Back to home
All Datasets 🏷
All datasets from our datasets repository and community bucket.
Also check out the list of supported Metrics 📉.
23 results
ArCOV-19 is an Arabic COVID-19 Twitter dataset that covers the period from 27th of January till 30th of April 2020. ArCOV-19 is designed to enable research under several domains including natural language processing, information retrieval, and social computing, among others
In this paper, we introduce Chinese AI and Law challenge dataset (CAIL2018), the first large-scale Chinese legal dataset for judgment prediction. CAIL contains more than 2.6 million criminal cases published by the Supreme People's Court of China, which are several times larger than other datasets in existing works on judgment prediction. Moreover, the annotations of judgment results are more detailed and rich. It consists of applicable law articles, charges, and prison terms, which are expected to be inferred according to the fact descriptions of cases. For comparison, we implement several conventional text classification baselines for judgment prediction and experimental results show that it is still a challenge for current models to predict the judgment results of legal cases, especially on prison terms. To help the researchers make improvements on legal judgment prediction.
Polish CDSCorpus consists of 10K Polish sentence pairs which are human-annotated for semantic relatedness and entailment. The dataset may be used for the evaluation of compositional distributional semantics models of Polish. The dataset was presented at ACL 2017. Please refer to the Wróblewska and Krasnowska-Kieraś (2017) for a detailed description of the resource.
A dataset consisting of 502 English dialogs with 12,000 annotated utterances between a user and an assistant discussing movie preferences in natural language. It was collected using a Wizard-of-Oz methodology between two paid crowd-workers, where one worker plays the role of an 'assistant', while the other plays the role of a 'user'. The 'assistant' elicits the 'user’s' preferences about movies following a Coached Conversational Preference Elicitation (CCPE) method. The assistant asks questions designed to minimize the bias in the terminology the 'user' employs to convey his or her preferences as much as possible, and to obtain these preferences in natural language. Each dialog is annotated with entity mentions, preferences expressed about entities, descriptions of entities provided, and other statements of entities.
Corpus of domain names scraped from Common Crawl and manually annotated to add word boundaries (e.g. "commoncrawl" to "common crawl"). Breaking domain names such as "openresearch" into component words "open" and "research" is important for applications such as Text-to-Speech synthesis and web search. Common Crawl is an open repository of web crawl data that can be accessed and analyzed by anyone. Specifically, we scraped the plaintext (WET) extracts for domain names from URLs that contained diverse letter casing (e.g. "OpenBSD"). Although in the previous example, segmentation is trivial using letter casing, this was not always the case (e.g. "NASA"), so we had to manually annotate the data. The dataset is stored as plaintext file where each line is an example of space separated segments of a domain name. The examples are stored in their original letter casing, but harder and more interesting examples can be generated by lowercasing the input first.
DialogRE is the first human-annotated dialogue based relation extraction (RE) dataset aiming to support the prediction of relation(s) between two arguments that appear in a dialogue. The dataset annotates all occurrences of 36 possible relation types that exist between pairs of arguments in the 1,788 dialogues originating from the complete transcripts of Friends.
The GenericsKB contains 3.4M+ generic sentences about the world, i.e., sentences expressing general truths such as "Dogs bark," and "Trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere." Generics are potentially useful as a knowledge source for AI systems requiring general world knowledge. The GenericsKB is the first large-scale resource containing naturally occurring generic sentences (as opposed to extracted or crowdsourced triples), and is rich in high-quality, general, semantically complete statements. Generics were primarily extracted from three large text sources, namely the Waterloo Corpus, selected parts of Simple Wikipedia, and the ARC Corpus. A filtered, high-quality subset is also available in GenericsKB-Best, containing 1,020,868 sentences. We recommend you start with GenericsKB-Best.
Data-To-Text Generation involves converting knowledge graph (KG) triples of the form (subject, relation, object) into a natural language sentence(s). This dataset consists of English KG data converted into paired natural language text. The generated corpus consists of ∼18M sentences spanning ∼45M triples with ∼1500 distinct relations.
The Large Spanish Corpus is a compilation of 15 unlabelled Spanish corpora spanning Wikipedia to European parliament notes. Each config contains the data corresponding to a different corpus. For example, "all_wiki" only includes examples from Spanish Wikipedia. By default, the config is set to "combined" which loads all the corpora; with this setting you can also specify the number of samples to return per corpus by configuring the "split" argument.
A large medical text dataset (14Go) curated to 4Go for abbreviation disambiguation, designed for natural language understanding pre-training in the medical domain. For example, DHF can be disambiguated to dihydrofolate, diastolic heart failure, dengue hemorragic fever or dihydroxyfumarate
The MNIST dataset consists of 70,000 28x28 black-and-white images in 10 classes (one for each digits), with 7,000 images per class. There are 60,000 training images and 10,000 test images.
The database is derived from the NCI PID Pathway Interaction Database, and the textual mentions are extracted from cooccurring pairs of genes in PubMed abstracts, processed and annotated by Literome (Poon et al. 2014). This dataset was used in the paper “Compositional Learning of Embeddings for Relation Paths in Knowledge Bases and Text” (Toutanova, Lin, Yih, Poon, and Quirk, 2016).
The Ollie dataset includes two configs for the data used to train the Ollie informatation extraction algorithm, for 18M sentences and 3M sentences respectively. This data is for academic use only. From the authors: Ollie is a program that automatically identifies and extracts binary relationships from English sentences. Ollie is designed for Web-scale information extraction, where target relations are not specified in advance. Ollie is our second-generation information extraction system . Whereas ReVerb operates on flat sequences of tokens, Ollie works with the tree-like (graph with only small cycles) representation using Stanford's compression of the dependencies. This allows Ollie to capture expression that ReVerb misses, such as long-range relations. Ollie also captures context that modifies a binary relation. Presently Ollie handles attribution (He said/she believes) and enabling conditions (if X then). More information is available at the Ollie homepage: https://knowitall.github.io/ollie/
ReDial (Recommendation Dialogues) is an annotated dataset of dialogues, where users recommend movies to each other. The dataset was collected by a team of researchers working at Polytechnique Montréal, MILA – Quebec AI Institute, Microsoft Research Montréal, HEC Montreal, and Element AI. The dataset allows research at the intersection of goal-directed dialogue systems (such as restaurant recommendation) and free-form (also called “chit-chat”) dialogue systems.
An unannotated Spanish corpus of nearly 1.5 billion words, compiled from different resources from the web. This resources include the spanish portions of SenSem, the Ancora Corpus, some OPUS Project Corpora and the Europarl, the Tibidabo Treebank, the IULA Spanish LSP Treebank, and dumps from the Spanish Wikipedia, Wikisource and Wikibooks. This corpus is a compilation of 100 text files. Each line of these files represents one of the 50 million sentences from the corpus.
The TupleInf Open IE dataset contains Open IE tuples extracted from 263K sentences that were used by the solver in “Answering Complex Questions Using Open Information Extraction” (referred as Tuple KB, T). These sentences were collected from a large Web corpus using training questions from 4th and 8th grade as queries. This dataset contains 156K sentences collected for 4th grade questions and 107K sentences for 8th grade questions. Each sentence is followed by the Open IE v4 tuples using their simple format.
Twitter users often post parallel tweets—tweets that contain the same content but are written in different languages. Parallel tweets can be an important resource for developing machine translation (MT) systems among other natural language processing (NLP) tasks. This resource is a result of a generic method for collecting parallel tweets. Using the method, we compiled a bilingual corpus of English-Arabic parallel tweets and a list of Twitter accounts who post English-Arabic tweets regularly. Additionally, we annotate a subset of Twitter accounts with their countries of origin and topic of interest, which provides insights about the population who post parallel tweets.
Universal Dependencies is a project that seeks to develop cross-linguistically consistent treebank annotation for many languages, with the goal of facilitating multilingual parser development, cross-lingual learning, and parsing research from a language typology perspective. The annotation scheme is based on (universal) Stanford dependencies (de Marneffe et al., 2006, 2008, 2014), Google universal part-of-speech tags (Petrov et al., 2012), and the Interset interlingua for morphosyntactic tagsets (Zeman, 2008).
Dataset built from pairs of YouTube captions where both 'auto-generated' and 'manually-corrected' captions are available for a single specified language. This dataset labels two-way (e.g. ignoring single-sided insertions) same-length token differences in the `diff_type` column. The `default_seq` is composed of tokens from the 'auto-generated' captions. When a difference occurs between the 'auto-generated' vs 'manually-corrected' captions types, the `correction_seq` contains tokens from the 'manually-corrected' captions.