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38 results
Allocine Dataset: A Large-Scale French Movie Reviews Dataset. This is a dataset for binary sentiment classification, made of user reviews scraped from Allocine.fr. It contains 100k positive and 100k negative reviews divided into 3 balanced splits: train (160k reviews), val (20k) and test (20k).
The Amazon reviews dataset consists of reviews from amazon. The data span a period of 18 years, including ~35 million reviews up to March 2013. Reviews include product and user information, ratings, and a plaintext review.
We provide an Amazon product reviews dataset for multilingual text classification. The dataset contains reviews in English, Japanese, German, French, Chinese and Spanish, collected between November 1, 2015 and November 1, 2019. Each record in the dataset contains the review text, the review title, the star rating, an anonymized reviewer ID, an anonymized product ID and the coarse-grained product category (e.g. ‘books’, ‘appliances’, etc.) The corpus is balanced across stars, so each star rating constitutes 20% of the reviews in each language. For each language, there are 200,000, 5,000 and 5,000 reviews in the training, development and test sets respectively. The maximum number of reviews per reviewer is 20 and the maximum number of reviews per product is 20. All reviews are truncated after 2,000 characters, and all reviews are at least 20 characters long. Note that the language of a review does not necessarily match the language of its marketplace (e.g. reviews from amazon.de are primarily written in German, but could also be written in English, etc.). For this reason, we applied a language detection algorithm based on the work in Bojanowski et al. (2017) to determine the language of the review text and we removed reviews that were not written in the expected language.
The Dutch Book Review Dataset (DBRD) contains over 110k book reviews of which 22k have associated binary sentiment polarity labels. It is intended as a benchmark for sentiment classification in Dutch and created due to a lack of annotated datasets in Dutch that are suitable for this task.
This dataset contains 30,000 messages drawn from events including an earthquake in Haiti in 2010, an earthquake in Chile in 2010, floods in Pakistan in 2010, super-storm Sandy in the U.S.A. in 2012, and news articles spanning a large number of years and 100s of different disasters. The data has been encoded with 36 different categories related to disaster response and has been stripped of messages with sensitive information in their entirety. Upon release, this is the featured dataset of a new Udacity course on Data Science and the AI4ALL summer school and is especially utile for text analytics and natural language processing (NLP) tasks and models. The input data in this job contains thousands of untranslated disaster-related messages and their English translations.
The dataset contains around 271,342 tweets. The tweets are filtered via the official Twitter API to contain tweets in Dutch language or by users who have specified their location information within Netherlands geographical boundaries. Using natural language processing we have classified the tweets for their HISCO codes. If the user has provided their location within Dutch boundaries, we have also classified them to their respective provinces The objective of this dataset is to make research data available publicly in a FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) way. Twitter's Terms of Service Licensed under Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) (2020-10-27)
ETHOS: onlinE haTe speecH detectiOn dataSet. This repository contains a dataset for hate speech detection on social media platforms, called Ethos. There are two variations of the dataset: Ethos_Dataset_Binary: contains 998 comments in the dataset alongside with a label about hate speech presence or absence. 565 of them do not contain hate speech, while the rest of them, 433, contain. Ethos_Dataset_Multi_Label: which contains 8 labels for the 433 comments with hate speech content. These labels are violence (if it incites (1) or not (0) violence), directed_vs_general (if it is directed to a person (1) or a group (0)), and 6 labels about the category of hate speech like, gender, race, national_origin, disability, religion and sexual_orientation.
HebrewSentiment is a data set consists of 12,804 user comments to posts on the official Facebook page of Israel’s president, Mr. Reuven Rivlin. In October 2015, we used the open software application Netvizz (Rieder, 2013) to scrape all the comments to all of the president’s posts in the period of June – August 2014, the first three months of Rivlin’s presidency.2 While the president’s posts aimed at reconciling tensions and called for tolerance and empathy, the sentiment expressed in the comments to the president’s posts was polarized between citizens who warmly thanked the president, and citizens that fiercely critiqued his policy. Of the 12,804 comments, 370 are neutral; 8,512 are positive, 3,922 negative. Data Annotation: A trained researcher examined each comment and determined its sentiment value, where comments with an overall positive sentiment were assigned the value 1, comments with an overall negative sentiment were assigned the value -1, and comments that are off-topic to the post’s content were assigned the value 0. We validated the coding scheme by asking a second trained researcher to code the same data. There was substantial agreement between raters (N of agreements: 10623, N of disagreements: 2105, Coehn’s Kappa = 0.697, p = 0).
Large Movie translated Urdu Reviews Dataset. This is a dataset for binary sentiment classification containing substantially more data than previous benchmark datasets. We provide a set of 40,000 highly polar movie reviews for training, and 10,000 for testing. To increase the availability of sentiment analysis dataset for a low recourse language like Urdu, we opted to use the already available IMDB Dataset. we have translated this dataset using google translator. This is a binary classification dataset having two classes as positive and negative. The reason behind using this dataset is high polarity for each class. It contains 50k samples equally divided in two classes.
MultiBooked is a corpus of Basque and Catalan Hotel Reviews Annotated for Aspect-level Sentiment Classification. The corpora are compiled from hotel reviews taken mainly from booking.com. The corpora are in Kaf/Naf format, which is an xml-style stand-off format that allows for multiple layers of annotation. Each review was sentence- and word-tokenized and lemmatized using Freeling for Catalan and ixa-pipes for Basque. Finally, for each language two annotators annotated opinion holders, opinion targets, and opinion expressions for each review, following the guidelines set out in the OpeNER project.
This is a movie review dataset in the Korean language. Reviews were scraped from Naver movies. The dataset construction is based on the method noted in Large movie review dataset from Maas et al., 2011.
The researchers of OCLAR Marwan et al. (2019), they gathered Arabic costumer reviews from Google reviewsa and Zomato website (https://www.zomato.com/lebanon) on wide scope of domain, including restaurants, hotels, hospitals, local shops, etc.The corpus finally contains 3916 reviews in 5-rating scale. For this research purpose, the positive class considers rating stars from 5 to 3 of 3465 reviews, and the negative class is represented from values of 1 and 2 of about 451 texts.
The “One Million Posts” corpus is an annotated data set consisting of user comments posted to an Austrian newspaper website (in German language). DER STANDARD is an Austrian daily broadsheet newspaper. On the newspaper’s website, there is a discussion section below each news article where readers engage in online discussions. The data set contains a selection of user posts from the 12 month time span from 2015-06-01 to 2016-05-31. There are 11,773 labeled and 1,000,000 unlabeled posts in the data set. The labeled posts were annotated by professional forum moderators employed by the newspaper. The data set contains the following data for each post: * Post ID * Article ID * Headline (max. 250 characters) * Main Body (max. 750 characters) * User ID (the user names used by the website have been re-mapped to new numeric IDs) * Time stamp * Parent post (replies give rise to tree-like discussion thread structures) * Status (online or deleted by a moderator) * Number of positive votes by other community members * Number of negative votes by other community members For each article, the data set contains the following data: * Article ID * Publishing date * Topic Path (e.g.: Newsroom / Sports / Motorsports / Formula 1) * Title * Body Detailed descriptions of the post selection and annotation procedures are given in the paper. ## Annotated Categories Potentially undesirable content: * Sentiment (negative/neutral/positive) An important goal is to detect changes in the prevalent sentiment in a discussion, e.g., the location within the fora and the point in time where a turn from positive/neutral sentiment to negative sentiment takes place. * Off-Topic (yes/no) Posts which digress too far from the topic of the corresponding article. * Inappropriate (yes/no) Swearwords, suggestive and obscene language, insults, threats etc. * Discriminating (yes/no) Racist, sexist, misogynistic, homophobic, antisemitic and other misanthropic content. Neutral content that requires a reaction: * Feedback (yes/no) Sometimes users ask questions or give feedback to the author of the article or the newspaper in general, which may require a reply/reaction. Potentially desirable content: * Personal Stories (yes/no) In certain fora, users are encouraged to share their personal stories, experiences, anecdotes etc. regarding the respective topic. * Arguments Used (yes/no) It is desirable for users to back their statements with rational argumentation, reasoning and sources.
Person SenTiment (PerSenT) is a crowd-sourced dataset that captures the sentiment of an author towards the main entity in a news article. This dataset contains annotation for 5.3k documents and 38k paragraphs covering 3.2k unique entities. The dataset consists of sentiment annotations on news articles about people. For each article, annotators judge what the author’s sentiment is towards the main (target) entity of the article. The annotations also include similar judgments on paragraphs within the article. To split the dataset, entities into 4 mutually exclusive sets. Due to the nature of news collections, some entities tend to dominate the collection. In the collection, there were four entities which were the main entity in nearly 800 articles. To avoid these entities from dominating the train or test splits, we moved them to a separate test collection. We split the remaining into a training, dev, and test sets at random. Thus our collection includes one standard test set consisting of articles drawn at random (Test Standard -- `test_random`), while the other is a test set which contains multiple articles about a small number of popular entities (Test Frequent -- `test_fixed`).
The PolEmo2.0 is a set of online reviews from medicine and hotels domains. The task is to predict the sentiment of a review. There are two separate test sets, to allow for in-domain (medicine and hotels) as well as out-of-domain (products and university) validation.
ReDial (Recommendation Dialogues) is an annotated dataset of dialogues, where users recommend movies to each other. The dataset was collected by a team of researchers working at Polytechnique Montréal, MILA – Quebec AI Institute, Microsoft Research Montréal, HEC Montreal, and Element AI. The dataset allows research at the intersection of goal-directed dialogue systems (such as restaurant recommendation) and free-form (also called “chit-chat”) dialogue systems.
This dataset add sentiment lexicons for 81 languages generated via graph propagation based on a knowledge graph--a graphical representation of real-world entities and the links between them.
The first gold standard Tamil-English code-switched, sentiment-annotated corpus containing 15,744 comment posts from YouTube. Train: 11,335 Validation: 1,260 and Test: 3,149. This makes the largest general domain sentiment dataset for this relatively low-resource language with code-mixing phenomenon. The dataset contains all the three types of code-mixed sentences - Inter-Sentential switch, Intra-Sentential switch and Tag switching. Most comments were written in Roman script with either Tamil grammar with English lexicon or English grammar with Tamil lexicon. Some comments were written in Tamil script with English expressions in between.
Thai Toxicity Tweet Corpus contains 3,300 tweets annotated by humans with guidelines including a 44-word dictionary. The author obtained 2,027 and 1,273 toxic and non-toxic tweets, respectively; these were labeled by three annotators. The result of corpus analysis indicates that tweets that include toxic words are not always toxic. Further, it is more likely that a tweet is toxic, if it contains toxic words indicating their original meaning. Moreover, disagreements in annotation are primarily because of sarcasm, unclear existing target, and word sense ambiguity. Notes from data cleaner: The data is included into [huggingface/datasets](https://www.github.com/huggingface/datasets) in Dec 2020. By this time, 506 of the tweets are not available publicly anymore. We denote these by `TWEET_NOT_FOUND` in `tweet_text`. Processing can be found at [this PR](https://github.com/tmu-nlp/ThaiToxicityTweetCorpus/pull/1).
Tunisian Sentiment Analysis Corpus. About 17k user comments manually annotated to positive and negative polarities. This corpus is collected from Facebook users comments written on official pages of Tunisian radios and TV channels namely Mosaique FM, JawhraFM, Shemes FM, HiwarElttounsi TV and Nessma TV. The corpus is collected from a period spanning January 2015 until June 2016.
On social media, Arabic speakers tend to express themselves in their own local dialect. To do so, Tunisians use "Tunisian Arabizi", which consists in supplementing numerals to the Latin script rather than the Arabic alphabet. TUNIZI is the first Tunisian Arabizi Dataset including 3K sentences, balanced, covering different topics, preprocessed and annotated as positive and negative.
The objective of this task is to detect hate speech in tweets. For the sake of simplicity, we say a tweet contains hate speech if it has a racist or sexist sentiment associated with it. So, the task is to classify racist or sexist tweets from other tweets. Formally, given a training sample of tweets and labels, where label ‘1’ denotes the tweet is racist/sexist and label ‘0’ denotes the tweet is not racist/sexist, your objective is to predict the labels on the given test dataset.
“Urdu Sentiment Corpus” (USC) shares the dat of Urdu tweets for the sentiment analysis and polarity detection. The dataset is consisting of tweets and overall, the dataset is comprising over 17, 185 tokens with 52% records as positive, and 48 % records as negative.
Wisesight Sentiment Corpus: Social media messages in Thai language with sentiment category (positive, neutral, negative, question) * Released to public domain under Creative Commons Zero v1.0 Universal license. * Category (Labels): {"pos": 0, "neu": 1, "neg": 2, "q": 3} * Size: 26,737 messages * Language: Central Thai * Style: Informal and conversational. With some news headlines and advertisement. * Time period: Around 2016 to early 2019. With small amount from other period. * Domains: Mixed. Majority are consumer products and services (restaurants, cosmetics, drinks, car, hotels), with some current affairs. * Privacy: * Only messages that made available to the public on the internet (websites, blogs, social network sites). * For Facebook, this means the public comments (everyone can see) that made on a public page. * Private/protected messages and messages in groups, chat, and inbox are not included. * Alternations and modifications: * Keep in mind that this corpus does not statistically represent anything in the language register. * Large amount of messages are not in their original form. Personal data are removed or masked. * Duplicated, leading, and trailing whitespaces are removed. Other punctuations, symbols, and emojis are kept intact. (Mis)spellings are kept intact. * Messages longer than 2,000 characters are removed. * Long non-Thai messages are removed. Duplicated message (exact match) are removed. * More characteristics of the data can be explore: https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/wisesight-sentiment/blob/master/exploration.ipynb
A multilingual fine-grained emotion dataset. The dataset consists of human annotated Finnish (25k) and English sentences (30k). Plutchik’s core emotions are used to annotate the dataset with the addition of neutral to create a multilabel multiclass dataset. The dataset is carefully evaluated using language-specific BERT models and SVMs to show that XED performs on par with other similar datasets and is therefore a useful tool for sentiment analysis and emotion detection.
The Yelp reviews dataset consists of reviews from Yelp. It is extracted from the Yelp Dataset Challenge 2015 data. The Yelp reviews full star dataset is constructed by Xiang Zhang (xiang.zhang@nyu.edu) from the above dataset. It is first used as a text classification benchmark in the following paper: Xiang Zhang, Junbo Zhao, Yann LeCun. Character-level Convolutional Networks for Text Classification. Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 28 (NIPS 2015).