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ADE-Corpus-V2 Dataset: Adverse Drug Reaction Data. This is a dataset for Classification if a sentence is ADE-related (True) or not (False) and Relation Extraction between Adverse Drug Event and Drug. DRUG-AE.rel provides relations between drugs and adverse effects. DRUG-DOSE.rel provides relations between drugs and dosages. ADE-NEG.txt provides all sentences in the ADE corpus that DO NOT contain any drug-related adverse effects.
AdversarialQA is a Reading Comprehension dataset, consisting of questions posed by crowdworkers on a set of Wikipedia articles using an adversarial model-in-the-loop. We use three different models; BiDAF (Seo et al., 2016), BERT-Large (Devlin et al., 2018), and RoBERTa-Large (Liu et al., 2019) in the annotation loop and construct three datasets; D(BiDAF), D(BERT), and D(RoBERTa), each with 10,000 training examples, 1,000 validation, and 1,000 test examples. The adversarial human annotation paradigm ensures that these datasets consist of questions that current state-of-the-art models (at least the ones used as adversaries in the annotation loop) find challenging.
Allegro Reviews is a sentiment analysis dataset, consisting of 11,588 product reviews written in Polish and extracted from Allegro.pl - a popular e-commerce marketplace. Each review contains at least 50 words and has a rating on a scale from one (negative review) to five (positive review). We recommend using the provided train/dev/test split. The ratings for the test set reviews are kept hidden. You can evaluate your model using the online evaluation tool available on klejbenchmark.com.
AmbigNQ, a dataset covering 14,042 questions from NQ-open, an existing open-domain QA benchmark. We find that over half of the questions in NQ-open are ambiguous. The types of ambiguity are diverse and sometimes subtle, many of which are only apparent after examining evidence provided by a very large text corpus. AMBIGNQ, a dataset with 14,042 annotations on NQ-OPEN questions containing diverse types of ambiguity. We provide two distributions of our new dataset AmbigNQ: a full version with all annotation metadata and a light version with only inputs and outputs.
A large-scale dataset consisting of approximately 100,000 algebraic word problems. The solution to each question is explained step-by-step using natural language. This data is used to train a program generation model that learns to generate the explanation, while generating the program that solves the question.
The ASSIN (Avaliação de Similaridade Semântica e INferência textual) corpus is a corpus annotated with pairs of sentences written in Portuguese that is suitable for the exploration of textual entailment and paraphrasing classifiers. The corpus contains pairs of sentences extracted from news articles written in European Portuguese (EP) and Brazilian Portuguese (BP), obtained from Google News Portugal and Brazil, respectively. To create the corpus, the authors started by collecting a set of news articles describing the same event (one news article from Google News Portugal and another from Google News Brazil) from Google News. Then, they employed Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) models to retrieve pairs of similar sentences between sets of news articles that were grouped together around the same topic. For that, two LDA models were trained (for EP and for BP) on external and large-scale collections of unannotated news articles from Portuguese and Brazilian news providers, respectively. Then, the authors defined a lower and upper threshold for the sentence similarity score of the retrieved pairs of sentences, taking into account that high similarity scores correspond to sentences that contain almost the same content (paraphrase candidates), and low similarity scores correspond to sentences that are very different in content from each other (no-relation candidates). From the collection of pairs of sentences obtained at this stage, the authors performed some manual grammatical corrections and discarded some of the pairs wrongly retrieved. Furthermore, from a preliminary analysis made to the retrieved sentence pairs the authors noticed that the number of contradictions retrieved during the previous stage was very low. Additionally, they also noticed that event though paraphrases are not very frequent, they occur with some frequency in news articles. Consequently, in contrast with the majority of the currently available corpora for other languages, which consider as labels “neutral”, “entailment” and “contradiction” for the task of RTE, the authors of the ASSIN corpus decided to use as labels “none”, “entailment” and “paraphrase”. Finally, the manual annotation of pairs of sentences was performed by human annotators. At least four annotators were randomly selected to annotate each pair of sentences, which is done in two steps: (i) assigning a semantic similarity label (a score between 1 and 5, from unrelated to very similar); and (ii) providing an entailment label (one sentence entails the other, sentences are paraphrases, or no relation). Sentence pairs where at least three annotators do not agree on the entailment label were considered controversial and thus discarded from the gold standard annotations. The full dataset has 10,000 sentence pairs, half of which in Brazilian Portuguese and half in European Portuguese. Either language variant has 2,500 pairs for training, 500 for validation and 2,000 for testing.
The ASSIN 2 corpus is composed of rather simple sentences. Following the procedures of SemEval 2014 Task 1. The training and validation data are composed, respectively, of 6,500 and 500 sentence pairs in Brazilian Portuguese, annotated for entailment and semantic similarity. Semantic similarity values range from 1 to 5, and text entailment classes are either entailment or none. The test data are composed of approximately 3,000 sentence pairs with the same annotation. All data were manually annotated.
Multilingual information access is stipulated in the South African constitution. In practise, this is hampered by a lack of resources and capacity to perform the large volumes of translation work required to realise multilingual information access. One of the aims of the Autshumato project is to develop machine translation systems for three South African languages pairs.
This is a multilingual parallel corpus created from translations of the Bible compiled by Christos Christodoulopoulos and Mark Steedman. 102 languages, 5,148 bitexts total number of files: 107 total number of tokens: 56.43M total number of sentence fragments: 2.84M
This is the Business Scene Dialogue (BSD) dataset, a Japanese-English parallel corpus containing written conversations in various business scenarios. The dataset was constructed in 3 steps: 1) selecting business scenes, 2) writing monolingual conversation scenarios according to the selected scenes, and 3) translating the scenarios into the other language. Half of the monolingual scenarios were written in Japanese and the other half were written in English. Fields: - id: dialogue identifier - no: sentence pair number within a dialogue - en_speaker: speaker name in English - ja_speaker: speaker name in Japanese - en_sentence: sentence in English - ja_sentence: sentence in Japanese - original_language: language in which monolingual scenario was written - tag: scenario - title: scenario title
This dataset contains two corpora in Spanish and Catalan that consist of annotated Twitter messages for automatic stance detection. The data was collected over 12 days during February and March of 2019 from tweets posted in Barcelona, and during September of 2018 from tweets posted in the town of Terrassa, Catalonia. Each corpus is annotated with three classes: AGAINST, FAVOR and NEUTRAL, which express the stance towards the target - independence of Catalonia.
Polish CDSCorpus consists of 10K Polish sentence pairs which are human-annotated for semantic relatedness and entailment. The dataset may be used for the evaluation of compositional distributional semantics models of Polish. The dataset was presented at ACL 2017. Please refer to the Wróblewska and Krasnowska-Kieraś (2017) for a detailed description of the resource.
ChrEn is a Cherokee-English parallel dataset to facilitate machine translation research between Cherokee and English. ChrEn is extremely low-resource contains 14k sentence pairs in total, split in ways that facilitate both in-domain and out-of-domain evaluation. ChrEn also contains 5k Cherokee monolingual data to enable semi-supervised learning.
The Circa (meaning ‘approximately’) dataset aims to help machine learning systems to solve the problem of interpreting indirect answers to polar questions. The dataset contains pairs of yes/no questions and indirect answers, together with annotations for the interpretation of the answer. The data is collected in 10 different social conversational situations (eg. food preferences of a friend). NOTE: There might be missing labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1. The original dataset contains no train/dev/test splits.
This dataset is for evaluating the performance of intent classification systems in the presence of "out-of-scope" queries. By "out-of-scope", we mean queries that do not fall into any of the system-supported intent classes. Most datasets include only data that is "in-scope". Our dataset includes both in-scope and out-of-scope data. You might also know the term "out-of-scope" by other terms, including "out-of-domain" or "out-of-distribution".
Named entities are phrases that contain the names of persons, organizations, locations, times and quantities. Example: [PER Wolff] , currently a journalist in [LOC Argentina] , played with [PER Del Bosque] in the final years of the seventies in [ORG Real Madrid] . The shared task of CoNLL-2002 concerns language-independent named entity recognition. We will concentrate on four types of named entities: persons, locations, organizations and names of miscellaneous entities that do not belong to the previous three groups. The participants of the shared task will be offered training and test data for at least two languages. They will use the data for developing a named-entity recognition system that includes a machine learning component. Information sources other than the training data may be used in this shared task. We are especially interested in methods that can use additional unannotated data for improving their performance (for example co-training). The train/validation/test sets are available in Spanish and Dutch. For more details see https://www.clips.uantwerpen.be/conll2002/ner/ and https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/W02-2024/
53,640 Japanese tweets with annotation if a tweet is related to COVID-19 or not. The annotation is by majority decision by 5 - 10 crowd workers. Target tweets include "COVID" or "コロナ". The period of the tweets is from around January 2020 to around June 2020. The original tweets are not contained. Please use Twitter API to get them, for example.
Corpus of domain names scraped from Common Crawl and manually annotated to add word boundaries (e.g. "commoncrawl" to "common crawl"). Breaking domain names such as "openresearch" into component words "open" and "research" is important for applications such as Text-to-Speech synthesis and web search. Common Crawl is an open repository of web crawl data that can be accessed and analyzed by anyone. Specifically, we scraped the plaintext (WET) extracts for domain names from URLs that contained diverse letter casing (e.g. "OpenBSD"). Although in the previous example, segmentation is trivial using letter casing, this was not always the case (e.g. "NASA"), so we had to manually annotate the data. The dataset is stored as plaintext file where each line is an example of space separated segments of a domain name. The examples are stored in their original letter casing, but harder and more interesting examples can be generated by lowercasing the input first.
This dataset contains 14K dialogs (181K utterances) where users and assistants converse about geographic topics like geopolitical entities and locations. This dataset is annotated with pre-existing user knowledge, message-level dialog acts, grounding to Wikipedia, and user reactions to messages.
DART is a large and open-domain structured DAta Record to Text generation corpus with high-quality sentence annotations with each input being a set of entity-relation triples following a tree-structured ontology. It consists of 82191 examples across different domains with each input being a semantic RDF triple set derived from data records in tables and the tree ontology of table schema, annotated with sentence description that covers all facts in the triple set. DART is released in the following paper where you can find more details and baseline results: https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.02871
This dataset contains 30,000 messages drawn from events including an earthquake in Haiti in 2010, an earthquake in Chile in 2010, floods in Pakistan in 2010, super-storm Sandy in the U.S.A. in 2012, and news articles spanning a large number of years and 100s of different disasters. The data has been encoded with 36 different categories related to disaster response and has been stripped of messages with sensitive information in their entirety. Upon release, this is the featured dataset of a new Udacity course on Data Science and the AI4ALL summer school and is especially utile for text analytics and natural language processing (NLP) tasks and models. The input data in this job contains thousands of untranslated disaster-related messages and their English translations.
The E2E dataset is used for training end-to-end, data-driven natural language generation systems in the restaurant domain, which is ten times bigger than existing, frequently used datasets in this area. The E2E dataset poses new challenges: (1) its human reference texts show more lexical richness and syntactic variation, including discourse phenomena; (2) generating from this set requires content selection. As such, learning from this dataset promises more natural, varied and less template-like system utterances. E2E is released in the following paper where you can find more details and baseline results: https://arxiv.org/abs/1706.09254
An update release of E2E NLG Challenge data with cleaned MRs and scripts, accompanying the following paper: Ondřej Dušek, David M. Howcroft, and Verena Rieser (2019): Semantic Noise Matters for Neural Natural Language Generation. In INLG, Tokyo, Japan.
EXAMS is a benchmark dataset for multilingual and cross-lingual question answering from high school examinations. It consists of more than 24,000 high-quality high school exam questions in 16 languages, covering 8 language families and 24 school subjects from Natural Sciences and Social Sciences, among others.
GermaNER is a freely available statistical German Named Entity Tagger based on conditional random fields(CRF). The tagger is trained and evaluated on the NoSta-D Named Entity dataset, which was used in the GermEval 2014 for named entity recognition. The tagger comes close to the performance of the best (proprietary) system in the competition with 77% F-measure (this is the latest result; the one reported in the paper is 76%) test set performance on the four standard NER classes (PERson, LOCation, ORGanisation and OTHer). We describe a range of features and their influence on German NER classification and provide a comparative evaluation and some analysis of the results. The software components, the training data and all data used for feature generation are distributed under permissive licenses, thus this tagger can be used in academic and commercial settings without restrictions or fees. The tagger is available as a command-line tool and as an Apache UIMA component.
When humans read or listen, they make implicit commonsense inferences that frame their understanding of what happened and why. As a step toward AI systems that can build similar mental models, we introduce GLUCOSE, a large-scale dataset of implicit commonsense causal knowledge, encoded as causal mini-theories about the world, each grounded in a narrative context.
This dataset is intended to advance topic classification for German texts. A classifier that is efffective in English may not be effective in German dataset because it has a higher inflection and longer compound words. The 10kGNAD dataset contains 10273 German news articles from an Austrian online newspaper categorized into 9 categories. Article titles and text are concatenated together and authors are removed to avoid a keyword-like classification on authors that write frequently about one category. This dataset can be used as a benchmark for German topic classification.
The GoEmotions dataset contains 58k carefully curated Reddit comments labeled for 27 emotion categories or Neutral. The emotion categories are admiration, amusement, anger, annoyance, approval, caring, confusion, curiosity, desire, disappointment, disapproval, disgust, embarrassment, excitement, fear, gratitude, grief, joy, love, nervousness, optimism, pride, realization, relief, remorse, sadness, surprise.
Google's query wellformedness dataset was created by crowdsourcing well-formedness annotations for 25,100 queries from the Paralex corpus. Every query was annotated by five raters each with 1/0 rating of whether or not the query is well-formed.
This dataset is a new knowledge-base (KB) of hasPart relationships, extracted from a large corpus of generic statements. Complementary to other resources available, it is the first which is all three of: accurate (90% precision), salient (covers relationships a person may mention), and has high coverage of common terms (approximated as within a 10 year old’s vocabulary), as well as having several times more hasPart entries than in the popular ontologies ConceptNet and WordNet. In addition, it contains information about quantifiers, argument modifiers, and links the entities to appropriate concepts in Wikipedia and WordNet.
These files contain text extracted from Stormfront, a white supremacist forum. A random set of forums posts have been sampled from several subforums and split into sentences. Those sentences have been manually labelled as containing hate speech or not, according to certain annotation guidelines.
Hatexplain is the first benchmark hate speech dataset covering multiple aspects of the issue. Each post in the dataset is annotated from three different perspectives: the basic, commonly used 3-class classification (i.e., hate, offensive or normal), the target community (i.e., the community that has been the victim of hate speech/offensive speech in the post), and the rationales, i.e., the portions of the post on which their labelling decision (as hate, offensive or normal) is based.
PUBHEALTH is a comprehensive dataset for explainable automated fact-checking of public health claims. Each instance in the PUBHEALTH dataset has an associated veracity label (true, false, unproven, mixture). Furthermore each instance in the dataset has an explanation text field. The explanation is a justification for which the claim has been assigned a particular veracity label. The dataset was created to explore fact-checking of difficult to verify claims i.e., those which require expertise from outside of the journalistics domain, in this case biomedical and public health expertise. It was also created in response to the lack of fact-checking datasets which provide gold standard natural language explanations for verdicts/labels. NOTE: There are missing labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1.
This repository contains a dump of thousands of public domain works in Hebrew, from Project Ben-Yehuda, in plaintext UTF-8 files, with and without diacritics (nikkud). The metadata (pseudocatalogue.csv) file is a list of titles, authors, genres, and file paths, to help you process the dump. All these works are in the public domain, so you are free to make any use of them, and do not need to ask for permission. There are 10078 files, 3181136 lines
HebrewSentiment is a data set consists of 12,804 user comments to posts on the official Facebook page of Israel’s president, Mr. Reuven Rivlin. In October 2015, we used the open software application Netvizz (Rieder, 2013) to scrape all the comments to all of the president’s posts in the period of June – August 2014, the first three months of Rivlin’s presidency.2 While the president’s posts aimed at reconciling tensions and called for tolerance and empathy, the sentiment expressed in the comments to the president’s posts was polarized between citizens who warmly thanked the president, and citizens that fiercely critiqued his policy. Of the 12,804 comments, 370 are neutral; 8,512 are positive, 3,922 negative. Data Annotation: A trained researcher examined each comment and determined its sentiment value, where comments with an overall positive sentiment were assigned the value 1, comments with an overall negative sentiment were assigned the value -1, and comments that are off-topic to the post’s content were assigned the value 0. We validated the coding scheme by asking a second trained researcher to code the same data. There was substantial agreement between raters (N of agreements: 10623, N of disagreements: 2105, Coehn’s Kappa = 0.697, p = 0).
The Hong Kong Cantonese Corpus (HKCanCor) comprise transcribed conversations recorded between March 1997 and August 1998. It contains recordings of spontaneous speech (51 texts) and radio programmes (42 texts), which involve 2 to 4 speakers, with 1 text of monologue. In total, the corpus contains around 230,000 Chinese words. The text is word-segmented, annotated with part-of-speech (POS) tags and romanised Cantonese pronunciation. Romanisation scheme - Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) POS scheme - Peita-Fujitsu-Renmin Ribao (PRF) corpus (Duan et al., 2000), with extended tags for Cantonese-specific phenomena added by Luke and Wang (see original paper for details).
A Hope Speech dataset for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (HopeEDI) containing user-generated comments from the social media platform YouTube with 28,451, 20,198 and 10,705 comments in English, Tamil and Malayalam, respectively, manually labelled as containing hope speech or not.
HoVer is an open-domain, many-hop fact extraction and claim verification dataset built upon the Wikipedia corpus. The original 2-hop claims are adapted from question-answer pairs from HotpotQA. It is collected by a team of NLP researchers at UNC Chapel Hill and Verisk Analytics.
The hrenWaC corpus version 2.0 consists of parallel Croatian-English texts crawled from the .hr top-level domain for Croatia. The corpus was built with Spidextor (https://github.com/abumatran/spidextor), a tool that glues together the output of SpiderLing used for crawling and Bitextor used for bitext extraction. The accuracy of the extracted bitext on the segment level is around 80% and on the word level around 84%.
Existing question answering datasets focus on dealing with homogeneous information, based either only on text or KB/Table information alone. However, as human knowledge is distributed over heterogeneous forms, using homogeneous information alone might lead to severe coverage problems. To fill in the gap, we present HybridQA, a new large-scale question-answering dataset that requires reasoning on heterogeneous information. Each question is aligned with a Wikipedia table and multiple free-form corpora linked with the entities in the table. The questions are designed to aggregate both tabular information and text information, i.e., lack of either form would render the question unanswerable.
Nergrit Corpus is a dataset collection for Indonesian Named Entity Recognition, Statement Extraction, and Sentiment Analysis. id_nergrit_corpus is the Named Entity Recognition of this dataset collection which contains 18 entities as follow: 'CRD': Cardinal 'DAT': Date 'EVT': Event 'FAC': Facility 'GPE': Geopolitical Entity 'LAW': Law Entity (such as Undang-Undang) 'LOC': Location 'MON': Money 'NOR': Political Organization 'ORD': Ordinal 'ORG': Organization 'PER': Person 'PRC': Percent 'PRD': Product 'QTY': Quantity 'REG': Religion 'TIM': Time 'WOA': Work of Art 'LAN': Language
Parallel Text Corpora for Multi-Domain Translation System created by BPPT (Indonesian Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology) for PAN Localization Project (A Regional Initiative to Develop Local Language Computing Capacity in Asia). The dataset contains around 24K sentences divided in 4 difference topics (Economic, international, Science and Technology and Sport).
Large Movie translated Urdu Reviews Dataset. This is a dataset for binary sentiment classification containing substantially more data than previous benchmark datasets. We provide a set of 40,000 highly polar movie reviews for training, and 10,000 for testing. To increase the availability of sentiment analysis dataset for a low recourse language like Urdu, we opted to use the already available IMDB Dataset. we have translated this dataset using google translator. This is a binary classification dataset having two classes as positive and negative. The reason behind using this dataset is high polarity for each class. It contains 50k samples equally divided in two classes.
Over >25k semiautomatically generated sentence pairs illustrating well-studied pragmatic inference types. IMPPRES is an NLI dataset following the format of SNLI (Bowman et al., 2015), MultiNLI (Williams et al., 2018) and XNLI (Conneau et al., 2018), which was created to evaluate how well trained NLI models recognize several classes of presuppositions and scalar implicatures.
A dataset of about 20k questions that are elicited from readers as they naturally read through a document sentence by sentence. Compared to existing datasets, INQUISITIVE questions target more towards high-level (semantic and discourse) comprehension of text. Because these questions are generated while the readers are processing the information, the questions directly communicate gaps between the reader’s and writer’s knowledge about the events described in the text, and are not necessarily answered in the document itself. This type of question reflects a real-world scenario: if one has questions during reading, some of them are answered by the text later on, the rest are not, but any of them would help further the reader’s understanding at the particular point when they asked it. This resource could enable question generation models to simulate human-like curiosity and cognitive processing, which may open up a new realm of applications.
The data came from the GENIA version 3.02 corpus (Kim et al., 2003). This was formed from a controlled search on MEDLINE using the MeSH terms human, blood cells and transcription factors. From this search 2,000 abstracts were selected and hand annotated according to a small taxonomy of 48 classes based on a chemical classification. Among the classes, 36 terminal classes were used to annotate the GENIA corpus.
KILT tasks training and evaluation data. - [FEVER](https://fever.ai) | Fact Checking | fever - [AIDA CoNLL-YAGO](https://www.mpi-inf.mpg.de/departments/databases-and-information-systems/research/ambiverse-nlu/aida/downloads) | Entity Linking | aidayago2 - [WNED-WIKI](https://github.com/U-Alberta/wned) | Entity Linking | wned - [WNED-CWEB](https://github.com/U-Alberta/wned) | Entity Linking | cweb - [T-REx](https://hadyelsahar.github.io/t-rex) | Slot Filling | trex - [Zero-Shot RE](http://nlp.cs.washington.edu/zeroshot) | Slot Filling | structured_zeroshot - [Natural Questions](https://ai.google.com/research/NaturalQuestions) | Open Domain QA | nq - [HotpotQA](https://hotpotqa.github.io) | Open Domain QA | hotpotqa - [TriviaQA](http://nlp.cs.washington.edu/triviaqa) | Open Domain QA | triviaqa - [ELI5](https://facebookresearch.github.io/ELI5/explore.html) | Open Domain QA | eli5 - [Wizard of Wikipedia](https://parl.ai/projects/wizard_of_wikipedia) | Dialogue | wow To finish linking TriviaQA questions to the IDs provided, follow the instructions [here](http://github.com/huggingface/datasets/datasets/kilt_tasks/README.md).
This dataset is designed to identify speaker intention based on real-life spoken utterance in Korean into one of 7 categories: fragment, description, question, command, rhetorical question, rhetorical command, utterances.
This new dataset is designed to extract intent from non-canonical directives which will help dialog managers extract intent from user dialog that may have no clear objective or are paraphrased forms of utterances.
The LAMBADA evaluates the capabilities of computational models for text understanding by means of a word prediction task. LAMBADA is a collection of narrative passages sharing the characteristic that human subjects are able to guess their last word if they are exposed to the whole passage, but not if they only see the last sentence preceding the target word. To succeed on LAMBADA, computational models cannot simply rely on local context, but must be able to keep track of information in the broader discourse. The LAMBADA dataset is extracted from BookCorpus and consists of 10'022 passages, divided into 4'869 development and 5'153 test passages. The training data for language models to be tested on LAMBADA include the full text of 2'662 novels (disjoint from those in dev+test), comprising 203 million words.
The Large Spanish Corpus is a compilation of 15 unlabelled Spanish corpora spanning Wikipedia to European parliament notes. Each config contains the data corresponding to a different corpus. For example, "all_wiki" only includes examples from Spanish Wikipedia. By default, the config is set to "combined" which loads all the corpora; with this setting you can also specify the number of samples to return per corpus by configuring the "split" argument.
LeNER-Br is a Portuguese language dataset for named entity recognition applied to legal documents. LeNER-Br consists entirely of manually annotated legislation and legal cases texts and contains tags for persons, locations, time entities, organizations, legislation and legal cases. To compose the dataset, 66 legal documents from several Brazilian Courts were collected. Courts of superior and state levels were considered, such as Supremo Tribunal Federal, Superior Tribunal de Justiça, Tribunal de Justiça de Minas Gerais and Tribunal de Contas da União. In addition, four legislation documents were collected, such as "Lei Maria da Penha", giving a total of 70 documents
LIAR is a dataset for fake news detection with 12.8K human labeled short statements from politifact.com's API, and each statement is evaluated by a politifact.com editor for its truthfulness. The distribution of labels in the LIAR dataset is relatively well-balanced: except for 1,050 pants-fire cases, the instances for all other labels range from 2,063 to 2,638. In each case, the labeler provides a lengthy analysis report to ground each judgment.
Motion recognition is one of the basic cognitive capabilities of many life forms, yet identifying motion of physical entities in natural language have not been explored extensively and empirically. Literal-Motion-in-Text (LiMiT) dataset, is a large human-annotated collection of English text sentences describing physical occurrence of motion, with annotated physical entities in motion.
Mac-Morpho is a corpus of Brazilian Portuguese texts annotated with part-of-speech tags. Its first version was released in 2003 [1], and since then, two revisions have been made in order to improve the quality of the resource [2, 3]. The corpus is available for download split into train, development and test sections. These are 76%, 4% and 20% of the corpus total, respectively (the reason for the unusual numbers is that the corpus was first split into 80%/20% train/test, and then 5% of the train section was set aside for development). This split was used in [3], and new POS tagging research with Mac-Morpho is encouraged to follow it in order to make consistent comparisons possible. [1] Aluísio, S., Pelizzoni, J., Marchi, A.R., de Oliveira, L., Manenti, R., Marquiafável, V. 2003. An account of the challenge of tagging a reference corpus for brazilian portuguese. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computational Processing of the Portuguese Language. PROPOR 2003 [2] Fonseca, E.R., Rosa, J.L.G. 2013. Mac-morpho revisited: Towards robust part-of-speech. In: Proceedings of the 9th Brazilian Symposium in Information and Human Language Technology – STIL [3] Fonseca, E.R., Aluísio, Sandra Maria, Rosa, J.L.G. 2015. Evaluating word embeddings and a revised corpus for part-of-speech tagging in Portuguese. Journal of the Brazilian Computer Society.
MC-TACO (Multiple Choice TemporAl COmmonsense) is a dataset of 13k question-answer pairs that require temporal commonsense comprehension. A system receives a sentence providing context information, a question designed to require temporal commonsense knowledge, and multiple candidate answers. More than one candidate answer can be plausible. The task is framed as binary classification: givent he context, the question, and the candidate answer, the task is to determine whether the candidate answer is plausible ("yes") or not ("no").
Machine learning models are trained to find patterns in data. NLP models can inadvertently learn socially undesirable patterns when training on gender biased text. In this work, we propose a general framework that decomposes gender bias in text along several pragmatic and semantic dimensions: bias from the gender of the person being spoken about, bias from the gender of the person being spoken to, and bias from the gender of the speaker. Using this fine-grained framework, we automatically annotate eight large scale datasets with gender information. In addition, we collect a novel, crowdsourced evaluation benchmark of utterance-level gender rewrites. Distinguishing between gender bias along multiple dimensions is important, as it enables us to train finer-grained gender bias classifiers. We show our classifiers prove valuable for a variety of important applications, such as controlling for gender bias in generative models, detecting gender bias in arbitrary text, and shed light on offensive language in terms of genderedness.
MENYO-20k is a multi-domain parallel dataset with texts obtained from news articles, ted talks, movie transcripts, radio transcripts, science and technology texts, and other short articles curated from the web and professional translators. The dataset has 20,100 parallel sentences split into 10,070 training sentences, 3,397 development sentences, and 6,633 test sentences (3,419 multi-domain, 1,714 news domain, and 1,500 ted talks speech transcript domain). The development and test sets are available upon request.
MetaLWOz: A Dataset of Multi-Domain Dialogues for the Fast Adaptation of Conversation Models. We introduce the Meta-Learning Wizard of Oz (MetaLWOz) dialogue dataset for developing fast adaptation methods for conversation models. This data can be used to train task-oriented dialogue models, specifically to develop methods to quickly simulate user responses with a small amount of data. Such fast-adaptation models fall into the research areas of transfer learning and meta learning. The dataset consists of 37,884 crowdsourced dialogues recorded between two human users in a Wizard of Oz setup, in which one was instructed to behave like a bot, and the other a true human user. The users are assigned a task belonging to a particular domain, for example booking a reservation at a particular restaurant, and work together to complete the task. Our dataset spans 47 domains having 227 tasks total. Dialogues are a minimum of 10 turns long.
The MNIST dataset consists of 70,000 28x28 black-and-white images in 10 classes (one for each digits), with 7,000 images per class. There are 60,000 training images and 10,000 test images.
Posing reading comprehension as a generation problem provides a great deal of flexibility, allowing for open-ended questions with few restrictions on possible answers. However, progress is impeded by existing generation metrics, which rely on token overlap and are agnostic to the nuances of reading comprehension. To address this, we introduce a benchmark for training and evaluating generative reading comprehension metrics: MOdeling Correctness with Human Annotations. MOCHA contains 40K human judgement scores on model outputs from 6 diverse question answering datasets and an additional set of minimal pairs for evaluation. Using MOCHA, we train an evaluation metric: LERC, a Learned Evaluation metric for Reading Comprehension, to mimic human judgement scores.
The Microsoft Terminology Collection can be used to develop localized versions of applications that integrate with Microsoft products. It can also be used to integrate Microsoft terminology into other terminology collections or serve as a base IT glossary for language development in the nearly 100 languages available. Terminology is provided in .tbx format, an industry standard for terminology exchange.
The database is derived from the NCI PID Pathway Interaction Database, and the textual mentions are extracted from cooccurring pairs of genes in PubMed abstracts, processed and annotated by Literome (Poon et al. 2014). This dataset was used in the paper “Compositional Learning of Embeddings for Relation Paths in Knowledge Bases and Text” (Toutanova, Lin, Yih, Poon, and Quirk, 2016).
Recent work in semantic parsing for question answering has focused on long and complicated questions, many of which would seem unnatural if asked in a normal conversation between two humans. In an effort to explore a conversational QA setting, we present a more realistic task: answering sequences of simple but inter-related questions. We created SQA by asking crowdsourced workers to decompose 2,022 questions from WikiTableQuestions (WTQ), which contains highly-compositional questions about tables from Wikipedia. We had three workers decompose each WTQ question, resulting in a dataset of 6,066 sequences that contain 17,553 questions in total. Each question is also associated with answers in the form of cell locations in the tables.
The Third International Chinese Language Processing Bakeoff was held in Spring 2006 to assess the state of the art in two important tasks: word segmentation and named entity recognition. Twenty-nine groups submitted result sets in the two tasks across two tracks and a total of five corpora. We found strong results in both tasks as well as continuing challenges. MSRA NER is one of the provided dataset. There are three types of NE, PER (person), ORG (organization) and LOC (location). The dataset is in the BIO scheme. For more details see https://faculty.washington.edu/levow/papers/sighan06.pdf
MultiReQA contains the sentence boundary annotation from eight publicly available QA datasets including SearchQA, TriviaQA, HotpotQA, NaturalQuestions, SQuAD, BioASQ, RelationExtraction, and TextbookQA. Five of these datasets, including SearchQA, TriviaQA, HotpotQA, NaturalQuestions, SQuAD, contain both training and test data, and three, including BioASQ, RelationExtraction, TextbookQA, contain only the test data
Multi-Domain Wizard-of-Oz dataset (MultiWOZ), a fully-labeled collection of human-human written conversations spanning over multiple domains and topics. MultiWOZ 2.1 (Eric et al., 2019) identified and fixed many erroneous annotations and user utterances in the original version, resulting in an improved version of the dataset. MultiWOZ 2.2 is a yet another improved version of this dataset, which identifies and fizes dialogue state annotation errors across 17.3% of the utterances on top of MultiWOZ 2.1 and redefines the ontology by disallowing vocabularies of slots with a large number of possible values (e.g., restaurant name, time of booking) and introducing standardized slot span annotations for these slots.
Multi-XScience, a large-scale multi-document summarization dataset created from scientific articles. Multi-XScience introduces a challenging multi-document summarization task: writing the related-work section of a paper based on its abstract and the articles it references.
The NarrativeQA dataset for question answering on long documents (movie scripts, books). It includes the list of documents with Wikipedia summaries, links to full stories, and questions and answers.
A parallel corpus of News Commentaries provided by WMT for training SMT. The source is taken from CASMACAT: http://www.casmacat.eu/corpus/news-commentary.html 12 languages, 63 bitexts total number of files: 61,928 total number of tokens: 49.66M total number of sentence fragments: 1.93M
NewsQA is a challenging machine comprehension dataset of over 100,000 human-generated question-answer pairs. Crowdworkers supply questions and answers based on a set of over 10,000 news articles from CNN, with answers consisting of spans of text from the corresponding articles.
The NKJP-NER is based on a human-annotated part of National Corpus of Polish (NKJP). We extracted sentences with named entities of exactly one type. The task is to predict the type of the named entity.
Named entities Recognition dataset for Norwegian. It is a version of the Universal Dependency (UD) Treebank for both Bokmål and Nynorsk (UDN) where all proper nouns have been tagged with their type according to the NER tagging scheme. UDN is a converted version of the Norwegian Dependency Treebank into the UD scheme.
The NQ-Open task, introduced by Lee et.al. 2019, is an open domain question answering benchmark that is derived from Natural Questions. The goal is to predict an English answer string for an input English question. All questions can be answered using the contents of English Wikipedia.
NumerSense is a new numerical commonsense reasoning probing task, with a diagnostic dataset consisting of 3,145 masked-word-prediction probes. We propose to study whether numerical commonsense knowledge can be induced from pre-trained language models like BERT, and to what extent this access to knowledge robust against adversarial examples is. We hope this will be beneficial for tasks such as knowledge base completion and open-domain question answering.
Offensive language identification in dravidian lanaguages dataset. The goal of this task is to identify offensive language content of the code-mixed dataset of comments/posts in Dravidian Languages ( (Tamil-English, Malayalam-English, and Kannada-English)) collected from social media.
Texts from the Ofis Publik ar Brezhoneg (Breton Language Board) provided by Francis Tyers 2 languages, total number of files: 278 total number of tokens: 2.12M total number of sentence fragments: 0.13M
The “One Million Posts” corpus is an annotated data set consisting of user comments posted to an Austrian newspaper website (in German language). DER STANDARD is an Austrian daily broadsheet newspaper. On the newspaper’s website, there is a discussion section below each news article where readers engage in online discussions. The data set contains a selection of user posts from the 12 month time span from 2015-06-01 to 2016-05-31. There are 11,773 labeled and 1,000,000 unlabeled posts in the data set. The labeled posts were annotated by professional forum moderators employed by the newspaper. The data set contains the following data for each post: * Post ID * Article ID * Headline (max. 250 characters) * Main Body (max. 750 characters) * User ID (the user names used by the website have been re-mapped to new numeric IDs) * Time stamp * Parent post (replies give rise to tree-like discussion thread structures) * Status (online or deleted by a moderator) * Number of positive votes by other community members * Number of negative votes by other community members For each article, the data set contains the following data: * Article ID * Publishing date * Topic Path (e.g.: Newsroom / Sports / Motorsports / Formula 1) * Title * Body Detailed descriptions of the post selection and annotation procedures are given in the paper. ## Annotated Categories Potentially undesirable content: * Sentiment (negative/neutral/positive) An important goal is to detect changes in the prevalent sentiment in a discussion, e.g., the location within the fora and the point in time where a turn from positive/neutral sentiment to negative sentiment takes place. * Off-Topic (yes/no) Posts which digress too far from the topic of the corresponding article. * Inappropriate (yes/no) Swearwords, suggestive and obscene language, insults, threats etc. * Discriminating (yes/no) Racist, sexist, misogynistic, homophobic, antisemitic and other misanthropic content. Neutral content that requires a reaction: * Feedback (yes/no) Sometimes users ask questions or give feedback to the author of the article or the newspaper in general, which may require a reply/reaction. Potentially desirable content: * Personal Stories (yes/no) In certain fora, users are encouraged to share their personal stories, experiences, anecdotes etc. regarding the respective topic. * Arguments Used (yes/no) It is desirable for users to back their statements with rational argumentation, reasoning and sources.
A collection of translation memories provided by the JRC. Source: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/language-technologies/dgt-translation-memory 25 languages, 299 bitexts total number of files: 817,410 total number of tokens: 2.13G total number of sentence fragments: 113.52M
A parallel corpus of GNOME localization files. Source: https://l10n.gnome.org 187 languages, 12,822 bitexts total number of files: 113,344 total number of tokens: 267.27M total number of sentence fragments: 58.12M
Parallel corpora from Web Crawls collected in the ParaCrawl project 40 languages, 41 bitexts total number of files: 20,995 total number of tokens: 21.40G total number of sentence fragments: 1.12G
This is a Croatian-English parallel corpus of transcribed and translated TED talks, originally extracted from https://wit3.fbk.eu. The corpus is compiled by Željko Agić and is taken from http://lt.ffzg.hr/zagic provided under the CC-BY-NC-SA license. 2 languages, total number of files: 2 total number of tokens: 2.81M total number of sentence fragments: 0.17M
A parallel corpus of Ubuntu localization files. Source: https://translations.launchpad.net 244 languages, 23,988 bitexts total number of files: 30,959 total number of tokens: 29.84M total number of sentence fragments: 7.73M
This is a corpus of parallel sentences extracted from Wikipedia by Krzysztof Wołk and Krzysztof Marasek. Please cite the following publication if you use the data: Krzysztof Wołk and Krzysztof Marasek: Building Subject-aligned Comparable Corpora and Mining it for Truly Parallel Sentence Pairs., Procedia Technology, 18, Elsevier, p.126-132, 2014 20 languages, 36 bitexts total number of files: 114 total number of tokens: 610.13M total number of sentence fragments: 25.90M
The OrangeSum dataset was inspired by the XSum dataset. It was created by scraping the "Orange Actu" website: https://actu.orange.fr/. Orange S.A. is a large French multinational telecommunications corporation, with 266M customers worldwide. Scraped pages cover almost a decade from Feb 2011 to Sep 2020. They belong to five main categories: France, world, politics, automotive, and society. The society category is itself divided into 8 subcategories: health, environment, people, culture, media, high-tech, unsual ("insolite" in French), and miscellaneous. Each article featured a single-sentence title as well as a very brief abstract, both professionally written by the author of the article. These two fields were extracted from each page, thus creating two summarization tasks: OrangeSum Title and OrangeSum Abstract.
ParaPat: The Multi-Million Sentences Parallel Corpus of Patents Abstracts This dataset contains the developed parallel corpus from the open access Google Patents dataset in 74 language pairs, comprising more than 68 million sentences and 800 million tokens. Sentences were automatically aligned using the Hunalign algorithm for the largest 22 language pairs, while the others were abstract (i.e. paragraph) aligned.
PAWS: Paraphrase Adversaries from Word Scrambling This dataset contains 108,463 human-labeled and 656k noisily labeled pairs that feature the importance of modeling structure, context, and word order information for the problem of paraphrase identification. The dataset has two subsets, one based on Wikipedia and the other one based on the Quora Question Pairs (QQP) dataset. For further details, see the accompanying paper: PAWS: Paraphrase Adversaries from Word Scrambling (https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.01130) PAWS-QQP is not available due to license of QQP. It must be reconstructed by downloading the original data and then running our scripts to produce the data and attach the labels. NOTE: There might be some missing or wrong labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1.
PAWS-X, a multilingual version of PAWS (Paraphrase Adversaries from Word Scrambling) for six languages. This dataset contains 23,659 human translated PAWS evaluation pairs and 296,406 machine translated training pairs in six typologically distinct languages: French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. English language is available by default. All translated pairs are sourced from examples in PAWS-Wiki. For further details, see the accompanying paper: PAWS-X: A Cross-lingual Adversarial Dataset for Paraphrase Identification (https://arxiv.org/abs/1908.11828) NOTE: There might be some missing or wrong labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1.
PearRead is a dataset of scientific peer reviews available to help researchers study this important artifact. The dataset consists of over 14K paper drafts and the corresponding accept/reject decisions in top-tier venues including ACL, NIPS and ICLR, as well as over 10K textual peer reviews written by experts for a subset of the papers.
People's Daily NER Dataset is a commonly used dataset for Chinese NER, with text from People's Daily (人民日报), the largest official newspaper. The dataset is in BIO scheme. Entity types are: PER (person), ORG (organization) and LOC (location).
A parallel corpus originally extracted from http://se.php.net/download-docs.php. The original documents are written in English and have been partly translated into 21 languages. The original manuals contain about 500,000 words. The amount of actually translated texts varies for different languages between 50,000 and 380,000 words. The corpus is rather noisy and may include parts from the English original in some of the translations. The corpus is tokenized and each language pair has been sentence aligned. 23 languages, 252 bitexts total number of files: 71,414 total number of tokens: 3.28M total number of sentence fragments: 1.38M
To apply eyeshadow without a brush, should I use a cotton swab or a toothpick? Questions requiring this kind of physical commonsense pose a challenge to state-of-the-art natural language understanding systems. The PIQA dataset introduces the task of physical commonsense reasoning and a corresponding benchmark dataset Physical Interaction: Question Answering or PIQA. Physical commonsense knowledge is a major challenge on the road to true AI-completeness, including robots that interact with the world and understand natural language. PIQA focuses on everyday situations with a preference for atypical solutions. The dataset is inspired by instructables.com, which provides users with instructions on how to build, craft, bake, or manipulate objects using everyday materials. The underlying task is formualted as multiple choice question answering: given a question `q` and two possible solutions `s1`, `s2`, a model or a human must choose the most appropriate solution, of which exactly one is correct. The dataset is further cleaned of basic artifacts using the AFLite algorithm which is an improvement of adversarial filtering. The dataset contains 16,000 examples for training, 2,000 for development and 3,000 for testing.
A well-structured summarization dataset for the Persian language consists of 93,207 records. It is prepared for Abstractive/Extractive tasks (like cnn_dailymail for English). It can also be used in other scopes like Text Generation, Title Generation, and News Category Classification. It is imperative to consider that the newlines were replaced with the `[n]` symbol. Please interpret them into normal newlines (for ex. `t.replace("[n]", "\n")`) and then use them for your purposes.
In Task 6-1, the participants are to distinguish between normal/non-harmful tweets (class: 0) and tweets that contain any kind of harmful information (class: 1). This includes cyberbullying, hate speech and related phenomena. In Task 6-2, the participants shall distinguish between three classes of tweets: 0 (non-harmful), 1 (cyberbullying), 2 (hate-speech). There are various definitions of both cyberbullying and hate-speech, some of them even putting those two phenomena in the same group. The specific conditions on which we based our annotations for both cyberbullying and hate-speech, which have been worked out during ten years of research will be summarized in an introductory paper for the task, however, the main and definitive condition to 1 distinguish the two is whether the harmful action is addressed towards a private person(s) (cyberbullying), or a public person/entity/large group (hate-speech).
PolEval is a SemEval-inspired evaluation campaign for natural language processing tools for Polish.Submitted solutions compete against one another within certain tasks selected by organizers, using available data and are evaluated according topre-established procedures. One of the tasks in PolEval-2019 was Machine Translation (Task-4). The task is to train as good as possible machine translation system, using any technology,with limited textual resources.The competition will be done for 2 language pairs, more popular English-Polish (into Polish direction) and pair that can be called low resourcedRussian-Polish (in both directions). Here, Polish-English is also made available to allow for training in both directions. However, the test data is ONLY available for English-Polish.
`prachathai-67k`: News Article Corpus and Multi-label Text Classificdation from Prachathai.com The prachathai-67k dataset was scraped from the news site Prachathai. We filtered out those articles with less than 500 characters of body text, mostly images and cartoons. It contains 67,889 articles wtih 12 curated tags from August 24, 2004 to November 15, 2018. The dataset was originally scraped by @lukkiddd and cleaned by @cstorm125. You can also see preliminary exploration at https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/prachathai-67k/blob/master/exploration.ipynb
The dataset contains question-answer pairs to model verbal predicate-argument structure. The questions start with wh-words (Who, What, Where, What, etc.) and contain a verb predicate in the sentence; the answers are phrases in the sentence. There were 2 datsets used in the paper, newswire and wikipedia. Unfortunately the newswiredataset is built from CoNLL-2009 English training set that is covered under license Thus, we are providing only Wikipedia training set here. Please check README.md for more details on newswire dataset. For the Wikipedia domain, randomly sampled sentences from the English Wikipedia (excluding questions and sentences with fewer than 10 or more than 60 words) were taken. This new dataset is designed to solve this great NLP task and is crafted with a lot of care.
Question Answering in Context is a dataset for modeling, understanding, and participating in information seeking dialog. Data instances consist of an interactive dialog between two crowd workers: (1) a student who poses a sequence of freeform questions to learn as much as possible about a hidden Wikipedia text, and (2) a teacher who answers the questions by providing short excerpts (spans) from the text. QuAC introduces challenges not found in existing machine comprehension datasets: its questions are often more open-ended, unanswerable, or only meaningful within the dialog context.
ReDial (Recommendation Dialogues) is an annotated dataset of dialogues, where users recommend movies to each other. The dataset was collected by a team of researchers working at Polytechnique Montréal, MILA – Quebec AI Institute, Microsoft Research Montréal, HEC Montreal, and Element AI. The dataset allows research at the intersection of goal-directed dialogue systems (such as restaurant recommendation) and free-form (also called “chit-chat”) dialogue systems.
ROPES (Reasoning Over Paragraph Effects in Situations) is a QA dataset which tests a system's ability to apply knowledge from a passage of text to a new situation. A system is presented a background passage containing a causal or qualitative relation(s) (e.g., "animal pollinators increase efficiency of fertilization in flowers"), a novel situation that uses this background, and questions that require reasoning about effects of the relationships in the background passage in the background of the situation.
SAMSum Corpus contains over 16k chat dialogues with manually annotated summaries. There are two features: - dialogue: text of dialogue. - summary: human written summary of the dialogue. - id: id of a example.
The Schema-Guided Dialogue dataset (SGD) was developed for the Dialogue State Tracking task of the Eights Dialogue Systems Technology Challenge (dstc8). The SGD dataset consists of over 18k annotated multi-domain, task-oriented conversations between a human and a virtual assistant. These conversations involve interactions with services and APIs spanning 17 domains, ranging from banks and events to media, calendar, travel, and weather. For most of these domains, the SGD dataset contains multiple different APIs, many of which have overlapping functionalities but different interfaces, which reflects common real-world scenarios.
ShARC is a Conversational Question Answering dataset focussing on question answering from texts containing rules. The goal is to answer questions by possibly asking follow-up questions first. It is assumed assume that the question is often underspecified, in the sense that the question does not provide enough information to be answered directly. However, an agent can use the supporting rule text to infer what needs to be asked in order to determine the final answer.
ShARC, a conversational QA task, requires a system to answer user questions based on rules expressed in natural language text. However, it is found that in the ShARC dataset there are multiple spurious patterns that could be exploited by neural models. SharcModified is a new dataset which reduces the patterns identified in the original dataset. To reduce the sensitivity of neural models, for each occurence of an instance conforming to any of the patterns, we automatically construct alternatives where we choose to either replace the current instance with an alternative instance which does not exhibit the pattern; or retain the original instance. The modified ShARC has two versions sharc-mod and history-shuffled. For morre details refer to Appendix A.3 .
About SNOW T15: The simplified corpus for the Japanese language. The corpus has 50,000 manually simplified and aligned sentences. This corpus contains the original sentences, simplified sentences and English translation of the original sentences. It can be used for automatic text simplification as well as translating simple Japanese into English and vice-versa. The core vocabulary is restricted to 2,000 words where it is selected by accounting for several factors such as meaning preservation, variation, simplicity and the UniDic word segmentation criterion. For details, refer to the explanation page of Japanese simplification (http://www.jnlp.org/research/Japanese_simplification). The original texts are from "small_parallel_enja: 50k En/Ja Parallel Corpus for Testing SMT Methods", which is a bilingual corpus for machine translation. About SNOW T23: An expansion corpus of 35,000 sentences rewritten in easy Japanese (simple Japanese vocabulary) based on SNOW T15. The original texts are from "Tanaka Corpus" (http://www.edrdg.org/wiki/index.php/Tanaka_Corpus).
This is a collection of parallel corpora collected by Hercules Dalianis and his research group for bilingual dictionary construction. More information in: Hercules Dalianis, Hao-chun Xing, Xin Zhang: Creating a Reusable English-Chinese Parallel Corpus for Bilingual Dictionary Construction, In Proceedings of LREC2010 (source: http://people.dsv.su.se/~hercules/SEC/) and Konstantinos Charitakis (2007): Using Parallel Corpora to Create a Greek-English Dictionary with UPLUG, In Proceedings of NODALIDA 2007. Afrikaans-English: Aldin Draghoender and Mattias Kanhov: Creating a reusable English – Afrikaans parallel corpora for bilingual dictionary construction 4 languages, 3 bitexts total number of files: 6 total number of tokens: 1.32M total number of sentence fragments: 0.15M
KorQuAD 1.0 is a large-scale Korean dataset for machine reading comprehension task consisting of human generated questions for Wikipedia articles. We benchmark the data collecting process of SQuADv1.0 and crowdsourced 70,000+ question-answer pairs. 1,637 articles and 70,079 pairs of question answers were collected. 1,420 articles are used for the training set, 140 for the dev set, and 77 for the test set. 60,407 question-answer pairs are for the training set, 5,774 for the dev set, and 3,898 for the test set.
KorQuAD 2.0 is a Korean question and answering dataset consisting of a total of 100,000+ pairs. There are three major differences from KorQuAD 1.0, which is the standard Korean Q & A data. The first is that a given document is a whole Wikipedia page, not just one or two paragraphs. Second, because the document also contains tables and lists, it is necessary to understand the document structured with HTML tags. Finally, the answer can be a long text covering not only word or phrase units, but paragraphs, tables, and lists. As a baseline model, BERT Multilingual is used, released by Google as an open source. It shows 46.0% F1 score, a very low score compared to 85.7% of the human F1 score. It indicates that this data is a challenging task. Additionally, we increased the performance by no-answer data augmentation. Through the distribution of this data, we intend to extend the limit of MRC that was limited to plain text to real world tasks of various lengths and formats.
The Swahili dataset developed specifically for language modeling task. The dataset contains 28,000 unique words with 6.84M, 970k, and 2M words for the train, valid and test partitions respectively which represent the ratio 80:10:10. The entire dataset is lowercased, has no punctuation marks and, the start and end of sentence markers have been incorporated to facilitate easy tokenization during language modeling.
Swahili is spoken by 100-150 million people across East Africa. In Tanzania, it is one of two national languages (the other is English) and it is the official language of instruction in all schools. News in Swahili is an important part of the media sphere in Tanzania. News contributes to education, technology, and the economic growth of a country, and news in local languages plays an important cultural role in many Africa countries. In the modern age, African languages in news and other spheres are at risk of being lost as English becomes the dominant language in online spaces. The Swahili news dataset was created to reduce the gap of using the Swahili language to create NLP technologies and help AI practitioners in Tanzania and across Africa continent to practice their NLP skills to solve different problems in organizations or societies related to Swahili language. Swahili News were collected from different websites that provide news in the Swahili language. I was able to find some websites that provide news in Swahili only and others in different languages including Swahili. The dataset was created for a specific task of text classification, this means each news content can be categorized into six different topics (Local news, International news , Finance news, Health news, Sports news, and Entertainment news). The dataset comes with a specified train/test split. The train set contains 75% of the dataset and test set contains 25% of the dataset.
The first gold standard Tamil-English code-switched, sentiment-annotated corpus containing 15,744 comment posts from YouTube. Train: 11,335 Validation: 1,260 and Test: 3,149. This makes the largest general domain sentiment dataset for this relatively low-resource language with code-mixing phenomenon. The dataset contains all the three types of code-mixed sentences - Inter-Sentential switch, Intra-Sentential switch and Tag switching. Most comments were written in Roman script with either Tamil grammar with English lexicon or English grammar with Tamil lexicon. Some comments were written in Tamil script with English expressions in between.
This is a collection of translated sentences from Tatoeba 359 languages, 3,403 bitexts total number of files: 750 total number of tokens: 65.54M total number of sentence fragments: 8.96M
Tunisian Sentiment Analysis Corpus. About 17k user comments manually annotated to positive and negative polarities. This corpus is collected from Facebook users comments written on official pages of Tunisian radios and TV channels namely Mosaique FM, JawhraFM, Shemes FM, HiwarElttounsi TV and Nessma TV. The corpus is collected from a period spanning January 2015 until June 2016.
The objective of this task is to detect hate speech in tweets. For the sake of simplicity, we say a tweet contains hate speech if it has a racist or sexist sentiment associated with it. So, the task is to classify racist or sexist tweets from other tweets. Formally, given a training sample of tweets and labels, where label ‘1’ denotes the tweet is racist/sexist and label ‘0’ denotes the tweet is not racist/sexist, your objective is to predict the labels on the given test dataset.
The WebNLG challenge consists in mapping data to text. The training data consists of Data/Text pairs where the data is a set of triples extracted from DBpedia and the text is a verbalisation of these triples. For instance, given the 3 DBpedia triples shown in (a), the aim is to generate a text such as (b). a. (John_E_Blaha birthDate 1942_08_26) (John_E_Blaha birthPlace San_Antonio) (John_E_Blaha occupation Fighter_pilot) b. John E Blaha, born in San Antonio on 1942-08-26, worked as a fighter pilot As the example illustrates, the task involves specific NLG subtasks such as sentence segmentation (how to chunk the input data into sentences), lexicalisation (of the DBpedia properties), aggregation (how to avoid repetitions) and surface realisation (how to build a syntactically correct and natural sounding text).
WikiAsp is a multi-domain, aspect-based summarization dataset in the encyclopedic domain. In this task, models are asked to summarize cited reference documents of a Wikipedia article into aspect-based summaries. Each of the 20 domains include 10 domain-specific pre-defined aspects.
WikiHop is open-domain and based on Wikipedia articles; the goal is to recover Wikidata information by hopping through documents. The goal is to answer text understanding queries by combining multiple facts that are spread across different documents.
WikiLingua is a large-scale multilingual dataset for the evaluation of crosslingual abstractive summarization systems. The dataset includes ~770k article and summary pairs in 18 languages from WikiHow. The gold-standard article-summary alignments across languages was done by aligning the images that are used to describe each how-to step in an article.
\ The dataset extracted from Persian Wikipedia into the form of articles and highlights and cleaned the dataset into pairs of articles and highlights and reduced the articles' length (only version 1.0.0) and highlights' length to a maximum of 512 and 128, respectively, suitable for parsBERT.
WinoBias, a Winograd-schema dataset for coreference resolution focused on gender bias. The corpus contains Winograd-schema style sentences with entities corresponding to people referred by their occupation (e.g. the nurse, the doctor, the carpenter).
Wisesight Sentiment Corpus: Social media messages in Thai language with sentiment category (positive, neutral, negative, question) * Released to public domain under Creative Commons Zero v1.0 Universal license. * Category (Labels): {"pos": 0, "neu": 1, "neg": 2, "q": 3} * Size: 26,737 messages * Language: Central Thai * Style: Informal and conversational. With some news headlines and advertisement. * Time period: Around 2016 to early 2019. With small amount from other period. * Domains: Mixed. Majority are consumer products and services (restaurants, cosmetics, drinks, car, hotels), with some current affairs. * Privacy: * Only messages that made available to the public on the internet (websites, blogs, social network sites). * For Facebook, this means the public comments (everyone can see) that made on a public page. * Private/protected messages and messages in groups, chat, and inbox are not included. * Alternations and modifications: * Keep in mind that this corpus does not statistically represent anything in the language register. * Large amount of messages are not in their original form. Personal data are removed or masked. * Duplicated, leading, and trailing whitespaces are removed. Other punctuations, symbols, and emojis are kept intact. (Mis)spellings are kept intact. * Messages longer than 2,000 characters are removed. * Long non-Thai messages are removed. Duplicated message (exact match) are removed. * More characteristics of the data can be explore: https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/wisesight-sentiment/blob/master/exploration.ipynb
XGLUE is a new benchmark dataset to evaluate the performance of cross-lingual pre-trained models with respect to cross-lingual natural language understanding and generation. The benchmark is composed of the following 11 tasks: - NER - POS Tagging (POS) - News Classification (NC) - MLQA - XNLI - PAWS-X - Query-Ad Matching (QADSM) - Web Page Ranking (WPR) - QA Matching (QAM) - Question Generation (QG) - News Title Generation (NTG) For more information, please take a look at https://microsoft.github.io/XGLUE/.
XOR-TyDi QA brings together for the first time information-seeking questions, open-retrieval QA, and multilingual QA to create a multilingual open-retrieval QA dataset that enables cross-lingual answer retrieval. It consists of questions written by information-seeking native speakers in 7 typologically diverse languages and answer annotations that are retrieved from multilingual document collections. There are three sub-tasks: XOR-Retrieve, XOR-EnglishSpan, and XOR-Full.
Yahoo Non-Factoid Question Dataset is derived from Yahoo's Webscope L6 collection using machine learning techiques such that the questions would contain non-factoid answers.The dataset contains 87,361 questions and their corresponding answers. Each question contains its best answer along with additional other answers submitted by users. Only the best answer was reviewed in determining the quality of the question-answer pair.
ZEST tests whether NLP systems can perform unseen tasks in a zero-shot way, given a natural language description of the task. It is an instantiation of our proposed framework "learning from task descriptions". The tasks include classification, typed entity extraction and relationship extraction, and each task is paired with 20 different annotated (input, output) examples. ZEST's structure allows us to systematically test whether models can generalize in five different ways.