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ADE-Corpus-V2 Dataset: Adverse Drug Reaction Data. This is a dataset for Classification if a sentence is ADE-related (True) or not (False) and Relation Extraction between Adverse Drug Event and Drug. DRUG-AE.rel provides relations between drugs and adverse effects. DRUG-DOSE.rel provides relations between drugs and dosages. ADE-NEG.txt provides all sentences in the ADE corpus that DO NOT contain any drug-related adverse effects.
The ALT project aims to advance the state-of-the-art Asian natural language processing (NLP) techniques through the open collaboration for developing and using ALT. It was first conducted by NICT and UCSY as described in Ye Kyaw Thu, Win Pa Pa, Masao Utiyama, Andrew Finch and Eiichiro Sumita (2016). Then, it was developed under ASEAN IVO as described in this Web page. The process of building ALT began with sampling about 20,000 sentences from English Wikinews, and then these sentences were translated into the other languages. ALT now has 13 languages: Bengali, English, Filipino, Hindi, Bahasa Indonesia, Japanese, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Myanmar (Burmese), Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese (Simplified Chinese).
Chinese word segmentation (CWS) trained from open source corpus faces dramatic performance drop when dealing with domain text, especially for a domain with lots of special terms and diverse writing styles, such as the biomedical domain. However, building domain-specific CWS requires extremely high annotation cost. In this paper, we propose an approach by exploiting domain-invariant knowledge from high resource to low resource domains. Extensive experiments show that our mode achieves consistently higher accuracy than the single-task CWS and other transfer learning baselines, especially when there is a large disparity between source and target domains. This dataset is the accompanied medical Chinese word segmentation (CWS) dataset. The tags are in BIES scheme. For more details see https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/C18-1307/
The Dialectal Arabic Datasets contain four dialects of Arabic, Etyptian (EGY), Levantine (LEV), Gulf (GLF), and Maghrebi (MGR). Each dataset consists of a set of 350 manually segmented and POS tagged tweets.
Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions. For more details, see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2559986/ The original dataset can be downloaded from: https://biocreative.bioinformatics.udel.edu/resources/corpora/biocreative-ii-corpus/ This dataset has been converted to CoNLL format for NER using the following tool: https://github.com/spyysalo/standoff2conll
`best2009` is a Thai word-tokenization dataset from encyclopedia, novels, news and articles by [NECTEC](https://www.nectec.or.th/) (148,995/2,252 lines of train/test). It was created for [BEST 2010: Word Tokenization Competition](https://thailang.nectec.or.th/archive/indexa290.html?q=node/10). The test set answers are not provided publicly.
A dataset consisting of 502 English dialogs with 12,000 annotated utterances between a user and an assistant discussing movie preferences in natural language. It was collected using a Wizard-of-Oz methodology between two paid crowd-workers, where one worker plays the role of an 'assistant', while the other plays the role of a 'user'. The 'assistant' elicits the 'user’s' preferences about movies following a Coached Conversational Preference Elicitation (CCPE) method. The assistant asks questions designed to minimize the bias in the terminology the 'user' employs to convey his or her preferences as much as possible, and to obtain these preferences in natural language. Each dialog is annotated with entity mentions, preferences expressed about entities, descriptions of entities provided, and other statements of entities.
Named entities are phrases that contain the names of persons, organizations, locations, times and quantities. Example: [PER Wolff] , currently a journalist in [LOC Argentina] , played with [PER Del Bosque] in the final years of the seventies in [ORG Real Madrid] . The shared task of CoNLL-2002 concerns language-independent named entity recognition. We will concentrate on four types of named entities: persons, locations, organizations and names of miscellaneous entities that do not belong to the previous three groups. The participants of the shared task will be offered training and test data for at least two languages. They will use the data for developing a named-entity recognition system that includes a machine learning component. Information sources other than the training data may be used in this shared task. We are especially interested in methods that can use additional unannotated data for improving their performance (for example co-training). The train/validation/test sets are available in Spanish and Dutch. For more details see https://www.clips.uantwerpen.be/conll2002/ner/ and https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/W02-2024/
The DaNE dataset has been annotated with Named Entities for PER, ORG and LOC by the Alexandra Institute. It is a reannotation of the UD-DDT (Universal Dependency - Danish Dependency Treebank) which has annotations for dependency parsing and part-of-speech (POS) tagging. The Danish UD treebank (Johannsen et al., 2015, UD-DDT) is a conversion of the Danish Dependency Treebank (Buch-Kromann et al. 2003) based on texts from Parole (Britt, 1998).
The corpora comprise of files per data provider that are encoded in the IOB format (Ramshaw & Marcus, 1995). The IOB format is a simple text chunking format that divides texts into single tokens per line, and, separated by a whitespace, tags to mark named entities. The most commonly used categories for tags are PER (person), LOC (location) and ORG (organization). To mark named entities that span multiple tokens, the tags have a prefix of either B- (beginning of named entity) or I- (inside of named entity). O (outside of named entity) tags are used to mark tokens that are not a named entity.
The directory data contains a corpus of Finnish technology related news articles with a manually prepared named entity annotation (digitoday.2014.csv). The text material was extracted from the archives of Digitoday, a Finnish online technology news source (www.digitoday.fi). The corpus consists of 953 articles (193,742 word tokens) with six named entity classes (organization, location, person, product, event, and date). The corpus is available for research purposes and can be readily used for development of NER systems for Finnish.
GermaNER is a freely available statistical German Named Entity Tagger based on conditional random fields(CRF). The tagger is trained and evaluated on the NoSta-D Named Entity dataset, which was used in the GermEval 2014 for named entity recognition. The tagger comes close to the performance of the best (proprietary) system in the competition with 77% F-measure (this is the latest result; the one reported in the paper is 76%) test set performance on the four standard NER classes (PERson, LOCation, ORGanisation and OTHer). We describe a range of features and their influence on German NER classification and provide a comparative evaluation and some analysis of the results. The software components, the training data and all data used for feature generation are distributed under permissive licenses, thus this tagger can be used in academic and commercial settings without restrictions or fees. The tagger is available as a command-line tool and as an Apache UIMA component.
The HAREM is a Portuguese language corpus commonly used for Named Entity Recognition tasks. It includes about 93k words, from 129 different texts, from several genres, and language varieties. The split of this dataset version follows the division made by [1], where 7% HAREM documents are the validation set and the miniHAREM corpus (with about 65k words) is the test set. There are two versions of the dataset set, a version that has a total of 10 different named entity classes (Person, Organization, Location, Value, Date, Title, Thing, Event, Abstraction, and Other) and a "selective" version with only 5 classes (Person, Organization, Location, Value, and Date). It's important to note that the original version of the HAREM dataset has 2 levels of NER details, namely "Category" and "Sub-type". The dataset version processed here ONLY USE the "Category" level of the original dataset. [1] Souza, Fábio, Rodrigo Nogueira, and Roberto Lotufo. "BERTimbau: Pretrained BERT Models for Brazilian Portuguese." Brazilian Conference on Intelligent Systems. Springer, Cham, 2020.
The Hausa VOA NER dataset is a labeled dataset for named entity recognition in Hausa. The texts were obtained from Hausa Voice of America News articles https://www.voahausa.com/ . We concentrate on four types of named entities: persons [PER], locations [LOC], organizations [ORG], and dates & time [DATE]. The Hausa VOA NER data files contain 2 columns separated by a tab ('\t'). Each word has been put on a separate line and there is an empty line after each sentences i.e the CoNLL format. The first item on each line is a word, the second is the named entity tag. The named entity tags have the format I-TYPE which means that the word is inside a phrase of type TYPE. For every multi-word expression like 'New York', the first word gets a tag B-TYPE and the subsequent words have tags I-TYPE, a word with tag O is not part of a phrase. The dataset is in the BIO tagging scheme. For more details, see https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/2020.emnlp-main.204/
Nergrit Corpus is a dataset collection for Indonesian Named Entity Recognition, Statement Extraction, and Sentiment Analysis. id_nergrit_corpus is the Named Entity Recognition of this dataset collection which contains 18 entities as follow: 'CRD': Cardinal 'DAT': Date 'EVT': Event 'FAC': Facility 'GPE': Geopolitical Entity 'LAW': Law Entity (such as Undang-Undang) 'LOC': Location 'MON': Money 'NOR': Political Organization 'ORD': Ordinal 'ORG': Organization 'PER': Person 'PRC': Percent 'PRD': Product 'QTY': Quantity 'REG': Religion 'TIM': Time 'WOA': Work of Art 'LAN': Language
The data came from the GENIA version 3.02 corpus (Kim et al., 2003). This was formed from a controlled search on MEDLINE using the MeSH terms human, blood cells and transcription factors. From this search 2,000 abstracts were selected and hand annotated according to a small taxonomy of 48 classes based on a chemical classification. Among the classes, 36 terminal classes were used to annotate the GENIA corpus.
LeNER-Br is a Portuguese language dataset for named entity recognition applied to legal documents. LeNER-Br consists entirely of manually annotated legislation and legal cases texts and contains tags for persons, locations, time entities, organizations, legislation and legal cases. To compose the dataset, 66 legal documents from several Brazilian Courts were collected. Courts of superior and state levels were considered, such as Supremo Tribunal Federal, Superior Tribunal de Justiça, Tribunal de Justiça de Minas Gerais and Tribunal de Contas da União. In addition, four legislation documents were collected, such as "Lei Maria da Penha", giving a total of 70 documents
Motion recognition is one of the basic cognitive capabilities of many life forms, yet identifying motion of physical entities in natural language have not been explored extensively and empirically. Literal-Motion-in-Text (LiMiT) dataset, is a large human-annotated collection of English text sentences describing physical occurrence of motion, with annotated physical entities in motion.
LST20 Corpus is a dataset for Thai language processing developed by National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Thailand. It offers five layers of linguistic annotation: word boundaries, POS tagging, named entities, clause boundaries, and sentence boundaries. At a large scale, it consists of 3,164,002 words, 288,020 named entities, 248,181 clauses, and 74,180 sentences, while it is annotated with 16 distinct POS tags. All 3,745 documents are also annotated with one of 15 news genres. Regarding its sheer size, this dataset is considered large enough for developing joint neural models for NLP. Manually download at https://aiforthai.in.th/corpus.php
Mac-Morpho is a corpus of Brazilian Portuguese texts annotated with part-of-speech tags. Its first version was released in 2003 [1], and since then, two revisions have been made in order to improve the quality of the resource [2, 3]. The corpus is available for download split into train, development and test sections. These are 76%, 4% and 20% of the corpus total, respectively (the reason for the unusual numbers is that the corpus was first split into 80%/20% train/test, and then 5% of the train section was set aside for development). This split was used in [3], and new POS tagging research with Mac-Morpho is encouraged to follow it in order to make consistent comparisons possible. [1] Aluísio, S., Pelizzoni, J., Marchi, A.R., de Oliveira, L., Manenti, R., Marquiafável, V. 2003. An account of the challenge of tagging a reference corpus for brazilian portuguese. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computational Processing of the Portuguese Language. PROPOR 2003 [2] Fonseca, E.R., Rosa, J.L.G. 2013. Mac-morpho revisited: Towards robust part-of-speech. In: Proceedings of the 9th Brazilian Symposium in Information and Human Language Technology – STIL [3] Fonseca, E.R., Aluísio, Sandra Maria, Rosa, J.L.G. 2015. Evaluating word embeddings and a revised corpus for part-of-speech tagging in Portuguese. Journal of the Brazilian Computer Society.
The Third International Chinese Language Processing Bakeoff was held in Spring 2006 to assess the state of the art in two important tasks: word segmentation and named entity recognition. Twenty-nine groups submitted result sets in the two tasks across two tracks and a total of five corpora. We found strong results in both tasks as well as continuing challenges. MSRA NER is one of the provided dataset. There are three types of NE, PER (person), ORG (organization) and LOC (location). The dataset is in the BIO scheme. For more details see https://faculty.washington.edu/levow/papers/sighan06.pdf
Multi-Domain Wizard-of-Oz dataset (MultiWOZ), a fully-labeled collection of human-human written conversations spanning over multiple domains and topics. MultiWOZ 2.1 (Eric et al., 2019) identified and fixed many erroneous annotations and user utterances in the original version, resulting in an improved version of the dataset. MultiWOZ 2.2 is a yet another improved version of this dataset, which identifies and fizes dialogue state annotation errors across 17.3% of the utterances on top of MultiWOZ 2.1 and redefines the ontology by disallowing vocabularies of slots with a large number of possible values (e.g., restaurant name, time of booking) and introducing standardized slot span annotations for these slots.
This paper presents the disease name and concept annotations of the NCBI disease corpus, a collection of 793 PubMed abstracts fully annotated at the mention and concept level to serve as a research resource for the biomedical natural language processing community. Each PubMed abstract was manually annotated by two annotators with disease mentions and their corresponding concepts in Medical Subject Headings (MeSH®) or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®). Manual curation was performed using PubTator, which allowed the use of pre-annotations as a pre-step to manual annotations. Fourteen annotators were randomly paired and differing annotations were discussed for reaching a consensus in two annotation phases. In this setting, a high inter-annotator agreement was observed. Finally, all results were checked against annotations of the rest of the corpus to assure corpus-wide consistency. For more details, see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3951655/ The original dataset can be downloaded from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Dogan/DISEASE/NCBI_corpus.zip This dataset has been converted to CoNLL format for NER using the following tool: https://github.com/spyysalo/standoff2conll Note: there is a duplicate document (PMID 8528200) in the original data, and the duplicate is recreated in the converted data.
The development of linguistic resources for use in natural language processingis of utmost importance for the continued growth of research anddevelopment in the field, especially for resource-scarce languages. In this paper we describe the process and challenges of simultaneouslydevelopingmultiple linguistic resources for ten of the official languages of South Africa. The project focussed on establishing a set of foundational resources that can foster further development of both resources and technologies for the NLP industry in South Africa. The development efforts during the project included creating monolingual unannotated corpora, of which a subset of the corpora for each language was annotated on token, orthographic, morphological and morphosyntactic layers. The annotated subsetsincludes both development and test setsand were used in the creation of five core-technologies, viz. atokeniser, sentenciser,lemmatiser, part of speech tagger and morphological decomposer for each language. We report on the quality of these tools for each language and provide some more context of the importance of the resources within the South African context.
The NKJP-NER is based on a human-annotated part of National Corpus of Polish (NKJP). We extracted sentences with named entities of exactly one type. The task is to predict the type of the named entity.
Named entities Recognition dataset for Norwegian. It is a version of the Universal Dependency (UD) Treebank for both Bokmål and Nynorsk (UDN) where all proper nouns have been tagged with their type according to the NER tagging scheme. UDN is a converted version of the Norwegian Dependency Treebank into the UD scheme.
Fused Head constructions are noun phrases in which the head noun is missing and is said to be "fused" with its dependent modifier. This missing information is implicit and is important for sentence understanding.The missing heads are easily filled in by humans, but pose a challenge for computational models. For example, in the sentence: "I bought 5 apples but got only 4.", 4 is a Fused-Head, and the missing head is apples, which appear earlier in the sentence. This is a crowd-sourced dataset of 10k numerical fused head examples (1M tokens).
People's Daily NER Dataset is a commonly used dataset for Chinese NER, with text from People's Daily (人民日报), the largest official newspaper. The dataset is in BIO scheme. Entity types are: PER (person), ORG (organization) and LOC (location).
The RONEC (Named Entity Corpus for the Romanian language) dataset contains over 26000 entities in ~5000 annotated sentence, belonging to 16 distinct classes. It represents the first initiative in the Romanian language space specifically targeted for named entity recognition
The Schema-Guided Dialogue dataset (SGD) was developed for the Dialogue State Tracking task of the Eights Dialogue Systems Technology Challenge (dstc8). The SGD dataset consists of over 18k annotated multi-domain, task-oriented conversations between a human and a virtual assistant. These conversations involve interactions with services and APIs spanning 17 domains, ranging from banks and events to media, calendar, travel, and weather. For most of these domains, the SGD dataset contains multiple different APIs, many of which have overlapping functionalities but different interfaces, which reflects common real-world scenarios.
Propagandistic news articles use specific techniques to convey their message, such as whataboutism, red Herring, and name calling, among many others. The Propaganda Techniques Corpus (PTC) allows to study automatic algorithms to detect them. We provide a permanent leaderboard to allow researchers both to advertise their progress and to be up-to-speed with the state of the art on the tasks offered (see below for a definition).
SentimentWortschatz, or SentiWS for short, is a publicly available German-language resource for sentiment analysis, and pos-tagging. The POS tags are ["NN", "VVINF", "ADJX", "ADV"] -> ["noun", "verb", "adjective", "adverb"], and positive and negative polarity bearing words are weighted within the interval of [-1, 1].
DFKI SmartData Corpus is a dataset of 2598 German-language documents which has been annotated with fine-grained geo-entities, such as streets, stops and routes, as well as standard named entity types. It has also been annotated with a set of 15 traffic- and industry-related n-ary relations and events, such as Accidents, Traffic jams, Acquisitions, and Strikes. The corpus consists of newswire texts, Twitter messages, and traffic reports from radio stations, police and railway companies. It allows for training and evaluating both named entity recognition algorithms that aim for fine-grained typing of geo-entities, as well as n-ary relation extraction systems.
The SOFC-Exp corpus consists of 45 open-access scholarly articles annotated by domain experts. A corpus and an inter-annotator agreement study demonstrate the complexity of the suggested named entity recognition and slot filling tasks as well as high annotation quality is presented in the accompanying paper.
We have developed an efficient algorithm and implementation of a dictionary-based approach to named entity recognition, which we here use to identifynames of species and other taxa in text. The tool, SPECIES, is more than an order of magnitude faster and as accurate as existing tools. The precision and recall was assessed both on an existing gold-standard corpus and on a new corpus of 800 abstracts, which were manually annotated after the development of the tool. The corpus comprises abstracts from journals selected to represent many taxonomic groups, which gives insights into which types of organism names are hard to detect and which are easy. Finally, we have tagged organism names in the entire Medline database and developed a web resource, ORGANISMS, that makes the results accessible to the broad community of biologists.
Webbnyheter 2012 from Spraakbanken, semi-manually annotated and adapted for CoreNLP Swedish NER. Semi-manually defined in this case as: Bootstrapped from Swedish Gazetters then manually correcte/reviewed by two independent native speaking swedish annotators. No annotator agreement calculated.
ThaiNER (v1.3) is a 6,456-sentence named entity recognition dataset created from expanding the 2,258-sentence [unnamed dataset](http://pioneer.chula.ac.th/~awirote/Data-Nutcha.zip) by [Tirasaroj and Aroonmanakun (2012)](http://pioneer.chula.ac.th/~awirote/publications/). It is used to train NER taggers in [PyThaiNLP](https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/pythainlp). The NER tags are annotated by [Tirasaroj and Aroonmanakun (2012)]((http://pioneer.chula.ac.th/~awirote/publications/)) for 2,258 sentences and the rest by [@wannaphong](https://github.com/wannaphong/). The POS tags are done by [PyThaiNLP](https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/pythainlp)'s `perceptron` engine trained on `orchid_ud`. [@wannaphong](https://github.com/wannaphong/) is now the only maintainer of this dataset.
Turkish Wikipedia Named-Entity Recognition and Text Categorization (TWNERTC) dataset is a collection of automatically categorized and annotated sentences obtained from Wikipedia. The authors constructed large-scale gazetteers by using a graph crawler algorithm to extract relevant entity and domain information from a semantic knowledge base, Freebase. The constructed gazetteers contains approximately 300K entities with thousands of fine-grained entity types under 77 different domains.
Shrinked version (48 entity type) of the turkish_ner. Original turkish_ner dataset: Automatically annotated Turkish corpus for named entity recognition and text categorization using large-scale gazetteers. The constructed gazetteers contains approximately 300K entities with thousands of fine-grained entity types under 25 different domains. Shrinked entity types are: academic, academic_person, aircraft, album_person, anatomy, animal, architect_person, capital, chemical, clothes, country, culture, currency, date, food, genre, government, government_person, language, location, material, measure, medical, military, military_person, nation, newspaper, organization, organization_person, person, production_art_music, production_art_music_person, quantity, religion, science, shape, ship, software, space, space_person, sport, sport_name, sport_person, structure, subject, tech, train, vehicle
The WebNLG challenge consists in mapping data to text. The training data consists of Data/Text pairs where the data is a set of triples extracted from DBpedia and the text is a verbalisation of these triples. For instance, given the 3 DBpedia triples shown in (a), the aim is to generate a text such as (b). a. (John_E_Blaha birthDate 1942_08_26) (John_E_Blaha birthPlace San_Antonio) (John_E_Blaha occupation Fighter_pilot) b. John E Blaha, born in San Antonio on 1942-08-26, worked as a fighter pilot As the example illustrates, the task involves specific NLG subtasks such as sentence segmentation (how to chunk the input data into sentences), lexicalisation (of the DBpedia properties), aggregation (how to avoid repetitions) and surface realisation (how to build a syntactically correct and natural sounding text).
Tags: PER(人名), LOC(地点名), GPE(行政区名), ORG(机构名) Label Tag Meaning PER PER.NAM 名字(张三) PER.NOM 代称、类别名(穷人) LOC LOC.NAM 特指名称(紫玉山庄) LOC.NOM 泛称(大峡谷、宾馆) GPE GPE.NAM 行政区的名称(北京) ORG ORG.NAM 特定机构名称(通惠医院) ORG.NOM 泛指名称、统称(文艺公司)
WikiANN (sometimes called PAN-X) is a multilingual named entity recognition dataset consisting of Wikipedia articles annotated with LOC (location), PER (person), and ORG (organisation) tags in the IOB2 format. This version corresponds to the balanced train, dev, and test splits of Rahimi et al. (2019), which supports 176 of the 282 languages from the original WikiANN corpus.
The Wikicorpus is a trilingual corpus (Catalan, Spanish, English) that contains large portions of the Wikipedia (based on a 2006 dump) and has been automatically enriched with linguistic information. In its present version, it contains over 750 million words.
WinoBias, a Winograd-schema dataset for coreference resolution focused on gender bias. The corpus contains Winograd-schema style sentences with entities corresponding to people referred by their occupation (e.g. the nurse, the doctor, the carpenter).
A Winograd schema is a pair of sentences that differ in only one or two words and that contain an ambiguity that is resolved in opposite ways in the two sentences and requires the use of world knowledge and reasoning for its resolution. The schema takes its name from a well-known example by Terry Winograd: > The city councilmen refused the demonstrators a permit because they [feared/advocated] violence. If the word is ``feared'', then ``they'' presumably refers to the city council; if it is ``advocated'' then ``they'' presumably refers to the demonstrators.
`wisesight1000` contains Thai social media texts randomly drawn from the full `wisesight-sentiment`, tokenized by human annotators. Out of the labels `neg` (negative), `neu` (neutral), `pos` (positive), `q` (question), 250 samples each. Some texts are removed because they look like spam.Because these samples are representative of real world content, we believe having these annotaed samples will allow the community to robustly evaluate tokenization algorithms.
Wizard-of-Oz (WOZ) is a dataset for training task-oriented dialogue systems. The dataset is designed around the task of finding a restaurant in the Cambridge, UK area. There are three informable slots (food, pricerange,area) that users can use to constrain the search and six requestable slots (address, phone, postcode plus the three informable slots) that the user can ask a value for once a restaurant has been offered.
XGLUE is a new benchmark dataset to evaluate the performance of cross-lingual pre-trained models with respect to cross-lingual natural language understanding and generation. The benchmark is composed of the following 11 tasks: - NER - POS Tagging (POS) - News Classification (NC) - MLQA - XNLI - PAWS-X - Query-Ad Matching (QADSM) - Web Page Ranking (WPR) - QA Matching (QAM) - Question Generation (QG) - News Title Generation (NTG) For more information, please take a look at https://microsoft.github.io/XGLUE/.
The Yoruba GV NER dataset is a labeled dataset for named entity recognition in Yoruba. The texts were obtained from Yoruba Global Voices News articles https://yo.globalvoices.org/ . We concentrate on four types of named entities: persons [PER], locations [LOC], organizations [ORG], and dates & time [DATE]. The Yoruba GV NER data files contain 2 columns separated by a tab ('\t'). Each word has been put on a separate line and there is an empty line after each sentences i.e the CoNLL format. The first item on each line is a word, the second is the named entity tag. The named entity tags have the format I-TYPE which means that the word is inside a phrase of type TYPE. For every multi-word expression like 'New York', the first word gets a tag B-TYPE and the subsequent words have tags I-TYPE, a word with tag O is not part of a phrase. The dataset is in the BIO tagging scheme. For more details, see https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/2020.lrec-1.335/
ZEST tests whether NLP systems can perform unseen tasks in a zero-shot way, given a natural language description of the task. It is an instantiation of our proposed framework "learning from task descriptions". The tasks include classification, typed entity extraction and relationship extraction, and each task is paired with 20 different annotated (input, output) examples. ZEST's structure allows us to systematically test whether models can generalize in five different ways.