Back to home
All Datasets 🏷
All datasets from our datasets repository and community bucket.
Also check out the list of supported Metrics 📉.
170 results
ADE-Corpus-V2 Dataset: Adverse Drug Reaction Data. This is a dataset for Classification if a sentence is ADE-related (True) or not (False) and Relation Extraction between Adverse Drug Event and Drug. DRUG-AE.rel provides relations between drugs and adverse effects. DRUG-DOSE.rel provides relations between drugs and dosages. ADE-NEG.txt provides all sentences in the ADE corpus that DO NOT contain any drug-related adverse effects.
The ALT project aims to advance the state-of-the-art Asian natural language processing (NLP) techniques through the open collaboration for developing and using ALT. It was first conducted by NICT and UCSY as described in Ye Kyaw Thu, Win Pa Pa, Masao Utiyama, Andrew Finch and Eiichiro Sumita (2016). Then, it was developed under ASEAN IVO as described in this Web page. The process of building ALT began with sampling about 20,000 sentences from English Wikinews, and then these sentences were translated into the other languages. ALT now has 13 languages: Bengali, English, Filipino, Hindi, Bahasa Indonesia, Japanese, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Myanmar (Burmese), Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese (Simplified Chinese).
The Dialectal Arabic Datasets contain four dialects of Arabic, Etyptian (EGY), Levantine (LEV), Gulf (GLF), and Maghrebi (MGR). Each dataset consists of a set of 350 manually segmented and POS tagged tweets.
The ASSIN (Avaliação de Similaridade Semântica e INferência textual) corpus is a corpus annotated with pairs of sentences written in Portuguese that is suitable for the exploration of textual entailment and paraphrasing classifiers. The corpus contains pairs of sentences extracted from news articles written in European Portuguese (EP) and Brazilian Portuguese (BP), obtained from Google News Portugal and Brazil, respectively. To create the corpus, the authors started by collecting a set of news articles describing the same event (one news article from Google News Portugal and another from Google News Brazil) from Google News. Then, they employed Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) models to retrieve pairs of similar sentences between sets of news articles that were grouped together around the same topic. For that, two LDA models were trained (for EP and for BP) on external and large-scale collections of unannotated news articles from Portuguese and Brazilian news providers, respectively. Then, the authors defined a lower and upper threshold for the sentence similarity score of the retrieved pairs of sentences, taking into account that high similarity scores correspond to sentences that contain almost the same content (paraphrase candidates), and low similarity scores correspond to sentences that are very different in content from each other (no-relation candidates). From the collection of pairs of sentences obtained at this stage, the authors performed some manual grammatical corrections and discarded some of the pairs wrongly retrieved. Furthermore, from a preliminary analysis made to the retrieved sentence pairs the authors noticed that the number of contradictions retrieved during the previous stage was very low. Additionally, they also noticed that event though paraphrases are not very frequent, they occur with some frequency in news articles. Consequently, in contrast with the majority of the currently available corpora for other languages, which consider as labels “neutral”, “entailment” and “contradiction” for the task of RTE, the authors of the ASSIN corpus decided to use as labels “none”, “entailment” and “paraphrase”. Finally, the manual annotation of pairs of sentences was performed by human annotators. At least four annotators were randomly selected to annotate each pair of sentences, which is done in two steps: (i) assigning a semantic similarity label (a score between 1 and 5, from unrelated to very similar); and (ii) providing an entailment label (one sentence entails the other, sentences are paraphrases, or no relation). Sentence pairs where at least three annotators do not agree on the entailment label were considered controversial and thus discarded from the gold standard annotations. The full dataset has 10,000 sentence pairs, half of which in Brazilian Portuguese and half in European Portuguese. Either language variant has 2,500 pairs for training, 500 for validation and 2,000 for testing.
The ASSIN 2 corpus is composed of rather simple sentences. Following the procedures of SemEval 2014 Task 1. The training and validation data are composed, respectively, of 6,500 and 500 sentence pairs in Brazilian Portuguese, annotated for entailment and semantic similarity. Semantic similarity values range from 1 to 5, and text entailment classes are either entailment or none. The test data are composed of approximately 3,000 sentence pairs with the same annotation. All data were manually annotated.
Multilingual information access is stipulated in the South African constitution. In practise, this is hampered by a lack of resources and capacity to perform the large volumes of translation work required to realise multilingual information access. One of the aims of the Autshumato project is to develop machine translation systems for three South African languages pairs.
Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions. For more details, see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2559986/ The original dataset can be downloaded from: https://biocreative.bioinformatics.udel.edu/resources/corpora/biocreative-ii-corpus/ This dataset has been converted to CoNLL format for NER using the following tool: https://github.com/spyysalo/standoff2conll
`best2009` is a Thai word-tokenization dataset from encyclopedia, novels, news and articles by [NECTEC](https://www.nectec.or.th/) (148,995/2,252 lines of train/test). It was created for [BEST 2010: Word Tokenization Competition](https://thailang.nectec.or.th/archive/indexa290.html?q=node/10). The test set answers are not provided publicly.
The Bengali Hate Speech Dataset is a collection of Bengali articles collected from Bengali news articles, news dump of Bengali TV channels, books, blogs, and social media. Emphasis was placed on Facebook pages and newspaper sources because they attract close to 50 million followers and is a common source of opinions and hate speech. The raw text corpus contains 250 million articles and the full dataset is being prepared for release. This is a subset of the full dataset. This dataset was prepared for hate-speech text classification benchmark on Bengali, an under-resourced language.
This is the Business Scene Dialogue (BSD) dataset, a Japanese-English parallel corpus containing written conversations in various business scenarios. The dataset was constructed in 3 steps: 1) selecting business scenes, 2) writing monolingual conversation scenarios according to the selected scenes, and 3) translating the scenarios into the other language. Half of the monolingual scenarios were written in Japanese and the other half were written in English. Fields: - id: dialogue identifier - no: sentence pair number within a dialogue - en_speaker: speaker name in English - ja_speaker: speaker name in Japanese - en_sentence: sentence in English - ja_sentence: sentence in Japanese - original_language: language in which monolingual scenario was written - tag: scenario - title: scenario title
Machine reading comprehension tasks require a machine reader to answer questions relevant to the given document. In this paper, we present the first free-form multiple-Choice Chinese machine reading Comprehension dataset (C^3), containing 13,369 documents (dialogues or more formally written mixed-genre texts) and their associated 19,577 multiple-choice free-form questions collected from Chinese-as-a-second-language examinations. We present a comprehensive analysis of the prior knowledge (i.e., linguistic, domain-specific, and general world knowledge) needed for these real-world problems. We implement rule-based and popular neural methods and find that there is still a significant performance gap between the best performing model (68.5%) and human readers (96.0%), especially on problems that require prior knowledge. We further study the effects of distractor plausibility and data augmentation based on translated relevant datasets for English on model performance. We expect C^3 to present great challenges to existing systems as answering 86.8% of questions requires both knowledge within and beyond the accompanying document, and we hope that C^3 can serve as a platform to study how to leverage various kinds of prior knowledge to better understand a given written or orally oriented text.
This dataset contains two corpora in Spanish and Catalan that consist of annotated Twitter messages for automatic stance detection. The data was collected over 12 days during February and March of 2019 from tweets posted in Barcelona, and during September of 2018 from tweets posted in the town of Terrassa, Catalonia. Each corpus is annotated with three classes: AGAINST, FAVOR and NEUTRAL, which express the stance towards the target - independence of Catalonia.
Polish CDSCorpus consists of 10K Polish sentence pairs which are human-annotated for semantic relatedness and entailment. The dataset may be used for the evaluation of compositional distributional semantics models of Polish. The dataset was presented at ACL 2017. Please refer to the Wróblewska and Krasnowska-Kieraś (2017) for a detailed description of the resource.
ChrEn is a Cherokee-English parallel dataset to facilitate machine translation research between Cherokee and English. ChrEn is extremely low-resource contains 14k sentence pairs in total, split in ways that facilitate both in-domain and out-of-domain evaluation. ChrEn also contains 5k Cherokee monolingual data to enable semi-supervised learning.
The Circa (meaning ‘approximately’) dataset aims to help machine learning systems to solve the problem of interpreting indirect answers to polar questions. The dataset contains pairs of yes/no questions and indirect answers, together with annotations for the interpretation of the answer. The data is collected in 10 different social conversational situations (eg. food preferences of a friend). NOTE: There might be missing labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1. The original dataset contains no train/dev/test splits.
A dataset adopting the FEVER methodology that consists of 1,535 real-world claims regarding climate-change collected on the internet. Each claim is accompanied by five manually annotated evidence sentences retrieved from the English Wikipedia that support, refute or do not give enough information to validate the claim totalling in 7,675 claim-evidence pairs. The dataset features challenging claims that relate multiple facets and disputed cases of claims where both supporting and refuting evidence are present.
This dataset is for evaluating the performance of intent classification systems in the presence of "out-of-scope" queries. By "out-of-scope", we mean queries that do not fall into any of the system-supported intent classes. Most datasets include only data that is "in-scope". Our dataset includes both in-scope and out-of-scope data. You might also know the term "out-of-scope" by other terms, including "out-of-domain" or "out-of-distribution".
A dataset consisting of 502 English dialogs with 12,000 annotated utterances between a user and an assistant discussing movie preferences in natural language. It was collected using a Wizard-of-Oz methodology between two paid crowd-workers, where one worker plays the role of an 'assistant', while the other plays the role of a 'user'. The 'assistant' elicits the 'user’s' preferences about movies following a Coached Conversational Preference Elicitation (CCPE) method. The assistant asks questions designed to minimize the bias in the terminology the 'user' employs to convey his or her preferences as much as possible, and to obtain these preferences in natural language. Each dialog is annotated with entity mentions, preferences expressed about entities, descriptions of entities provided, and other statements of entities.
The COrpus of Urdu News TExt Reuse (COUNTER) corpus contains 1200 documents with real examples of text reuse from the field of journalism. It has been manually annotated at document level with three levels of reuse: wholly derived, partially derived and non derived.
Corpus of domain names scraped from Common Crawl and manually annotated to add word boundaries (e.g. "commoncrawl" to "common crawl"). Breaking domain names such as "openresearch" into component words "open" and "research" is important for applications such as Text-to-Speech synthesis and web search. Common Crawl is an open repository of web crawl data that can be accessed and analyzed by anyone. Specifically, we scraped the plaintext (WET) extracts for domain names from URLs that contained diverse letter casing (e.g. "OpenBSD"). Although in the previous example, segmentation is trivial using letter casing, this was not always the case (e.g. "NASA"), so we had to manually annotate the data. The dataset is stored as plaintext file where each line is an example of space separated segments of a domain name. The examples are stored in their original letter casing, but harder and more interesting examples can be generated by lowercasing the input first.
The DaNE dataset has been annotated with Named Entities for PER, ORG and LOC by the Alexandra Institute. It is a reannotation of the UD-DDT (Universal Dependency - Danish Dependency Treebank) which has annotations for dependency parsing and part-of-speech (POS) tagging. The Danish UD treebank (Johannsen et al., 2015, UD-DDT) is a conversion of the Danish Dependency Treebank (Buch-Kromann et al. 2003) based on texts from Parole (Britt, 1998).
The dataset consists of 9008 sentences that are labelled with fine-grained polarity in the range from -2 to 2 (negative to postive). The quality of the fine-grained is not cross validated and is therefore subject to uncertainties; however, the simple polarity has been cross validated and therefore is considered to be more correct.
DialogRE is the first human-annotated dialogue based relation extraction (RE) dataset aiming to support the prediction of relation(s) between two arguments that appear in a dialogue. The dataset annotates all occurrences of 36 possible relation types that exist between pairs of arguments in the 1,788 dialogues originating from the complete transcripts of Friends.
This dataset contains 30,000 messages drawn from events including an earthquake in Haiti in 2010, an earthquake in Chile in 2010, floods in Pakistan in 2010, super-storm Sandy in the U.S.A. in 2012, and news articles spanning a large number of years and 100s of different disasters. The data has been encoded with 36 different categories related to disaster response and has been stripped of messages with sensitive information in their entirety. Upon release, this is the featured dataset of a new Udacity course on Data Science and the AI4ALL summer school and is especially utile for text analytics and natural language processing (NLP) tasks and models. The input data in this job contains thousands of untranslated disaster-related messages and their English translations.
Doc2dial is dataset of goal-oriented dialogues that are grounded in the associated documents. It includes over 4500 annotated conversations with an average of 14 turns that are grounded in over 450 documents from four domains. Compared to the prior document-grounded dialogue datasets this dataset covers a variety of dialogue scenes in information-seeking conversations.
DREAM is a multiple-choice Dialogue-based REAding comprehension exaMination dataset. In contrast to existing reading comprehension datasets, DREAM is the first to focus on in-depth multi-turn multi-party dialogue understanding.
The Did You Know (pol. Czy wiesz?) dataset consists of human-annotated question-answer pairs. The task is to predict if the answer is correct. We chose the negatives which have the largest token overlap with a question.
ETHOS: onlinE haTe speecH detectiOn dataSet. This repository contains a dataset for hate speech detection on social media platforms, called Ethos. There are two variations of the dataset: Ethos_Dataset_Binary: contains 998 comments in the dataset alongside with a label about hate speech presence or absence. 565 of them do not contain hate speech, while the rest of them, 433, contain. Ethos_Dataset_Multi_Label: which contains 8 labels for the 433 comments with hate speech content. These labels are violence (if it incites (1) or not (0) violence), directed_vs_general (if it is directed to a person (1) or a group (0)), and 6 labels about the category of hate speech like, gender, race, national_origin, disability, religion and sexual_orientation.
The corpora comprise of files per data provider that are encoded in the IOB format (Ramshaw & Marcus, 1995). The IOB format is a simple text chunking format that divides texts into single tokens per line, and, separated by a whitespace, tags to mark named entities. The most commonly used categories for tags are PER (person), LOC (location) and ORG (organization). To mark named entities that span multiple tokens, the tags have a prefix of either B- (beginning of named entity) or I- (inside of named entity). O (outside of named entity) tags are used to mark tokens that are not a named entity.
In October 2012, the European Union's (EU) Directorate General for Education and Culture ( DG EAC) released a translation memory (TM), i.e. a collection of sentences and their professionally produced translations, in twenty-six languages. This resource bears the name EAC Translation Memory, short EAC-TM. EAC-TM covers up to 26 languages: 22 official languages of the EU (all except Irish) plus Icelandic, Croatian, Norwegian and Turkish. EAC-TM thus contains translations from English into the following 25 languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, German, Greek, Finnish, French, Croatian, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish. All documents and sentences were originally written in English (source language is English) and then translated into the other languages. The texts were translated by staff of the National Agencies of the Lifelong Learning and Youth in Action programmes. They are typically professionals in the field of education/youth and EU programmes. They are thus not professional translators, but they are normally native speakers of the target language.
In October 2012, the European Union (EU) agency 'European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control' (ECDC) released a translation memory (TM), i.e. a collection of sentences and their professionally produced translations, in twenty-five languages. This resource bears the name EAC Translation Memory, short EAC-TM. ECDC-TM covers 25 languages: the 23 official languages of the EU plus Norwegian (Norsk) and Icelandic. ECDC-TM was created by translating from English into the following 24 languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Gaelige (Irish), German, Greek, Finnish, French, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Norwegian (NOrsk), Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish and Swedish. All documents and sentences were thus originally written in English. They were then translated into the other languages by professional translators from the Translation Centre CdT in Luxembourg.
Data and code from our "Inferring Which Medical Treatments Work from Reports of Clinical Trials", NAACL 2019. This work concerns inferring the results reported in clinical trials from text. The dataset consists of biomedical articles describing randomized control trials (RCTs) that compare multiple treatments. Each of these articles will have multiple questions, or 'prompts' associated with them. These prompts will ask about the relationship between an intervention and comparator with respect to an outcome, as reported in the trial. For example, a prompt may ask about the reported effects of aspirin as compared to placebo on the duration of headaches. For the sake of this task, we assume that a particular article will report that the intervention of interest either significantly increased, significantly decreased or had significant effect on the outcome, relative to the comparator. The dataset could be used for automatic data extraction of the results of a given RCT. This would enable readers to discover the effectiveness of different treatments without needing to read the paper.
A dataset to study Fake News in Portuguese, presenting a supposedly false News along with their respective fact check and classification. The data is collected from the ClaimReview, a structured data schema used by fact check agencies to share their results in search engines, enabling data collect in real time. The FACTCK.BR dataset contains 1309 claims with its corresponding label.
Fake news has become a major societal issue and a technical challenge for social media companies to identify. This content is difficult to identify because the term "fake news" covers intentionally false, deceptive stories as well as factual errors, satire, and sometimes, stories that a person just does not like. Addressing the problem requires clear definitions and examples. In this work, we present a dataset of fake news and satire stories that are hand coded, verified, and, in the case of fake news, include rebutting stories. We also include a thematic content analysis of the articles, identifying major themes that include hyperbolic support or condemnation of a gure, conspiracy theories, racist themes, and discrediting of reliable sources. In addition to releasing this dataset for research use, we analyze it and show results based on language that are promising for classification purposes. Overall, our contribution of a dataset and initial analysis are designed to support future work by fake news researchers.
The directory data contains a corpus of Finnish technology related news articles with a manually prepared named entity annotation (digitoday.2014.csv). The text material was extracted from the archives of Digitoday, a Finnish online technology news source (www.digitoday.fi). The corpus consists of 953 articles (193,742 word tokens) with six named entity classes (organization, location, person, product, event, and date). The corpus is available for research purposes and can be readily used for development of NER systems for Finnish.
`generated_reviews_enth` Generated product reviews dataset for machine translation quality prediction, part of [scb-mt-en-th-2020](https://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03541.pdf) `generated_reviews_enth` is created as part of [scb-mt-en-th-2020](https://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03541.pdf) for machine translation task. This dataset (referred to as `generated_reviews_yn` in [scb-mt-en-th-2020](https://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03541.pdf)) are English product reviews generated by [CTRL](https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.05858), translated by Google Translate API and annotated as accepted or rejected (`correct`) based on fluency and adequacy of the translation by human annotators. This allows it to be used for English-to-Thai translation quality esitmation (binary label), machine translation, and sentiment analysis.
The dataset for the variable-misuse task, described in the ICLR 2020 paper 'Global Relational Models of Source Code' [https://openreview.net/forum?id=B1lnbRNtwr] This is the public version of the dataset used in that paper. The original, used to produce the graphs in the paper, could not be open-sourced due to licensing issues. See the public associated code repository [https://github.com/VHellendoorn/ICLR20-Great] for results produced from this dataset. This dataset was generated synthetically from the corpus of Python code in the ETH Py150 Open dataset [https://github.com/google-research-datasets/eth_py150_open].
The HAREM is a Portuguese language corpus commonly used for Named Entity Recognition tasks. It includes about 93k words, from 129 different texts, from several genres, and language varieties. The split of this dataset version follows the division made by [1], where 7% HAREM documents are the validation set and the miniHAREM corpus (with about 65k words) is the test set. There are two versions of the dataset set, a version that has a total of 10 different named entity classes (Person, Organization, Location, Value, Date, Title, Thing, Event, Abstraction, and Other) and a "selective" version with only 5 classes (Person, Organization, Location, Value, and Date). It's important to note that the original version of the HAREM dataset has 2 levels of NER details, namely "Category" and "Sub-type". The dataset version processed here ONLY USE the "Category" level of the original dataset. [1] Souza, Fábio, Rodrigo Nogueira, and Roberto Lotufo. "BERTimbau: Pretrained BERT Models for Brazilian Portuguese." Brazilian Conference on Intelligent Systems. Springer, Cham, 2020.
The Hausa VOA NER dataset is a labeled dataset for named entity recognition in Hausa. The texts were obtained from Hausa Voice of America News articles https://www.voahausa.com/ . We concentrate on four types of named entities: persons [PER], locations [LOC], organizations [ORG], and dates & time [DATE]. The Hausa VOA NER data files contain 2 columns separated by a tab ('\t'). Each word has been put on a separate line and there is an empty line after each sentences i.e the CoNLL format. The first item on each line is a word, the second is the named entity tag. The named entity tags have the format I-TYPE which means that the word is inside a phrase of type TYPE. For every multi-word expression like 'New York', the first word gets a tag B-TYPE and the subsequent words have tags I-TYPE, a word with tag O is not part of a phrase. The dataset is in the BIO tagging scheme. For more details, see https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/2020.emnlp-main.204/
A collection of news article headlines in Hausa from VOA Hausa. Each headline is labeled with one of the following classes: Nigeria, Africa, World, Health or Politics. The dataset was presented in the paper: Hedderich, Adelani, Zhu, Alabi, Markus, Klakow: Transfer Learning and Distant Supervision for Multilingual Transformer Models: A Study on African Languages (EMNLP 2020).
PUBHEALTH is a comprehensive dataset for explainable automated fact-checking of public health claims. Each instance in the PUBHEALTH dataset has an associated veracity label (true, false, unproven, mixture). Furthermore each instance in the dataset has an explanation text field. The explanation is a justification for which the claim has been assigned a particular veracity label. The dataset was created to explore fact-checking of difficult to verify claims i.e., those which require expertise from outside of the journalistics domain, in this case biomedical and public health expertise. It was also created in response to the lack of fact-checking datasets which provide gold standard natural language explanations for verdicts/labels. NOTE: There are missing labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1.
This repository contains a dump of thousands of public domain works in Hebrew, from Project Ben-Yehuda, in plaintext UTF-8 files, with and without diacritics (nikkud). The metadata (pseudocatalogue.csv) file is a list of titles, authors, genres, and file paths, to help you process the dump. All these works are in the public domain, so you are free to make any use of them, and do not need to ask for permission. There are 10078 files, 3181136 lines
HebrewSentiment is a data set consists of 12,804 user comments to posts on the official Facebook page of Israel’s president, Mr. Reuven Rivlin. In October 2015, we used the open software application Netvizz (Rieder, 2013) to scrape all the comments to all of the president’s posts in the period of June – August 2014, the first three months of Rivlin’s presidency.2 While the president’s posts aimed at reconciling tensions and called for tolerance and empathy, the sentiment expressed in the comments to the president’s posts was polarized between citizens who warmly thanked the president, and citizens that fiercely critiqued his policy. Of the 12,804 comments, 370 are neutral; 8,512 are positive, 3,922 negative. Data Annotation: A trained researcher examined each comment and determined its sentiment value, where comments with an overall positive sentiment were assigned the value 1, comments with an overall negative sentiment were assigned the value -1, and comments that are off-topic to the post’s content were assigned the value 0. We validated the coding scheme by asking a second trained researcher to code the same data. There was substantial agreement between raters (N of agreements: 10623, N of disagreements: 2105, Coehn’s Kappa = 0.697, p = 0).
HindEnCorp parallel texts (sentence-aligned) come from the following sources: Tides, which contains 50K sentence pairs taken mainly from news articles. This dataset was originally col- lected for the DARPA-TIDES surprise-language con- test in 2002, later refined at IIIT Hyderabad and provided for the NLP Tools Contest at ICON 2008 (Venkatapathy, 2008). Commentaries by Daniel Pipes contain 322 articles in English written by a journalist Daniel Pipes and translated into Hindi. EMILLE. This corpus (Baker et al., 2002) consists of three components: monolingual, parallel and annotated corpora. There are fourteen monolingual sub- corpora, including both written and (for some lan- guages) spoken data for fourteen South Asian lan- guages. The EMILLE monolingual corpora contain in total 92,799,000 words (including 2,627,000 words of transcribed spoken data for Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Punjabi and Urdu). The parallel corpus consists of 200,000 words of text in English and its accompanying translations into Hindi and other languages. Smaller datasets as collected by Bojar et al. (2010) include the corpus used at ACL 2005 (a subcorpus of EMILLE), a corpus of named entities from Wikipedia (crawled in 2009), and Agriculture domain parallel corpus.  For the current release, we are extending the parallel corpus using these sources: Intercorp (Čermák and Rosen,2012) is a large multilingual parallel corpus of 32 languages including Hindi. The central language used for alignment is Czech. Intercorp’s core texts amount to 202 million words. These core texts are most suitable for us because their sentence alignment is manually checked and therefore very reliable. They cover predominately short sto- ries and novels. There are seven Hindi texts in Inter- corp. Unfortunately, only for three of them the English translation is available; the other four are aligned only with Czech texts. The Hindi subcorpus of Intercorp contains 118,000 words in Hindi. TED talks 3 held in various languages, primarily English, are equipped with transcripts and these are translated into 102 languages. There are 179 talks for which Hindi translation is available. The Indic multi-parallel corpus (Birch et al., 2011; Post et al., 2012) is a corpus of texts from Wikipedia translated from the respective Indian language into English by non-expert translators hired over Mechanical Turk. The quality is thus somewhat mixed in many respects starting from typesetting and punctuation over capi- talization, spelling, word choice to sentence structure. A little bit of control could be in principle obtained from the fact that every input sentence was translated 4 times. We used the 2012 release of the corpus. Launchpad.net is a software collaboration platform that hosts many open-source projects and facilitates also collaborative localization of the tools. We downloaded all revisions of all the hosted projects and extracted the localization (.po) files. Other smaller datasets. This time, we added Wikipedia entities as crawled in 2013 (including any morphological variants of the named entitity that appears on the Hindi variant of the Wikipedia page) and words, word examples and quotes from the Shabdkosh online dictionary.
To examine the cognitive processes of remembering and imagining and their traces in language, we introduce Hippocorpus, a dataset of 6,854 English diary-like short stories about recalled and imagined events. Using a crowdsourcing framework, we first collect recalled stories and summaries from workers, then provide these summaries to other workers who write imagined stories. Finally, months later, we collect a retold version of the recalled stories from a subset of recalled authors. Our dataset comes paired with author demographics (age, gender, race), their openness to experience, as well as some variables regarding the author's relationship to the event (e.g., how personal the event is, how often they tell its story, etc.).
The Hong Kong Cantonese Corpus (HKCanCor) comprise transcribed conversations recorded between March 1997 and August 1998. It contains recordings of spontaneous speech (51 texts) and radio programmes (42 texts), which involve 2 to 4 speakers, with 1 text of monologue. In total, the corpus contains around 230,000 Chinese words. The text is word-segmented, annotated with part-of-speech (POS) tags and romanised Cantonese pronunciation. Romanisation scheme - Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) POS scheme - Peita-Fujitsu-Renmin Ribao (PRF) corpus (Duan et al., 2000), with extended tags for Cantonese-specific phenomena added by Luke and Wang (see original paper for details).
A Hope Speech dataset for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (HopeEDI) containing user-generated comments from the social media platform YouTube with 28,451, 20,198 and 10,705 comments in English, Tamil and Malayalam, respectively, manually labelled as containing hope speech or not.
HoVer is an open-domain, many-hop fact extraction and claim verification dataset built upon the Wikipedia corpus. The original 2-hop claims are adapted from question-answer pairs from HotpotQA. It is collected by a team of NLP researchers at UNC Chapel Hill and Verisk Analytics.
The CLICK-ID dataset is a collection of Indonesian news headlines that was collected from 12 local online news publishers; detikNews, Fimela, Kapanlagi, Kompas, Liputan6, Okezone, Posmetro-Medan, Republika, Sindonews, Tempo, Tribunnews, and Wowkeren. This dataset is comprised of mainly two parts; (i) 46,119 raw article data, and (ii) 15,000 clickbait annotated sample headlines. Annotation was conducted with 3 annotator examining each headline. Judgment were based only on the headline. The majority then is considered as the ground truth. In the annotated sample, our annotation shows 6,290 clickbait and 8,710 non-clickbait.
Nergrit Corpus is a dataset collection for Indonesian Named Entity Recognition, Statement Extraction, and Sentiment Analysis. id_nergrit_corpus is the Named Entity Recognition of this dataset collection which contains 18 entities as follow: 'CRD': Cardinal 'DAT': Date 'EVT': Event 'FAC': Facility 'GPE': Geopolitical Entity 'LAW': Law Entity (such as Undang-Undang) 'LOC': Location 'MON': Money 'NOR': Political Organization 'ORD': Ordinal 'ORG': Organization 'PER': Person 'PRC': Percent 'PRD': Product 'QTY': Quantity 'REG': Religion 'TIM': Time 'WOA': Work of Art 'LAN': Language
Parallel Text Corpora for Multi-Domain Translation System created by BPPT (Indonesian Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology) for PAN Localization Project (A Regional Initiative to Develop Local Language Computing Capacity in Asia). The dataset contains around 24K sentences divided in 4 difference topics (Economic, international, Science and Technology and Sport).
JFLEG (JHU FLuency-Extended GUG) is an English grammatical error correction (GEC) corpus. It is a gold standard benchmark for developing and evaluating GEC systems with respect to fluency (extent to which a text is native-sounding) as well as grammaticality. For each source document, there are four human-written corrections (ref0 to ref3).
The data came from the GENIA version 3.02 corpus (Kim et al., 2003). This was formed from a controlled search on MEDLINE using the MeSH terms human, blood cells and transcription factors. From this search 2,000 abstracts were selected and hand annotated according to a small taxonomy of 48 classes based on a chemical classification. Among the classes, 36 terminal classes were used to annotate the GENIA corpus.
This dataset is designed to identify speaker intention based on real-life spoken utterance in Korean into one of 7 categories: fragment, description, question, command, rhetorical question, rhetorical command, utterances.
This is a Korean paired question dataset containing labels indicating whether two questions in a given pair are semantically identical. This dataset was used to evaluate the performance of [KoGPT2](https://github.com/SKT-AI/KoGPT2#subtask-evaluations) on a phrase detection downstream task.
This new dataset is designed to extract intent from non-canonical directives which will help dialog managers extract intent from user dialog that may have no clear objective or are paraphrased forms of utterances.
The LAMBADA evaluates the capabilities of computational models for text understanding by means of a word prediction task. LAMBADA is a collection of narrative passages sharing the characteristic that human subjects are able to guess their last word if they are exposed to the whole passage, but not if they only see the last sentence preceding the target word. To succeed on LAMBADA, computational models cannot simply rely on local context, but must be able to keep track of information in the broader discourse. The LAMBADA dataset is extracted from BookCorpus and consists of 10'022 passages, divided into 4'869 development and 5'153 test passages. The training data for language models to be tested on LAMBADA include the full text of 2'662 novels (disjoint from those in dev+test), comprising 203 million words.
LeNER-Br is a Portuguese language dataset for named entity recognition applied to legal documents. LeNER-Br consists entirely of manually annotated legislation and legal cases texts and contains tags for persons, locations, time entities, organizations, legislation and legal cases. To compose the dataset, 66 legal documents from several Brazilian Courts were collected. Courts of superior and state levels were considered, such as Supremo Tribunal Federal, Superior Tribunal de Justiça, Tribunal de Justiça de Minas Gerais and Tribunal de Contas da União. In addition, four legislation documents were collected, such as "Lei Maria da Penha", giving a total of 70 documents
LIAR is a dataset for fake news detection with 12.8K human labeled short statements from politifact.com's API, and each statement is evaluated by a politifact.com editor for its truthfulness. The distribution of labels in the LIAR dataset is relatively well-balanced: except for 1,050 pants-fire cases, the instances for all other labels range from 2,063 to 2,638. In each case, the labeler provides a lengthy analysis report to ground each judgment.
LST20 Corpus is a dataset for Thai language processing developed by National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Thailand. It offers five layers of linguistic annotation: word boundaries, POS tagging, named entities, clause boundaries, and sentence boundaries. At a large scale, it consists of 3,164,002 words, 288,020 named entities, 248,181 clauses, and 74,180 sentences, while it is annotated with 16 distinct POS tags. All 3,745 documents are also annotated with one of 15 news genres. Regarding its sheer size, this dataset is considered large enough for developing joint neural models for NLP. Manually download at https://aiforthai.in.th/corpus.php
Mac-Morpho is a corpus of Brazilian Portuguese texts annotated with part-of-speech tags. Its first version was released in 2003 [1], and since then, two revisions have been made in order to improve the quality of the resource [2, 3]. The corpus is available for download split into train, development and test sections. These are 76%, 4% and 20% of the corpus total, respectively (the reason for the unusual numbers is that the corpus was first split into 80%/20% train/test, and then 5% of the train section was set aside for development). This split was used in [3], and new POS tagging research with Mac-Morpho is encouraged to follow it in order to make consistent comparisons possible. [1] Aluísio, S., Pelizzoni, J., Marchi, A.R., de Oliveira, L., Manenti, R., Marquiafável, V. 2003. An account of the challenge of tagging a reference corpus for brazilian portuguese. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computational Processing of the Portuguese Language. PROPOR 2003 [2] Fonseca, E.R., Rosa, J.L.G. 2013. Mac-morpho revisited: Towards robust part-of-speech. In: Proceedings of the 9th Brazilian Symposium in Information and Human Language Technology – STIL [3] Fonseca, E.R., Aluísio, Sandra Maria, Rosa, J.L.G. 2015. Evaluating word embeddings and a revised corpus for part-of-speech tagging in Portuguese. Journal of the Brazilian Computer Society.
A large medical text dataset (14Go) curated to 4Go for abbreviation disambiguation, designed for natural language understanding pre-training in the medical domain. For example, DHF can be disambiguated to dihydrofolate, diastolic heart failure, dengue hemorragic fever or dihydroxyfumarate
MENYO-20k is a multi-domain parallel dataset with texts obtained from news articles, ted talks, movie transcripts, radio transcripts, science and technology texts, and other short articles curated from the web and professional translators. The dataset has 20,100 parallel sentences split into 10,070 training sentences, 3,397 development sentences, and 6,633 test sentences (3,419 multi-domain, 1,714 news domain, and 1,500 ted talks speech transcript domain). The development and test sets are available upon request.
The dataset consists of tweets belonging to #MeToo movement on Twitter, labelled into different categories. Due to Twitter's development policies, we only provide the tweet ID's and corresponding labels, other data can be fetched via Twitter API. The data has been labelled by experts, with the majority taken into the account for deciding the final label. We provide these labels for each of the tweets. The labels provided for each data point includes -- Relevance, Directed Hate, Generalized Hate, Sarcasm, Allegation, Justification, Refutation, Support, Oppose
The Microsoft Terminology Collection can be used to develop localized versions of applications that integrate with Microsoft products. It can also be used to integrate Microsoft terminology into other terminology collections or serve as a base IT glossary for language development in the nearly 100 languages available. Terminology is provided in .tbx format, an industry standard for terminology exchange.
The database is derived from the NCI PID Pathway Interaction Database, and the textual mentions are extracted from cooccurring pairs of genes in PubMed abstracts, processed and annotated by Literome (Poon et al. 2014). This dataset was used in the paper “Compositional Learning of Embeddings for Relation Paths in Knowledge Bases and Text” (Toutanova, Lin, Yih, Poon, and Quirk, 2016).
MultiBooked is a corpus of Basque and Catalan Hotel Reviews Annotated for Aspect-level Sentiment Classification. The corpora are compiled from hotel reviews taken mainly from booking.com. The corpora are in Kaf/Naf format, which is an xml-style stand-off format that allows for multiple layers of annotation. Each review was sentence- and word-tokenized and lemmatized using Freeling for Catalan and ixa-pipes for Basque. Finally, for each language two annotators annotated opinion holders, opinion targets, and opinion expressions for each review, following the guidelines set out in the OpeNER project.
MultiReQA contains the sentence boundary annotation from eight publicly available QA datasets including SearchQA, TriviaQA, HotpotQA, NaturalQuestions, SQuAD, BioASQ, RelationExtraction, and TextbookQA. Five of these datasets, including SearchQA, TriviaQA, HotpotQA, NaturalQuestions, SQuAD, contain both training and test data, and three, including BioASQ, RelationExtraction, TextbookQA, contain only the test data
This paper presents the disease name and concept annotations of the NCBI disease corpus, a collection of 793 PubMed abstracts fully annotated at the mention and concept level to serve as a research resource for the biomedical natural language processing community. Each PubMed abstract was manually annotated by two annotators with disease mentions and their corresponding concepts in Medical Subject Headings (MeSH®) or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®). Manual curation was performed using PubTator, which allowed the use of pre-annotations as a pre-step to manual annotations. Fourteen annotators were randomly paired and differing annotations were discussed for reaching a consensus in two annotation phases. In this setting, a high inter-annotator agreement was observed. Finally, all results were checked against annotations of the rest of the corpus to assure corpus-wide consistency. For more details, see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3951655/ The original dataset can be downloaded from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Dogan/DISEASE/NCBI_corpus.zip This dataset has been converted to CoNLL format for NER using the following tool: https://github.com/spyysalo/standoff2conll Note: there is a duplicate document (PMID 8528200) in the original data, and the duplicate is recreated in the converted data.
The development of linguistic resources for use in natural language processingis of utmost importance for the continued growth of research anddevelopment in the field, especially for resource-scarce languages. In this paper we describe the process and challenges of simultaneouslydevelopingmultiple linguistic resources for ten of the official languages of South Africa. The project focussed on establishing a set of foundational resources that can foster further development of both resources and technologies for the NLP industry in South Africa. The development efforts during the project included creating monolingual unannotated corpora, of which a subset of the corpora for each language was annotated on token, orthographic, morphological and morphosyntactic layers. The annotated subsetsincludes both development and test setsand were used in the creation of five core-technologies, viz. atokeniser, sentenciser,lemmatiser, part of speech tagger and morphological decomposer for each language. We report on the quality of these tools for each language and provide some more context of the importance of the resources within the South African context.
Neural-Code-Search-Evaluation-Dataset presents an evaluation dataset consisting of natural language query and code snippet pairs and a search corpus consisting of code snippets collected from the most popular Android repositories on GitHub.
The NKJP-NER is based on a human-annotated part of National Corpus of Polish (NKJP). We extracted sentences with named entities of exactly one type. The task is to predict the type of the named entity.
Named entities Recognition dataset for Norwegian. It is a version of the Universal Dependency (UD) Treebank for both Bokmål and Nynorsk (UDN) where all proper nouns have been tagged with their type according to the NER tagging scheme. UDN is a converted version of the Norwegian Dependency Treebank into the UD scheme.
The NQ-Open task, introduced by Lee et.al. 2019, is an open domain question answering benchmark that is derived from Natural Questions. The goal is to predict an English answer string for an input English question. All questions can be answered using the contents of English Wikipedia.
NumerSense is a new numerical commonsense reasoning probing task, with a diagnostic dataset consisting of 3,145 masked-word-prediction probes. We propose to study whether numerical commonsense knowledge can be induced from pre-trained language models like BERT, and to what extent this access to knowledge robust against adversarial examples is. We hope this will be beneficial for tasks such as knowledge base completion and open-domain question answering.
Fused Head constructions are noun phrases in which the head noun is missing and is said to be "fused" with its dependent modifier. This missing information is implicit and is important for sentence understanding.The missing heads are easily filled in by humans, but pose a challenge for computational models. For example, in the sentence: "I bought 5 apples but got only 4.", 4 is a Fused-Head, and the missing head is apples, which appear earlier in the sentence. This is a crowd-sourced dataset of 10k numerical fused head examples (1M tokens).
Offensive language identification in dravidian lanaguages dataset. The goal of this task is to identify offensive language content of the code-mixed dataset of comments/posts in Dravidian Languages ( (Tamil-English, Malayalam-English, and Kannada-English)) collected from social media.
The “One Million Posts” corpus is an annotated data set consisting of user comments posted to an Austrian newspaper website (in German language). DER STANDARD is an Austrian daily broadsheet newspaper. On the newspaper’s website, there is a discussion section below each news article where readers engage in online discussions. The data set contains a selection of user posts from the 12 month time span from 2015-06-01 to 2016-05-31. There are 11,773 labeled and 1,000,000 unlabeled posts in the data set. The labeled posts were annotated by professional forum moderators employed by the newspaper. The data set contains the following data for each post: * Post ID * Article ID * Headline (max. 250 characters) * Main Body (max. 750 characters) * User ID (the user names used by the website have been re-mapped to new numeric IDs) * Time stamp * Parent post (replies give rise to tree-like discussion thread structures) * Status (online or deleted by a moderator) * Number of positive votes by other community members * Number of negative votes by other community members For each article, the data set contains the following data: * Article ID * Publishing date * Topic Path (e.g.: Newsroom / Sports / Motorsports / Formula 1) * Title * Body Detailed descriptions of the post selection and annotation procedures are given in the paper. ## Annotated Categories Potentially undesirable content: * Sentiment (negative/neutral/positive) An important goal is to detect changes in the prevalent sentiment in a discussion, e.g., the location within the fora and the point in time where a turn from positive/neutral sentiment to negative sentiment takes place. * Off-Topic (yes/no) Posts which digress too far from the topic of the corresponding article. * Inappropriate (yes/no) Swearwords, suggestive and obscene language, insults, threats etc. * Discriminating (yes/no) Racist, sexist, misogynistic, homophobic, antisemitic and other misanthropic content. Neutral content that requires a reaction: * Feedback (yes/no) Sometimes users ask questions or give feedback to the author of the article or the newspaper in general, which may require a reply/reaction. Potentially desirable content: * Personal Stories (yes/no) In certain fora, users are encouraged to share their personal stories, experiences, anecdotes etc. regarding the respective topic. * Arguments Used (yes/no) It is desirable for users to back their statements with rational argumentation, reasoning and sources.
PAWS: Paraphrase Adversaries from Word Scrambling This dataset contains 108,463 human-labeled and 656k noisily labeled pairs that feature the importance of modeling structure, context, and word order information for the problem of paraphrase identification. The dataset has two subsets, one based on Wikipedia and the other one based on the Quora Question Pairs (QQP) dataset. For further details, see the accompanying paper: PAWS: Paraphrase Adversaries from Word Scrambling (https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.01130) PAWS-QQP is not available due to license of QQP. It must be reconstructed by downloading the original data and then running our scripts to produce the data and attach the labels. NOTE: There might be some missing or wrong labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1.
PAWS-X, a multilingual version of PAWS (Paraphrase Adversaries from Word Scrambling) for six languages. This dataset contains 23,659 human translated PAWS evaluation pairs and 296,406 machine translated training pairs in six typologically distinct languages: French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. English language is available by default. All translated pairs are sourced from examples in PAWS-Wiki. For further details, see the accompanying paper: PAWS-X: A Cross-lingual Adversarial Dataset for Paraphrase Identification (https://arxiv.org/abs/1908.11828) NOTE: There might be some missing or wrong labels in the dataset and we have replaced them with -1.
PearRead is a dataset of scientific peer reviews available to help researchers study this important artifact. The dataset consists of over 14K paper drafts and the corresponding accept/reject decisions in top-tier venues including ACL, NIPS and ICLR, as well as over 10K textual peer reviews written by experts for a subset of the papers.
People's Daily NER Dataset is a commonly used dataset for Chinese NER, with text from People's Daily (人民日报), the largest official newspaper. The dataset is in BIO scheme. Entity types are: PER (person), ORG (organization) and LOC (location).
The PolEmo2.0 is a set of online reviews from medicine and hotels domains. The task is to predict the sentiment of a review. There are two separate test sets, to allow for in-domain (medicine and hotels) as well as out-of-domain (products and university) validation.
The Polish Summaries Corpus contains news articles and their summaries. We used summaries of the same article as positive pairs and sampled the most similar summaries of different articles as negatives.
This is the Penn Treebank Project: Release 2 CDROM, featuring a million words of 1989 Wall Street Journal material. This corpus has been annotated for part-of-speech (POS) information. In addition, over half of it has been annotated for skeletal syntactic structure.
PubMedQA is a novel biomedical question answering (QA) dataset collected from PubMed abstracts. The task of PubMedQA is to answer research questions with yes/no/maybe (e.g.: Do preoperative statins reduce atrial fibrillation after coronary artery bypass grafting?) using the corresponding abstracts. PubMedQA has 1k expert-annotated, 61.2k unlabeled and 211.3k artificially generated QA instances. Each PubMedQA instance is composed of (1) a question which is either an existing research article title or derived from one, (2) a context which is the corresponding abstract without its conclusion, (3) a long answer, which is the conclusion of the abstract and, presumably, answers the research question, and (4) a yes/no/maybe answer which summarizes the conclusion. PubMedQA is the first QA dataset where reasoning over biomedical research texts, especially their quantitative contents, is required to answer the questions.
The dataset contains question-answer pairs to model verbal predicate-argument structure. The questions start with wh-words (Who, What, Where, What, etc.) and contain a verb predicate in the sentence; the answers are phrases in the sentence. There were 2 datsets used in the paper, newswire and wikipedia. Unfortunately the newswiredataset is built from CoNLL-2009 English training set that is covered under license Thus, we are providing only Wikipedia training set here. Please check README.md for more details on newswire dataset. For the Wikipedia domain, randomly sampled sentences from the English Wikipedia (excluding questions and sentences with fewer than 10 or more than 60 words) were taken. This new dataset is designed to solve this great NLP task and is crafted with a lot of care.
QED, is a linguistically informed, extensible framework for explanations in question answering. A QED explanation specifies the relationship between a question and answer according to formal semantic notions such as referential equality, sentencehood, and entailment. It is an expertannotated dataset of QED explanations built upon a subset of the Google Natural Questions dataset.
The RONEC (Named Entity Corpus for the Romanian language) dataset contains over 26000 entities in ~5000 annotated sentence, belonging to 16 distinct classes. It represents the first initiative in the Romanian language space specifically targeted for named entity recognition
SAMSum Corpus contains over 16k chat dialogues with manually annotated summaries. There are two features: - dialogue: text of dialogue. - summary: human written summary of the dialogue. - id: id of a example.
scb-mt-en-th-2020: A Large English-Thai Parallel Corpus The primary objective of our work is to build a large-scale English-Thai dataset for machine translation. We construct an English-Thai machine translation dataset with over 1 million segment pairs, curated from various sources, namely news, Wikipedia articles, SMS messages, task-based dialogs, web-crawled data and government documents. Methodology for gathering data, building parallel texts and removing noisy sentence pairs are presented in a reproducible manner. We train machine translation models based on this dataset. Our models' performance are comparable to that of Google Translation API (as of May 2020) for Thai-English and outperform Google when the Open Parallel Corpus (OPUS) is included in the training data for both Thai-English and English-Thai translation. The dataset, pre-trained models, and source code to reproduce our work are available for public use.
Propagandistic news articles use specific techniques to convey their message, such as whataboutism, red Herring, and name calling, among many others. The Propaganda Techniques Corpus (PTC) allows to study automatic algorithms to detect them. We provide a permanent leaderboard to allow researchers both to advertise their progress and to be up-to-speed with the state of the art on the tasks offered (see below for a definition).
This dataset add sentiment lexicons for 81 languages generated via graph propagation based on a knowledge graph--a graphical representation of real-world entities and the links between them.
SentimentWortschatz, or SentiWS for short, is a publicly available German-language resource for sentiment analysis, and pos-tagging. The POS tags are ["NN", "VVINF", "ADJX", "ADV"] -> ["noun", "verb", "adjective", "adverb"], and positive and negative polarity bearing words are weighted within the interval of [-1, 1].
DFKI SmartData Corpus is a dataset of 2598 German-language documents which has been annotated with fine-grained geo-entities, such as streets, stops and routes, as well as standard named entity types. It has also been annotated with a set of 15 traffic- and industry-related n-ary relations and events, such as Accidents, Traffic jams, Acquisitions, and Strikes. The corpus consists of newswire texts, Twitter messages, and traffic reports from radio stations, police and railway companies. It allows for training and evaluating both named entity recognition algorithms that aim for fine-grained typing of geo-entities, as well as n-ary relation extraction systems.
Snips' built in intents dataset was initially used to compare different voice assistants and released as a public dataset hosted at https://github.com/sonos/nlu-benchmark 2016-12-built-in-intents. The dataset contains 328 utterances over 10 intent classes. The related paper mentioned on the github page is https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.10190 and a related Medium post is https://medium.com/snips-ai/benchmarking-natural-language-understanding-systems-d35be6ce568d .
The SOFC-Exp corpus consists of 45 open-access scholarly articles annotated by domain experts. A corpus and an inter-annotator agreement study demonstrate the complexity of the suggested named entity recognition and slot filling tasks as well as high annotation quality is presented in the accompanying paper.
We have developed an efficient algorithm and implementation of a dictionary-based approach to named entity recognition, which we here use to identifynames of species and other taxa in text. The tool, SPECIES, is more than an order of magnitude faster and as accurate as existing tools. The precision and recall was assessed both on an existing gold-standard corpus and on a new corpus of 800 abstracts, which were manually annotated after the development of the tool. The corpus comprises abstracts from journals selected to represent many taxonomic groups, which gives insights into which types of organism names are hard to detect and which are easy. Finally, we have tagged organism names in the entire Medline database and developed a web resource, ORGANISMS, that makes the results accessible to the broad community of biologists.
Swahili is spoken by 100-150 million people across East Africa. In Tanzania, it is one of two national languages (the other is English) and it is the official language of instruction in all schools. News in Swahili is an important part of the media sphere in Tanzania. News contributes to education, technology, and the economic growth of a country, and news in local languages plays an important cultural role in many Africa countries. In the modern age, African languages in news and other spheres are at risk of being lost as English becomes the dominant language in online spaces. The Swahili news dataset was created to reduce the gap of using the Swahili language to create NLP technologies and help AI practitioners in Tanzania and across Africa continent to practice their NLP skills to solve different problems in organizations or societies related to Swahili language. Swahili News were collected from different websites that provide news in the Swahili language. I was able to find some websites that provide news in Swahili only and others in different languages including Swahili. The dataset was created for a specific task of text classification, this means each news content can be categorized into six different topics (Local news, International news , Finance news, Health news, Sports news, and Entertainment news). The dataset comes with a specified train/test split. The train set contains 75% of the dataset and test set contains 25% of the dataset.
Webbnyheter 2012 from Spraakbanken, semi-manually annotated and adapted for CoreNLP Swedish NER. Semi-manually defined in this case as: Bootstrapped from Swedish Gazetters then manually correcte/reviewed by two independent native speaking swedish annotators. No annotator agreement calculated.
The first gold standard Tamil-English code-switched, sentiment-annotated corpus containing 15,744 comment posts from YouTube. Train: 11,335 Validation: 1,260 and Test: 3,149. This makes the largest general domain sentiment dataset for this relatively low-resource language with code-mixing phenomenon. The dataset contains all the three types of code-mixed sentences - Inter-Sentential switch, Intra-Sentential switch and Tag switching. Most comments were written in Roman script with either Tamil grammar with English lexicon or English grammar with Tamil lexicon. Some comments were written in Tamil script with English expressions in between.
The core of WIT3 is the TED Talks corpus, that basically redistributes the original content published by the TED Conference website (http://www.ted.com). Since 2007, the TED Conference, based in California, has been posting all video recordings of its talks together with subtitles in English and their translations in more than 80 languages. Aside from its cultural and social relevance, this content, which is published under the Creative Commons BYNC-ND license, also represents a precious language resource for the machine translation research community, thanks to its size, variety of topics, and covered languages. This effort repurposes the original content in a way which is more convenient for machine translation researchers.
Thai Toxicity Tweet Corpus contains 3,300 tweets annotated by humans with guidelines including a 44-word dictionary. The author obtained 2,027 and 1,273 toxic and non-toxic tweets, respectively; these were labeled by three annotators. The result of corpus analysis indicates that tweets that include toxic words are not always toxic. Further, it is more likely that a tweet is toxic, if it contains toxic words indicating their original meaning. Moreover, disagreements in annotation are primarily because of sarcasm, unclear existing target, and word sense ambiguity. Notes from data cleaner: The data is included into [huggingface/datasets](https://www.github.com/huggingface/datasets) in Dec 2020. By this time, 506 of the tweets are not available publicly anymore. We denote these by `TWEET_NOT_FOUND` in `tweet_text`. Processing can be found at [this PR](https://github.com/tmu-nlp/ThaiToxicityTweetCorpus/pull/1).
ThaiNER (v1.3) is a 6,456-sentence named entity recognition dataset created from expanding the 2,258-sentence [unnamed dataset](http://pioneer.chula.ac.th/~awirote/Data-Nutcha.zip) by [Tirasaroj and Aroonmanakun (2012)](http://pioneer.chula.ac.th/~awirote/publications/). It is used to train NER taggers in [PyThaiNLP](https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/pythainlp). The NER tags are annotated by [Tirasaroj and Aroonmanakun (2012)]((http://pioneer.chula.ac.th/~awirote/publications/)) for 2,258 sentences and the rest by [@wannaphong](https://github.com/wannaphong/). The POS tags are done by [PyThaiNLP](https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/pythainlp)'s `perceptron` engine trained on `orchid_ud`. [@wannaphong](https://github.com/wannaphong/) is now the only maintainer of this dataset.
`thaiqa_squad` is an open-domain, extractive question answering dataset (4,000 questions in `train` and 74 questions in `dev`) in [SQuAD](https://rajpurkar.github.io/SQuAD-explorer/) format, originally created by [NECTEC](https://www.nectec.or.th/en/) from Wikipedia articles and adapted to [SQuAD](https://rajpurkar.github.io/SQuAD-explorer/) format by [PyThaiNLP](https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/).
Thai Literature Corpora (TLC): Corpora of machine-ingestible Thai classical literature texts. Release: 6/25/19 It consists of two datasets: ## TLC set It is texts from [Vajirayana Digital Library](https://vajirayana.org/), stored by chapters and stanzas (non-tokenized). tlc v.2.0 (6/17/19 : a total of 34 documents, 292,270 lines, 31,790,734 characters) tlc v.1.0 (6/11/19 : a total of 25 documents, 113,981 lines, 28,775,761 characters) ## TNHC set It is texts from Thai National Historical Corpus, stored by lines (manually tokenized). tnhc v.1.0 (6/25/19 : a total of 47 documents, 756,478 lines, 13,361,142 characters)
ToTTo is an open-domain English table-to-text dataset with over 120,000 training examples that proposes a controlled generation task: given a Wikipedia table and a set of highlighted table cells, produce a one-sentence description.
Tunisian Sentiment Analysis Corpus. About 17k user comments manually annotated to positive and negative polarities. This corpus is collected from Facebook users comments written on official pages of Tunisian radios and TV channels namely Mosaique FM, JawhraFM, Shemes FM, HiwarElttounsi TV and Nessma TV. The corpus is collected from a period spanning January 2015 until June 2016.
On social media, Arabic speakers tend to express themselves in their own local dialect. To do so, Tunisians use "Tunisian Arabizi", which consists in supplementing numerals to the Latin script rather than the Arabic alphabet. TUNIZI is the first Tunisian Arabizi Dataset including 3K sentences, balanced, covering different topics, preprocessed and annotated as positive and negative.
Twitter users often post parallel tweets—tweets that contain the same content but are written in different languages. Parallel tweets can be an important resource for developing machine translation (MT) systems among other natural language processing (NLP) tasks. This resource is a result of a generic method for collecting parallel tweets. Using the method, we compiled a bilingual corpus of English-Arabic parallel tweets and a list of Twitter accounts who post English-Arabic tweets regularly. Additionally, we annotate a subset of Twitter accounts with their countries of origin and topic of interest, which provides insights about the population who post parallel tweets.
Universal Dependencies is a project that seeks to develop cross-linguistically consistent treebank annotation for many languages, with the goal of facilitating multilingual parser development, cross-lingual learning, and parsing research from a language typology perspective. The annotation scheme is based on (universal) Stanford dependencies (de Marneffe et al., 2006, 2008, 2014), Google universal part-of-speech tags (Petrov et al., 2012), and the Interset interlingua for morphosyntactic tagsets (Zeman, 2008).
“Urdu Sentiment Corpus” (USC) shares the dat of Urdu tweets for the sentiment analysis and polarity detection. The dataset is consisting of tweets and overall, the dataset is comprising over 17, 185 tokens with 52% records as positive, and 48 % records as negative.
Tags: PER(人名), LOC(地点名), GPE(行政区名), ORG(机构名) Label Tag Meaning PER PER.NAM 名字(张三) PER.NOM 代称、类别名(穷人) LOC LOC.NAM 特指名称(紫玉山庄) LOC.NOM 泛称(大峡谷、宾馆) GPE GPE.NAM 行政区的名称(北京) ORG ORG.NAM 特定机构名称(通惠医院) ORG.NOM 泛指名称、统称(文艺公司)
Write & Improve (Yannakoudakis et al., 2018) is an online web platform that assists non-native English students with their writing. Specifically, students from around the world submit letters, stories, articles and essays in response to various prompts, and the W&I system provides instant feedback. Since W&I went live in 2014, W&I annotators have manually annotated some of these submissions and assigned them a CEFR level.
WinoBias, a Winograd-schema dataset for coreference resolution focused on gender bias. The corpus contains Winograd-schema style sentences with entities corresponding to people referred by their occupation (e.g. the nurse, the doctor, the carpenter).
A Winograd schema is a pair of sentences that differ in only one or two words and that contain an ambiguity that is resolved in opposite ways in the two sentences and requires the use of world knowledge and reasoning for its resolution. The schema takes its name from a well-known example by Terry Winograd: > The city councilmen refused the demonstrators a permit because they [feared/advocated] violence. If the word is ``feared'', then ``they'' presumably refers to the city council; if it is ``advocated'' then ``they'' presumably refers to the demonstrators.
`wisesight1000` contains Thai social media texts randomly drawn from the full `wisesight-sentiment`, tokenized by human annotators. Out of the labels `neg` (negative), `neu` (neutral), `pos` (positive), `q` (question), 250 samples each. Some texts are removed because they look like spam.Because these samples are representative of real world content, we believe having these annotaed samples will allow the community to robustly evaluate tokenization algorithms.
Wisesight Sentiment Corpus: Social media messages in Thai language with sentiment category (positive, neutral, negative, question) * Released to public domain under Creative Commons Zero v1.0 Universal license. * Category (Labels): {"pos": 0, "neu": 1, "neg": 2, "q": 3} * Size: 26,737 messages * Language: Central Thai * Style: Informal and conversational. With some news headlines and advertisement. * Time period: Around 2016 to early 2019. With small amount from other period. * Domains: Mixed. Majority are consumer products and services (restaurants, cosmetics, drinks, car, hotels), with some current affairs. * Privacy: * Only messages that made available to the public on the internet (websites, blogs, social network sites). * For Facebook, this means the public comments (everyone can see) that made on a public page. * Private/protected messages and messages in groups, chat, and inbox are not included. * Alternations and modifications: * Keep in mind that this corpus does not statistically represent anything in the language register. * Large amount of messages are not in their original form. Personal data are removed or masked. * Duplicated, leading, and trailing whitespaces are removed. Other punctuations, symbols, and emojis are kept intact. (Mis)spellings are kept intact. * Messages longer than 2,000 characters are removed. * Long non-Thai messages are removed. Duplicated message (exact match) are removed. * More characteristics of the data can be explore: https://github.com/PyThaiNLP/wisesight-sentiment/blob/master/exploration.ipynb
This shared task (part of WMT20) will build on its previous editions to further examine automatic methods for estimating the quality of neural machine translation output at run-time, without relying on reference translations. As in previous years, we cover estimation at various levels. Important elements introduced this year include: a new task where sentences are annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores instead of labels based on post-editing; a new multilingual sentence-level dataset mainly from Wikipedia articles, where the source articles can be retrieved for document-wide context; the availability of NMT models to explore system-internal information for the task. Task 1 uses Wikipedia data for 6 language pairs that includes high-resource English--German (En-De) and English--Chinese (En-Zh), medium-resource Romanian--English (Ro-En) and Estonian--English (Et-En), and low-resource Sinhalese--English (Si-En) and Nepalese--English (Ne-En), as well as a dataset with a combination of Wikipedia articles and Reddit articles for Russian-English (En-Ru). The datasets were collected by translating sentences sampled from source language articles using state-of-the-art NMT models built using the fairseq toolkit and annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores by professional translators. Each sentence was annotated following the FLORES setup, which presents a form of DA, where at least three professional translators rate each sentence from 0-100 according to the perceived translation quality. DA scores are standardised using the z-score by rater. Participating systems are required to score sentences according to z-standardised DA scores.
This shared task (part of WMT20) will build on its previous editions to further examine automatic methods for estimating the quality of neural machine translation output at run-time, without relying on reference translations. As in previous years, we cover estimation at various levels. Important elements introduced this year include: a new task where sentences are annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores instead of labels based on post-editing; a new multilingual sentence-level dataset mainly from Wikipedia articles, where the source articles can be retrieved for document-wide context; the availability of NMT models to explore system-internal information for the task. Task 2 evaluates the application of QE for post-editing purposes. It consists of predicting: - A/ Word-level tags. This is done both on source side (to detect which words caused errors) and target side (to detect mistranslated or missing words). - A1/ Each token is tagged as either `OK` or `BAD`. Additionally, each gap between two words is tagged as `BAD` if one or more missing words should have been there, and `OK` otherwise. Note that number of tags for each target sentence is 2*N+1, where N is the number of tokens in the sentence. - A2/ Tokens are tagged as `OK` if they were correctly translated, and `BAD` otherwise. Gaps are not tagged. - B/ Sentence-level HTER scores. HTER (Human Translation Error Rate) is the ratio between the number of edits (insertions/deletions/replacements) needed and the reference translation length.
This shared task (part of WMT20) will build on its previous editions to further examine automatic methods for estimating the quality of neural machine translation output at run-time, without relying on reference translations. As in previous years, we cover estimation at various levels. Important elements introduced this year include: a new task where sentences are annotated with Direct Assessment (DA) scores instead of labels based on post-editing; a new multilingual sentence-level dataset mainly from Wikipedia articles, where the source articles can be retrieved for document-wide context; the availability of NMT models to explore system-internal information for the task. The goal of this task 3 is to predict document-level quality scores as well as fine-grained annotations.
WUT Relations Between Sentences Corpus contains 2827 pairs of related sentences. Relationships are derived from Cross-document Structure Theory (CST), which enables multi-document summarization through identification of cross-document rhetorical relationships within a cluster of related documents. Every relation was marked by at least 3 annotators.
A multilingual fine-grained emotion dataset. The dataset consists of human annotated Finnish (25k) and English sentences (30k). Plutchik’s core emotions are used to annotate the dataset with the addition of neutral to create a multilabel multiclass dataset. The dataset is carefully evaluated using language-specific BERT models and SVMs to show that XED performs on par with other similar datasets and is therefore a useful tool for sentiment analysis and emotion detection.
XGLUE is a new benchmark dataset to evaluate the performance of cross-lingual pre-trained models with respect to cross-lingual natural language understanding and generation. The benchmark is composed of the following 11 tasks: - NER - POS Tagging (POS) - News Classification (NC) - MLQA - XNLI - PAWS-X - Query-Ad Matching (QADSM) - Web Page Ranking (WPR) - QA Matching (QAM) - Question Generation (QG) - News Title Generation (NTG) For more information, please take a look at https://microsoft.github.io/XGLUE/.
XQuAD-R is a retrieval version of the XQuAD dataset (a cross-lingual extractive QA dataset). Like XQuAD, XQUAD-R is an 11-way parallel dataset, where each question appears in 11 different languages and has 11 parallel correct answers across the languages.
A collection of news article headlines in Yoruba from BBC Yoruba. Each headline is labeled with one of the following classes: africa, entertainment, health, nigeria, politics, sport or world. The dataset was presented in the paper: Hedderich, Adelani, Zhu, Alabi, Markus, Klakow: Transfer Learning and Distant Supervision for Multilingual Transformer Models: A Study on African Languages (EMNLP 2020).
The Yoruba GV NER dataset is a labeled dataset for named entity recognition in Yoruba. The texts were obtained from Yoruba Global Voices News articles https://yo.globalvoices.org/ . We concentrate on four types of named entities: persons [PER], locations [LOC], organizations [ORG], and dates & time [DATE]. The Yoruba GV NER data files contain 2 columns separated by a tab ('\t'). Each word has been put on a separate line and there is an empty line after each sentences i.e the CoNLL format. The first item on each line is a word, the second is the named entity tag. The named entity tags have the format I-TYPE which means that the word is inside a phrase of type TYPE. For every multi-word expression like 'New York', the first word gets a tag B-TYPE and the subsequent words have tags I-TYPE, a word with tag O is not part of a phrase. The dataset is in the BIO tagging scheme. For more details, see https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/2020.lrec-1.335/
Dataset built from pairs of YouTube captions where both 'auto-generated' and 'manually-corrected' captions are available for a single specified language. This dataset labels two-way (e.g. ignoring single-sided insertions) same-length token differences in the `diff_type` column. The `default_seq` is composed of tokens from the 'auto-generated' captions. When a difference occurs between the 'auto-generated' vs 'manually-corrected' captions types, the `correction_seq` contains tokens from the 'manually-corrected' captions.