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AirDialogue, is a large dataset that contains 402,038 goal-oriented conversations. To collect this dataset, we create a contextgenerator which provides travel and flight restrictions. Then the human annotators are asked to play the role of a customer or an agent and interact with the goal of successfully booking a trip given the restrictions.
The ALT project aims to advance the state-of-the-art Asian natural language processing (NLP) techniques through the open collaboration for developing and using ALT. It was first conducted by NICT and UCSY as described in Ye Kyaw Thu, Win Pa Pa, Masao Utiyama, Andrew Finch and Eiichiro Sumita (2016). Then, it was developed under ASEAN IVO as described in this Web page. The process of building ALT began with sampling about 20,000 sentences from English Wikinews, and then these sentences were translated into the other languages. ALT now has 13 languages: Bengali, English, Filipino, Hindi, Bahasa Indonesia, Japanese, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Myanmar (Burmese), Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese (Simplified Chinese).
We provide an Amazon product reviews dataset for multilingual text classification. The dataset contains reviews in English, Japanese, German, French, Chinese and Spanish, collected between November 1, 2015 and November 1, 2019. Each record in the dataset contains the review text, the review title, the star rating, an anonymized reviewer ID, an anonymized product ID and the coarse-grained product category (e.g. ‘books’, ‘appliances’, etc.) The corpus is balanced across stars, so each star rating constitutes 20% of the reviews in each language. For each language, there are 200,000, 5,000 and 5,000 reviews in the training, development and test sets respectively. The maximum number of reviews per reviewer is 20 and the maximum number of reviews per product is 20. All reviews are truncated after 2,000 characters, and all reviews are at least 20 characters long. Note that the language of a review does not necessarily match the language of its marketplace (e.g. reviews from amazon.de are primarily written in German, but could also be written in English, etc.). For this reason, we applied a language detection algorithm based on the work in Bojanowski et al. (2017) to determine the language of the review text and we removed reviews that were not written in the expected language.
ASSET is a dataset for evaluating Sentence Simplification systems with multiple rewriting transformations, as described in "ASSET: A Dataset for Tuning and Evaluation of Sentence Simplification Models with Multiple Rewriting Transformations". The corpus is composed of 2000 validation and 359 test original sentences that were each simplified 10 times by different annotators. The corpus also contains human judgments of meaning preservation, fluency and simplicity for the outputs of several automatic text simplification systems.
This dataset provides the template sentences and relationships defined in the ATOMIC common sense dataset. There are three splits - train, test, and dev. From the authors. Disclaimer/Content warning: the events in atomic have been automatically extracted from blogs, stories and books written at various times. The events might depict violent or problematic actions, which we left in the corpus for the sake of learning the (probably negative but still important) commonsense implications associated with the events. We removed a small set of truly out-dated events, but might have missed some so please email us (msap@cs.washington.edu) if you have any concerns.
Multilingual information access is stipulated in the South African constitution. In practise, this is hampered by a lack of resources and capacity to perform the large volumes of translation work required to realise multilingual information access. One of the aims of the Autshumato project is to develop machine translation systems for three South African languages pairs.
A parallel news corpus in Turkish, Kurdish and English. Bianet collects 3,214 Turkish articles with their sentence-aligned Kurdish or English translations from the Bianet online newspaper. 3 languages, 3 bitexts total number of files: 6 total number of tokens: 2.25M total number of sentence fragments: 0.14M
This is a multilingual parallel corpus created from translations of the Bible compiled by Christos Christodoulopoulos and Mark Steedman. 102 languages, 5,148 bitexts total number of files: 107 total number of tokens: 56.43M total number of sentence fragments: 2.84M
BIGPATENT, consisting of 1.3 million records of U.S. patent documents along with human written abstractive summaries. Each US patent application is filed under a Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC) code. There are nine such classification categories: A (Human Necessities), B (Performing Operations; Transporting), C (Chemistry; Metallurgy), D (Textiles; Paper), E (Fixed Constructions), F (Mechanical Engineering; Lightning; Heating; Weapons; Blasting), G (Physics), H (Electricity), and Y (General tagging of new or cross-sectional technology) There are two features: - description: detailed description of patent. - abstract: Patent abastract.
This is the Business Scene Dialogue (BSD) dataset, a Japanese-English parallel corpus containing written conversations in various business scenarios. The dataset was constructed in 3 steps: 1) selecting business scenes, 2) writing monolingual conversation scenarios according to the selected scenes, and 3) translating the scenarios into the other language. Half of the monolingual scenarios were written in Japanese and the other half were written in English. Fields: - id: dialogue identifier - no: sentence pair number within a dialogue - en_speaker: speaker name in English - ja_speaker: speaker name in Japanese - en_sentence: sentence in English - ja_sentence: sentence in Japanese - original_language: language in which monolingual scenario was written - tag: scenario - title: scenario title
A parallel corpus of theses and dissertations abstracts in English and Portuguese were collected from the CAPES website (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior) - Brazil. The corpus is sentence aligned for all language pairs. Approximately 240,000 documents were collected and aligned using the Hunalign algorithm.
ChrEn is a Cherokee-English parallel dataset to facilitate machine translation research between Cherokee and English. ChrEn is extremely low-resource contains 14k sentence pairs in total, split in ways that facilitate both in-domain and out-of-domain evaluation. ChrEn also contains 5k Cherokee monolingual data to enable semi-supervised learning.
CNN/DailyMail non-anonymized summarization dataset. There are two features: - article: text of news article, used as the document to be summarized - highlights: joined text of highlights with <s> and </s> around each highlight, which is the target summary
ConvAI is a dataset of human-to-bot conversations labelled for quality. This data can be used to train a metric for evaluating dialogue systems. Moreover, it can be used in the development of chatbots themselves: it contains the information on the quality of utterances and entire dialogues, that can guide a dialogue system in search of better answers.
ConvAI is a dataset of human-to-bot conversations labelled for quality. This data can be used to train a metric for evaluating dialogue systems. Moreover, it can be used in the development of chatbots themselves: it contains the information on the quality of utterances and entire dialogues, that can guide a dialogue system in search of better answers.
The Conv AI 3 challenge is organized as part of the Search-oriented Conversational AI (SCAI) EMNLP workshop in 2020. The main aim of the conversational systems is to return an appropriate answer in response to the user requests. However, some user requests might be ambiguous. In Information Retrieval (IR) settings such a situation is handled mainly through the diversification of search result page. It is however much more challenging in dialogue settings. Hence, we aim to study the following situation for dialogue settings: - a user is asking an ambiguous question (where ambiguous question is a question to which one can return > 1 possible answers) - the system must identify that the question is ambiguous, and, instead of trying to answer it directly, ask a good clarifying question.
DART is a large and open-domain structured DAta Record to Text generation corpus with high-quality sentence annotations with each input being a set of entity-relation triples following a tree-structured ontology. It consists of 82191 examples across different domains with each input being a semantic RDF triple set derived from data records in tables and the tree ontology of table schema, annotated with sentence description that covers all facts in the triple set. DART is released in the following paper where you can find more details and baseline results: https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.02871
This dataset contains 30,000 messages drawn from events including an earthquake in Haiti in 2010, an earthquake in Chile in 2010, floods in Pakistan in 2010, super-storm Sandy in the U.S.A. in 2012, and news articles spanning a large number of years and 100s of different disasters. The data has been encoded with 36 different categories related to disaster response and has been stripped of messages with sensitive information in their entirety. Upon release, this is the featured dataset of a new Udacity course on Data Science and the AI4ALL summer school and is especially utile for text analytics and natural language processing (NLP) tasks and models. The input data in this job contains thousands of untranslated disaster-related messages and their English translations.
The E2E dataset is used for training end-to-end, data-driven natural language generation systems in the restaurant domain, which is ten times bigger than existing, frequently used datasets in this area. The E2E dataset poses new challenges: (1) its human reference texts show more lexical richness and syntactic variation, including discourse phenomena; (2) generating from this set requires content selection. As such, learning from this dataset promises more natural, varied and less template-like system utterances. E2E is released in the following paper where you can find more details and baseline results: https://arxiv.org/abs/1706.09254
An update release of E2E NLG Challenge data with cleaned MRs and scripts, accompanying the following paper: Ondřej Dušek, David M. Howcroft, and Verena Rieser (2019): Semantic Noise Matters for Neural Natural Language Generation. In INLG, Tokyo, Japan.
Original source: Website and documentatuion from the European Central Bank, compiled and made available by Alberto Simoes (thank you very much!) 19 languages, 170 bitexts total number of files: 340 total number of tokens: 757.37M total number of sentence fragments: 30.55M
EiTB-ParCC: Parallel Corpus of Comparable News. A Basque-Spanish parallel corpus provided by Vicomtech (https://www.vicomtech.org), extracted from comparable news produced by the Basque public broadcasting group Euskal Irrati Telebista.
This is a parallel corpus made out of PDF documents from the European Medicines Agency. All files are automatically converted from PDF to plain text using pdftotext with the command line arguments -layout -nopgbrk -eol unix. There are some known problems with tables and multi-column layouts - some of them are fixed in the current version. source: http://www.emea.europa.eu/ 22 languages, 231 bitexts total number of files: 41,957 total number of tokens: 311.65M total number of sentence fragments: 26.51M
WebNLG is a valuable resource and benchmark for the Natural Language Generation (NLG) community. However, as other NLG benchmarks, it only consists of a collection of parallel raw representations and their corresponding textual realizations. This work aimed to provide intermediate representations of the data for the development and evaluation of popular tasks in the NLG pipeline architecture (Reiter and Dale, 2000), such as Discourse Ordering, Lexicalization, Aggregation and Referring Expression Generation.
In October 2012, the European Union's (EU) Directorate General for Education and Culture ( DG EAC) released a translation memory (TM), i.e. a collection of sentences and their professionally produced translations, in twenty-six languages. This resource bears the name EAC Translation Memory, short EAC-TM. EAC-TM covers up to 26 languages: 22 official languages of the EU (all except Irish) plus Icelandic, Croatian, Norwegian and Turkish. EAC-TM thus contains translations from English into the following 25 languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, German, Greek, Finnish, French, Croatian, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish. All documents and sentences were originally written in English (source language is English) and then translated into the other languages. The texts were translated by staff of the National Agencies of the Lifelong Learning and Youth in Action programmes. They are typically professionals in the field of education/youth and EU programmes. They are thus not professional translators, but they are normally native speakers of the target language.
In October 2012, the European Union (EU) agency 'European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control' (ECDC) released a translation memory (TM), i.e. a collection of sentences and their professionally produced translations, in twenty-five languages. This resource bears the name EAC Translation Memory, short EAC-TM. ECDC-TM covers 25 languages: the 23 official languages of the EU plus Norwegian (Norsk) and Icelandic. ECDC-TM was created by translating from English into the following 24 languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Gaelige (Irish), German, Greek, Finnish, French, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Norwegian (NOrsk), Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish and Swedish. All documents and sentences were thus originally written in English. They were then translated into the other languages by professional translators from the Translation Centre CdT in Luxembourg.
`generated_reviews_enth` Generated product reviews dataset for machine translation quality prediction, part of [scb-mt-en-th-2020](https://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03541.pdf) `generated_reviews_enth` is created as part of [scb-mt-en-th-2020](https://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03541.pdf) for machine translation task. This dataset (referred to as `generated_reviews_yn` in [scb-mt-en-th-2020](https://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03541.pdf)) are English product reviews generated by [CTRL](https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.05858), translated by Google Translate API and annotated as accepted or rejected (`correct`) based on fluency and adequacy of the translation by human annotators. This allows it to be used for English-to-Thai translation quality esitmation (binary label), machine translation, and sentiment analysis.
Giga-word corpus for French-English from WMT2010 collected by Chris Callison-Burch 2 languages, total number of files: 452 total number of tokens: 1.43G total number of sentence fragments: 47.55M
The dataset for the variable-misuse task, described in the ICLR 2020 paper 'Global Relational Models of Source Code' [https://openreview.net/forum?id=B1lnbRNtwr] This is the public version of the dataset used in that paper. The original, used to produce the graphs in the paper, could not be open-sourced due to licensing issues. See the public associated code repository [https://github.com/VHellendoorn/ICLR20-Great] for results produced from this dataset. This dataset was generated synthetically from the corpus of Python code in the ETH Py150 Open dataset [https://github.com/google-research-datasets/eth_py150_open].
HindEnCorp parallel texts (sentence-aligned) come from the following sources: Tides, which contains 50K sentence pairs taken mainly from news articles. This dataset was originally col- lected for the DARPA-TIDES surprise-language con- test in 2002, later refined at IIIT Hyderabad and provided for the NLP Tools Contest at ICON 2008 (Venkatapathy, 2008). Commentaries by Daniel Pipes contain 322 articles in English written by a journalist Daniel Pipes and translated into Hindi. EMILLE. This corpus (Baker et al., 2002) consists of three components: monolingual, parallel and annotated corpora. There are fourteen monolingual sub- corpora, including both written and (for some lan- guages) spoken data for fourteen South Asian lan- guages. The EMILLE monolingual corpora contain in total 92,799,000 words (including 2,627,000 words of transcribed spoken data for Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Punjabi and Urdu). The parallel corpus consists of 200,000 words of text in English and its accompanying translations into Hindi and other languages. Smaller datasets as collected by Bojar et al. (2010) include the corpus used at ACL 2005 (a subcorpus of EMILLE), a corpus of named entities from Wikipedia (crawled in 2009), and Agriculture domain parallel corpus.  For the current release, we are extending the parallel corpus using these sources: Intercorp (Čermák and Rosen,2012) is a large multilingual parallel corpus of 32 languages including Hindi. The central language used for alignment is Czech. Intercorp’s core texts amount to 202 million words. These core texts are most suitable for us because their sentence alignment is manually checked and therefore very reliable. They cover predominately short sto- ries and novels. There are seven Hindi texts in Inter- corp. Unfortunately, only for three of them the English translation is available; the other four are aligned only with Czech texts. The Hindi subcorpus of Intercorp contains 118,000 words in Hindi. TED talks 3 held in various languages, primarily English, are equipped with transcripts and these are translated into 102 languages. There are 179 talks for which Hindi translation is available. The Indic multi-parallel corpus (Birch et al., 2011; Post et al., 2012) is a corpus of texts from Wikipedia translated from the respective Indian language into English by non-expert translators hired over Mechanical Turk. The quality is thus somewhat mixed in many respects starting from typesetting and punctuation over capi- talization, spelling, word choice to sentence structure. A little bit of control could be in principle obtained from the fact that every input sentence was translated 4 times. We used the 2012 release of the corpus. Launchpad.net is a software collaboration platform that hosts many open-source projects and facilitates also collaborative localization of the tools. We downloaded all revisions of all the hosted projects and extracted the localization (.po) files. Other smaller datasets. This time, we added Wikipedia entities as crawled in 2013 (including any morphological variants of the named entitity that appears on the Hindi variant of the Wikipedia page) and words, word examples and quotes from the Shabdkosh online dictionary.
The Hong Kong Cantonese Corpus (HKCanCor) comprise transcribed conversations recorded between March 1997 and August 1998. It contains recordings of spontaneous speech (51 texts) and radio programmes (42 texts), which involve 2 to 4 speakers, with 1 text of monologue. In total, the corpus contains around 230,000 Chinese words. The text is word-segmented, annotated with part-of-speech (POS) tags and romanised Cantonese pronunciation. Romanisation scheme - Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) POS scheme - Peita-Fujitsu-Renmin Ribao (PRF) corpus (Duan et al., 2000), with extended tags for Cantonese-specific phenomena added by Luke and Wang (see original paper for details).
The hrenWaC corpus version 2.0 consists of parallel Croatian-English texts crawled from the .hr top-level domain for Croatia. The corpus was built with Spidextor (https://github.com/abumatran/spidextor), a tool that glues together the output of SpiderLing used for crawling and Bitextor used for bitext extraction. The accuracy of the extracted bitext on the segment level is around 80% and on the word level around 84%.
In this paper, we introduce a large-scale Indonesian summarization dataset. We harvest articles from this http URL, an online news portal, and obtain 215,827 document-summary pairs. We leverage pre-trained language models to develop benchmark extractive and abstractive summarization methods over the dataset with multilingual and monolingual BERT-based models. We include a thorough error analysis by examining machine-generated summaries that have low ROUGE scores, and expose both issues with ROUGE it-self, as well as with extractive and abstractive summarization models.
Parallel Text Corpora for Multi-Domain Translation System created by BPPT (Indonesian Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology) for PAN Localization Project (A Regional Initiative to Develop Local Language Computing Capacity in Asia). The dataset contains around 24K sentences divided in 4 difference topics (Economic, international, Science and Technology and Sport).
A dataset of about 20k questions that are elicited from readers as they naturally read through a document sentence by sentence. Compared to existing datasets, INQUISITIVE questions target more towards high-level (semantic and discourse) comprehension of text. Because these questions are generated while the readers are processing the information, the questions directly communicate gaps between the reader’s and writer’s knowledge about the events described in the text, and are not necessarily answered in the document itself. This type of question reflects a real-world scenario: if one has questions during reading, some of them are answered by the text later on, the rest are not, but any of them would help further the reader’s understanding at the particular point when they asked it. This resource could enable question generation models to simulate human-like curiosity and cognitive processing, which may open up a new realm of applications.
JFLEG (JHU FLuency-Extended GUG) is an English grammatical error correction (GEC) corpus. It is a gold standard benchmark for developing and evaluating GEC systems with respect to fluency (extent to which a text is native-sounding) as well as grammaticality. For each source document, there are four human-written corrections (ref0 to ref3).
A parallel corpus of KDE4 localization files (v.2). 92 languages, 4,099 bitexts total number of files: 75,535 total number of tokens: 60.75M total number of sentence fragments: 8.89M
The LAMBADA evaluates the capabilities of computational models for text understanding by means of a word prediction task. LAMBADA is a collection of narrative passages sharing the characteristic that human subjects are able to guess their last word if they are exposed to the whole passage, but not if they only see the last sentence preceding the target word. To succeed on LAMBADA, computational models cannot simply rely on local context, but must be able to keep track of information in the broader discourse. The LAMBADA dataset is extracted from BookCorpus and consists of 10'022 passages, divided into 4'869 development and 5'153 test passages. The training data for language models to be tested on LAMBADA include the full text of 2'662 novels (disjoint from those in dev+test), comprising 203 million words.
MENYO-20k is a multi-domain parallel dataset with texts obtained from news articles, ted talks, movie transcripts, radio transcripts, science and technology texts, and other short articles curated from the web and professional translators. The dataset has 20,100 parallel sentences split into 10,070 training sentences, 3,397 development sentences, and 6,633 test sentences (3,419 multi-domain, 1,714 news domain, and 1,500 ted talks speech transcript domain). The development and test sets are available upon request.
The Microsoft Terminology Collection can be used to develop localized versions of applications that integrate with Microsoft products. It can also be used to integrate Microsoft terminology into other terminology collections or serve as a base IT glossary for language development in the nearly 100 languages available. Terminology is provided in .tbx format, an industry standard for terminology exchange.
This dataset contains sentences and short paragraphs with corresponding shorter (compressed) versions. There are up to five compressions for each input text, together with quality judgements of their meaning preservation and grammaticality. The dataset is derived using source texts from the Open American National Corpus (ww.anc.org) and crowd-sourcing.
Translator Human Parity Data Human evaluation results and translation output for the Translator Human Parity Data release, as described in https://blogs.microsoft.com/ai/machine-translation-news-test-set-human-parity/. The Translator Human Parity Data release contains all human evaluation results and translations related to our paper "Achieving Human Parity on Automatic Chinese to English News Translation", published on March 14, 2018.
Parallel corpora from Web Crawls collected in the ParaCrawl project and further processed for making it a multi-parallel corpus by pivoting via English. Here we only provide the additional language pairs that came out of pivoting. The bitexts for English are available from the ParaCrawl release. 40 languages, 669 bitexts total number of files: 40 total number of tokens: 10.14G total number of sentence fragments: 505.48M Please, acknowledge the ParaCrawl project at http://paracrawl.eu. This version is derived from the original release at their website adjusted for redistribution via the OPUS corpus collection. Please, acknowledge OPUS as well for this service.
Multi-XScience, a large-scale multi-document summarization dataset created from scientific articles. Multi-XScience introduces a challenging multi-document summarization task: writing the related-work section of a paper based on its abstract and the articles it references.
This dataset provides version 1115 of the belief extracted by CMU's Never Ending Language Learner (NELL) and version 1110 of the candidate belief extracted by NELL. See http://rtw.ml.cmu.edu/rtw/overview. NELL is an open information extraction system that attempts to read the Clueweb09 of 500 million web pages (http://boston.lti.cs.cmu.edu/Data/clueweb09/) and general web searches. The dataset has 4 configurations: nell_belief, nell_candidate, nell_belief_sentences, and nell_candidate_sentences. nell_belief is certainties of belief are lower. The two sentences config extracts the CPL sentence patterns filled with the applicable 'best' literal string for the entities filled into the sentence patterns. And also provides sentences found using web searches containing the entities and relationships. There are roughly 21M entries for nell_belief_sentences, and 100M sentences for nell_candidate_sentences.
A parallel corpus of News Commentaries provided by WMT for training SMT. The source is taken from CASMACAT: http://www.casmacat.eu/corpus/news-commentary.html 12 languages, 63 bitexts total number of files: 61,928 total number of tokens: 49.66M total number of sentence fragments: 1.93M
Texts from the Ofis Publik ar Brezhoneg (Breton Language Board) provided by Francis Tyers 2 languages, total number of files: 278 total number of tokens: 2.12M total number of sentence fragments: 0.13M
This dataset is a compilation of the OneStopEnglish corpus of texts written at three reading levels into one file. Text documents are classified into three reading levels - ele, int, adv (Elementary, Intermediate and Advance). This dataset demonstrates its usefulness for through two applica-tions - automatic readability assessment and automatic text simplification. The corpus consists of 189 texts, each in three versions/reading levels (567 in total).
This is a new collection of translated movie subtitles from http://www.opensubtitles.org/. IMPORTANT: If you use the OpenSubtitle corpus: Please, add a link to http://www.opensubtitles.org/ to your website and to your reports and publications produced with the data! This is a slightly cleaner version of the subtitle collection using improved sentence alignment and better language checking. 62 languages, 1,782 bitexts total number of files: 3,735,070 total number of tokens: 22.10G total number of sentence fragments: 3.35G
This is a collection of copyright free books aligned by Andras Farkas, which are available from http://www.farkastranslations.com/bilingual_books.php Note that the texts are rather dated due to copyright issues and that some of them are manually reviewed (check the meta-data at the top of the corpus files in XML). The source is multilingually aligned, which is available from http://www.farkastranslations.com/bilingual_books.php. In OPUS, the alignment is formally bilingual but the multilingual alignment can be recovered from the XCES sentence alignment files. Note also that the alignment units from the original source may include multi-sentence paragraphs, which are split and sentence-aligned in OPUS. All texts are freely available for personal, educational and research use. Commercial use (e.g. reselling as parallel books) and mass redistribution without explicit permission are not granted. Please acknowledge the source when using the data! 16 languages, 64 bitexts total number of files: 158 total number of tokens: 19.50M total number of sentence fragments: 0.91M
A collection of translation memories provided by the JRC. Source: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/language-technologies/dgt-translation-memory 25 languages, 299 bitexts total number of files: 817,410 total number of tokens: 2.13G total number of sentence fragments: 113.52M
The Finlex Data Base is a comprehensive collection of legislative and other judicial information of Finland, which is available in Finnish, Swedish and partially in English. This corpus is taken from the Semantic Finlex serice that provides the Finnish and Swedish data as linked open data and also raw XML files.
A parallel corpus of GNOME localization files. Source: https://l10n.gnome.org 187 languages, 12,822 bitexts total number of files: 113,344 total number of tokens: 267.27M total number of sentence fragments: 58.12M
Parallel corpora from Web Crawls collected in the ParaCrawl project 40 languages, 41 bitexts total number of files: 20,995 total number of tokens: 21.40G total number of sentence fragments: 1.12G
This is a Croatian-English parallel corpus of transcribed and translated TED talks, originally extracted from https://wit3.fbk.eu. The corpus is compiled by Željko Agić and is taken from http://lt.ffzg.hr/zagic provided under the CC-BY-NC-SA license. 2 languages, total number of files: 2 total number of tokens: 2.81M total number of sentence fragments: 0.17M
A parallel corpus of Ubuntu localization files. Source: https://translations.launchpad.net 244 languages, 23,988 bitexts total number of files: 30,959 total number of tokens: 29.84M total number of sentence fragments: 7.73M
This is a corpus of parallel sentences extracted from Wikipedia by Krzysztof Wołk and Krzysztof Marasek. Please cite the following publication if you use the data: Krzysztof Wołk and Krzysztof Marasek: Building Subject-aligned Comparable Corpora and Mining it for Truly Parallel Sentence Pairs., Procedia Technology, 18, Elsevier, p.126-132, 2014 20 languages, 36 bitexts total number of files: 114 total number of tokens: 610.13M total number of sentence fragments: 25.90M
The OrangeSum dataset was inspired by the XSum dataset. It was created by scraping the "Orange Actu" website: https://actu.orange.fr/. Orange S.A. is a large French multinational telecommunications corporation, with 266M customers worldwide. Scraped pages cover almost a decade from Feb 2011 to Sep 2020. They belong to five main categories: France, world, politics, automotive, and society. The society category is itself divided into 8 subcategories: health, environment, people, culture, media, high-tech, unsual ("insolite" in French), and miscellaneous. Each article featured a single-sentence title as well as a very brief abstract, both professionally written by the author of the article. These two fields were extracted from each page, thus creating two summarization tasks: OrangeSum Title and OrangeSum Abstract.
A parallel corpus originally extracted from http://se.php.net/download-docs.php. The original documents are written in English and have been partly translated into 21 languages. The original manuals contain about 500,000 words. The amount of actually translated texts varies for different languages between 50,000 and 380,000 words. The corpus is rather noisy and may include parts from the English original in some of the translations. The corpus is tokenized and each language pair has been sentence aligned. 23 languages, 252 bitexts total number of files: 71,414 total number of tokens: 3.28M total number of sentence fragments: 1.38M
A well-structured summarization dataset for the Persian language consists of 93,207 records. It is prepared for Abstractive/Extractive tasks (like cnn_dailymail for English). It can also be used in other scopes like Text Generation, Title Generation, and News Category Classification. It is imperative to consider that the newlines were replaced with the `[n]` symbol. Please interpret them into normal newlines (for ex. `t.replace("[n]", "\n")`) and then use them for your purposes.
PolEval is a SemEval-inspired evaluation campaign for natural language processing tools for Polish.Submitted solutions compete against one another within certain tasks selected by organizers, using available data and are evaluated according topre-established procedures. One of the tasks in PolEval-2019 was Machine Translation (Task-4). The task is to train as good as possible machine translation system, using any technology,with limited textual resources.The competition will be done for 2 language pairs, more popular English-Polish (into Polish direction) and pair that can be called low resourcedRussian-Polish (in both directions). Here, Polish-English is also made available to allow for training in both directions. However, the test data is ONLY available for English-Polish.
The Polish Summaries Corpus contains news articles and their summaries. We used summaries of the same article as positive pairs and sampled the most similar summaries of different articles as negatives.
NLM produces a baseline set of MEDLINE/PubMed citation records in XML format for download on an annual basis. The annual baseline is released in December of each year. Each day, NLM produces update files that include new, revised and deleted citations. See our documentation page for more information.
The QCRI Educational Domain Corpus (formerly QCRI AMARA Corpus) is an open multilingual collection of subtitles for educational videos and lectures collaboratively transcribed and translated over the AMARA web-based platform. Developed by: Qatar Computing Research Institute, Arabic Language Technologies Group The QED Corpus is made public for RESEARCH purpose only. The corpus is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Copyright Qatar Computing Research Institute. All rights reserved. 225 languages, 9,291 bitexts total number of files: 271,558 total number of tokens: 371.76M total number of sentence fragments: 30.93M
SAMSum Corpus contains over 16k chat dialogues with manually annotated summaries. There are two features: - dialogue: text of dialogue. - summary: human written summary of the dialogue. - id: id of a example.
scb-mt-en-th-2020: A Large English-Thai Parallel Corpus The primary objective of our work is to build a large-scale English-Thai dataset for machine translation. We construct an English-Thai machine translation dataset with over 1 million segment pairs, curated from various sources, namely news, Wikipedia articles, SMS messages, task-based dialogs, web-crawled data and government documents. Methodology for gathering data, building parallel texts and removing noisy sentence pairs are presented in a reproducible manner. We train machine translation models based on this dataset. Our models' performance are comparable to that of Google Translation API (as of May 2020) for Thai-English and outperform Google when the Open Parallel Corpus (OPUS) is included in the training data for both Thai-English and English-Thai translation. The dataset, pre-trained models, and source code to reproduce our work are available for public use.
A parallel corpus of full-text scientific articles collected from Scielo database in the following languages: English, Portuguese and Spanish. The corpus is sentence aligned for all language pairs, as well as trilingual aligned for a small subset of sentences. Alignment was carried out using the Hunalign algorithm.
A new multi-target dataset of 5.4K TLDRs over 3.2K papers. SCITLDR contains both author-written and expert-derived TLDRs, where the latter are collected using a novel annotation protocol that produces high-quality summaries while minimizing annotation burden.
SETimes – A Parallel Corpus of English and South-East European Languages The corpus is based on the content published on the SETimes.com news portal. The news portal publishes “news and views from Southeast Europe” in ten languages: Bulgarian, Bosnian, Greek, English, Croatian, Macedonian, Romanian, Albanian and Serbian. This version of the corpus tries to solve the issues present in an older version of the corpus (published inside OPUS, described in the LREC 2010 paper by Francis M. Tyers and Murat Serdar Alperen). The following procedures were applied to resolve existing issues: - stricter extraction process – no HTML residues present - language identification on every non-English document – non-English online documents contain English material in case the article was not translated into that language - resolving encoding issues in Croatian and Serbian – diacritics were partially lost due to encoding errors – text was rediacritized.
About SNOW T15: The simplified corpus for the Japanese language. The corpus has 50,000 manually simplified and aligned sentences. This corpus contains the original sentences, simplified sentences and English translation of the original sentences. It can be used for automatic text simplification as well as translating simple Japanese into English and vice-versa. The core vocabulary is restricted to 2,000 words where it is selected by accounting for several factors such as meaning preservation, variation, simplicity and the UniDic word segmentation criterion. For details, refer to the explanation page of Japanese simplification (http://www.jnlp.org/research/Japanese_simplification). The original texts are from "small_parallel_enja: 50k En/Ja Parallel Corpus for Testing SMT Methods", which is a bilingual corpus for machine translation. About SNOW T23: An expansion corpus of 35,000 sentences rewritten in easy Japanese (simple Japanese vocabulary) based on SNOW T15. The original texts are from "Tanaka Corpus" (http://www.edrdg.org/wiki/index.php/Tanaka_Corpus).
Social Bias Frames is a new way of representing the biases and offensiveness that are implied in language. For example, these frames are meant to distill the implication that "women (candidates) are less qualified" behind the statement "we shouldn’t lower our standards to hire more women."
This is a collection of parallel corpora collected by Hercules Dalianis and his research group for bilingual dictionary construction. More information in: Hercules Dalianis, Hao-chun Xing, Xin Zhang: Creating a Reusable English-Chinese Parallel Corpus for Bilingual Dictionary Construction, In Proceedings of LREC2010 (source: http://people.dsv.su.se/~hercules/SEC/) and Konstantinos Charitakis (2007): Using Parallel Corpora to Create a Greek-English Dictionary with UPLUG, In Proceedings of NODALIDA 2007. Afrikaans-English: Aldin Draghoender and Mattias Kanhov: Creating a reusable English – Afrikaans parallel corpora for bilingual dictionary construction 4 languages, 3 bitexts total number of files: 6 total number of tokens: 1.32M total number of sentence fragments: 0.15M
This is a collection of Quran translations compiled by the Tanzil project The translations provided at this page are for non-commercial purposes only. If used otherwise, you need to obtain necessary permission from the translator or the publisher. If you are using more than three of the following translations in a website or application, we require you to put a link back to this page to make sure that subsequent users have access to the latest updates. 42 languages, 878 bitexts total number of files: 105 total number of tokens: 22.33M total number of sentence fragments: 1.01M
A freely available paraphrase corpus for 73 languages extracted from the Tatoeba database. Tatoeba is a crowdsourcing project mainly geared towards language learners. Its aim is to provide example sentences and translations for particular linguistic constructions and words. The paraphrase corpus is created by populating a graph with Tatoeba sentences and equivalence links between sentences “meaning the same thing”. This graph is then traversed to extract sets of paraphrases. Several language-independent filters and pruning steps are applied to remove uninteresting sentences. A manual evaluation performed on three languages shows that between half and three quarters of inferred paraphrases are correct and that most remaining ones are either correct but trivial, or near-paraphrases that neutralize a morphological distinction. The corpus contains a total of 1.9 million sentences, with 200 – 250 000 sentences per language. It covers a range of languages for which, to our knowledge,no other paraphrase dataset exists.
This is a collection of translated sentences from Tatoeba 359 languages, 3,403 bitexts total number of files: 750 total number of tokens: 65.54M total number of sentence fragments: 8.96M
A parallel corpus of TED talk subtitles provided by CASMACAT: http://www.casmacat.eu/corpus/ted2013.html. The files are originally provided by https://wit3.fbk.eu. 15 languages, 14 bitexts total number of files: 28 total number of tokens: 67.67M total number of sentence fragments: 3.81M
The core of WIT3 is the TED Talks corpus, that basically redistributes the original content published by the TED Conference website (http://www.ted.com). Since 2007, the TED Conference, based in California, has been posting all video recordings of its talks together with subtitles in English and their translations in more than 80 languages. Aside from its cultural and social relevance, this content, which is published under the Creative Commons BYNC-ND license, also represents a precious language resource for the machine translation research community, thanks to its size, variety of topics, and covered languages. This effort repurposes the original content in a way which is more convenient for machine translation researchers.
ThaiSum is a large-scale corpus for Thai text summarization obtained from several online news websites namely Thairath, ThaiPBS, Prachathai, and The Standard. This dataset consists of over 350,000 article and summary pairs written by journalists.
This is the Tilde MODEL Corpus – Multilingual Open Data for European Languages. The data has been collected from sites allowing free use and reuse of its content, as well as from Public Sector web sites. The activities have been undertaken as part of the ODINE Open Data Incubator for Europe, which aims to support the next generation of digital businesses and fast-track the development of new products and services. The corpus includes the following parts: Tilde MODEL - EESC is a multilingual corpus compiled from document texts of European Economic and Social Committee document portal. Source: http://dm.eesc.europa.eu/ Tilde MODEL - RAPID multilingual parallel corpus is compiled from all press releases of Press Release Database of European Commission released between 1975 and end of 2016 as available from http://europa.eu/rapid/ Tilde MODEL - ECB multilingual parallel corpus is compiled from the multilingual pages of European Central Bank web site http://ebc.europa.eu/ Tilde MODEL - EMA is a corpus compiled from texts of European Medicines Agency document portal as available in http://www.ema.europa.eu/ at the end of 2016 Tilde MODEL - World Bank is a corpus compiled from texts of World Bank as available in http://www.worldbank.org/ in 2017 Tilde MODEL - AirBaltic.com Travel Destinations is a multilingual parallel corpus compiled from description texts of AirBaltic.com travel destinations as available in https://www.airbaltic.com/en/destinations/ in 2017 Tilde MODEL - LiveRiga.com is a multilingual parallel corpus compiled from Riga tourist attractions description texts of http://liveriga.com/ web site in 2017 Tilde MODEL - Lithuanian National Philharmonic Society is a parallel corpus compiled from texts of Lithuanian National Philharmonic Society web site http://www.filharmonija.lt/ in 2017 Tilde MODEL - mupa.hu is a parallel corpus from texts of Müpa Budapest - web site of Hungarian national culture house and concert venue https://www.mupa.hu/en/ compiled in spring of 2017 Tilde MODEL - fold.lv is a parallel corpus from texts of fold.lv portal http://www.fold.lv/en/ of the best of Latvian and foreign creative industries as compiled in spring of 2017 Tilde MODEL - czechtourism.com is a multilingual parallel corpus from texts of http://czechtourism.com/ portal compiled in spring of 2017 30 languages, 274 bitexts total number of files: 125 total number of tokens: 1.43G total number of sentence fragments: 62.44M
This news dataset is a persistent historical archive of noteable events in the Indian subcontinent from start-2001 to mid-2020, recorded in realtime by the journalists of India. It contains approximately 3.3 million events published by Times of India. Times Group as a news agency, reaches out a very wide audience across Asia and drawfs every other agency in the quantity of english articles published per day. Due to the heavy daily volume over multiple years, this data offers a deep insight into Indian society, its priorities, events, issues and talking points and how they have unfolded over time. It is possible to chop this dataset into a smaller piece for a more focused analysis, based on one or more facets.
ToTTo is an open-domain English table-to-text dataset with over 120,000 training examples that proposes a controlled generation task: given a Wikipedia table and a set of highlighted table cells, produce a one-sentence description.
TURKCorpus is a dataset for evaluating sentence simplification systems that focus on lexical paraphrasing, as described in "Optimizing Statistical Machine Translation for Text Simplification". The corpus is composed of 2000 validation and 359 test original sentences that were each simplified 8 times by different annotators.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, it set out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected. The Declaration was adopted by the UN General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 during its 183rd plenary meeting. The dataset includes translations of the document in 464 languages and dialects. © 1996 – 2009 The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights This plain text version prepared by the “UDHR in Unicode” project, https://www.unicode.org/udhr.
UMC005 English-Urdu is a parallel corpus of texts in English and Urdu language with sentence alignments. The corpus can be used for experiments with statistical machine translation. The texts come from four different sources: - Quran - Bible - Penn Treebank (Wall Street Journal) - Emille corpus The authors provide the religious texts of Quran and Bible for direct download. Because of licensing reasons, Penn and Emille texts cannot be redistributed freely. However, if you already hold a license for the original corpora, we are able to provide scripts that will recreate our data on your disk. Our modifications include but are not limited to the following: - Correction of Urdu translations and manual sentence alignment of the Emille texts. - Manually corrected sentence alignment of the other corpora. - Our data split (training-development-test) so that our published experiments can be reproduced. - Tokenization (optional, but needed to reproduce our experiments). - Normalization (optional) of e.g. European vs. Urdu numerals, European vs. Urdu punctuation, removal of Urdu diacritics.
United nations general assembly resolutions: A six-language parallel corpus. This is a collection of translated documents from the United Nations originally compiled into a translation memory by Alexandre Rafalovitch, Robert Dale (see http://uncorpora.org). 6 languages, 15 bitexts total number of files: 6 total number of tokens: 18.87M total number of sentence fragments: 0.44M
This is a collection of translated documents from the United Nations. This corpus is available in all 6 official languages of the UN, consisting of around 300 million words per language
This parallel corpus consists of manually translated UN documents from the last 25 years (1990 to 2014) for the six official UN languages, Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.
The WebNLG challenge consists in mapping data to text. The training data consists of Data/Text pairs where the data is a set of triples extracted from DBpedia and the text is a verbalisation of these triples. For instance, given the 3 DBpedia triples shown in (a), the aim is to generate a text such as (b). a. (John_E_Blaha birthDate 1942_08_26) (John_E_Blaha birthPlace San_Antonio) (John_E_Blaha occupation Fighter_pilot) b. John E Blaha, born in San Antonio on 1942-08-26, worked as a fighter pilot As the example illustrates, the task involves specific NLG subtasks such as sentence segmentation (how to chunk the input data into sentences), lexicalisation (of the DBpedia properties), aggregation (how to avoid repetitions) and surface realisation (how to build a syntactically correct and natural sounding text).
Write & Improve (Yannakoudakis et al., 2018) is an online web platform that assists non-native English students with their writing. Specifically, students from around the world submit letters, stories, articles and essays in response to various prompts, and the W&I system provides instant feedback. Since W&I went live in 2014, W&I annotators have manually annotated some of these submissions and assigned them a CEFR level.
WikiAsp is a multi-domain, aspect-based summarization dataset in the encyclopedic domain. In this task, models are asked to summarize cited reference documents of a Wikipedia article into aspect-based summaries. Each of the 20 domains include 10 domain-specific pre-defined aspects.
A dataset of atomic wikipedia edits containing insertions and deletions of a contiguous chunk of text in a sentence. This dataset contains ~43 million edits across 8 languages. An atomic edit is defined as an edit e applied to a natural language expression S as the insertion, deletion, or substitution of a sub-expression P such that both the original expression S and the resulting expression e(S) are well-formed semantic constituents (MacCartney, 2009). In this corpus, we release such atomic insertions and deletions made to sentences in wikipedia.
WikiAuto provides a set of aligned sentences from English Wikipedia and Simple English Wikipedia as a resource to train sentence simplification systems. The authors first crowd-sourced a set of manual alignments between sentences in a subset of the Simple English Wikipedia and their corresponding versions in English Wikipedia (this corresponds to the `manual` config), then trained a neural CRF system to predict these alignments. The trained model was then applied to the other articles in Simple English Wikipedia with an English counterpart to create a larger corpus of aligned sentences (corresponding to the `auto`, `auto_acl`, `auto_full_no_split`, and `auto_full_with_split` configs here).
This dataset gathers 728,321 biographies from wikipedia. It aims at evaluating text generation algorithms. For each article, we provide the first paragraph and the infobox (both tokenized). For each article, we extracted the first paragraph (text), the infobox (structured data). Each infobox is encoded as a list of (field name, field value) pairs. We used Stanford CoreNLP (http://stanfordnlp.github.io/CoreNLP/) to preprocess the data, i.e. we broke the text into sentences and tokenized both the text and the field values. The dataset was randomly split in three subsets train (80%), valid (10%), test (10%).
WikiLingua is a large-scale multilingual dataset for the evaluation of crosslingual abstractive summarization systems. The dataset includes ~770k article and summary pairs in 18 languages from WikiHow. The gold-standard article-summary alignments across languages was done by aligning the images that are used to describe each how-to step in an article.
\ The dataset extracted from Persian Wikipedia into the form of articles and highlights and cleaned the dataset into pairs of articles and highlights and reduced the articles' length (only version 1.0.0) and highlights' length to a maximum of 512 and 128, respectively, suitable for parsBERT.
This shared task (part of WMT20) will build on its previous editions to further examine automatic methods for estimating the quality of neural machine translation output at run-time, without relying on reference translations. As in previous years, we cover estimation at various levels. Important elements introduced this year include: a new task where sentences are annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores instead of labels based on post-editing; a new multilingual sentence-level dataset mainly from Wikipedia articles, where the source articles can be retrieved for document-wide context; the availability of NMT models to explore system-internal information for the task. Task 1 uses Wikipedia data for 6 language pairs that includes high-resource English--German (En-De) and English--Chinese (En-Zh), medium-resource Romanian--English (Ro-En) and Estonian--English (Et-En), and low-resource Sinhalese--English (Si-En) and Nepalese--English (Ne-En), as well as a dataset with a combination of Wikipedia articles and Reddit articles for Russian-English (En-Ru). The datasets were collected by translating sentences sampled from source language articles using state-of-the-art NMT models built using the fairseq toolkit and annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores by professional translators. Each sentence was annotated following the FLORES setup, which presents a form of DA, where at least three professional translators rate each sentence from 0-100 according to the perceived translation quality. DA scores are standardised using the z-score by rater. Participating systems are required to score sentences according to z-standardised DA scores.
This shared task (part of WMT20) will build on its previous editions to further examine automatic methods for estimating the quality of neural machine translation output at run-time, without relying on reference translations. As in previous years, we cover estimation at various levels. Important elements introduced this year include: a new task where sentences are annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores instead of labels based on post-editing; a new multilingual sentence-level dataset mainly from Wikipedia articles, where the source articles can be retrieved for document-wide context; the availability of NMT models to explore system-internal information for the task. Task 2 evaluates the application of QE for post-editing purposes. It consists of predicting: - A/ Word-level tags. This is done both on source side (to detect which words caused errors) and target side (to detect mistranslated or missing words). - A1/ Each token is tagged as either `OK` or `BAD`. Additionally, each gap between two words is tagged as `BAD` if one or more missing words should have been there, and `OK` otherwise. Note that number of tags for each target sentence is 2*N+1, where N is the number of tokens in the sentence. - A2/ Tokens are tagged as `OK` if they were correctly translated, and `BAD` otherwise. Gaps are not tagged. - B/ Sentence-level HTER scores. HTER (Human Translation Error Rate) is the ratio between the number of edits (insertions/deletions/replacements) needed and the reference translation length.
This shared task (part of WMT20) will build on its previous editions to further examine automatic methods for estimating the quality of neural machine translation output at run-time, without relying on reference translations. As in previous years, we cover estimation at various levels. Important elements introduced this year include: a new task where sentences are annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores instead of labels based on post-editing; a new multilingual sentence-level dataset mainly from Wikipedia articles, where the source articles can be retrieved for document-wide context; the availability of NMT models to explore system-internal information for the task. The goal of this task 3 is to predict document-level quality scores as well as fine-grained annotations.
XGLUE is a new benchmark dataset to evaluate the performance of cross-lingual pre-trained models with respect to cross-lingual natural language understanding and generation. The benchmark is composed of the following 11 tasks: - NER - POS Tagging (POS) - News Classification (NC) - MLQA - XNLI - PAWS-X - Query-Ad Matching (QADSM) - Web Page Ranking (WPR) - QA Matching (QAM) - Question Generation (QG) - News Title Generation (NTG) For more information, please take a look at https://microsoft.github.io/XGLUE/.
Neural abstractive summarization models are highly prone to hallucinate content that is unfaithful to the input document. The popular metric such as ROUGE fails to show the severity of the problem. The dataset consists of faithfulness and factuality annotations of abstractive summaries for the XSum dataset. We have crowdsourced 3 judgements for each of 500 x 5 document-system pairs. This will be a valuable resource to the abstractive summarization community.