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In addition, many of the project’s end-customers are large entities with wide ranging activities. A climate related event in a non-related part of the business could have a material adverse impact on the financial strength of such end-customer and their ability to honor their contractual obligations which could negatively impact on revenue and the cash flow of the project and our business.
0 (no)
However, the implementation of a carbon tax may also have a negative impact on the financial health of utilities and corporate entities who also happen to purchase power from renewable energy projects in which we have invested. The credit ratings of these entities may be downgraded due to additional operating expenses resulting from a carbon tax. A credit rating downgrade may reduce the amount of financial leverage we are able to utilize. If this were to occur, our overall profitability could decline.
0 (no)
In anticipation of climate change related physical risks, projects related to our investments in particularly vulnerable regions, such as low-lying coastal areas, may face increases in insurance costs. An increase in insurance costs may reduce the cash flows and financial returns from these investments and may cause us to reduce the amount of financial leverage we utilize and cause a decline in our overall profitability.
0 (no)
A reduction in GHG emissions relies on the commercial viability and scalability of emission reduction strategies and related technology and products. In the event that we are unable to implement these strategies and technologies as planned without negatively impacting our expected operations or cost structure, or such strategies or technologies do not perform as expected, we may be unable to meet our GHG 2030 targets or 2050 ambition on the current timelines, or at all.
0 (no)
Low Carbon Fuel Standards Existing and proposed environmental legislation and regulation developed by certain U.S. states, Canadian provinces, the Canadian federal government and members of the European Union, regulating carbon fuel standards could result in increased costs and reduced revenue. The potential regulation may negatively affect the marketing of Cenovus’s bitumen, crude oil or refined products, and may require us to purchase emissions credits in order to affect sales in such jurisdictions. As an oil sands producer, we are not directly regulated and are not expected to have a compliance obligation for carbon intensity reduction requirements for liquid fuels. Refiners, importers, and fuel distributors in these jurisdictions are required to comply with the legislation.
0 (no)
DEFINITIONS Scope 1 emissions are direct emissions from owned or operated facilities. Cenovus accounts for emissions on a gross operatorship basis. This includes fuel combustion, venting, flaring and fugitive emissions. It does not include emissions from the 50% non-operated ownership in the company’s refineries or emissions from non-operated Deep Basin assets.
0 (no)
Failure to comply and adapt to climate related matters is also a significant reputation risk which could result in e.g. lack of tenant interest, higher cost of capital in the financial market, and lack of ability to attract or retain talent. Also, not handling the company’s corporate social responsibilities in an informed and good matter is a reputation risk, whereas the opposite is an opportunity.
0 (no)
Climate change means climate risk, not only physical risk but also transition risk – the risk associated with economic impacts of the transition to a low carbon economy. Future social developments, climate policy developments and technology developments are subject to high uncertainty, and these factors have a major impact on greenhouse gas emissions. There is also significant uncertainty with regard to how sensitive the climate system is to changes in greenhouse gas emissions, and uncertainty with regard to the effects of a given level of warming.
0 (no)
The analysis of economic implications of climate change is fraught with difficulty, and it is impossible to survey all potential impacts of climate change as no existing scenario or model can fully describe the workings of the entire physical world and how all physical, chemical, geological and biological processes influence each other. Impacts of climate changes will thus depend on how rapidly they occur, how large the changes are, as well as the adaptability of societies and ecosystems. As such, many analyses are based on factors that lend themselves to some degree of quantification, but climate change will also have effects which are difficult to quantify, or which cannot meaning- fully be quantified.
0 (no)
– Commonly used benchmarks are the current climate or the pre-industrial climate situation. Norway will probably experience increased precipitation, more flooding, more frequent landslips and rising sea level, and these physical changes and the uncertainty associated therewith constitute risk factors. Many of the physical processes happen very slowly, from a human perspective. Even if net global emissions were to be reduced to zero within a short space of time, it may therefore take a very long time for the climate system to arrive at a new equilibrium.
0 (no)
The two biggest emissions categories are car use and air travel. Compared to 2016, there was a decrease in the category ‘car’ as a result of the switch to electric lease cars. There were more kilometres of air travel in 2019, which resulted in higher CO 2 emissions in this area.
0 (no)
■ While our facilities and operations are distributed across the globe, we can experience extreme weather, natural disasters, civil unrest, human-made disasters, power outages, pandemic, and other events which can prevent access to, and operations within, the facilities for our employees, partners, and other parties that support our business operations.
0 (no)
Financial losses stemming from climate-related factors adversely impacting the capital value of securities held within the Investment Vehicle portfolio and/or the ability of those companies whose securities are held to meet their financial obligations thereunder. Reputational damage stemming from the Company’s association with companies whose securities are held within the Investment Vehicle portfolio and whose ESG policies, activities or disclosures fail to meet the standards expected by stakeholders.
0 (no)
Risk Impact Assessment of change in risk year-on-year Mitigation of risk absorber tubes, blades, PV panels or transformers are susceptible to being damaged by severe weather, including for example hail. In addition, replacement and spare parts for key components may be difficult or costly to acquire or may be unavailable
0 (no)
In addition, to the physical risks mentioned previously, rising temperatures could cause an increase in our operation and maintenance costs. Rising temperatures are associated to the reduction of the cycle efficiency of our turbines, a reduction of efficiency in solar photovoltaic modules, lower efficiency in wind facilities and higher consumption of chemicals used for operational purposes in our desalination plants, among others.
0 (no)
Climate-related physical risks are those risks resulting from climate change, which involve event-driven (acute) or longer-term (chronic) shifts in climate patterns. Acute physical risks refer to those that are event-driven, including increased severity of extreme weather events such as cyclones, hurricanes or floods. Chronic physical risks refer to longer-term shifts in climate patterns (e.g., sustained higher temperatures) that may cause sea level rise or chronic heat waves.
0 (no)
Climate change is one of the greatest challenges we face today, with the potential to significantly impact our business, as well as our planet, in a number of ways. Construction delays, loss in productivity, rising material, water and energy costs and damage to property are just some of the climate-related risks we face as weather events caused by higher temperatures continue to become more extreme.
0 (no)
42_ Scope 1 concerns direct emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels, such as gas, oil, coal, etc. Scope 2 covers indirect emissions related to the consumption of electricity, heat or steam required to manufacture a product. Scope 3 concerns other indirect emissions, such as the extraction of materials purchased by the company to manufacture a product or the transport-related emissions of employees and of customers who buy the product. This is the largest share of a company’s emissions.
0 (no)
The impact of climate change presents a significant risk. Damage to assets caused by extreme weather events linked to climate change is becoming more evident, highlighting the fragility of global infrastructure. We also anticipate the potential effects of climate change will increasingly impact our own operations and those of client properties we manage, especially when they are in coastal cities.
0 (no)
Emerging risks are monitored proactively, their potential long-term impact on the Company is evaluated, and Senior Management and Risk Management Committee are informed on the subject. In this context, climate change risks stand out in terms of both impact and probability. Moreover, loss of reputation/brand damage, business interruption, failure to innovate, cyber attack and information security risks stand out as globally emerging risks.
0 (no)
Changes in the portfolio’s carbon footprint may occur for two reasons: a change in portfolio composition or a change in the emissions of investee companies. Not until companies reduce their real emissions will we see a reduction of atmospheric carbon and an improvement in the climate. In the past, it was not possible to show the reasons for changes in portfolio carbon footprint. However, the AP funds in 2019 were for the first time able to quantify changes over time in total carbon emissions and portfolio-weighted carbon intensity. Nevertheless, the metrics have limitations that restrict their applicability for measuring total portfolio climate risk and impact. This is because the figures do not, for example, include carbon emissions caused indirectly by investee business activities.
0 (no)
LafargeHolcim is exposed to a variety of regulatory frameworks to reduce emissions. In addition, a perception of the sector as a high emitter could impact our reputation, thus reducing our attractiveness to investors, employees and potential employees. Based on TCFD framework and risk categorization, LafargeHolcim assesses all climate-related risks. See page 67 the most relevant risks associated with our business.
0 (no)
The cement industry is associated with high CO2 intensity and LafargeHolcim is exposed to a variety of regulatory frameworks to reduce emissions, some of which may be under revision. These frameworks can affect the business activities of LafargeHolcim. In addition, a perception of the sector as a high emitter could impact our reputation, thus reducing our attractiveness to investors, employees and potential employees.
0 (no)
MARKE T: As the carbon debate intensifies, cement and concrete could be challenged by our customers as the building material of first choice because of perceived high embodied CO2. In the long term, should regulatory frameworks fail to incentivize consumption of low-carbon products, customers may be unwilling to pay for additional costs and the cement sector’s low-carbon roadmap might be compromised.
0 (no)
Net CO2 emissions (kg per ton of cementitious material) Net CO2 emissions are CO2 emissions from the calcination process of the raw materials and the combustion of traditional kiln and non-kiln fuels. Cementitious materials refer to clinker production volumes, mineral components consumed in cement production and mineral components processed and sold externally.
0 (no)
Disengaging and divesting from thermal coal, oil sands and oil shale Fossil fuels emit carbon dioxide (CO2) when burned and extracting them can harm the environment. We are working with customers and companies in which we invest that have more than 30 percent exposure to thermal coal, oil sands and oil shales to help them to reduce their use and exposure to these fuels. Zurich will also generally no longer underwrite or invest in companies generating more than 30 percent of their revenue from mining or more than 30 percent of their electricity from thermal coal.
1 (yes)
Climate-related physical risks Changes are expected in the frequency, severity and geographical distribution of extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones and extreme rainfall and associated flooding or heat waves in the event that society fails to limit climate change to well below an increase of two degrees Celsius. Scientific consensus suggests society is likely to experience devastating impacts as a result of these changes. Current climate models, such as the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) model upon which Zurich bases its internal climate scenarios, indicate that physical climate-change risk will begin to rise more materially after the next two decades if left unmitigated.
0 (no)
Zurich could be exposed to transition risks if it fails to manage changing market conditions and customer needs as part of the transition to a low-carbon economy, resulting in asset impairment, opportunity cost and lost market share. In a transition scenario, industries unable to de-carbonize could experience declining profitability and lack of re-financing, which could lead to a lack of maintenance with increasing rates of outages and equipment break-downs that translate into higher insurance losses. Failure to manage transition risk could also lead to reputational impacts, both internal and external, resulting from a failure to deliver on publicly stated commitments. Although not considered material in the near-term, the increasing frequency of climate-related legal action suggests climate-related litigation could represent a significant potential risk in the long term.
0 (no)
Climate change can pose material risks to sovereign debt due to its impact on national expenditures associated with disaster recovery from extreme weather events or preparedness through climate change mitigation and adaptation projects. Emerging market countries are particularly vulnerable since they often lack capital or have higher funding costs, which exacerbates the myriad risks that they already face. For example, many of these countries are vulnerable to food insecurity from both the impact of climate change on their own agricultural production and higher prices for imports. Our investment team members are increasingly focused on deepening their understanding of environmental risk in sovereigns and its complex links to fiscal and monetary conditions, which in turn affect bond yields and credit ratings.
0 (no)
Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions Scope 3 emissions are indirect greenhouse gas emissions as a consequence of the operations of the Company, but are not owned or controlled by the Company, such as emissions from third-party logistics providers, waste management suppliers, travel suppliers, employee commuting, and combustion of sold gas by customers.
0 (no)
The impact of climate change may over time affect the operations of the Group and the markets in which the Group operates. This could include physical risks such as acute and chronic changes in weather and/or transitional risks such as technological development, policy and regulatory change, and market and economic responses. Efforts to address climate change through laws and regulations, for example by requiring reductions in emissions of GHGs such as CO2, can create economic risks and uncertainties for the Group’s businesses. Such risks could include the cost of purchasing allowances or credits to meet GHG emissions caps, the cost of installing equipment to reduce emissions to comply with GHG limits or required technological standards, decreased profits or losses arising from decreased demand for the Group’s goods and higher production costs resulting directly or indirectly from the imposition of legislative or regulatory controls. Manifestation of these increased costs may increase the underlying cost of production of the Group’s products which may adversely impact the financial performance of the Group.
0 (no)
It includes the risk that the Group fails to develop or to execute successful strategies to deliver acceptable returns in the context of the economic, competitive, regulatory / legal and interest rate environments that arise. It also includes non-financial risks such as people risks and risks relating to climate change.
0 (no)
We have imposed restrictions on providing loans, advice and insurance to controversial and socially sensitive sectors and activities such as: the energy sector, project finance, arms-related activities, narcotic crops, gambling, fur, palm oil production, mining, deforestation, land acquisition and involuntary resettlement of indigenous populations, tobacco, mining, animal welfare and prostitution.
1 (yes)
Business risk is the risk arising from changes in external factors (the macroeconomic environment, regulations, client behaviour, competitive landscape, socio-demographic environment, climate, etc.) that impact the demand for and/or profitability of our products and services. Strategic risk is the risk caused by not taking a strategic decision, by taking a strategic decision that does not have the intended effect or by not adequately implementing strategic decisions. quantified under different stress test scenarios and long-term earnings assessments.
0 (no)
The physical risks identified were all expected to only manifest in the longer term. Physical risks include: reduced ability to complete construction on time in the case of extreme weather events; construction times may similarly be marginally prolonged from chronic changes in weather patterns, such as heavier rainfall and increased humidity; and rising sea levels and heightened risk of flooding may impact the availability of development plots.
0 (no)
Human rights are being severely affected by climate change. Human rights outcomes related to climate impacts include the loss of land, forced migration, and loss of life and resources due to conflict. People also have their rights to livelihood and work affected. Consequently, human rights impacts are of primary concern in a just transition.
0 (no)
The downsides of disruptive technology have been apparent in other engagements. The Forum’s discussions with Tesla, a company that potentially will play a central role in decarbonising the car industry, have focused on health and safety concerns about their Freemont car plant. Despite introducing new technologies on the production line, reports have suggested that incident rates are higher than their competitors. There have been similar concerns that employment standards and health and safety records have been worse in new industries, including in the renewable energy sector.
0 (no)
Climate change exposes us to physical risks which may challenge our ability to effectively underwrite, model and price catastrophe risk particularly if the frequency and severity of catastrophic events such as pandemics, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, wildfires and windstorms and other natural disasters continue to increase. For example, losses resulting from actual policy experience may be adverse as compared to the assumptions made in product pricing and our ability to mitigate our exposure may be reduced.
0 (no)
Climate change-related risks may also adversely impact the value of the securities that we hold or lead to increased credit risk of other counterparties we transact business with, including reinsurers. In addition, our reputation or corporate brand could be negatively impacted as a result of changing customer or societal perceptions of organizations that we either insure or invest in due to their actions (or lack thereof) with respect to climate change. We cannot predict the long-term impacts of climate change on our business and results of operations.
0 (no)
Other regulatory risks entail litigation risk and potential direct regulations in line with increasing carbon neutrality ambitions in various jurisdictions, such as the EU’s European Green Deal. Climate-related policy changes may also reduce access to prospective geographical areas for future exploration and production. Disruptive developments may not be ruled out, possibly triggered by severe weather events affecting public perception and policy making.
0 (no)
Reputational and financial impact: Increased concern over climate change could lead to increased expectations to fossil fuel producers, as well as a more negative perception of the oil and gas industry. This could lead to litigation and divestment risk and could also have an impact on talent attraction and retention and on our licenses to operate in certain jurisdictions.
0 (no)
Examples of parameters that could impact Equinor’s operations include increasing frequency and severity of extreme weather events, rising sea level, changes in sea currents and restrained water availability. There is also uncertainty regarding the magnitude and time horizon for the occurrence of physical impacts of climate change, which increases uncertainty regarding their potential impact on Equinor.
0 (no)
Fluctuations in weather and other environmental conditions, including temperature and precipitation levels, may affect consumer demand for electricity. In addition, the potential physical effects of climate change, such as increased frequency and severity of storms, floods and other climatic events, could disrupt NRG's operations and supply chain, and cause them to incur significant costs in preparing for or responding to these effects. These or other meteorological changes could lead to increased operating costs, capital expenses or power purchase costs. NRG's commercial and residential customers may also experience the potential physical impacts of climate change and may incur significant costs in preparing for or responding to these efforts, including increasing the mix and resiliency of their energy solutions and supply.
0 (no)
We are committed to net zero. At the same time, we cannot see a viable path to a 100 percent reduction in our greenhouse gas emissions based on our current or potential asset mix and technologies. Committing to 100 percent carbon- and methane-free operations, without adequate technology and forceful policy and regulatory prescriptions, would jeopardize our mandate to provide safe, reliable, and affordable energy to our customers.
1 (yes)
Water stress Household water scarcity caused by climate change is another physical risk, which is exacerbated by population growth and urbanisation. During periods of drought consumers may reduce their use of certain products including laundry detergents, shampoos and conditioners, and toilet cleaners as they are unable to access water to use them or experience declining water quality which limits their enjoyment and/or efficacy. While the overall impact of water stress on our sales, from both policy and physical impacts, was not found to be significant in our scenario analysis at a global level within the 2030 time horizon evaluated, the impacts we see in the short term tend to be more local.
0 (no)
Governments alone also cannot address the challenges laid out in the SDGs. The U.S. operating budget is the largest in the world at about $4.5 trillion. If all of it were dedicated to the SDGs only —meaning not funding national security, basic research, basic services for the U.S. taxpayers, and not paying the federal debt —we still would fall short of the annual need.
0 (no)
The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has issued a report helping UPM to predict the future physical long-term impacts of climate change on its business in Finland, Uruguay, Southern Germany and Eastern China. The Institute incorporated three alternative emission scenarios in the report. The biggest risks in the company's business are related to more frequent and severe extreme weather conditions such as heavy rainfall, storms and drought.
0 (no)
In Eastern China, the annual average temperature may rise by between 1.6°C and 2.7°C. The FMI predicts that the biggest related risk would be the flooding of the River Yangtze due to a potential increase in rainfall. In Southern Germany, the annual average temperature could rise between 1.6°C and 2.7°C by 2050, depending on the eventual emission scenario. The increase of droughts and forest fires due to higher temperatures constitute the biggest risks for forestry.
0 (no)
Climate change Climate change exposes UPM to variety of risks, that can be considered strategic, operational, hazard or financial. Strategic risks are related to competition, markets, customers, products and regulation. For example, unpredictable regulation and subsidies may distort raw material and final product markets, and costs of greenhouse gas emissions may influence UPM’s financial performance. However, transition to low-carbon economy should bring business opportunities to UPM’s renewable and recyclable products. Operational risks can be related to supply chain, availability and price of major inputs. Climate change may also cause operational or hazard risk related to exceptional weather events such as more severe storms, floods and draughts resulting in e.g. unpredictable wood harvesting conditions and hydro power availability. Climate change may also contribute to financial risks such as electricity price.
0 (no)
RISK TOLERANCE We have a low tolerance for risk, when it comes to protecting the human and environmental resources we all depend on. However, given the long-term nature of some sustainability risks and the level of uncertainty associated with their occurrence and impact, we accept that some risks are inevitable. We therefore focus on helping to minimise global risks while building resilience in our operations and supply chain. EXAMPLES OR RISKS • Resource scarcity, coupled with increasing demand, could affect the production, availability, quality and cost of raw materials. • Increased frequency of extreme weather events, from floods to droughts, could cause disruption in our supply chain and impact our business model by changing the sourcing of raw materials, as well as the production and distribution of finished goods. • Increased regulation and more stringent environmental standards could impact our business by affecting production costs and flexibility of operations. • Our industry is sustained by many agricultural and manufacturing communities around the world. Failure to support them in preserving key skills and building more sustainable livelihoods could cause social, economic and operational challenges, from community tensions and disruption to production to a reduced talent pool.
0 (no)
Electrical and electronic waste (WEEE) accounts for 7% of the total waste generated by Wavestone’s activities in weight. This type of waste represents a major challenge given its large carbon footprint throughout its entire lifespan (use of water, metal and energy resources at all stages from product design through to recycling). We recycle all this waste or channel it for reuse or energy recovery.
0 (no)
The current model for financing renewables is an example of inefficient distribution of effort, since, even though the electricity sector accounts for only around 25% of energy consumption, it is the electricity consumers who bear most of these costs (more than 80% in Portugal and Spain). This effect distorts competition among the various energy vectors, limiting electrification and penalizing consumers who are most dependent on this energy vector.
0 (no)
Uncertainty around the evolution of the wholesale market design, given the current challenges: • Marginal remuneration system not adjusted to the current context of growing penetration of fixed cost technologies (renewables, backup, storage). • Growing penetration of technologies with 0 marginal cost (reducing prices and increasing prices’ volatility). • Uncertainty around the returns of the conventional generation, in particular as backup capacity (relevant in a perspective of ensuring security of supply). • Volatile context, not suitable for long-term investments necessary to the modernization, decarbonization and security of supply.
0 (no)
We have and could suffer losses due to operational risks Operational risk is the risk of loss resulting from inadequate or failed internal processes, people and systems or from external events. It also includes, among other things, reputational risk, technology risk, model risk and outsourcing risk, as well as the risk of business disruption due to external events such as natural disasters, environmental hazard, damage to critical utilities, and targeted activism and protest activity. While we have policies, processes and controls in place to manage these risks, these may not always have been, or continue to be effective.
0 (no)
Climate change may have adverse effects on our business We, our customers and external suppliers, may be adversely affected by the physical risks of climate change, including increases in temperatures, sea levels, and the frequency and severity of adverse climatic events including fires, storms, floods and droughts. These effects, whether acute or chronic in nature, may directly impact us and our customers through reputational damage, environmental factors, insurance risk and business disruption and may have an adverse impact on financial performance (including through an increase in defaults in credit exposures).
0 (no)
Initiatives to mitigate or respond to adverse impacts of climate change may impact market and asset prices, economic activity, and customer behaviour, particularly in geographic locations and industry sectors adversely affected by these changes. Failure to effectively manage these transition risks could adversely affect our business, prospects, reputation, financial performance or financial condition.
0 (no)
There is an increased focus by foreign, federal, state and local regulatory and legislative bodies regarding environmental policies relating to climate change, regulating greenhouse gas emissions, energy policies and sustainability, including single use plastics. This new or increased focus may result in new or increased laws and regulations that could cause significant increases in our costs of operation and delivery. In particular, increasing regulation of fuel emissions could substantially increase the distribution and supply chain costs associated with our products. Lastly, consumers and customers may put an increased priority on purchasing products that are sustainably grown and made, requiring us to incur increased costs for additional transparency, due diligence and reporting. As a result, climate change could negatively affect our business and operations.
0 (no)
Climate change exacerbates existing risks in some areas, while also posing new risks. We identified a number of transitional risks as the world adapts to a new climate, including effects on the New Zealand electricity market, which is largely dependent on weather to provide fuel, increased pressure on our business to reduce our emissions and transition to lower carbon options, and potential costs resulting from regulatory interventions.
0 (no)
Climate change strategy Climate risks the Commissioners face include: • Transition risk – the risk that our asset allocation, asset managers or individual investment assets prove to be poorly positioned for the investment risks and opportunities associated with the transition to a net zero carbon economy. • Physical risk – the risk that our assets are impacted by the physical risks associated with climate change, such as flooding and fire, particularly our property, rural and forest assets.
0 (no)
Forests, which are home to 80% of Earth's biodiversity, are shrinking by 13 million hectares per year. More than 75% of the planet's land surface has already been altered in a more or less reversible way, leading to desertification, deforestation, pollution and salinisation. At the current rate, experts at the IPBES (Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) estimate that 95% of the planet's land may deteriorate by 2050, which could provoke massive population displacements.
0 (no)
In 2019, AP6 compiled its first high-level analysis of physical climate risks in the portfolio. Although it does not go into great depth, it does indicate that there are medi- um-high risks in nearly half of the portfolio. It is not currently possible for AP6 to, at the portfolio level, assess other climate-related risks like changes in consumer behavior or more regulation of products and emissions.
0 (no)
In recent years the impact of climate change is being felt throughout Japan. Its e ects include higher surface temperature, more frequent heavy rainfall events, declining quality of agricultural products, shifting plant and animal species distributions, and a higher risk of heat illness. �ere is a high probability that these e ects will continue and become more severe over an extended period.
0 (no)
Climate change Climate change is an external risk factor that is part of environmental risk. It is defined as an entity’s vulnerability to the negative effects of climate change, which could lead to financial losses. It includes:  physical risks, namely the risks resulting from damage caused by extreme weather events;  transition risks, namely the risks related to implementation of measures to ensure environmental transition.
0 (no)
Changes in precipitation patterns and extreme weather conditions such as floods, storms, droughts and fires may impact our plantations and the forests we source wood from and could result in fibre supply chain interruptions and higher fibre costs. Higher temperatures may also increase the vulnerability of forests to pests and disease. Increased severity of extreme weather events may also interrupt our operations. In water-scarce countries, we may see an impact on our production process as a result of limited water availability.
0 (no)
We are subject to a wide range of international, national and local environmental laws and regulations, as well as the requirements of our customers and expectations of our broader stakeholders. Costs of continuing compliance, potential restoration and clean-up activities, and increasing costs from the effects of emissions could have an adverse impact on our profitability.
0 (no)
The physical risks of climate change are divided into acute and chronic risks. Acute risks include risks related to extreme weather events, such as floods and hurricanes. Chronic risks include, for example, permanently higher temperatures and the ensuing sea level rise. Sectors particularly exposed to physical risks include the forest sector, agriculture and real estate, to name a few.
0 (no)
Group environmental impacts: With over 83,000 employees in more than 100 countries, the Group’s operations impact on the environment, particularly as a result of travel, energy consumption and waste. Impacts associated with climate change: Climate events (floods, storms, tsunamis, etc.) may disrupt or interrupt the services delivered by agencies and teams to their clients.
0 (no)
However, given the unprecedented global supply chain issues that we are now seeing with many car manufactures and dealerships, we may be unable to purchase new EVs in sufficient numbers. In addition, our latest assessments of EV readiness in Europe show that, while the growth in public charging points continues apace, a significant number of countries are unlikely to have the infrastructure, fiscal incentives or model availability in place to support us reaching this goal by 2021.
0 (no)
Within our overall risk management categories, we recognise a number of key non-financial risks pertaining to our supply chain, environmental impact, employees, and social issues such as labour rights, human rights and corruption. These risks, as well as others that could emerge in the future, could hinder the company in achieving its strategic and financial objectives. Below we outline some of the most material non-financial risks to our business and performance, along with the main steps we have taken to manage them, while on page 84, we further consider our main climate-related risks and opportunities.
0 (no)
Our business model may also be adversely affected by risks related to the physical impacts of climate change and extreme weather conditions. As the risk of flooding, wildfires, storms or hail increases it could become more difficult for LeasePlan to offer affordable insurance protection and may impact our pricing of these products. These could also impact our RMT services if more vehicles in our fleet are damaged or require more frequent servicing as a result of changing weather patterns. Finally, there is the possibility that extreme weather events will impact our business continuity at certain locations, if our employees are unable to reach their places of work or if office locations and delivery stores are physically damaged.
0 (no)
Developments in these and other external factors may affect customers’ use of EVs and, therefore, our EV transition goals. These may have a material adverse effect on the market prices of certain vehicle types in certain jurisdictions, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Sudden changes in the market can also make it harder for LeasePlan to have the right resources, people and stock in place to meet demand.
0 (no)
As for climate-related risks, we have followed TCFD classification in considering (1) risks related to the transition to a low-carbon economy in the 2°C scenario and (2) risks related to the physical impacts of climate change in the 4°C scenario, which assumes that efforts to reduce global CO2 emissions have failed. Risks are categorized into short term (over the next three years from fiscal 2019 to 2021), medium term (through fiscal 2030), and long term (through fiscal
0 (no)
Exposure to Extractives Industries It is important to identify exposure to business activities in extractives industries in order to assess the potential risk of ‘stranded assets’. ‘Stranded assets’ are assets that may suffer from premature write-downs and may even become obsolete due to changes in policy or consumer behaviour. This is a real potential risk for assets in extractives industries as we transition to a lower carbon future.
0 (no)
The Trustees believe that climate change will have significant and wide-ranging implications for the global economy and therefore presents a Significant risk to the long-term value and security of the pension fund's assets. The Trustees also believe that failure to consider ESG factors, including climate change, cou ld lead to underperformance or financial loss in the short as well as the longer term.
0 (no)
Risks—Transition Risks and Physical Risks Clients to whom MUFG has provided credits may be exposed to risks arising in the course of the transition to a low-carbon society, such as stricter regulation and the introduction of low-carbon technologies (transition risks). They can also be exposed to risks arising from physical damage due to the growing occurrences of climate change-induced natural disasters and abnormal weather (physical risks). If these risks were to impact the clients’ businesses or financial conditions, MUFG’s credit portfolio would also be exposed to substantial risks.
0 (no)
A global increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration in our atmosphere has caused a record-breaking pace of temperature rise, and the rate of change is still increasing. Since the 1880s, the average global temperature has increased by 1.1 degrees Celsius. A destructive trend of impacts has emerged, from stronger hurricanes to intensified droughts and rising sea levels: climate change is already causing large-scale damage to communities around the world.
0 (no)
PROHIBIT COAL GENERATION: There is no denying that coal is on the decline around the world. Even with artificial incentives being set up to extend the lives of coal plants in supply-strapped regions, it is clear that no amount of subsidies or lobbying will slow the global transition. The problem is with the laggards, certain regions that have been too slow in realizing the true cost of coal to their citizens and natural environment, and therefore have dangerously prolonged the decline.
0 (no)
In the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report, climate change poses an increasing threat to mankind and the global economy. Transitioning to a low-carbon economy may entail extensive policy, legal, technology and market changes. Physical risks such as frequent or severe weather events may also give rise to credit, operational and reputational risks.
0 (no)
Over the past several years, changing weather patterns and climatic conditions, including as a result of climate change, have added to the unpredictability of natural disasters and to the frequency and severity thereof and created additional uncertainty as to future trends and exposures. In particular, the consequences of climate change might significantly impact the insurance and reinsurance industry, including with respect to risk perception, pricing and modelling assumptions, and the need for new insurance products, all of which may create unforeseen risks and costs not currently known to us.
0 (no)
Group has divested from. Therefore, AXA also restricts insurance coverage for coal and oil sands-related assets (as well as in the other industries mentioned in the previous section), and arctic drilling. Since 2017, the underwriting restrictions ban Property and Construction covers for coal mines, coal plants, oil sands extraction sites or associated pipeline.
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Business interruption An external hazardous event (floods, riots, fires etc.) or internal disruption (e.g. availability of critical spare parts, global supply chain complexity etc.) may result in a significant period of plant shutdown or disruption and hence in delayed/non-delivery of our products to internal and/or external customers, ultimately leading to adverse financial and reputational consequences.
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7. OUR R E SIL IE NCE T O CL IM AT E CH A NGE The Group fails to respond appropriately, and sufficiently, to climate change risks or adapt to benefit from the potential opportunities. This could lead to damage to our reputation, loss of income and/or property values, and loss of our licence to operate.
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Climate change is a long-term risk associated with high uncertainty regarding timing, scope and severity of potential impacts. Climate risks can be grouped into physical risks and transition risks. Physical risks relate to losses from overall climate changes (i.e. changing weather patterns and sea level rise) and acute climate events (i.e. extreme weather and natural disasters). These physical risks impact property & casualty (P&C) insurance, but also life insurance, for instance through higher than expected mortality rates. Losses can also follow from credit risk and collateral linked to the mortgage portfolio. Aegon is exposed to mortality risk and mortgage underwriting
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Our current global economy’s linear business model of “take, make, and waste” is depleting natural resources faster than they can be replenished and straining ecosystems. Imagine repurposing a piece of plastic at the end of its use, giving it another life as something else. Its use is, in fact, circular, and the end of use doesn’t mean the end of life.
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25 large Dutch banks, insurers and pension funds are particularly exposed to these risks, these financial institutions have not yet sufficiently integrated them into their business operations. For example, they invest EUR 97 billion in shares of companies operating in areas with significant water scarcity and EUR 56 billion in companies dependent on scarce resources.
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When these damages are uninsured – and therefore borne by households, businesses or public authorities – this affects financial institutions’ exposure to these parties. The second type of risk, transition risk, is the result of the transition to a carbon-neutral economy. Climate policy, technological developments and changing consumer preferences may cause the value of loans and investments in sectors and companies that emit large quantities of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases to decrease much faster than previously expected. Underestimating this risk could lead to sudden and significant losses in the financial sector. Such a collapse is what is known as a
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Beith: Stranded carbon assets was the underappreciated risk back then. Today it’s policy risk. There’s a palpable sense of grass-roots alarm as we see real-world, real-time effects of climate change, and that could create a policy tipping point where governments have historically been skeptical. That is the case next door to us in Australia, with its devastating bush fires, but also in the U.S., where state and municipal governments have taken the lead while the federal government moves in the opposite direction. Those potential tipping points create substantial investment risk.
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Environmental and social risk is often associated with credit, operational and reputation risk. Environmental and social risk involves a broad spectrum of topics and issues, such as: pollution and waste; energy, water and other resource usage; climate change; biodiversity; human rights; labour standards; community health, safety and security; land acquisition and involuntary resettlement; Indigenous peoples’ rights and consultation; and cultural heritage.
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Ecological factors and environmental regulations for access to raw material deposits also create a degree of uncertainty. In some regions of the world, for example in West Africa south of the Sahara, raw materials for cement production are so scarce that cement or clinker needs to be imported by sea. Rising transportation costs and capacity constraints in the port facilities can lead to an increase in product costs.
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Climate change presents both physical and transition risks to our investment portfolio. Physical risks include the risk of loss due to extreme weather events or longer-term shifts in climate patterns. Transition risks include changes in government policy, regulation, consumer preferences and technology, which may increase the costs of certain assets (e.g. carbon pricing) or their marketability (e.g. stranded assets). These changes may impact the value of our investments.
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Physical risks have a higher probability to impact coffee, with higher temperatures and water shortages compromising quality and reducing availability. This may lead to an increase in raw material costs for the industry, and have economic and social impacts on coffee-growing communities. For wheat and dairy, there is a potential increase in the volatility of regional sourcing due to greater local climate variability but overall we foresee limited impact on global macro yields.
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Accordingly, data for FY2019 is not consistent with data for FY2018 or preceding fiscal years. 3.Data for FY2016 regarding CO2 emissions from Showa Shell business sites is not publicly disclosed. 4.In line with a change in the end of fiscal year, Showa Shell’s FY2018 data is based on emissions during the 15-month period from January 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019.
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CFRA Phase I confirmed that Vancouver is most vulnerable to flooding caused by the combined effect of a coastal storm surge and a king tide (exceptionally high tides that typically occur in December and January) rather than river-related flooding caused by spring run-off. In addition to mapping the areas vulnerable to flooding, Phase I also identified the community assets, infrastructure and buildings at risk to flooding over time.
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Water is an essential input for our industrial activities. Concerns regarding the long-term availability and quality of water, and security of access to water, have increased due to changes to demography and climate. Damage caused by storm surges and strong winds can affect the availability of ports and critical infrastructure required to transport our goods. Changes in temperature can lead to heat stress affecting our workforce and equipment.
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The majority of our Scope 1 emissions include fugitive emissions from the production of coal and consumption of fuel and reductants. Scope 2 emissions principally relate to purchased electricity for our operations, in particular our metals processing assets, which require secure and reliable energy 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
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Responding to the threats of climate change Our exposure to climate change falls into two broad categories. Physical risks, particularly to our property assets from severe weather events; and transition risks from the move to a low carbon economy, which will impact the value of investments associated with higher levels of greenhouse gas emissions. The two risks are linked. Continued emissions will increase physical risks, and limiting the impacts will require substantial emission reductions increasing transition risks.
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We fail to respond to the emerging threats from climate change for our investment portfolios and wider businesses As a significant investor in financial markets, commercial real estate and housing, we are exposed to climate related transition risks, particularly should abrupt shifts in the political and technological landscape impact the value of those investment assets associated with higher levels of greenhouse gas emissions.
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At CEMEX, we are seeking to invest in upgrading our cement plants, trying to maximize the use of alternative fuels to power our kilns and transition away from fossil fuels. In 2019, we pledged more than US$50 million to invest in an innovative global program to replace fossil fuels with alternative fuels. Among our initiatives, we are starting to integrate an innovative new hydrogen-based technology to enable our cement kilns to increase their use of alternative fuels by optimizing their combustion process, while lowering their consumption of fossil fuels and reducing their CO2 emissions.
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The EIB also supports innovative investment funds that are tackling adaptation challenges. A new fund called CRAFT, the Climate Resilience and Adaptation Finance & Technology Transfer Facility, is developing new technologies and specialised services to help developing countries address droughts, bad weather, disease, wind and solar energy. The European Investment Bank invested $30 million in CRAFT and also deployed €5 million via the Luxembourg-EIB Climate Finance Platform as risk capital that catalyses more money by drawing in private investors.
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The Bank also signed a €19 million deal in 2019 in Poland with BNP Paribas Bank Polska to improve energy efficiency in existing homes. The Polish bank will use the money to give loans to farmers and homeowners to install solar panels. The money also will help housing associations improve energy efficiency.
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