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The ALT project aims to advance the state-of-the-art Asian natural language processing (NLP) techniques through the open collaboration for developing and using ALT. It was first conducted by NICT and UCSY as described in Ye Kyaw Thu, Win Pa Pa, Masao Utiyama, Andrew Finch and Eiichiro Sumita (2016). Then, it was developed under ASEAN IVO as described in this Web page. The process of building ALT began with sampling about 20,000 sentences from English Wikinews, and then these sentences were translated into the other languages. ALT now has 13 languages: Bengali, English, Filipino, Hindi, Bahasa Indonesia, Japanese, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Myanmar (Burmese), Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese (Simplified Chinese).
The Bengali Hate Speech Dataset is a collection of Bengali articles collected from Bengali news articles, news dump of Bengali TV channels, books, blogs, and social media. Emphasis was placed on Facebook pages and newspaper sources because they attract close to 50 million followers and is a common source of opinions and hate speech. The raw text corpus contains 250 million articles and the full dataset is being prepared for release. This is a subset of the full dataset. This dataset was prepared for hate-speech text classification benchmark on Bengali, an under-resourced language.
This corpus is an attempt to recreate the dataset used for training XLM-R. This corpus comprises of monolingual data for 100+ languages and also includes data for romanized languages (indicated by *_rom). This was constructed using the urls and paragraph indices provided by the CC-Net repository by processing January-December 2018 Commoncrawl snapshots. Each file comprises of documents separated by double-newlines and paragraphs within the same document separated by a newline. The data is generated using the open source CC-Net repository. No claims of intellectual property are made on the work of preparation of the corpus.
A parallel corpus of KDE4 localization files (v.2). 92 languages, 4,099 bitexts total number of files: 75,535 total number of tokens: 60.75M total number of sentence fragments: 8.89M
The Microsoft Terminology Collection can be used to develop localized versions of applications that integrate with Microsoft products. It can also be used to integrate Microsoft terminology into other terminology collections or serve as a base IT glossary for language development in the nearly 100 languages available. Terminology is provided in .tbx format, an industry standard for terminology exchange.
This is a new collection of translated movie subtitles from http://www.opensubtitles.org/. IMPORTANT: If you use the OpenSubtitle corpus: Please, add a link to http://www.opensubtitles.org/ to your website and to your reports and publications produced with the data! This is a slightly cleaner version of the subtitle collection using improved sentence alignment and better language checking. 62 languages, 1,782 bitexts total number of files: 3,735,070 total number of tokens: 22.10G total number of sentence fragments: 3.35G
OPUS-100 is English-centric, meaning that all training pairs include English on either the source or target side. The corpus covers 100 languages (including English).OPUS-100 contains approximately 55M sentence pairs. Of the 99 language pairs, 44 have 1M sentence pairs of training data, 73 have at least 100k, and 95 have at least 10k.
A parallel corpus of GNOME localization files. Source: https://l10n.gnome.org 187 languages, 12,822 bitexts total number of files: 113,344 total number of tokens: 267.27M total number of sentence fragments: 58.12M
A parallel corpus of Ubuntu localization files. Source: https://translations.launchpad.net 244 languages, 23,988 bitexts total number of files: 30,959 total number of tokens: 29.84M total number of sentence fragments: 7.73M
This new dataset is the large scale sentence aligned corpus in 11 Indian languages, viz. CVIT-PIB corpus that is the largest multilingual corpus available for Indian languages.
The QCRI Educational Domain Corpus (formerly QCRI AMARA Corpus) is an open multilingual collection of subtitles for educational videos and lectures collaboratively transcribed and translated over the AMARA web-based platform. Developed by: Qatar Computing Research Institute, Arabic Language Technologies Group The QED Corpus is made public for RESEARCH purpose only. The corpus is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Copyright Qatar Computing Research Institute. All rights reserved. 225 languages, 9,291 bitexts total number of files: 271,558 total number of tokens: 371.76M total number of sentence fragments: 30.93M
This dataset add sentiment lexicons for 81 languages generated via graph propagation based on a knowledge graph--a graphical representation of real-world entities and the links between them.
This is a collection of Quran translations compiled by the Tanzil project The translations provided at this page are for non-commercial purposes only. If used otherwise, you need to obtain necessary permission from the translator or the publisher. If you are using more than three of the following translations in a website or application, we require you to put a link back to this page to make sure that subsequent users have access to the latest updates. 42 languages, 878 bitexts total number of files: 105 total number of tokens: 22.33M total number of sentence fragments: 1.01M
A freely available paraphrase corpus for 73 languages extracted from the Tatoeba database. Tatoeba is a crowdsourcing project mainly geared towards language learners. Its aim is to provide example sentences and translations for particular linguistic constructions and words. The paraphrase corpus is created by populating a graph with Tatoeba sentences and equivalence links between sentences “meaning the same thing”. This graph is then traversed to extract sets of paraphrases. Several language-independent filters and pruning steps are applied to remove uninteresting sentences. A manual evaluation performed on three languages shows that between half and three quarters of inferred paraphrases are correct and that most remaining ones are either correct but trivial, or near-paraphrases that neutralize a morphological distinction. The corpus contains a total of 1.9 million sentences, with 200 – 250 000 sentences per language. It covers a range of languages for which, to our knowledge,no other paraphrase dataset exists.
This is a collection of translated sentences from Tatoeba 359 languages, 3,403 bitexts total number of files: 750 total number of tokens: 65.54M total number of sentence fragments: 8.96M
The core of WIT3 is the TED Talks corpus, that basically redistributes the original content published by the TED Conference website (http://www.ted.com). Since 2007, the TED Conference, based in California, has been posting all video recordings of its talks together with subtitles in English and their translations in more than 80 languages. Aside from its cultural and social relevance, this content, which is published under the Creative Commons BYNC-ND license, also represents a precious language resource for the machine translation research community, thanks to its size, variety of topics, and covered languages. This effort repurposes the original content in a way which is more convenient for machine translation researchers.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, it set out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected. The Declaration was adopted by the UN General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 during its 183rd plenary meeting. The dataset includes translations of the document in 464 languages and dialects. © 1996 – 2009 The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights This plain text version prepared by the “UDHR in Unicode” project, https://www.unicode.org/udhr.
WikiANN (sometimes called PAN-X) is a multilingual named entity recognition dataset consisting of Wikipedia articles annotated with LOC (location), PER (person), and ORG (organisation) tags in the IOB2 format. This version corresponds to the balanced train, dev, and test splits of Rahimi et al. (2019), which supports 176 of the 282 languages from the original WikiANN corpus.
XOR-TyDi QA brings together for the first time information-seeking questions, open-retrieval QA, and multilingual QA to create a multilingual open-retrieval QA dataset that enables cross-lingual answer retrieval. It consists of questions written by information-seeking native speakers in 7 typologically diverse languages and answer annotations that are retrieved from multilingual document collections. There are three sub-tasks: XOR-Retrieve, XOR-EnglishSpan, and XOR-Full.