appearance, the Lions of Teranga look capable of winning AFCON for the very first time.
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Story highlightsMaradona and Veron clash in charity game"United for Peace" game organized by Pope Match raised funds for Italy earthquake victims (CNN)You don't become one of the greatest footballers of all time without having a burning desire to win.And even in a charity match dubbed "United for Peace" -- organized by Pope Francis -- soccer legend Diego Maradona, now aged 55, shows no sign of losing that competitive streak.Follow @cnnsport The Argentine, famed for his heavenly skill, was one of several high-profile current and former players to take to the pitch at Roma's Stadio Olimpico on Wednesday.READ MORE: The 8.1 second goal. The fastest ever?Rome's own son Francesco Totti, Brazilian Ronaldinho and Juan Sebastian Veron were just some of the star names to make an appearance at the charity event.Read MoreLa pelea completa entre Verón y Maradona en pleno partido por La Paz. https://t.co/lXP6HA3VcH pic.twitter.com/zLWk88IMeE— CrackDeportivo (@crackdeportivo) October 12, 2016 It was fellow Argentine Veron that sent Maradona into a bit of a strop as the two teams were walking off at the end of the first half.Maradona, who inspired Argentina to the 1986 World Cup, took exception to a tackle from Veron midway through the opening 45 minutes.While the pair initially laughed the incident off, something triggered a heated discussion as they made their way towards the changing rooms.Maradona coached Veron between 2008-10 while in charge of the Argentina national team, and it was reported the compatriots reconciled their differences during the interval.Proceeds from the charity match will go to the Vatican's international projects, including rebuilding facilities in Italy's earthquake-hit town of Amatrice.The Pope, a fellow countryman of Maradona and Veron, is a huge football fan and supports Argentine club San Lorenzo.READ MORE: FIFA fighting 'forces that don't want change'Pope Francis welcomes players of San Lorenzo to the vatican following their Copa Libertadores win.In 2014, following San Lorenzo winning the Copa Libertadores title -- South America's Champions League equivalent -- the Pope invited the team to visit him at the Vatican.Health problemsMaradona also credits Pope Francis for renewing his faith, saying he had previously distanced himself from religion."I am with Pope Francis, for him I am always available," Maradona told a press conference before the match."He is doing a great job also inside the Vatican, which pleases all Catholics. I had distanced myself from the church for many reasons. ... Pope Francis made me come back."JUST WATCHEDLionel Messi is ...ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHLionel Messi is ... 01:03READ MORE: Guardiola on his legacy mission for mentor CruyffMaradona is one of the greatest players in soccer history, having helped Napoli win two Italian league titles after a difficult two-year stay at Barcelona -- both clubs signed him for world-record fees.But his career was marred by controversy over drug use -- he was thrown out of the 1994 World Cup after testing positive for ephedrine -- and he suffered from subsequent health problems.Veron had the last laugh in Wednesday's game -- the "White Team" he played for won 4-3.
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Story highlightsNovak Djokovic beats Radek Stepanek at Rome Masters after nearly a month out with injuryWorld No. 2 takes 97 minutes to win in straight setsFederer explains decision to leave home for RomeSwiss became father to twin boys last weekNovak Djokovic made a winning return from a wrist injury when beating Radek Stepanek at the Rome Masters but the Serb described the conditions as some of the most testing he's faced. Playing his first match since losing in Monte Carlo to Roger Federer on April 19, the second seed dropped serve three times but beat the Czech 6-3 7-5. Despite Stepanek's resistance, the two-time winner of the event found the gusting wind to be an even bigger obstacle. Read: Djokovic pulls out of Madrid with wrist problem"It was one of the most difficult conditions I've played in my life," Djokovic told the ATP website. "When it's very windy on court, especially on clay, the clay gets in your eyes. It was very difficult to get any kind of rhythm." JUST WATCHEDWilliams' father: We're too soft on kidsReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWilliams' father: We're too soft on kids 03:50JUST WATCHEDWhat happened inside James Blake's mansion?ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWhat happened inside James Blake's mansion? 02:39JUST WATCHEDTennis star Elena Baltacha dies at 30ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHTennis star Elena Baltacha dies at 30 01:01JUST WATCHEDIn the footsteps of 'Grand Slam Stan'ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHIn the footsteps of 'Grand Slam Stan' 04:31JUST WATCHEDA game-changer for tennis?ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHA game-changer for tennis? 02:43"But the positive is that I managed to stay mentally tough until the end and win." Watched by new coach Boris Becker, the 26-year-old needed one hour and 37 minutes to win through as he finetunes preparations for the French Open, which starts on May 25. The world number two missed last week's Madrid Open because of his the trouble in his right wrist and there had been some expectations that Federer would be a headline absentee in the Italian capital. Surprise ReturnThe Swiss welcomed the second set of twins into his life on Tuesday last week after wife Mirka gave birth to Leo and Lenny, who join elder sisters Myla and Charlene. The 32-year-old only arrived in the Italian capital on Monday after being packed off -- to his own surprise -- by his family. "It happened all of sudden on Thursday," Federer, who plays on Wednesday, told reporters. "I spoke to the team, I spoke to Mirka, asked all of them what they thought I should do and they said too quickly that I should come here and play. "So 'ok, if you don't want me around, I'll go away!'" joked the Swiss. "It's hard to leave all the family, but I'll see them soon." Read: Doubles time for ecstatic FedererThe world number four revealed that he fully expects the twins to soon be joining the rest of the family on the ATP World Tour. "Clearly, it's going to be so much work with four kids on the road, but I feel like we're going to be able to handle it," he said. "My wife's unbelievably supportive, and she's so good with the kids. I try my best every day as well, when I can, to help. I'm there every day, always with the kids, and I see them so often. "It's something I'm really going to look forward to, spending this quality time with them, as we travel the world and are in different countries and cities. It's going to be actually very exciting."Federer will meet France's Jeremy Chardy as he returns to the court just eight days after the expansion of his family. He has not played since losing last month's Monte Carlo final to compatriot Stanislas Wawrinka, who beat qualifier Pere Riba 6-0 6-3, registering 50 winners in a victory that lasted as many minutes. In the women's first round, there was local pride as Camilla Giorgi surprised ninth seed Dominika Cibulkova while Sara Errani also made it through, beating Chanelle Scheepers in straight sets.
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(CNN)There's a special bond between German football club Union Berlin and its fans and the closeness of that relationship was honored in a poignant way over the weekend as the team made its Bundesliga debut.Ahead of Saturday's match against RB Leipzig, Union supporters held up placards of deceased loved ones with the inscription "Endlich dabei" (Finally there). The deceased were even counted in the official attendance. The Stadion An der Alten Försterei's official capacity is listed as 22,402, but Saturday's attendance was recorded as 22,467.The stadium, which is the largest purpose-built football ground in Berlin, was officially opened in 1920, but has undergone a series of structural changes over the years, notably the refurbishment and roofing of the standing areas between June 2008 and July 2009.According to the club's website, Union fans "built their own stadium," with over 2,300 volunteers providing 140,000 hours of labor time, helping the Berlin team save millions of dollars.Read MoreREAD: How Borussia Dortmund is leading gootball's fight against the far-right in GermanyREAD: Europe's next generation of football stars shine across the continentSaturday's tribute was organized by a collection of fan groups, with images of the departed fans raised prior to kick-off as the club's anthem rang out. The costs of their tickets were paid for by supporters. Yussuf Poulsen of RB Leipzig battles with Christopher Trimmel of 1. FC Union Berlin.However, Union's introduction to the Bundesliga proved a tough one -- they were hammered 4-0 by Leipzig.Last season Union finished third in German football's second tier to earn a playoff against VfB Stuttgart.Union's subsequent two-legged victory and promotion saw the club become the first from East Berlin and the fifth from the former East Germany to gain passage into the Bundesliga.
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Story highlightsUK police say six new cases have come to light of a male intruder targeting childrenPolice say there are 18 potentially linked cases in the same regionOne of the new sexual assault cases occurred in Praia da Luz in 2005Madeleine McCann was 3 when she vanished in Praia da Luz while on a family vacation Detectives investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann in Portugal are looking at six more cases where a male intruder entered holiday villas where children were staying, police said Wednesday.The development means there are now 18 potentially linked crimes at resorts near where the 3-year-old vanished in June 2007, London's Metropolitan Police said. Children were sexually assaulted by the intruder in half of those cases.Madeleine's disappearance while on a family vacation in the Portuguese resort town of Praia da Luz prompted headlines worldwide -- and remains a mystery.The six new cases have come to light thanks to an appeal for information last month that prompted more than 500 calls from the public, a police statement said.JUST WATCHEDFresh lead in Madeleine McCann caseReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHFresh lead in Madeleine McCann case 07:22JUST WATCHEDSerial attacker linked to missing McCann ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSerial attacker linked to missing McCann 01:06"Five involve sexual assaults on children and one was a 'near miss,' " it said."Of particular interest to the team is that one of the new sexual assaults took place in Praia da Luz in 2005."All but one of the six offenses had been reported to the Portuguese police at the time of the Madeleine's disappearance, the Metropolitan Police said."These new cases are similar to a number of the originally identified (12 offenses) whereby a male intruder has gained access to holiday villas occupied by UK families in the Western Algarve," the force said.Investigators request Portugal interviewsOf the 18 potentially linked incidents, five were in Carvoeiro, nine in the Albufeira district, three in Praia da Luz and one in Vilamoura. The offenses in Praia da Luz occurred between 2005 and 2010.When police appealed for information last month, they said witnesses described the intruder as being tanned with short, dark, unkempt hair.The man was said to have spoken in English with an accent, and his voice was described as slow, or possibly slurred.No new information about the suspect was given Wednesday.In October, new police sketches were released of potential suspects in the case, and UK police appeared in a television appeal for information.The program prompted a flurry of tips, and police in Portugal announced they would reopen the case.Since then, the Portuguese investigation has run parallel to the British one.Detectives previously said they were investigating a spike in break-ins in the area in the weeks before Madeleine disappeared, two in the same block where her family was staying.Neither her parents, Kate and Gerry McCann, nor the detectives investigating her case have given up on one day finding the little girl from Leicestershire, England.Read: Madeleine McCann case: Police hunt intruder who assaulted other girlsRead: Madeleine McCann: Hunt for missing girl goes on
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(CNN)Rapper and businessman Jay-Z said a new partnership between his Roc Nation company and the NFL will bring attention to social justice issues and build on former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick's activism.The partnership, announced Tuesday, aims to "nurture and strengthen community through football and music, including through the NFL's Inspire Change initiative," according to NFL.com.Roc Nation will help the NFL choose artists to perform at games, and will contribute to the league's Inspire Change initiative, launched in early 2019, which supports "programs and initiatives that reduce barriers to opportunity, with a focus on three priority areas: education and economic advancement; police and community relations; and criminal justice reform."Trump says he'd 'love' for Colin Kaepernick to play in NFL, but 'only if he's good enough'Jay-Z, whose real name is Shawn Carter, told reporters Wednesday that he aims to draw attention to the same issues that Kaepernick was protesting when he sat or knelt during the National Anthem before several 2016 NFL preseason and regular-season games."I think we forget that Colin's whole thing was to bring attention to social injustice," Jay-Z said. "So, in that case, this is a success. This is the next thing."Read More"If protesting on the field is the most effective way, then protest on the field," he said. "But if you have a vehicle that can inspire change or you can speak to the masses and educate at the same time as well, tell people what's going on, so people are not controlling your narrative, not telling you, 'your protest is about this.'""I think we've passed kneeling. I think it's time to go into our actionable items," he added.Fans and hip-hop stars have criticized the NFL over its perceived shunning of Kaepernick. He became a free agent in 2017 but has not been signed by a team since his protests. Kaepernick later filed a grievance against the league, accusing team owners of colluding to keep him from being signed. He and former teammate Eric Reid, who also kneeled with him, settled their grievances in February.NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has denied the league's team owners conspired to ensure that Kaepernick is not signed, saying, "Teams are making the best decision for what they need, as a football team."When asked by a reporter if he wanted people stop kneeling, Jay-Z said, "No. I don't want people to stop protesting at all.""Kneeling -- I don't want to step on it because it's a real thing, but, it's a form of protest. I support protest across the board," he said. Jay-Z said he has spoken to Kaepernick but declined to discuss the details of the conversation. Later on Wednesday, Kaepernick posted a Tweet marking the third anniversary of his on-field protest."Today marks the three year anniversary of the first time I protested systemic oppression," he wrote. "I continue to work and stand with the people in our fight for liberation, despite those who are trying to erase the movement! The movement has always lived with the people!"Today marks the three year anniversary of the first time I protested systemic oppression. I continue to work and stand with the people in our fight for liberation, despite those who are trying to erase the movement! The movement has always lived with the people! ✊🏾🎥: @REL pic.twitter.com/TAqumRfjbi— Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) August 14, 2019 Last week, Kaepernick released a video saying he has been out of work for more than 800 days and was "still ready" to play professional football.5am. 5 days a week. For 3 years. Still Ready. pic.twitter.com/AGczejA1rM— Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) August 7, 2019 Jay-Z has previously called Kaepernick an "iconic figure" and said he would "100%" advise Kaepernick to do the same thing and stand against racism in this country, despite losing his job for it. In a 2017 Saturday Night Live performance, Jay-Z wore a Kaepernick jersey. And in "Apesh*t," a recent song with his wife, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, he rapped: "I said no to the Super Bowl. You need me. I don't need you." The video showed a group of black men kneeling, an apparent sign of support for Kaepernick's activism. JUST WATCHEDJay-Z: Colin Kaepernick 'an iconic figure'ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHJay-Z: Colin Kaepernick 'an iconic figure' 01:24In an interview Tuesday at Roc Nation's New York offices, Jay-Z told The Washington Post: "I think we have autonomy.""I anticipate that there will be a lot of -- with any big organization, in this building right here we have internal problems," the rapper and businessman told the paper. "Anything that's new is going to go through its growing pains. We put what we want to do on the table. The NFL agreed to it. So we're going to proceed with that as if we have a partnership." Goodell told reporters he and Jay-Z both expected their new relationship will have its critics. "I'm not into how it looks," Jay-Z said. "How it looks only lasts for a couple months until we really start doing the work."Reid, who protested with Kaepernick, seemed less than impressed by the announcement of the Roc Nation-NFL partnership. You & some others seem to misunderstand that we had no beef with the NFL until they started perpetuating the systemic oppression that we are fighting by blackballing Colin and then me. Nah I won't quit playing but I will be a royal pain in the NFL's a** for acting like they care https://t.co/bL6SMUkrQP— Eric Reid (@E_Reid35) August 14, 2019 Responding to a user who tweeted that it "seems kinda weird" that he would denounce such a venture while being employed by the Carolina Panthers, Reid replied that they were separate issues. "You & some others seem to misunderstand that we had no beef with the NFL until they started perpetuating the systemic oppression that we are fighting by blackballing Colin and then me. Nah I won't quit playing but I will be a royal pain in the NFL's a** for acting like they care about people of color by forming numerous disingenuous partnerships to address social injustice while collectively blackballing Colin, the person who brought oppression and social injustice to the forefront of the NFL platform," Reid said in a pair of tweets. An attempt by CNN to contact representatives for Kaepernick was unsuccessful. The National Football League Players Association declined to comment.Evan Simko-Bednarski reported and wrote from New York. Darran Simon wrote from Atlanta. CNN's Elizabeth Joseph, Deena Zaru, Eliott C. McLaughlin and Melissa Mahtani contributed to this report.
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(CNN)Anderson Cooper got the giggles. Again. One woman got on the Pope's bad side. And somebody get this phone OUTTA HERE! These are your must-see videos of the week:'This is 2020!'JUST WATCHED'SNL' alum revives iconic character, and Anderson loses itReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCH'SNL' alum revives iconic character, and Anderson loses it 03:57"Saturday Night Live" alum Cheri Oteri revived her iconic Barbara Walters impression to ring in 2020 on CNN. For the new year, we're hoping Anderson resolves to feature his giggle on live TV more often.Holy molyJUST WATCHEDPope Francis apologizes for smacking woman on handReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHPope Francis apologizes for smacking woman on hand 00:50Pope Francis showed a rare moment of frustration after a woman grabbed his hand and wouldn't let go. He later apologized for the "bad example" he displayed.Read MoreNew phone, who dis?JUST WATCHEDSee general's reaction when phone rings live on CNNReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSee general's reaction when phone rings live on CNN 01:18The floor may be lava, but retired Gen. Wesley Clark isn't leaving phones to chance either. He chucked his phone after it started ringing during a live interview with CNN's Jim Sciutto.Lookout belowJUST WATCHEDSinkhole swallows SUV driving down the streetReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHSinkhole swallows SUV driving down the street 01:17An SUV plunged into a sinkhole that opened as it approached an intersection in Pennsylvania. The driver was able to escape the sudden crater much easier than the vehicle.Drink up, little buddyJUST WATCHEDThirsty koala guzzles cyclist's water bottleReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHThirsty koala guzzles cyclist's water bottle 01:07Some cyclists in South Australia was stunned by a thirsty koala that approached them on their ride. As the country deals with deadly bushfires and record-breaking heat waves, wildlife there has been devastated.Follow @christipocket
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Story highlightsNewly reopened American Wing at Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows American history through artCollection includes iconic paintings of American Revolution and American Civil War until beginning of 20th centuryPreoccupation with protecting natural environment and use of European styles reflected in the collectionCollection now houses new acquisition, a bronze sculpture of Abraham LincolnWith its early colonial portraits, depictions of grand historical battles, transcendentalist landscapes and intimate, turn-of-the-century paintings of the elite classes, the collection of American art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York ranks as one of the finest in the world. It also functions as a visual timeline for the events in the nation's history. "It's American history through the eyes of American artists," said Morrison Heckscher, Chairman of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art."Most of the major trends, the events of importance in the nation's history, were addressed by artists in one way or another -- war, Civil War, the environment, all of these things," he said. Now, the American Wing at the museum has been re-configured for the 21st century and has re-opened to the public following a decade-long renovation program. "The display of the art is broadly chronological," said Heckscher, explaining that the re-designed galleries move from early colonial paintings, onto the post-Revolutionary period, the Hudson River School, the Civil War era and finally to the late-nineteenth century paintings of John Singer Sargent and James McNeill Whistler. Hermitage sets up 'mini-museum' in Madrid's PradoAlso on display are collections of American decorative arts, including furniture, silverware and ceramics. "We want to treat these different media as works of art on their own -- it's an effort to have a broader a view of what constitutes art," said Heckscher. But the jewel in the collection, according to Heckscher, is Emanuel Leutze's monumental painting Washington Crossing the Delaware, which depicts George Washington crossing an iceberg-strewn river with his troops at a pivotal moment in the revolution. "It was a major history painting, Leutze had done a series of history paintings that documented and touched on the evolution of the United States as a democratic society," said curator at the American Wing Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser.Leutze grew up in America but subsequently moved back to his native Germany, where he painted Washington Crossing the Delaware in 1851. "The intention was really to fuel the quest for freedom in Europe and Germany by looking back in time to this great hero of the American Revolution, creating this kind of mythic historical scene, an event that was a turning point in the revolution," said Kornhauser.It was later taken to America and served as a focal point during the Civil War, Kornhauser said, and has fallen in and out of public favor ever since. Now it takes pride of place in the new galleries. Also on display following a recent acquisition -- obtained just three days before the new wing opened in January -- is a sculpture of Abraham Lincoln by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, a reduction of the one that stands in Lincoln Park in Chicago. "This is particularly exciting for us because it was originally in the collection of John Hay and John Hay was Lincoln's private secretary during the Civil War," said curator Thayer Tolles.Khubiliai Khan's riches travel to New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art The sculpture portrays Lincoln deep in thought and looking, according to Thayer, "as if the weight of the world is on his shoulders."Though the works in the collection are arranged chronologically, themes emerge throughout -- notably the importance of the environment. Kornhauser describes a painting by Thomas Cole, founder of the landscape-oriented, mid-19th-century Hudson River School, depicting a tourist attraction on the Connecticut River. "He's portrayed settled land on the right and wilderness on the left and it's essentially his manifesto to preserve the wilderness, to not lose sight of the beauty and spiritual importance of the wilderness as we rush to settle the land," said Kornhauser. "It's almost like the beginning of the environmental movement, portrayed in this painting," she continued. This also comes through in the 1918 bronze sculpture "End of the Trail," by James Earle Fraser, which portrays a Native American sat slumped on his exhausted horse and which functions as a metaphor, according to Thayer, "for the effect of Euro-American settlement on the American West." What also emerges throughout the collection is the enduring influence of European styles in American art. Through the works, said Tholles, you can see "an interesting blend of European sophistication and aesthetics with American subjects."This carries through from the early colonial portraits by British artists, which influenced American painters such as John Singleton Copley, all the way through to Europhile John Singer Sargent. "What is American art?" said Heckscher. "Well, it's somewhat in the eye of the beholder."
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(CNN)The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) has announced that women's basketball player Liz Cambage -- a star player on the WNBA's Las Vegas Aces -- has withdrawn from the Australian Olympic Team and will not compete in Tokyo.Cambage, a 2021 WNBA All-Star, is averaging 14.6 points and 8.9 rebounds per game for the Aces this season."It's no secret that in the past I've struggled with my mental health and recently I've been really worried about heading into a 'bubble' Olympics," Cambage said in posts on Instagram and Twitter. "No family. No friends. No fans. No support system outside of my team. It's honestly terrifying for me. The past month I've been having panic attacks, not sleeping and not eating."Relying on daily medication to control my anxiety is not the place I want to be right now. Especially walking into competition on the world's biggest sporting stage.Read More"I know myself, and I know I can't be the Liz everyone deserves to see compete for the Opals. Not right now at least. I need to take care of myself mentally and physically."READ: Basketball star Liz Cambage criticizes lack of diversity in Australian Olympic team's promotional photosJUST WATCHEDWNBA star Jewell Loyd talks Olympics, athlete activism ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWNBA star Jewell Loyd talks Olympics, athlete activism 01:58Prior to the announcement of Cambage's withdrawal, an AOC spokesman had told CNN that it was aware of a potential incident involving Cambage and were awaiting a report from Basketball Australia, but the organization provided no further details.CNN has reached out to Basketball Australia for more information but has not heard back. The Australian team is in Las Vegas preparing for the Olympics. Following the announcement of Cambage's withdrawal, the Opals defeated the gold-medal favorite Team USA on Friday in an exhibition game, 70-67.Chef de Mission Ian Chesterman had said in an earlier press conference: "We've been informed by Basketball Australia that they're investigating an issue. We have not received any further reporting except for that."In an Instagram story posted Friday after she had withdrawn, Cambage referenced what had happened during a recent scrimmage between Australia and Nigeria -- and said her decision to not go to Tokyo had been "a few days in the making.""As soon as I put out that little statement yesterday and made the final decision, I felt a world of anxiety and pressure and heaviness I have been carrying lift straight off me," Cambage said, later adding, "I just want to say this decision was coming and I'm happy I finally made it on my own terms. It's sad that news got leaked yesterday that I didn't even know about."Yeah, things got heated in the Nigeria game. There was a physical altercation and there were words exchanged."Cambage had opted out of the 2020 WNBA season when it took place in a bubble environment in Florida."The main reason I sat out of the WNBA last season was my mental health," Cambage said. "I'm not OK in a bubble. I'm not OK playing in front of no fans. Mentally, I'm an escapist. If I have no escape from a situation, it gives me anxiety and I panic. There's definitely no escape except for leaving once you get into Tokyo, and I would not want to do that to my team."The AOC has said it will explore the potential for a late replacement for Cambage for the Opals Team."Liz has made a great contribution to the Australian Olympic Team over two Olympic Games campaigns. We respect her decision and wish her the best in returning to full health," Chesterman said.In May, Cambage threatened to boycott the Tokyo Olympics while speaking out against the lack of racial diversity in promotional photos of the Australian Olympic team.The Olympics are scheduled to get underway on July 23 and run until August 8.
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(CNN)Bangladesh cricket star Shakib Al Hasan has been banned from cricket for two years, with one year suspended, after breaching the sport's anti-corruption code.Al Hasan was guilty of failing to contact the sport's Anti-Corruption Unit (ACU) watchdog after being approached on three separate occasions to "engage in corrupt conduct," said a statement published on the International Cricket Council's website Tuesday. He accepted all three charges linked to requests to supply "inside information for betting purposes" and his failure to report "corrupt approaches."Shakib Al Hasan (right) was the third highest run scorer at the 2019 Cricket World Cup. The 32-year-old's failure to report the three separate incidents, two of which took place in January 2018 and the other on April 26, 2018, means that if he serves the terms of his ban, he will be able to return to action on October 29 next year.Al Hasan, who has made more than 200 one-day appearances for Bangladesh and starred at the 2019 Cricket World Cup, is one of the most exciting players in the sport.Shakib Al Hasan bowls during the Group Stage match of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 between Bangladesh and South Africa.Read MoreCaptain of the country's Test match and Twenty20 team, he was the third-highest run scorer at the 2019 Cricket World Cup."I am obviously extremely sad to have been banned from the game I love, but I completely accept my sanction for not reporting the approaches," Al Hasan said in a statement."The ICC ACU is reliant on players to play a central part in the fight against corruption and I didn't do my duty in this instance."Like the majority of players and fans around the world, I want cricket to be a corruption-free sport and I am looking forward to working with the ICC ACU team to support their education program and ensure young players don't make the same mistake I did."Schoolchildren in the Pavilion at Lord's with Bangladesh's Shakib Al Hasan on July 5, 2019 in London.Alex Marshall, ICC general manager - Integrity, added: "Shakib Al Hasan is a highly experienced international cricketer. He has attended many education sessions and knows his obligations under the Code. He should have reported each of these approaches."Shakib has accepted his errors and cooperated fully with the investigation. He has offered to assist the Integrity Unit in future education, to help younger players to learn from his mistakes. I am happy to accept this offer."
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(CNN)Greta Thunberg's father says he initially did not support his daughter's climate activism, calling it a "bad idea," but his view changed when he saw how happy it made her. In an interview on BBC Radio 4's Today program Monday, Svante Thunberg revealed that by skipping school and staging Friday sit-ins outside the Swedish parliament, Greta was not only battling climate change but also the crippling depression that had plagued her for up to four years. Greta Thunberg and her father Svante attend a press conference during the COP24 summit on climate change in Katowice, Poland on December 4, 2018. "She stopped talking, she stopped eating, and all these things," Svante Thunberg said of Greta's period of illness, speaking on a program guest-edited by the 16-year-old activist. "She stopped going to school. She was basically home for a year, she didn't eat for three months," the 50-year-old said of what he described as "the ultimate nightmare as a parent." Shouting into the apocalypse: The decade in climate changeThunberg and his wife, opera singer Malena Ernman, stopped work to look after Greta -- who at that point was only speaking to them, her sister and one of her teachers at school. Read MoreSo when she expressed a desire to become an activist, both parents said "quite clearly that we would not support it," worried that she was "putting herself out there on the frontline with such a huge question like climate change."Change in outlook But not only did Greta's strikes create a powerful global movement, they helped change her outlook. During her first sit-in outside the Swedish parliament, she began answering journalists' questions as when they approached her. On the third day, she ate a vegan pad thai dish someone had handed to her. "I cannot explain what a change that meant to her and to us," Thunberg said. "And she could do things she could not have done before." "I can see Greta is very happy from doing this," he added. During the wide-ranging interview with the BBC's Mishal Husain, Thunberg dismissed criticism that he and wife pushed Greta into becoming an activist. Greta Thunberg and German railway company trade tweets about 'overcrowded trains'"We are not climate activists, we never were," he said, saying Greta used to call them "hypocrites" for not taking the climate issue seriously. "We obviously did not have a clue (about) the climate crisis and she basically thought we were huge hypocrites," he said, adding that he and his wife were longtime refugee and human rights advocates instead. "So Greta was like 'Whose human rights are you standing up for?'' he said.Thunberg said he "ran out of arguments" against climate activism and started to support Greta's initiatives. His wife decided to stop flying to opera engagements and he became vegan -- but it was not because of the climate crisis, he added. "I didn't do it to save the climate, I did it to save my child," he said.
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(CNN)The International Judo Federation (IJF) has suspended Vladimir Putin's status as Honorary President and Ambassador of the federation due to "the ongoing war conflict in Ukraine," the sport's governing body announced Sunday."In light of the ongoing war conflict in Ukraine, the International Judo Federation announces the suspension of Mr. Vladimir Putin's status as Honorary President and Ambassador of the International Judo Federation," the statement read. On Friday, the IJF canceled the 2022 Grand Slam in Kazan, Russia which was to be held from May 20-22. Marius Vizer, the IJF president, said in Friday's statement: "We are saddened by the current international situation, the result of inefficient dialogue at international level. We, the sports community, must remain united and strong, to support each other and our universal values, in order to always promote peace and friendship, harmony and unity. "The judo family hopes that the current unrest can be solved in the last moment, to reestablish normality and stability in Eastern Europe and the world, to once again be able to focus on the diverse cultures, history and legacy of Europe, in the most positive way."Read MoreIt comes as the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) also announced the Russian and Belarusian national flags will not be displayed, and the two countries' anthems will not be played at any FIG sanctioned event "following the Russian military invasion of Ukraine," the sport's governing body announced on Saturday.The FIG has canceled all World Cup and World Challenge Cup events scheduled for Russia and Belarus and said "no other FIG events will be allocated to Russia or Belarus until further notice."The FIG added in a statement: "All FIG-sanctioned events planned to take place in Russia and Belarus are removed from the FIG calendar and will no longer be recognized by the FIG. No other events taking place in Russia and Belarus will be sanctioned by the FIG until further notice."Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, features, and videosIn its statement, FIG president Morinari Watanabe said: "As a sporting governing body, our first duty is to protect all our athletes, including to protect them from political pressure. Our thoughts go to the members of the Gymnastics community in Ukraine. Sport is friendship and solidarity. "We must show solidarity with the members of our family who are in despair and offer them a helping hand to ensure their future. The FIG will ask the FIG Foundation for Solidarity to allocate special aid to support Ukrainian athletes and other members of the Ukrainian Gymnastics Federation hit by the war."
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Story highlightsA rebel commander says many of those on MH17 were dead before it was shot downMoscow claims the plane was shot down by a Ukrainian fighter jetClaim: MH17 was traveling along almost the same route as Putin's presidential planeA rebel leader denies a string of evidence pointing to his forces shooting down MH17In the tangled aftermath of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 disaster, two narratives have emerged -- one that most of the world subscribes to, and another that Russia and the rebels are pushing. In the first, MH17 was shot down by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine, using a sophisticated Russian-built missile system. In the second, Russia and the rebels suggest several different scenarios for what brought the jetliner down, some of them bordering on the bizarre. JUST WATCHEDMH17: Tragedy, blame and heartacheReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHMH17: Tragedy, blame and heartache 02:22JUST WATCHEDMcCain: Putin 'getting away with murder'ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHMcCain: Putin 'getting away with murder' 01:59Propaganda is nothing new in world politics. Since the beginning of time, everyone has put their spin on the events of the day. But the word from Washington about Russia's take? Take any information coming out of Moscow "with a very large grain of salt.""I would also say that these aren't competing narratives from two equally credible sources here," said Marie Harf, a U.S. State Department spokeswoman. JUST WATCHEDMedia war over MH17 messagingReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHMedia war over MH17 messaging 03:31JUST WATCHEDWhat's Putin's next move?ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWhat's Putin's next move? 05:09JUST WATCHEDRebel leader: I invite international helpReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHRebel leader: I invite international help 04:58"The Russian government has repeatedly put out misinformation and propaganda throughout this conflict in Ukraine, so I would caution you from saying that these are two equally credible sources, although you're happy to report it that way, but I would take issue with it."The Russian mindset, says CNN's former Moscow bureau chief, loves a good story. And the Russian narrative is meant to sway public opinion on who's responsible for the jet's downing."Don't forget, the mentality of Russians is to think of conspiracy theories," said Jill Dougherty. "So when they hear something that is outrageous, they might believe it."Here are some of the stories circulating in the Russian media.THE RUSSIAN TAKE: The passengers were already deadRebel commander Igor Girkin suggested that many of MH17's passengers were corpses -- already dead -- and put aboard the 11-plus-hour flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur. Those claims were made on Russia's Russkaya Vessna website."A significant number of the bodies weren't fresh," Girkin said he'd learned, adding, their blood had been drained. He also reportedly claimed a vast amount of blood serum and medications were discovered in the wreckage.THE WORLD'S TAKE: The information contradicts the Malaysia Airlines passenger manifest for Flight 17 that lists the 298 people who were alive when they boarded the regularly scheduled flight. For instance, Dutch passenger Pim de Kuijer was on his way to an International AIDS Conference in Australia -- a trip that was to be followed by a backpacking excursion there. The day of the crash, de Kuijer posted to his Facebook page a picture of him posing beneath aviator sunglasses and sporting a large travelers' backpack.---THE RUSSIAN TAKE: A Ukrainian fighter jet shot it downOn the day of the crash, Russia's radar system spotted a Ukrainian Air Force jet approaching the Boeing, said Russian Army Lt. Gen. Andrey Kartopolov. "Its standard armament includes R60 air-to-air missiles, which are capable of locking and hitting targets from 12 kilometers (7 miles) and which are guaranteed to hit the target from the distance of 5 kilometers (3 miles)," he said. THE WORLD'S TAKE: That's a claim that Ukraine has denied. And the United States and others have said the plane was brought down by a surface-to-air missile. Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in Ukraine Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineDebris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 sits in a field at the crash site in Hrabove, Ukraine, on September 9, 2014. The Boeing 777 was shot down July 17, 2014, over Ukrainian territory controlled by pro-Russian separatists. All 298 people on board were killed. In an October 2015 report, Dutch investigators found the flight was shot down by a warhead that fit a Buk rocket, referring to Russian technology, Dutch Safety Board Chairman Tjibbe Joustra said.Hide Caption 1 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineAustralian and Dutch experts examine the area of the crash on August 3, 2014.Hide Caption 2 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA woman walks with her bicycle near the crash site on August 2, 2014.Hide Caption 3 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePolice secure a refrigerated train loaded with bodies of passengers from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 as it arrives in a Kharkiv, Ukraine, factory on July 22, 2014. Hide Caption 4 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA pro-Russian rebel passes wreckage from the crashed jet near Hrabove on Monday, July 21, 2014.Hide Caption 5 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in Ukraine – Wreckage from the jet lies in grass near Hrabove on July 21, 2014.Hide Caption 6 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man covers his face with a rag as members of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe and the Dutch National Forensic Investigations Team inspect bodies in a refrigerated train near the crash site in eastern Ukraine on July 21, 2014.Hide Caption 7 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineEmergency workers carry a victim's body in a bag at the crash site on July 21, 2014.Hide Caption 8 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA piece of the plane lies in the grass in eastern Ukraine's Donetsk region on July 21, 2014.Hide Caption 9 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineAn armed pro-Russian rebel stands guard next to a refrigerated train loaded with bodies in Torez, Ukraine, on Sunday, July 20, 2014.Hide Caption 10 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineUkrainian State Emergency Service employees sort through debris on July 20, 2014, as they work to locate the deceased.Hide Caption 11 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA woman covers her mouth with a piece of fabric July 20, 2014, to ward off smells from railway cars that reportedly contained passengers' bodies.Hide Caption 12 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineToys and flowers sit on the charred fuselage of the jet as a memorial on July 20, 2014.Hide Caption 13 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePeople search a wheat field for remains in the area of the crash site on July 20, 2014. Hide Caption 14 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA woman walks among charred debris at the crash site on July 20, 2014.Hide Caption 15 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineEmergency workers load the body of a victim onto a truck at the crash site on Saturday, July 19, 2014. Hide Caption 16 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineEmergency workers carry the body of a victim at the crash site on July 19, 2014. Hide Caption 17 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA large piece of the main cabin is under guard at the crash site on July 19, 2014. Hide Caption 18 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineVictims' bodies are placed by the side of the road on July 19, 2014, as recovery efforts continue at the crash site. International officials lament the lack of a secured perimeter.Hide Caption 19 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man looks through the debris at the crash site on July 19, 2014. Hide Caption 20 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineAn envelope bearing the Malaysia Airlines logo is seen at the crash site on July 19, 2014. Hide Caption 21 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineArmed rebels walk past large pieces of the Boeing 777 on July 19, 2014. Hide Caption 22 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineUkrainian rescue workers walk through a wheat field with a stretcher as they collect the bodies of victims on July 19, 2014.Hide Caption 23 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA woman looks at wreckage on July 19, 2014.Hide Caption 24 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePro-Russian rebels stand guard as the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe delegation arrives at the crash site on Friday, July 18, 2014. Hide Caption 25 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA woman walks through the debris field on July 18, 2014. Hide Caption 26 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePro-Russian rebels stand guard at the crash site.Hide Caption 27 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineWreckage from Flight 17 lies in a field in Shaktarsk, Ukraine, on July 18, 2014.Hide Caption 28 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man covers a body with a plastic sheet near the crash site on July 18, 2014. The passengers and crew hailed from all over the world, including Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Germany and Canada. Hide Caption 29 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA diver searches for the jet's flight data recorders on July 18, 2014.Hide Caption 30 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineCoal miners search the crash site.Hide Caption 31 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineWreckage from the Boeing 777 lies on the ground July 18, 2014.Hide Caption 32 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePeople search for bodies of passengers on July 18, 2014. Hide Caption 33 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA woman walks past a body covered with a plastic sheet near the crash site July 18, 2014.Hide Caption 34 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineBelongings of passengers lie in the grass on July 18, 2014.Hide Caption 35 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePeople inspect the crash site on Thursday, July 17, 2014.Hide Caption 36 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePeople walk amid the debris at the site of the crash.Hide Caption 37 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in Ukraine Debris smoulders in a field near the Russian border. Hide Caption 38 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineFire engines arrive at the crash site.Hide Caption 39 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man stands next to wreckage.Hide Caption 40 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineDebris from the crashed jet lies in a field in Ukraine.Hide Caption 41 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineFamily members of those aboard Flight 17 leave Schiphol Airport near Amsterdam, Netherlands.Hide Caption 42 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA large piece of the plane lies on the ground.Hide Caption 43 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineLuggage from the flight sits in a field at the crash site.Hide Caption 44 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA couple walks to the location at Schiphol Airport where more information would be given regarding the flight.Hide Caption 45 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineFlight arrivals are listed at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia.Hide Caption 46 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineDebris from the Boeing 777, pictured on July 17, 2014.Hide Caption 47 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man inspects debris from the plane.Hide Caption 48 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineWreckage from the plane is seen on July 17, 2014.Hide Caption 49 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man talks with security at Schiphol Airport on July 17, 2014.Hide Caption 50 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineWreckage burns in Ukraine.Hide Caption 51 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA man stands next to the wreckage of the airliner.Hide Caption 52 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePeople inspect a piece of wreckage believed to be from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. This image was posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 53 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkrainePeople inspect a piece of wreckage believed to be from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. This image was posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 54 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA piece of wreckage believed to be from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. This image was posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 55 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA piece of wreckage believed to be from MH17. This image was posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 56 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineAn airsickness bag believed to be from MH17. This image was posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 57 of 58 Photos: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashes in UkraineA piece of wreckage believed to be from MH17. This image was posted to Twitter.Hide Caption 58 of 58JUST WATCHEDWhen passenger jets become targetsReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWhen passenger jets become targets 02:49JUST WATCHEDFirth: RT was 'pushing a narrative'ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHFirth: RT was 'pushing a narrative' 01:33 Photos: MH17: What they left behind Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A birthday card found in a sunflower field near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine, on Thursday, July 24. The passenger plane was shot down July 17 above Ukraine. All 298 people aboard were killed, and much of what they left behind was scattered in a vast field of debris.Hide Caption 1 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A classical music record is seen among the sunflowers on July 24. Hide Caption 2 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A shoe, appearing to be brand new, sits under foliage at the crash site. Hide Caption 3 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Two Dutch passports belonging to passengers lie in a field at the site of the crash on Tuesday, July 22.Hide Caption 4 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Clothing, sunglasses and chocolate are seen on July 22.Hide Caption 5 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – More sunglasses and a travel guide lie in the field on July 22.Hide Caption 6 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A doll is seen on the ground on Saturday, July 19.Hide Caption 7 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A single shoe is seen among the debris and wreckage on July 19. There has been concern that the site has not been sealed off properly and that vital evidence is being tampered with. Hide Caption 8 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Pieces of a wristwatch lie on a plastic cover at the crash site. Hide Caption 9 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A toy monkey.Hide Caption 10 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Books, bags, a tourist T-shirt. Ukraine's government said it had received reports of looting, and it urged relatives to cancel the victims' credit cards. But a CNN crew at the scene July 19 said it did not see any signs of looting.Hide Caption 11 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Passports were scattered across the large field.Hide Caption 12 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Playing cards and euros are seen at the crash site.Hide Caption 13 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – A travel guide and toiletries.Hide Caption 14 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – Luggage on Friday, July 18.Hide Caption 15 of 16 Photos: MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind – An empty suitcase is cordoned off near the plane's impact site on Thursday, July 17.Hide Caption 16 of 16"The Russian government has a propaganda machine second to none, as these latest conspiracy theories demonstrate," a U.S. official told CNN.---THE RUSSIAN TAKE: Putin's plane was the targetAccording to some accounts in the Russian media, MH17 was traveling along almost the same route as President Vladimir Putin's presidential plane, which was returning to Moscow from a summit in Brazil. Both planes have red, white and blue markings."The contours of the airplanes are in general similar, the linear dimensions are also very similar and regarding the coloring, from a sufficiently long distance, they are practically identical," an aviation source was quoted as telling the news outlet, RT.THE WORLD'S TAKE: Another Russian media, the online news portal Gazeta.ru, reported that Putin's plane has not flown over Ukrainian airspace for quite some time because of the conflict between the government and rebel forces.---THE RUSSIAN TAKE: Don't believe what you read on the Internet Rebel leader Alexander Borodai has maintained for days that MH17 was shot down, just not by his forces. He said they don't have that capability.Asked about the trail of evidence that contradicted him, Borodai just rolled his eyes."It's very easy to refute it," Borodai told CNN's Chris Cuomo. "Almost all information that comes over the internet is practically all lies."THE WORLD'S TAKE: Western and Ukrainian intelligence say the rebels did have the means to bring down a jetliner. They were in control of a Russian missile system that once belonged to the Ukrainian military. A video reportedly showed the weapons system being carted out of eastern Ukraine into Russia. Intercepted conversations brag of an aircraft being shot down before the debris showed it was a civilian aircraft. A tweet from a rebel defense minister also bragged of the accomplishment -- before it was deleted.---THE RUSSIAN TAKE: Did we mention it was the Ukrainians?JUST WATCHEDRT Reporter quits over MH17 CoverageReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHRT Reporter quits over MH17 Coverage 06:40JUST WATCHEDPaying tribute to the lives lost on MH17ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHPaying tribute to the lives lost on MH17 01:30 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – The passengers and crew aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 came from around the world and held a wide range of hopes and dreams. While the identities of the 298 people aboard have not been release by the airline, CNN has been able to confirm some of them via family, friends and social media. Hide Caption 1 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Karlijn Keijzer, 25, was a champion rower from Amsterdam who showed much passion and leadership in the United States as a member of the team at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Hide Caption 2 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Miguel Calehr, left, and his older brother Shaka were both aboard the flight. They were on their way to Bali to visit their grandmother. Their middle brother, Mika, was supposed to be on the flight as well, but it was fully booked.Hide Caption 3 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – A 77-year-old teacher and Roman Catholic nun, Sister Philomene Tiernan, was on the flight, according to Australia's Kincoppal-Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart. The school principal described Tiernan as "wonderfully wise and compassionate."Hide Caption 4 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – On Friday, President Barack Obama told reporters that an American, Quinn Lucas Schansman, was aboard. His Facebook page said he was a student at International Business School Hogeschool van Amsterdam. Hide Caption 5 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – The World Health Organization was able to confirm to CNN that their employee Glenneth Thomas was on board and heading to the International AIDS Conference scheduled to begin this weekend in Melbourne, Australia.Hide Caption 6 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Shazana Salleh, a Malaysian national, was one of 15 crew members aboard.Hide Caption 7 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Prominent Dutch scientist Joep Lange was a pioneer in HIV research and a former president of the International AIDS Society, which organizes the International AIDS Conference.Hide Caption 8 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Jacqueline van Tongeren, partner of HIV researcher Joep Lange, was on the flight with him. Hide Caption 9 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Medical student Andrei Anghel, 24, boarded Flight 17 on his way to vacation in Bali. Hide Caption 10 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Darryl Dwight Gunawan, 20, was traveling home to the Philippines after a summer vacation with his family. His mother, Irene Gunawan, 54, and sister Sheryl Shania Gunawan, 15, were also aboard. Hide Caption 11 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – John Paulissen, his wife Yuli Hastini and their two children, Martin Arjuna and Sri were all aboard the flight. Hide Caption 12 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 passengers remembered – Tessa van der Sande, an Amnesty International employee, was on the flight. Hide Caption 13 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 passengers remembered – Angeline Premila Rajandaran was a flight attendant, one of the 15 crew on board. Hide Caption 14 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 passengers remembered – A lover of French literature, Adi Soetjipto, 73, was returning home to Jakarta, Indonesia, after her annual visit to her mother in the Netherlands, nephew Joss Wibisono said.Hide Caption 15 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Nick Norris and his three grandchildren, Otis, 8, Evie,10 and Mo, 12, were all aboard the flight. Hide Caption 16 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Pim de Kuijer was also on his way to the International AIDS Conference.Hide Caption 17 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Husband and wife Albert and Maree Rizk were among the passengers on board. Hide Caption 18 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Musician Cor Schilfder was on vacation with girlfriend NeeltjeTol, a florist. Hide Caption 19 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Shun Poh Fan and wife Jenny Loh were restaurant owners in the Netherlands. Hide Caption 20 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Fatima Dycynski was an engineer and the founder and CEO of Xoterra Space. Hide Caption 21 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Arjen and Yvonne RyderHide Caption 22 of 23 Photos: Photos: Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered Malaysia Flight 17 victims remembered – Flight attendant Sanjid Singh Sandu swapped flights at the last moment on Thursday and boarded MH17 in Amsterdam so he could get home early, his parents told CNN.Hide Caption 23 of 23JUST WATCHEDRussian media MH17 conspiracy theoriesReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHRussian media MH17 conspiracy theories 02:34With the stakes so high even basic information online was being changed to shape facts. The Twitter site @RuGovEdits automatically tracks changes made by Russian government sites to Wikipedia. It has tracked dozens of edits from Moscow to Wikipedia entries about MH17.In one case, one edit that said the plane was shot down by the pro-Russian rebels was changed less than an hour later by someone inside the Russian government to say: "The plane was shot down by Ukrainian soldiers."THE WORLD'S TAKE: The Wikipedia entry now says the two sides are accusing each other. ---THE RUSSIAN TAKE: At first, the story didn't require such heavy media coverage.Russian newspapers downplayed the story just after the crash. THE WORLD'S TAKE: The downing of the Malaysia Airlines made headlines instantly around the world."The Kremlin or the people that control the information, networks in Russia, decide how they are going to explain something, what the general narrative will be, and that is given to radio, TV, newspapers to a certain extent, etc.," said Dougherty. "They essentially are told, this is what you should say."It proved too much for one reporter, RT's Sarah Firth, who quit the network last week. "I've had many times over the five years I've been at RT where I had a similar struggle and you've watched the story handled in that way. And you felt very strongly that right away the narrative is being pitched -- a very specific narrative to the detriment to the facts and accuracy in reporting."READ: MH17 black boxes finally handed overREAD: How rebels in Ukraine built up an arsenal capable of reaching the skiesREAD: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17: Five unanswered questions
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(CNN)As the coronavirus pandemic spreads across Europe and the United States, a global scramble for medical equipment such as respirator masks and gloves is underway. Several countries have accused the United States of trying to hijack their orders, but the details of who may have done what to whom are still murky.In France they are calling it the "guerre des masques" -- the war of the masks, and on Friday German officials also made allegations against the United States. Andreas Geisel, a senior official in the state of Berlin, said that the US had committed an act of "modern piracy," alleging that a consignment of 200,000 respirator masks destined for the Berlin police had been diverted to the US while in transit in Bangkok.Related storiesCan you use apps to track coronavirus?Asia may have been right about face masksHow the coronavirus could impact gender equalityUpdates: Coronavirus deaths top 60,000 globally "This is not how you deal with transatlantic partners," Geisel said, adding that "even in times of global crisis, no wild west methods should be used."Read MoreA German media report said the company involved in the Berlin order was US manufacturer 3M. But 3M told CNN Friday that the company "has no evidence to suggest 3M products have been seized. 3M has no record of any order of respirators from China for the Berlin police."The Berlin police told CNN they could not confirm whether an order had been placed with 3M. CNN has reached out to the White House and US Department of Health and Human Services for comment.The US government's invocation of the Defense Production Act has made life difficult for some suppliers with foreign contracts. The 1950 law gives the government sweeping powers during emergencies to direct industrial production. President Donald Trump criticized 3M for seeking to export protective equipment, tweeting Thursday: "We hit 3M hard today after seeing what they were doing with their Masks. 'P Act' all the way. Big surprise to many in government as to what they were doing - will have a big price to pay!"Trump announces new face mask recommendations after heated internal debateOn Friday 3M responded: "Ceasing all export of respirators produced in the United States would likely cause other countries to retaliate and do the same, as some have already done."A senior White House official denied the administration was blocking 3M from sending shipments of respirators to Latin America and Canada.As stockpiles dwindle and countries embark on what one French official called a "global treasure hunt," governments are reluctant to allow protective and other equipment to leave their shores. Many governments say the prices being offered and demanded for personal protective equipment (PPE) are exorbitant.On Friday, Spanish Foreign Minister Arancha González Laya said an order for ventilators that had already been paid for had been impounded in Turkey."There is a shipment of ventilators that for now are not going to leave Turkey because the Turkish government understands that it is a priority for the treatment of its patients in Turkey," she said. "[What] they do guarantee is that, within a reasonable period of time, within a few weeks, they will make that material available to Spain again," González Laya added. CNN has requested comment from the Turkish government. Photos: The coronavirus pandemicWorkers at the Inhauma cemetery in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, carry the coffin containing the remains of 89-year-old Irodina Pinto Ribeiro on Friday, June 18, 2021. Brazil has now marked 500,000 deaths from Covid-19 -- the second-highest death toll in the world. Hide Caption 1 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA demonstrator holds a sign that reads "Bolsonaro out" in a protest against Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's administration on June 19, 2021 in Rio de Janeiro. Many are angry at his handling of the Covid-19 crisis as the country marks 500,000 deaths from the virus.Hide Caption 2 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicJeffrey Shiau, a volunteer from the crowd, spits water into the mouth of Sam Kaufman, a performer from the Human Fountains, during a "reopening party" in Los Angeles on Tuesday, June 15. California lifted most of its Covid-19 restrictions Tuesday as part of a grand reopening in which the state ended capacity limits, physical distancing and — at least for those vaccinated — mask requirements.Hide Caption 3 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople watch fireworks in front of the Statue of Liberty after the state of New York lifted most of its Covid-19 restrictions on Tuesday, June 15. Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that 70% of adults in New York had received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine.Hide Caption 4 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicExhausted grave diggers rest between funerals at a cemetery designated for Covid-19 victims in Bandung, Indonesia, on Tuesday, June 15.Hide Caption 5 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicThis aerial photo, taken on Sunday, June 13, shows a graduation ceremony at Central China Normal University. The ceremony in Wuhan, China, also included graduates who could not attend last year because of the Covid-19 pandemic.Hide Caption 6 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicDr. Brajpal Singh Tyagi, left, performs surgery to remove mucormycosis, a rare and potentially deadly infection also known as black fungus, from a patient in Ghaziabad, India, on June 1. In the past few weeks, thousands of black fungus cases have been reported across the country, with hundreds hospitalized and dozens dead. Many of those being infected are coronavirus patients or those who have recently recovered from Covid-19 and have weakened immune systems. Hide Caption 7 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA Covid-19 victim is laid to rest in a graveyard in Comas, Peru, on June 1. Peru has more than doubled its official death toll from the Covid-19 pandemic following a government review of the figures. That leaves the country with the world's highest coronavirus-related death rate per capita.Hide Caption 8 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicTwo moviegoers watch a film at the Kiggins Theatre in Vancouver, Washington, on May 14. Many places in the United States are starting to reopen and get back to some sort of normal as more people get vaccinated.Hide Caption 9 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople ride on a wave swinger at Chicago's Navy Pier on May 14. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently revised its Covid-19 guidelines, saying it's safe for fully vaccinated people to remove their face masks in most settings.Hide Caption 10 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicGuests are seen at the reopening of The Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, which held a concert for health care workers, first responders and essential workers.Hide Caption 11 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicFamily members look on as Jack Frilingos, 12, receives a Covid-19 vaccine in Decatur, Georgia, on May 11. It was a day after the US Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer's vaccine for the 12-15 age group.Hide Caption 12 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople in protective suits cremate the bodies of Covid-19 victims while others work to extend a crematorium in Kathmandu, Nepal, on May 5. Covid-19 cases are skyrocketing in Nepal, resembling a similar outbreak in neighboring India.Hide Caption 13 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicHealth workers carry signs while participating in a protest outside a hospital in Caracas, Venezuela, on May 1. During the protest, which was part of International Workers' Day, they demanded better wages and working conditions as well as mass vaccinations against Covid-19.Hide Caption 14 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPassengers sit on the deck of the Costa Smeralda cruise ship in Savona, Italy, on May 1. The Italian cruise line Costa Cruises set sail for the first time in more than four months.Hide Caption 15 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA member of the group Rio de la Paz places a cross at Rio de Janeiro's Copacabana Beach on April 30. It was in preparation for an event marking Brazil's Covid-19 death toll, which had reached 400,000.Hide Caption 16 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicCanadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau receives a Covid-19 vaccine at a pharmacy in Ottawa on April 23.Hide Caption 17 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicFuneral pyres burn in New Delhi as people wait to cremate Covid-19 victims on April 23. A second wave of Covid-19 is devastating India, killing thousands of people each day and setting world records for daily infections.Hide Caption 18 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople sit in an observation area after receiving Covid-19 vaccines at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Appointments are no longer necessary at any of the vaccination sites run by the city.Hide Caption 19 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicRelatives of a patient who died from Covid-19 perform his last rites amid other burning pyres at a crematorium in New Delhi.Hide Caption 20 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicMigrant workers line up to enter a railway station ahead of a lockdown in Mumbai, India, on April 14.Hide Caption 21 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA health worker at a charity hospital in Belém, Brazil, sings and prays for a Covid-19 patient as part of Easter celebrations on April 4.Hide Caption 22 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicThis aerial photo shows an area of Mumbai, India, on April 10. Because of rising Covid-19 cases, a weekend lockdown was imposed across the entire state of Maharashtra.Hide Caption 23 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicThe Rev. John Kellogg, rector of Christ Church, wears a protective mask as he distributes communion at a sunrise Easter service held at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, DC.Hide Caption 24 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicWomen in Krakow, Poland, carry Easter baskets after a food-blessing ceremony at the Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel on April 3.Hide Caption 25 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople wear face masks and observe social distancing as they attend a Good Friday church service in Berlin on April 2.Hide Caption 26 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople scatter as police fire water cannons to disperse a crowd at a park in Brussels, Belgium, on April 1. Violent clashes broke out between Brussels police and people gathering to attend a fake April Fool's Day festival that violated coronavirus restrictions.Hide Caption 27 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicYoshia Uomoto, 98, reacts as her son Mark Uomoto and niece Gail Yamada surprise her at her assisted-living facility in Seattle on March 30. Because of Covid-19 restrictions, it was their first in-person visit in a year.Hide Caption 28 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicPeople in Barcelona, Spain, attend a concert for the rock group Love of Lesbian on March 27. Fans had to take a same-day Covid-19 test before attending the show, which was permitted by Spanish health authorities.Hide Caption 29 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA person dressed as the Easter Bunny greets children in a vehicle during a drive-thru event in Alexandria, Virginia, on March 27.Hide Caption 30 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicBeachgoers are seen in Miami on March 22. Miami Beach was forced to extend a curfew and state of emergency, possibly for several weeks, after city police struggled to control shoulder-to-shoulder crowds of spring breakers over the weekend, Mayor Dan Gelber said.Hide Caption 31 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicTercio Galdino and his wife, Alicea, wear astronaut costumes to protect themselves from Covid-19 as they walk along the Ipanema Beach in Rio de Janeiro on March 20.Hide Caption 32 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA remote-controlled robot takes a throat swab at a hospital in Tanta, Egypt, on March 20. The robot prototype is part of a project to assist physicians in testing patients for Covid-19.Hide Caption 33 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicRelatives of Tereza Santos, a Covid-19 victim, react as she is about to be buried in São Paulo, Brazil, on March 9.Hide Caption 34 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicFirst-grader Sophia Frazier does her schoolwork behind a plastic divider at Two Rivers Elementary School in Sacramento, California, on March 8.Hide Caption 35 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicDr. Mayank Amin, dressed as Superman, prepares a Covid-19 vaccine at a clinic in Collegeville, Pennsylvania, on March 7. Amin has been on a mission to vaccinate thousands of people in his rural community.Hide Caption 36 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicA child tosses a surgical mask into a fire during a mask-burning event at the Idaho Statehouse in Boise on March 6. People gathered in at least 20 cities across the state to protest Covid-19 restrictions. Hide Caption 37 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicCountry music legend Dolly Parton receives a Covid-19 vaccine in Nashville, Tennessee, on March 2. She posted the video to her Twitter account, urging her followers to get their shot when they can.Hide Caption 38 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicFrom left, high school students Emma Banker, Jessi McIrvin and Valerie Sanchez record their vocals in pop-up tents during a choir class in Wenatchee, Washington, on February 26. Wenatchee High School has been using the tents for its music programs during the Covid-19 pandemic.Hide Caption 39 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicAnna, a resident of the Villa Sacra Famiglia Nursing Home, holds her daughter's hand in the Rome facility's "hug room" on February 24. The room allows residents and their families to touch one another while staying safe from Covid-19.Hide Caption 40 of 488 Photos: The coronavirus pandemicMembers of Congress observe a moment of silence on the steps of the US Capitol on Febru